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[CLJ-1787] Add executables to distribution (suggested changes included) Created: 27/Jul/15  Updated: 27/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Morten Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None
Environment:

Linix, OS X and Windows


Patch: Code

 Description   

Being new to clojure I was surprised that there was not a executable included in the download. It makes Clojure appear less proff then it is and is unnecessary complex to remember the exact java cmd line to use so I suggest that shell executable files are added to the distibution for the next version of Clojure. They could look as suggest below for Windows and OS X:

1) Linux and OS X:
#!/bin/bash
java -jar `dirname "$0"`/clojure-1.8.0.jar $@

2) Windows:
java -jar %~dp0\clojure-1.8.0.jar %1 %2 %3 %4 %5 %6 %7 %8






[CLJ-1784] Reflector.getMethods should be cached Created: 21/Jul/15  Updated: 28/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Vladimir Sitnikov Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

Currently Reflector.getMethods performs expensive logic that includes java.lang.reflect.Method copying.
See: https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/b8607d5870202034679cda50ec390426827ff692/src/jvm/clojure/lang/Reflector.java#L373

In our application I see the following back-traces:

at Reflector.copyMethods
at Reflector.invokeInstanceMethod
at ...

These kind of backtraces are second top consumers of all the heap allocation.

JDK cannot cache Methods / Fields since they are mutable (e.g. user can call setAccessible here and there).
However, for the purposes of Clojure, I believe it should be fine to cache Methods and Fields.

What do you think?
E.g. WeakHashMap<Class, WeakReference<List<Method>>> or more sophisticated structure to account String name.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 23/Jul/15 8:19 AM ]

If you are seeing Reflector as a hot spot in your application, you should probably turn on warn-on-reflection and use type hints to avoid reflection.

Comment by Vladimir Sitnikov [ 28/Jul/15 6:10 AM ]

Do you mean there is absolutely no reason to use reflection in Clojure ever?
I do understand that if developer gives enough type hints the reflection would go away.

However:
1) I just do not know if it is easily doable (in other words, if it is possible at all, maintainable, etc)
2) I'm not sure if "always use type hints" is considered a best practice. For instance, warn-on-reflection documentation page says nothing like "always use type hints"
3) Caching copyMethods seems to be a low-hanging fruit here, so it would shave cpu cycles for those who omitted type hints

PS. I'm a java performance engineer, not a Clojure engineer (as in "my Clojure knowledge is somewhere near (+ x y)"), so I kindly beg on your forgiveness for me not doing RTFM.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 28/Jul/15 7:44 AM ]

No, I'm saying that if reflection is a hotspot in your application, usually it's worth investing a few minutes to add type hints in those hotspot areas and this is common advice for Clojure apps. Once that minimal work is done, few Clojure apps are bound by reflection.

Caching seems like an easy solution until you consider all of the management aspects. How does the cache get cleaned? Are the instances mutable and able to be reused? Are there cases where class loaders or code reloading create unexpected side effects? What are the concurrency effects of putting a shared resource in the invocation path? What is the memory impact of a cache and is it configurable?

Those are all things that would need to be investigated, meaning that this is not low-hanging fruit.





[CLJ-1781] Tuples don't extend IKVReduce Created: 19/Jul/15  Updated: 19/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: regression
Environment:

1.8.0-alpha1 or 1.8.0-alpha2


Approval: Vetted

 Description   

This is a regression from the tuple stuff (both return nil in 1.7):

(reduce-kv (fn [acc idx in] acc) nil [1 2 3 4 5 6 7]) ; => nil
(reduce-kv (fn [acc idx in] acc) nil [1 2])
;; =>  No implementation of method: :kv-reduce of protocol:
;; #'clojure.core.protocols/IKVReduce found for class: clojure.lang.Tuple$T2


 Comments   
Comment by Michael Blume [ 19/Jul/15 11:47 AM ]

CLJ-1689 would sort this.





[CLJ-1780] Test OOME from locals clearing change Created: 17/Jul/15  Updated: 18/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: regression
Environment:

1.8.0-alpha2


Attachments: Text File strengthen-clearing-test.patch    
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

IBM JDK 1.6 in test matrix is throwing errors from the new test for CLJ-1250 in 1.8.0-alpha2.

[java] ERROR in (test-closed-over-clearing) (Range.java:133)
     [java] expected: (number? (reduce + 0 (r/map identity (range 1.0E8))))
     [java]   actual: java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: null
     [java]  at clojure.lang.Range.forceChunk (Range.java:133)
     [java]     clojure.lang.Range.chunkedFirst (Range.java:150)
     [java]     clojure.core$chunk_first.invoke (core.clj:667)
     [java]     clojure.core.protocols/fn (protocols.clj:136)
     [java]     clojure.core.protocols$fn__6478$G__6473__6487.invoke (protocols.clj:19)
     [java]     clojure.core.protocols$seq_reduce.invoke (protocols.clj:31)
     [java]     clojure.core.protocols/fn (protocols.clj:95)
     [java]     clojure.core.protocols$fn__6452$G__6447__6465.invoke (protocols.clj:13)
     [java]     clojure.core.reducers$folder$reify__21452.coll_reduce (reducers.clj:126)
     [java]     clojure.core$reduce.invoke (core.clj:6519)
     [java]     clojure.test_clojure.reducers/fn (reducers.clj:95)
     [java]     clojure.test$test_var$fn__7669.invoke (test.clj:703)
     [java]     clojure.test$test_var.invoke (test.clj:703)
     [java]     clojure.test$test_vars$fn__7691$fn__7696.invoke (test.clj:721)
     [java]     clojure.test$default_fixture.invoke (test.clj:673)
     [java]     clojure.test$test_vars$fn__7691.invoke (test.clj:721)
     [java]     clojure.test$default_fixture.invoke (test.clj:673)
     [java]     clojure.test$test_vars.invoke (test.clj:717)
     [java]     clojure.test$test_all_vars.invoke (test.clj:727)
     [java]     clojure.test$test_ns.invoke (test.clj:746)
     [java]     clojure.core$map$fn__4553.invoke (core.clj:2624)
     [java]     clojure.lang.LazySeq.sval (LazySeq.java:40)
     [java]     clojure.lang.LazySeq.seq (LazySeq.java:49)
     [java]     clojure.lang.Cons.next (Cons.java:39)
     [java]     clojure.lang.RT.next (RT.java:681)
     [java]     clojure.core/next (core.clj:64)
     [java]     clojure.core$reduce1.invoke (core.clj:909)
     [java]     clojure.core$reduce1.invoke (core.clj:900)
     [java]     clojure.core$merge_with.doInvoke (core.clj:2936)
     [java]     clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo (RestFn.java:139)
     [java]     clojure.core$apply.invoke (core.clj:632)
     [java]     clojure.test$run_tests.doInvoke (test.clj:761)
     [java]     clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo (RestFn.java:137)
     [java]     clojure.core$apply.invoke (core.clj:630)
     [java]     user$eval28810.invoke (run_test.clj:8)
     [java]     clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6850)


 Comments   
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 18/Jul/15 12:02 AM ]

I don't understand how forcing a 32 element chunk could consume the memory. If locals clearing worked properly there should be no other part of that sequence in memory but I might be missing some detail.

Might there be something going on with the recent change in impl for Range?

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 18/Jul/15 12:19 AM ]

An interesting note is that (reduce + 0 (r/map identity (range 1e8))) is going through the seq path, despite reducers && reducible range. This is because coll-reduce doesn't prefer IReduceInit.

The CLJ-1250 test should be modified to intentionally hold the head of a seq in order to exercise the locals clearing. A good hypothesis from Alex is that GC is a bit slower on the archaic IBM JDK.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 18/Jul/15 1:21 AM ]

I can't reproduce this on Linux x86-64 with IBM JDK and an artificially tiny heap.

[ghadi@amdhex ibm-java-x86_64-60]$ ./bin/java -Xmx128m -cp $HOME/jsr166y-1.7.0.jar:$HOME/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar clojure.main
Clojure 1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT
user=> (require '[clojure.core.reducers :as r])
nil
user=> (number? (reduce + 0 (r/map identity (range 1e8))))
true

Can you post details on the IBM JDK environment in CI? Need point release, heap size, kernel, distro, and jvm opts.

I've strengthened the CLJ-1250 test case by relying on neither reducer impl nor range impl, and I reverified that the bug is in fact present on <1.7 and gone on -master using Oracle JDK and 128m heap.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jul/15 8:52 AM ]

OS is CentOS 5.5 afaict

JDK details:

java version "1.6.0"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build pxa6460sr9fp2-20110625_01(SR9 FP2))
IBM J9 VM (build 2.4, JRE 1.6.0 IBM J9 2.4 Linux amd64-64 jvmxa6460sr9-20110624_85526 (JIT enabled, AOT enabled)
J9VM - 20110624_085526
JIT - r9_20101028_17488ifx17
GC - 20101027_AA)
JCL - 20110530_01

As far as I can tell, nothing is being done to alter the default heap size or other jvm opts during the build.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 18/Jul/15 2:27 PM ]

The IBM JDK6 version I used was:

java version "1.6.0"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build pxa6460sr16fp7-20150708_01(SR16 FP7))
IBM J9 VM (build 2.4, JRE 1.6.0 IBM J9 2.4 Linux amd64-64 jvmxa6460sr16fp7-20150701_255724 (JIT enabled, AOT enabled)
J9VM - 20150701_255724
JIT - r9_20150630_95420
GC - GA24_Java6_SR16_20150701_1008_B255724)
JCL - 20150628_01

Seems like SR16 FP7 == 6.0.16.7, and the one on the CI build is SR9 FP2 == 6.0.9.2, a four or five year difference between point releases.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 18/Jul/15 2:51 PM ]

OK I found a download for the (old) IBM JDK 6.0.9.2 and installed it on Linux x86-64. I cannot reproduce the bug.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jul/15 3:53 PM ]

I'd be happy to update the ibm jdk 1.6 version and n the build box too to see what happens.





[CLJ-1779] Optimise compiler usage of getMethod calls Created: 17/Jul/15  Updated: 17/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Mike Anderson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

Currently the Clojure compiler makes multiple redundant calls to Method.getMethod(...) while emitting code, e.g.

gen.invokeStatic(Type.getType(Long.class), Method.getMethod("Long valueOf(long)"));

It seems to be the case that that:

a) These getMethod calls are effectively returning equivalent, immutable constant values
b) getMethod is moderately expensive (performs string analysis and quite a few object allocations)
c) These calls are very common during compilation of typical Clojure code

The proposed enhancement is to replace all of these getMethod calls with constant static values. This should improve compilation performance noticeably with no effect on behaviour.






[CLJ-1778] let-bound namespace-qualified bindings should throw (if not map destructuring) Created: 16/Jul/15  Updated: 16/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Ragnar Dahlen
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler

Attachments: Text File clj-1778-2-with-tests.patch     Text File clj-1778.patch    
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Seen in a tweet...

user=> (let [a/x 42] x) ; throws CompilerException "Can't let qualified name ..."
user=> (let [a/x 42, [y] [1]] x) ;=> 42

The second one should throw like the first one.

Presume linkage to CLJ-1318.

Current patch: clj-1778-2-with-tests.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Ragnar Dahlen [ 16/Jul/15 11:41 AM ]

I can confirm that this is a regression from CLJ-1318. After that change, namespaces were removed from symbols regardless of whether they were used as part of a map destruring or not. The only reason the exception is caught in the first test case is because that binding form has no destructuring at all, in which case the destructuring logic is bypassed.

I've attached a patch that moves the namespace removal (and keyword handling) into `pmap` instead as it's really a special case for map destructuring only.

Comment by Ragnar Dahlen [ 16/Jul/15 3:53 PM ]

Updated patch with two changes:

1. Removed initial check for keywords in binding keys as that only looked for keywords at top-level and failed to catch cases like:

(let [[:x] [1]] x)
;; => 1

Keywords in non-map destructuring binding positions (like the example) will now fail with "Unsupported binding form: :x" instead. This is a change from the current behaviour where only top-level keywords would be caught, but the current exception is the slightly more specific "Unsupported binding key: :x". If a better, more specific exception is required, I'd be happy to update the patch.

2. Tests: added test for regression, updated/amended existing tests.





[CLJ-1777] Add function version of vswap! Created: 13/Jul/15  Updated: 14/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7, Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1777-Change-vswap-from-a-macro-to-an-inlineable-.patch    
Patch: Code

 Description   

Volatiles and vswap! were added in 1.7 as performant mechanisms to achieve uncoordinated mutation to the language.
given the fact that their addition was a performance-centric one, vswap! was implemented as a macro rather than a normal function to avoid runtime dereference of the function var and the optional apply overhead in case of multiple args.

However this:
-is not necessary
-breaks the api parallelism between volatile/atom swap!/vswap! reset!/vreset!
-makes impossible certain use cases (vswaps! in update-in forms)
-is potentially confusing given that swap! is a function

Infact the macro can be replaced with a function with :inline metadata.
This is a strictly additive change that will make so that for all the current valid usages of vswap! nothing will change, it will still be macroexpanded by the inliner and additionally since it is now a function it can be used in HOF contexts where it's not unusual to see swap! used.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Jul/15 8:07 PM ]

Nicola, please don't set the fix version on tickets.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 13/Jul/15 8:10 PM ]

Sorry, I mixed the fix version with the affected field





[CLJ-1774] Field access on typed record does not preserve type Created: 02/Jul/15  Updated: 03/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Michael Blume Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: defrecord, reflection, typehints


 Description   
(ns field-test.core
  (:import [java.util UUID]))

(defrecord UUIDWrapper [^UUID uuid])

(defn unwrap [^UUIDWrapper w]
  (.-uuid w)) ; <- No reflection

(defn get-lower-bits [^UUIDWrapper w]
  (-> w .-uuid .getLeastSignificantBits)) ; <- Reflection :(

The compiler seems to have all the information it needs, but lein check prints

Reflection warning, field_test/core.clj:10:3 - reference to field getLeastSignificantBits on java.lang.Object can't be resolved.

(test case also at https://github.com/MichaelBlume/field-test)



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Jul/15 4:31 PM ]

afaik, that ^UUID type hint on the record field doesn't do anything. The record field will be of type Object (only ^double and ^long affect the actual field type).

Perhaps more importantly, it is bad form to use Java interop to retrieve the field values of a record. Keyword access for that is preferred.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 03/Jul/15 4:48 AM ]

The same issue applies for deftypes where keyword access is not an option

Comment by Alex Miller [ 03/Jul/15 12:17 PM ]

Per http://clojure.org/datatypes: "You should always program to protocols or interfaces -
datatypes cannot expose methods not in their protocols or interfaces"

Along those lines, usually for deftypes, I gen an interface with the proper types if necessary, then have the deftype implement the interface to expose the field.

Also per http://clojure.org/datatypes:

"note that currently a type hint of a non-primitive type will not be used to constrain the field type nor the constructor arg, but will be used to optimize its use in the class methods" - that is, inside a method implemented on the record/type, referring to the field should have the right hint. So in the example above, if unwrap was an interface or protocol implementation method on the record, and you referred to the field, you should expect the hint to be utilized in that scenario.

So, my contention would be that all of the behavior described in this ticket should be expected based on the design, which is why I've reclassified this as an enhancement, not a defect.





[CLJ-1773] Support for REPL commands for tooling Created: 01/Jul/15  Updated: 01/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Alex Miller
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: repl

Approval: Incomplete

 Description   

Per http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/Socket+Server+REPL, want to enhance repl to support "commands" useful for nested repls or for parallel tooling repls communicating over sockets (CLJ-1671).

Commands are defined as keywords in the "repl" namespace. The REPL will trap these after reading but before evaluation. Currently this is a closed set, but perhaps it could be open - the server socket repl could then install new ones if desired when repl is invoked.

Commands:

  • :repl/quit - same as Ctrl-D but works in terminal environments where that's not feasible. Allows for backing out of a nested REPL.
  • :repl/push - push the current repl "state" (tbd what that is, but at least ns) to a stateful map in the runtime. Returns coordinates that can be used to retrieve it elsewhere
  • :repl/pull <coords> - retrieves the repl state defined by the coordinates

In the tooling scenario, it is expected that there are two repls - the client repl and the tooling repl. The tooling can send :repl/push over the client repl before startup and retrieve the coordinates (which don't change). Then the tooling repl can call :repl/pull at any time to retrieve the state of the client repl.






[CLJ-1771] Support for multiple key(s)-value pairs in assoc-in Created: 29/Jun/15  Updated: 23/Jul/15

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Griffin Smith Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None
Environment:

All


Attachments: Text File clj-1771.patch    
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

It would be nice if assoc-in supported multiple key(s)-to-value pairs (and threw an error when there were an even number of arguments, just like assoc):

user=> (assoc-in {} [:a :b] 1 [:c :d] 2)
{:a {:b 1}, :c {:d 2}}
user=> (assoc-in {} [:a :b] 1 [:c :d])
IllegalArgumentException assoc-in expects even number of arguments after map/vector, found odd number


 Comments   
Comment by Matthew Gilliard [ 23/Jul/15 2:15 PM ]

Simple patch attached. I did not find any existing tests for assoc-in but I could add them if wanted.





[CLJ-1766] Serializing+deserializing lists breaks their hash Created: 21/Jun/15  Updated: 27/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Chris Vermilion Assignee: Andrew Rosa
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: interop
Environment:

Tested on OS X 10.10.3, Clojure 1.6.0, Java 1.8.0_45-b14, but don't think this is a factor.


Attachments: File serialization_test_mod.diff    
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

clojure.lang.PersistentList implements Serializable but a serialization roundtrip results in a hash of 0. This appears to be caused by ASeq marking its _hash property as transient; other collection base classes don't do this. I don't know if there is a rational for the distinction, but the result is that serializing, then deserializing, a list results in its _hash property being 0 instead of either its previous, calculated value, or -1, which would trigger recalculation.

This means that any code that relies on a list's hash value can break in subtle ways.

Examples:

(import '[java.io ByteArrayInputStream ByteArrayOutputStream ObjectInputStream ObjectOutputStream])

(defn obj->bytes [obj]
  (let [bytestream (ByteArrayOutputStream.)]
    (doto (ObjectOutputStream. bytestream) (.writeObject obj))
    (.toByteArray bytestream)))

(defn bytes->obj [bs]
  (.readObject (ObjectInputStream. (ByteArrayInputStream. bs)))

(defn round-trip [x] (bytes->obj (obj->bytes x)))
user=> (hash '(1))
-1381383523
user=> (hash (round-trip '(1)))
0
user=> #{'(1) (round-trip '(1))}
#{(1) (1)}
user=> (def m {'(1) 1})
#'user/m
user=> (= m (round-trip m))
true
user=> (= (round-trip m) m)
false

Approach: Use 0 as the "uncomputed" hash value, not -1. The auto initialized value on serialization construction will then automatically trigger a re-computation.

Alternate approaches:

  • Implement a readObject method that sets the _hash property to -1. This is somewhat complicated in the face of subclasses, etc.

Note: Also need to consider other classes that use -1 instead of 0 as the uncomputed hash value: APersistentMap, APersistentSet, APersistentVector, PersistentQueue - however I believe in those cases they are not transient and thus may avoid the issue. Perhaps they should be transient though.



 Comments   
Comment by Chris Vermilion [ 21/Jun/15 1:10 PM ]

Yikes, sorry about the formatting above; JIRA newbie and looks like I can't edit. Also, I should have noted that the above functions require an import: (import '[java.io ByteArrayInputStream ByteArrayOutputStream ObjectInputStream ObjectOutputStream]).

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Jun/15 7:55 AM ]

Yes, this is a bug. My preference would be to use 0 to indicate "not computed" and thus sidestep this issue. The downside of changing from -1 to 0 is that serialization/deserialization is then broken between versions of Clojure (although maybe if it was already broken, that's not an issue). -1 is used like this for lazily computed hashes in many classes in Clojure so the issue should really be fixed across the board.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Jun/15 8:22 AM ]

There are some serialization round-trip tests in clojure.test-clojure.serialization - seems like those should be updated to compare the .hashCode and hash before/after, which should catch this. I attached a diff (not a proper patch) with that change just as a demonstration, which indeed produces a bunch of failures. That should be incorporated into any fix, possibly along with other failures.





[CLJ-1765] areduce speed improvements Created: 19/Jun/15  Updated: 20/Jun/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Karsten Schmidt Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: ft, performance
Environment:

OSX 10.8.5, Oracle JDK1.8.0_25-b17


Attachments: Text File clj-1765.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Two performance improvements for areduce:

1. Call alength once, rather than every iteration
2. Use unchecked-inc-int instead of inc since array indices are limited to int range

Example:

(def a (long-array (range 1000)))
(areduce a i ret 0 (+ ret (aget a i)))

Criterium quick-bench:

  • 1.7.0-RC2: 15.5 ms
  • RC2+patch: 7.7 ms

Patch: clj-1765.patch
Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Karsten Schmidt [ 19/Jun/15 7:08 PM ]

added patch w/ changes described above





[CLJ-1763] clojure.core/sort is not thread-safe on Java collections with backing arrays Created: 19/Jun/15  Updated: 22/Jun/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: collections

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1763-make-sort-thread-safe.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

If a (mutable) Java collection that exposes it's backing array is passed to c.c/sort in multiple threads, the collection will be concurrently modified in multiple threads.

user=> (def q (java.util.concurrent.ArrayBlockingQueue. 1))
#'user/q
user=> (future (loop [] (.add q 1) (.remove q 1) (recur)))
#object[clojure.core$future_call$reify__4393 0x4769b07b {:status :pending, :val nil}]
user=> (take 3 (distinct (repeatedly #(sort q))))
((1) () nil)

Approach: Convert coll to a seq before converting it to an array, thus preserving the original collection.

Patch: 0001-CLJ-1763-make-sort-thread-safe.patch

Alternate approaches:

1. Document in sort that, like Java arrays, Java collections backed by arrays are modified in-place.
2. Change RT.toArray() to defensively copy the array returned from a (non-IPersistentCollection) Java collection. This has a number of potential ramifications as this method is called from several paths.
3. For non-Clojure collections, could also use Collections.sort() instead of dumping to array and using Arrays.sort().



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jun/15 10:55 AM ]

The docstring says "If coll is a Java array, it will be modified. To avoid this, sort a copy of the array." which also seems like solid advice in this case.

Creating a sequence view of the input collection would significantly alter the performance characteristics.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jun/15 10:59 AM ]

I guess what I'm saying is, we should not make the performance worse for persistent collections in order to make it safer for arbitrary Java collections. But it may still be useful to make it safer without affecting persistent collection performance and/or updating the docstring.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 19/Jun/15 11:02 AM ]

Alex, no additional sequence is being created, the seq call was already there

Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jun/15 11:53 AM ]

Well, that's kind of true. The former use did not force realization of the whole seq, just the first element. That said, from a quick test the extra cost seems small on a set (vector seqs are actually faster due to their structure).





[CLJ-1760] Add `partial` reader macro Created: 17/Jun/15  Updated: 27/Jun/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Mario T. Lanza Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: reader, tacit-programming


 Description   

One of the most common things one does in functional programming is partial application. Clojure doesn't curry its functions as Haskell does. Instead it offers `partial` and the function macro:

(def hundred-times (partial * 100))
(def hundred-times #(* 100 %))

While the function macro is both terse and flexible it doesn't offer the same feel that partial does when it comes to [tacit style](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tacit_programming). Using `partial` regularly, however, defeats the brevity one would otherwise enjoy in point-free style. Having a `partial` reader macro, while seemingly a small thing, would better lend itself to the tacit style.

(def hundred-times #%(* 100))

Because most functions list arguments from general to specific, I rarely need to use the function macro to place the optional argument in some position other than last – e.g. normal partial application.



 Comments   
Comment by Mario T. Lanza [ 27/Jun/15 2:08 PM ]

Just wanted to note that others had suggested the same idea albeit using another implementation.

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/18648301/concise-syntax-for-partial-in-clojure





[CLJ-1758] xf overload for vec and set Created: 17/Jun/15  Updated: 17/Jun/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Leon Grapenthin Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

Having (vec xf coll) and (set xf coll) overloads seem useful as opposed to writing (into [] ...).

One might also consider these as variadic overloads, like the sequence function has. I am unsure about that since into doesn't have one and I know too little about multiple input transducers.






[CLJ-1754] Destructuring with :merge Created: 16/Jun/15  Updated: 16/Jun/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Henrik Heine Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

Destructuring with :or {...} does not add those defaults to :as binding. Destructuring with :merge adds this.
Usefull when you're wrapping calls to functions and want to add defaults that your callers need not pass in.

(defn foo [& {:merge {:c "C" :d "D"}
:as opt-args}]
opt-args)

should behave like:

(defn foo [& {:keys [c d]
:or {c "C" d "D"}
:as opt-args}]
(let [opt-args (merge {:c c :d d} opt-args)]
opt-args))

Options:
(a) the bindings for c and d in the example may be usefull or not. For the :merge example above they are not needed.
(b) :merge could use keywords or symbols. keywords make it look like the (merge) and symbols make it look like :keys/:or.

Suggestion: using symbols will build a binding for those names and using keywords will not. So users can get the bindings if they need them.

see also https://groups.google.com/forum/#!folder/Clojure$20Stuff/clojure/gG6Tzssn9Nw



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 16/Jun/15 7:14 AM ]

Destructuring is about extracting parts of a composite input value. This seems to go a step beyond that into transformation of the input value. Can't say I am a fan of that but I will leave it open.





[CLJ-1750] There should be a way to observe platform features at runtime Created: 08/Jun/15  Updated: 19/Jun/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Luke VanderHart Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: reader

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Reader conditionals let the reader emit code conditionally based upon a set of platform features.

This is a closed set - however, currently it is baked in as an implementation detail of the reader. Runtime code cannot access the current platform feature set.

This is problematic when writing a macro that needs to emit code conditionally based upon the platform of the code being compiled. Reader conditionals themselves won't work since macros are always themselves read in Clojure.

We should enable some mechanism for retrieving the current platform at runtime, or at least at macro expansion time.

For example, this is the kind of thing it should be possible to do:

(defmacro mymacro []
    (if (*platforms* :clj)
      `(some-clojure-thing)
      `(some-cljs-thing)))


 Comments   
Comment by Micah Martin [ 19/Jun/15 1:46 PM ]

+1 - Would very much like to see this in 1.7. Currently I have to use an ugly hack.

(def ^:private ^:no-doc cljs? (boolean (find-ns 'cljs.analyzer)))





[CLJ-1743] Avoid compile-time static initialization of classes when using inheritance Created: 02/Jun/15  Updated: 27/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Abe Fettig Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: aot, compiler, interop

Attachments: Text File 0001-Avoid-compile-time-class-initialization-when-using-g.patch     Text File clj-1743-2.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

I'm working on a project using Clojure and RoboVM. We use AOT compilation to compile Clojure to JVM classes, and then use RoboVM to compile the JVM classes to native code. In our Clojure code, we call Java APIs provided by RoboVM, which wrap the native iOS APIs.

But we've found an issue with inheritance and class-level static initialization code. Many iOS APIs require inheriting from a base object and then overriding certain methods. Currently, Clojure runs a superclass's static initialization code at compile time, whether using ":gen-class" or "proxy" to create the subclass. However, RoboVM's base "ObjCObject" class [1], which most iOS-specific classes inherit from, requires the iOS runtime to initialize, and throws an error at compile time since the code isn't running on a device.

CLJ-1315 addressed a similar issue by modifying "import" to load classes without running static initialization code. I've written my own patch which extends this behavior to work in ":gen-class" and "proxy" as well. The unit tests pass, and we're using this code successfully in our iOS app.

Patch: clj-1743-2.patch

Here's some sample code that can be used to demonstrate the current behavior (Full demo project at https://github.com/figly/clojure-static-initialization):

Demo.java
package clojure_static_initialization;

public class Demo {
  static {
    System.out.println("Running static initializers!");
  }
  public Demo () {
  }
}
gen_class_demo.clj
(ns clojure-static-initialization.gen-class-demo
  (:gen-class :extends clojure_static_initialization.Demo))
proxy_demo.clj
(ns clojure-static-initialization.proxy-demo)

(defn make-proxy []
  (proxy [clojure_static_initialization.Demo] []))

[1] https://github.com/robovm/robovm/blob/master/objc/src/main/java/org/robovm/objc/ObjCObject.java



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jun/15 3:01 PM ]

No changes from previous, just updated to apply to master as of 1.7.0-RC2.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jun/15 3:03 PM ]

If you had a sketch to test this with proxy and gen-class, that would be helpful.

Comment by Abe Fettig [ 22/Jun/15 8:31 AM ]

Sure, what form would you like for the sketch code? A small standalone project? Unit tests?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Jun/15 8:40 AM ]

Just a few lines of Java (a class with static initializer that printed) and Clojure code (for gen-class and proxy extending it) here in the test description that could be used to demonstrate the problem. Should not have any dependency on iOS or other external dependencies.

Comment by Abe Fettig [ 01/Jul/15 8:49 PM ]

Sample code added, let me know if I can add anything else!

Comment by Abe Fettig [ 27/Jul/15 2:21 PM ]

Just out of curiosity, what are the odds this could make it into 1.8?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 27/Jul/15 6:06 PM ]

unknown.





[CLJ-1741] deftype class literals and instances loaded from different classloaders when recompiling namespace Created: 30/May/15  Updated: 18/Jun/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Stephen Nelson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: aot, classloader, compiler

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1714-Don-t-load-AOT-class-when-compiling-already.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Incomplete

 Description   

Scenario: Given two files:

src/dispatch/core.clj:

(ns dispatch.core (:require [dispatch.dispatch]))

src/dispatch/dispatch.clj:

(ns dispatch.dispatch)
(deftype T [])
(def t (->T))
(println "T = (class t):" (= T (class t)))

Compile first core, then dispatch:

java -cp src:target/classes:clojure.jar -Dclojure.compile.path=target/classes clojure.main
user=> (compile 'dispatch.core)
T = (class t): true
dispatch.core
user=> (compile 'dispatch.dispatch)
T = (class t): false     ;; expected true
dispatch.dispatch

This scenario more commonly occurs in a leiningen project with :aot :all. Files are compiled in alphabetical order with :all. In this case, dispatch.core will be compiled first, then dispatch.dispatch.

Cause:

(compile 'dispatch.core)

  • transitively compiles dispatch.dispatch
  • writes .class files to compile-path (which is on the classpath)
  • assertion passes

(compile 'dispatch.dispatch)

  • due to prior compile, load dispatch.dispatch__init is loaded via the appclassloader
  • ->T constructor will use new bytecode to instantiate a T instance - this uses appclassloader, loaded from compiled T on disk
  • however, T class literals are resolved with RT.classForName, which checks the dynamic classloader cache, so uses old runtime version of T, instead of on-disk version

In 1.6, RT.classForName() did not check dynamic classloader cache, so loaded T from disk as with instances. This was changed in CLJ-979 to support other redefinition and AOT mixing usages.

Approaches:

1) Compile in reverse dependency order to avoid compiling twice.

Either swap the order of compilation in the first example or specify the order in project.clj:

:aot [dispatch.dispatch dispatch.core]

This is a short-term workaround.

2) Move the deftype into a separate namespace from where it is used so it is not redefined on the second compile. This is another short-term workaround.

3) Do not put compile-path on the classpath (this violates current expectations, but avoids loading dispatch__init)

(set! *compile-path* "foo")
(compile 'dispatch.core)
(compile 'dispatch.dispatch)

This is not easy to set up via Leiningen currently.

4) Compile each file with an independent Clojure runtime - avoids using cached classes in DCL for class literals.

Probably too annoying to actually do right now in Leiningen or otherwise.

5) Make compilation non-transitive. This is in the ballpark of CLJ-322, which is another can of worms. Also possibly where we should be headed though.

Screening: I do not believe the proposed patch is a good idea - it papers over the symptom without addressing the root cause. I think we need to re-evaluate how compilation works with regard to compile-path (#3) and transitivity (CLJ-322) (#5), but I think we should do this after 1.7. - Alex

See also: CLJ-1650



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/May/15 8:50 PM ]

Pulling into 1.7 for consideration.

Comment by Stephen Nelson [ 30/May/15 8:55 PM ]

I've added a debug flag to my example that causes type instance hashcodes and their class-loaders to be printed.

Compiling dispatch.core
deftype => 652433136 (clojure.lang.DynamicClassLoader@23c30a20)
defmethod => 652433136 (clojure.lang.DynamicClassLoader@23c30a20)
instance => 652433136 (clojure.lang.DynamicClassLoader@23c30a20)
dispatch:  :pass
Compiling dispatch.dispatch
deftype => 652433136 (clojure.lang.DynamicClassLoader@23c30a20)
defmethod => 652433136 (clojure.lang.DynamicClassLoader@23c30a20)
instance => 760357227 (sun.misc.Launcher$AppClassLoader@42a57993)
dispatch:  :fail
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 01/Jun/15 7:23 AM ]

The compiler has weird loading rules when using `compile` and both a clj file and a class file are present in the classpath.

This bug happens because RT.load will load the AOT class file rebinding the ->Ctor to use the AOT deftype instance.

A fix for this would be making load "loaded libs" aware to avoid unnecessary/harmful reloadings.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 01/Jun/15 10:55 AM ]

The attached patch fixes this bug by keeping track of what has already been loaded and loading the AOT class only if necessary

Comment by Alex Miller [ 16/Jun/15 2:24 PM ]

Original description (since replaced):

Type-dispatching multimethods are defined using the wrong type instance

When using a multimethod that dispatches on types, such as print-dup/print-method, the type reference passed to addMethod in the presence of aot is incorrect on the second load of the namespace. This means that if the namespace has already been loaded as a dependency of another file, the second load when the namespace is loaded for aot compilation will produce a multimethod that fails to dispatch correctly.

I've created an example repository:
https://github.com/sfnelson/clj-mm-dispatch

To reproduce independently, create a namespace that contains a deftype and a multimethod dispatching on the type, and a second namespace that requires the first and sorts alphabetically before the first. Aot-compile both namespaces. When the type-defining namespace is loaded via require it produces a class file for the deftype. When it is loaded the second time for aot-compilation, the type corresponding to the existing class file is given to the defmethod, instead of the new class constructed by loading the namespace. This causes the multimethod it fail to dispatch correctly.

To me this issue seems similar to CLJ-979: the type passed to the multimethod is retrieved using the wrong classloader. This suggests that it might have wider implications than AOT and multimethod dispatch.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 18/Jun/15 11:09 AM ]

I just realized this ticket is a duplicate of CLJ-1650





[CLJ-1733] Tagged literals throw on records containing sorted-set Created: 19/May/15  Updated: 26/May/15

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Nikita Prokopov Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None
Environment:

Clojure 1.6.0
Clojure 1.7.0-alpha5
Clojure 1.7.0-beta3

java version "1.8.0"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0-b132)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.0-b70, mixed mode)


Attachments: Text File clj-1733-tagged-literals-throw-on-sorted-set.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

This is a deadly combination for some reason:

1. Take sorted-set
2. Put it to a record
3. Return record from tagged literal reader fn

(ns tonsky)

(defrecord A [a])

(defn a [arg] (A. (sorted-set arg)))

(set! *data-readers* {'tonsky/tag tonsky/a})

(prn (a "123")) ;; => #tonsky.A{:a #{"123"}}
(prn #tonsky/tag "123") ;; =>
Caused by: java.lang.ClassCastException: Cannot cast clojure.lang.PersistentVector to clojure.lang.ISeq
	at java.lang.Class.cast(Class.java:3258)
	at clojure.lang.Reflector.boxArg(Reflector.java:427)
	at clojure.lang.Reflector.boxArgs(Reflector.java:460)
	at clojure.lang.Reflector.invokeMatchingMethod(Reflector.java:58)
	at clojure.lang.Reflector.invokeStaticMethod(Reflector.java:207)
	at clojure.lang.Reflector.invokeStaticMethod(Reflector.java:200)
	at clojure.lang.LispReader$EvalReader.invoke(LispReader.java:1048)
	at clojure.lang.LispReader$DispatchReader.invoke(LispReader.java:616)
	at clojure.lang.LispReader.read(LispReader.java:183)
	at clojure.lang.RT.readString(RT.java:1785)
	at tonsky$eval34.<clinit>(tonsky.clj:10)
	... 17 more


 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/May/15 4:55 PM ]

It's trying to invoke PersistentTreeSet.create(ISeq) with ["123"]. It's not clear to me where the vector comes from?

Comment by Nikita Prokopov [ 19/May/15 5:04 PM ]

It’s a particular case of CLJ-1461. Vector comes from reading output of print-dup:

(defrecord Rec [f])

(binding [*print-dup* true]
  (prn (Rec. (sorted-set 1))))
;; => #tonsky.Rec[#=(clojure.lang.PersistentTreeSet/create [1])]

I already have a patch for PersistentTreeSet (attached here). Can look into CLJ-1461 later.





[CLJ-1730] Improve `refer` performance Created: 13/May/15  Updated: 13/May/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: performance

Attachments: Text File refer-perf.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

refer underlies require, use, and refer-clojure use cases and is not particularly efficient at its primary job of copying symbol/var mapping from one namespace to another.

Approach: Some improvements that can be made:

  • Go directly to the namespace mappings and avoid creating filtered intermediate maps (ns-publics)
  • Use transients to build map of references to refer
  • Instead of cas'ing each new reference individually, build map of all changes, then cas
  • For (:require :only ...) case - instead of walking all referred vars and looking for matches, walk only the included vars and look up each one

There are undoubtedly more dramatic changes (like immutable namespaces) in how all this works that could further improve performance but I tried to make the scope small-ish for this change.

While individual refer timings are greatly reduced (~50% reduction for (refer clojure.core), ~90% reduction for :only use), refer is only a small component of broader require load times so the improvements in practice are modest.

Performance:

expr in a new repl 1.7.0-beta3 1.7.0-beta3+patch
(in-ns 'foo) (clojure.core/refer 'clojure.core) 2.65 ms 0.994 ms
(in-ns 'bar) (clojure.core/refer 'clojure.core :only '[inc dec]) 1.04 ms 0.113 ms
(use 'criterium.core) 0.877 ms 0.762 ms
(require '[clojure.core.async :refer (>!! <!! chan close!)]) 3408 ms 3302 ms

Patch: refer-perf.patch






[CLJ-1729] Make Counted and count() return long instead of integer Created: 12/May/15  Updated: 08/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

Currently count() returns an int - should bump that up to a long.

On long overflow, count() should throw ArithmeticException. Also see CLJ-1229.



 Comments   
Comment by Erik Assum [ 07/Jul/15 9:24 AM ]

Looking at this, there are some problems like in
clojure.lang.RT#toArray line 1658
where you create a new Object array based on the count of a collection.
It seems as if new Object[] takes an int as a param, so one would have to downcast the long to an int for this to work.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 07/Jul/15 9:39 AM ]

If you're creating an Object[] greater than 2147483647, you may have other problems.

But yes, this ticket definitely needs a more thorough analysis as to what is affected. In this case, I think if the count is <= Integer/MAX_VALUE, then it should proceed and otherwise should throw an exception.

Comment by Erik Assum [ 08/Jul/15 8:19 AM ]

hmmm, this also causes problems wrt java.util.Collection size:
clojure.lang.APersistentSet#size line 164
Where size is specified by

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Collection.html#size()





[CLJ-1721] Enable test case for char? Created: 03/May/15  Updated: 03/May/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Brandon Bloom Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: patch

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1721_v01.patch    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

clojure.core/char? already exists, but there was no test for it (despite a comment suggesting one).






[CLJ-1720] Add clojure.core/pattern? predicate Created: 03/May/15  Updated: 03/May/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Brandon Bloom Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: patch

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1720_v01.patch     Text File CLJ-1720_v02.patch    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

Just like http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1719 , this helps with clj/cljs compatibility.



 Comments   
Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 03/May/15 2:37 PM ]

See also http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJS-1242

Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 03/May/15 2:48 PM ]

Whoops, uploaded wrong patch. Tests actually pass in this v02 patch.





[CLJ-1719] Add clojure.core/boolean? predicate Created: 03/May/15  Updated: 03/May/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Brandon Bloom Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: patch

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1719_v01.patch    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

Having this predicate aids with clj/cljs compatibility.



 Comments   
Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 03/May/15 2:32 PM ]

See also: http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJS-1241





[CLJ-1714] Some static initialisers still run at compile time if used in type hints Created: 22/Apr/15  Updated: 19/May/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Adam Clements Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: compiler, typehints

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1714.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

This is more of the same problem as http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1315 (incorporated in 1.7-alphas) but in the specific case that the class with the static initialiser is used in a type hint



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Apr/15 10:53 AM ]

I think this might have been logged already but I'm not sure.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 22/Apr/15 12:30 PM ]

Patch won't apply to master for me

Comment by Adam Clements [ 22/Apr/15 2:39 PM ]

Really sorry, don't know what happened there. I checked out a fresh copy of the repo and re-applied the changes, deleted the old patch as it was garbage. Try the new one, timestamped 2:37pm





[CLJ-1708] Volatile mutable in deftype is not settable when using try..finally and returning this Created: 17/Apr/15  Updated: 17/Apr/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Patrick Gombert Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler, deftype
Environment:

clojure 1.6.0, clojure 1.7.0-beta1


Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Reproducible Code: https://gist.github.com/patrickgombert/1bcb8a051aeb3e82d855

When using a volatile-mutable field in deftype, compilation fails if the field is set! in a method call that uses both try..finally and returns itself from the method call. Leaving out either the try..finally or returning itself from the method causes compilation to succeed.

Expected behavior: set! should set the volatile-mutable variable and compilation should succeed.



 Comments   
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/15 7:15 PM ]

this must be the same issue as CLJ-1422 and CLJ-701, it has nothing to do with returning `this`, but with the try being in a tail position or not. if the try is not in a tail position the compiler hoists it out in to a thunk. effectively the code is

(deftype SomeType [^:volatile-mutable foo]
  SomeProtocol
  (someFn [_] ((fn [] (try (set! foo 1))))))

which the compiler also rejects, because it doesn't let you mutate fields from functions that are not the immediate protocol functions





[CLJ-1707] conditional form is not consumed when :read-allow is falsey Created: 15/Apr/15  Updated: 15/Apr/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: reader


 Description   
user=> (def a (java.io.PushbackReader. (java.io.StringReader. "#?(:clj [1 2])")))
#'user/a
user=> (read a)
RuntimeException Conditional read not allowed  clojure.lang.Util.runtimeException (Util.java:221)
user=> (read a)
(:clj [1 2])

the expected result would be an EOF exception on the second read.






[CLJ-1701] Serialization of protocol methods broken: java.io.NotSerializableException: clojure.lang.MethodImplCache Created: 13/Apr/15  Updated: 20/Apr/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Dr. Christian Betz Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

With this test, you can see that we cannot serialize methods from protocols (i.e. time-from-tweet), as this results in a java.io.NotSerializableException: clojure.lang.MethodImplCache
at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeObject0 (ObjectOutputStream.java:1183)
java.io.ObjectOutputStream.defaultWriteFields (ObjectOutputStream.java:1547)
java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeSerialData (ObjectOutputStream.java:1508)
java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeOrdinaryObject (ObjectOutputStream.java:1431)
java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeObject0 (ObjectOutputStream.java:1177)
java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeObject (ObjectOutputStream.java:347)
sparkling.protocol_test$serialize.invoke (protocol_test.clj:11)

This is the actual test:

(ns sparkling.protocol-test
(:require [clojure.test :refer :all])
(:import [java.io ObjectInputStream ByteArrayInputStream ObjectOutputStream ByteArrayOutputStream]))

(defn- serialize
"Serializes a single object, returning a byte array."
[v]
(with-open [bout (ByteArrayOutputStream.)
oos (ObjectOutputStream. bout)]
(.writeObject oos v)
(.flush oos)
(.toByteArray bout)))

(defn- deserialize
"Deserializes and returns a single object from the given byte array."
[bytes]
(with-open [ois (-> bytes ByteArrayInputStream. ObjectInputStream.)]
(.readObject ois)))

(defprotocol timestamped
(time-from-tweet [item]))

(defrecord tweet [username tweet timestamp]
timestamped
(time-from-tweet [_]
timestamp
))

(deftest sequable-serialization
(testing "Serialization of function"
(let [item identity]
(is item (-> item serialize deserialize))))

(testing "Serialization of protocol method"
(let [item time-from-tweet]
(is item (-> item serialize deserialize)))))



 Comments   
Comment by Dr. Christian Betz [ 13/Apr/15 6:15 AM ]

BTW: Same is true for multimethods, here the exception is java.io.NotSerializableException: clojure.lang.MultiFn

Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Apr/15 9:35 AM ]

I don't think we expect functions to be serializable in this way. Both protocols and multimethods effectively have runtime state based on what implementations have extended them. What would it mean to serialize these functions? Would you serialize them with whatever implementations have been loaded at that point? Or with none? Both seem problematic to me. Regular functions are closures and can capture the state of their environment. I think better answers are either AOT or for regular functions, something like the serializable-fn library.

Comment by Dr. Christian Betz [ 13/Apr/15 1:13 PM ]

Hi,

thanks for the comments. First, something to the background: I'm developing Sparkling, a Clojure API to Apache Spark. For distributing code in the cluster it depends on AOT compiled functions, so yes, you cannot simply serialize any function around, it needs to be AOT'd. Serializiation provides us with support for the current bindings etc, and everything works as expected. So, AFunction is serializable for a reason and so are other implementations of AFn/IFn, everything works well.

Regarding the state of protocols and multimethods - I think it's conceptually the same as the state of functions (which function definition, the var might be bound multiple times, etc.), and the closures given in bindings. There's no reason for me as the user of a protocol to believe that the method from the protocol differs from a function. In fact (ifn? protocol-method) also returns true.

serializable-fn, not being intended for over-the-wire serialization in the first place, has problems with collections of functions in bindings of the serializble function, together with an issue with PermGen pollution by creating classes for the same function over and over again in the context of Spark.

I think I'm fine for the moment, as I can wrap the protocol method in a function, but I still believe, that this is a bug.

Regards

Chris

Comment by Dr. Christian Betz [ 20/Apr/15 3:10 AM ]

actually, this is the code snippet from clojure.lang.AFunction causing the pain:

clojure.lang.AFunction.java
public abstract class AFunction extends AFn implements IObj, Comparator, Fn, Serializable {

public volatile MethodImplCache __methodImplCache;

AFunction is serializable, but MethodImplCache is not. I'm not sure if it's enough to mark it as transient, because I did not check where initialization happens.

Comment by Dr. Christian Betz [ 20/Apr/15 3:29 AM ]

My comment per mail got lost in SMTP-nirvana: There's an easy workaround. Wrap the protocol method in a function, that will do the trick at the cost of uglifying your code





[CLJ-1690] Make Range, Repeat and Cycle implement Indexed Created: 31/Mar/15  Updated: 01/Apr/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Mike Anderson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File clj-1690.patch    

 Description   

Currently, Cycle, Range and Repeat do not implement Indexed, which means that "nth" is O( n ) on average.

The proposed change is to implement Indexed for these classes, so that "nth" becomes an O( 1 ) operation.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 31/Mar/15 9:37 PM ]

This is an expansion of capabilities and commitments beyond what these functions have done in the past. We've already committed to more than we really wanted to with them, so I'm not sure we want to add yet more commitments. In any case, we won't do it for 1.7.

FYI, that Range you're patching is not currently used for anything - the current impl uses a chunked seq definition in core.clj. CLJ-1515 will (likely) replace the Range class with an all new impl. In any case, patching Range here probably isn't useful until CLJ-1515 is resolved.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 31/Mar/15 9:50 PM ]

Understood re 1.7. Though I personally think this is small enough that you could squeeze it in. Your call.

However I still think this approach is useful though: nth is a very common operation and I note you aren't benchmarking it yet in CLJ-1515. Whatever new Range implementation is used will benefit from implementing Indexed.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 31/Mar/15 11:22 PM ]

None of these functions currently promises to return something Indexed. If we add that and people come to rely on it, we can never change the implementation in a way that removes it. So I'm not sure that's a promise we want to make.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 01/Apr/15 1:39 AM ]

I am not proposing that we make any "promise" of an indexed return value, simply that such classes implement the interface as an implementation detail (where it makes sense).

This then causes the fast path in functions like RT.nth to be taken, so we get O(1) instead of O( n) for the most common indexed lookup cases.

TBH, my assumption was that this was the main purpose of the "Indexed" interface, i.e. to allow concrete collection types to participate in Clojure's indexed access functions with an efficient implementation.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 01/Apr/15 10:25 AM ]

People regularly rely on implementation details, promise or no promise. If clojure were to add Indexed then remove it, people's code would either break or get slower.

Implementation behavior (whether overt or implicit) is necessarily treated as future constraints (shackles), so it is considered carefully.





[CLJ-1689] Provide a default kv-reduce path for IPersistentVector Created: 31/Mar/15  Updated: 21/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Michael Blume Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File clj-1689-v1.patch     Text File clj-1689-v2.patch     Text File clj-1689-v3.patch    
Patch: Code

 Description   

Same as we do with IPersistentMap, make life a bit easier for implementors of IPersistentVector (though they can and should still provide a fast path)



 Comments   
Comment by Mike Anderson [ 21/Jul/15 1:07 AM ]

Would it potentially be better (or as an addition?) to add "reduce" and "kvreduce" methods to APersistentVector in the Java source?

This would allow better performance on the fast path, including the ability to make use of specialised implementations in subclasses (e.g. Tuples) in cases where these can do much better than the use of a volatile! box.





[CLJ-1679] Add fast path in seq comparison for structurally sharing seqs Created: 21/Mar/15  Updated: 23/Mar/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: collections, seq

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1679-do-pointer-checks-in-seq-equality.patch     Text File CLJ-1679-v2.patch     Text File CLJ-1679-v3.patch    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

Currently comparing two non identical seqs requires iterating through both seqs comparing value by value, ignoring the possibility of seq `a` and `b` having the same (pointer-equal) rest.

The proposed patch adds a pointer equality check on the seq tails that can make the equality short-circuit if the test returns true, which is helpful when comparing large (or possibly infinite) seqs that share a common subseq.

After this patch, comparisons like

(let [x (range)] (= x (cons 0 (rest x))))
which currently don't terminate, return true in constant time.

Patch: CLJ-1679-v3.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Michael Blume [ 23/Mar/15 12:52 PM ]

When this test fails (it fails on my master, but I've got a bunch of other development patches, I'm still figuring out where the conflict is), it fails by hanging forever. Maybe it'd be better to check equality in a future and time out the future?

Comment by Michael Blume [ 23/Mar/15 1:01 PM ]

like so =)

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 23/Mar/15 1:11 PM ]

Makes sense, thanks for the updated patch

Comment by Michael Blume [ 23/Mar/15 1:24 PM ]

Hm, previous patch had a problem where the reporting logic still tries to force the sequence and OOMs, this patch prevents that.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 23/Mar/15 1:41 PM ]

ok, looks like CLJ-1515, CLJ-1603, and this patch, all combine to fail together, though any two of them work fine.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 23/Mar/15 1:43 PM ]

(And really there's nothing wrong with the source of this patch, it still works nicely to short-circuit = where there's structural sharing, it's just that the other two patches break structural sharing for ranges, so the test fails)

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 23/Mar/15 2:02 PM ]

I see, I guess we'll have to change the test if the patches for those tickets get applied.





[CLJ-1676] map destructuring: prevent evaluation of values in :or when they are not used/needed Created: 14/Mar/15  Updated: 15/Mar/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Max Penet Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: destructuring

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The name :or implies this should behave as "or" and be "lazy" but it's not the case currently.
The following gist shows the issue. :x is present in the map but we eval the default value:

(defn foo
  [{:keys [x]
    :or {x (println :set-default)}}] 
  x)
 
 
 
user> (foo {:x 1})
:set-default
1


 Comments   
Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 15/Mar/15 2:40 PM ]

1.2 - current all behave this way, doesn't seem like a recent change.

Comment by Max Penet [ 15/Mar/15 2:55 PM ]

Right, I thought it might have been a regression, but wasn't sure at all.
It seems it would be safe to change the current behavior, I doubt it would break any ones code.





[CLJ-1674] Boolean return type-hint confusing the compiler Created: 12/Mar/15  Updated: 12/Mar/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Mikkel Kamstrup Erlandsen Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: typehints
Environment:

OSX, Clojure 1.6.0



 Description   

Saving the below snippet and running it like

java -jar clojure-1.6.0.jar snippet.clj

Produces

$ java -jar clojure-1.6.0.jar snippet.clj 
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Unable to resolve classname: clojure.core$boolean@1356d4d4, compiling:(/Users/kamstrup/tmp/snippet.clj:15:1)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6651)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6445)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6632)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6445)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.access$100(Compiler.java:38)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$DefExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:538)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6644)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6445)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6406)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6707)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:7130)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.loadFile(Compiler.java:7086)
	at clojure.main$load_script.invoke(main.clj:274)
	at clojure.main$script_opt.invoke(main.clj:336)
	at clojure.main$main.doInvoke(main.clj:420)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
	at clojure.lang.Var.invoke(Var.java:379)
	at clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:154)
	at clojure.lang.Var.applyTo(Var.java:700)
	at clojure.main.main(main.java:37)
Caused by: java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Unable to resolve classname: clojure.core$boolean@1356d4d4
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$HostExpr.tagToClass(Compiler.java:1069)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$InvokeExpr.getJavaClass(Compiler.java:3659)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$LocalBinding.hasJavaClass(Compiler.java:5657)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$LocalBindingExpr.hasJavaClass(Compiler.java:5751)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.maybePrimitiveType(Compiler.java:1283)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$IfExpr.doEmit(Compiler.java:2631)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$IfExpr.emit(Compiler.java:2613)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$BodyExpr.emit(Compiler.java:5826)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$LetExpr.doEmit(Compiler.java:6180)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$LetExpr.emit(Compiler.java:6133)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$BodyExpr.emit(Compiler.java:5826)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$FnMethod.doEmit(Compiler.java:5374)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$FnMethod.emit(Compiler.java:5232)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$FnExpr.emitMethods(Compiler.java:3771)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$ObjExpr.compile(Compiler.java:4410)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$FnExpr.parse(Compiler.java:3904)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6642)
	... 19 more

The snippet:

snippet.clj
;; Bug in the Clojure compiler (1.6.0): If we annotate the return here with ^boolean we get:
;; 'IllegalArgumentException: Unable to resolve classname: clojure.core$boolean' from the compiler.
;; Removing it, everything is as expected
(defn ^boolean foo-bar?
  [node]
  (= node "foo-bar"))

;; Check it out, we can have ^boolean here, but not on foo-bar? !! :-)
(defn ^boolean bar-foo?
  [node]
  (= node "bar-foo"))

;; Instead of removing the ^boolean return on foo-bar? we can also remove this function
;; to have all work as expected
(defn ^boolean interesting?
  [node]
  (or (foo-bar? node) (bar-foo? node)))

(println "Foo-Bar?" (foo-bar? "baz"))


 Comments   
Comment by Mikkel Kamstrup Erlandsen [ 12/Mar/15 5:25 AM ]

Typo in comment 2 in the snippet: s/xtc-scenario?/foo-bar?/

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 12/Mar/15 6:01 AM ]

Metadata on def's symbol is evaluated as per the doc (http://clojure.org/special_forms), evaluating `boolean` results in the clojure.core/boolean function which is not a valid type hint.

As a rule of thumb, attach the return tag in the argvec rather than on the def symbol, in this case you should write

(defn foo-bar?
   ^boolean [node]
  (= node "foo-bar"))

I understand why the fact that

(defn ^boolean foo [] true)

and

(defn foo ^boolean [] true)

behave differently and the fact that the compiler will throw iff the type hint is used rather than throwing at the function definition time is confusing (and I've complained about this and the lack of documentation/specification regarding type hints for a while) but this is not a bug

Comment by Mikkel Kamstrup Erlandsen [ 12/Mar/15 6:36 AM ]

Thanks for clarifying Nicola, you are indeed correct.

Putting return type annotations before the method name seems to be common practice in a lot of Clojure code I've read online. Perpetuated by some online tutorials, and the clojure.org docs them selves (fx.

(defn ^:private ^String my-fn ...)
is found in http://clojure.org/cheatsheet)

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 12/Mar/15 8:36 AM ]

Mikkel: If the type tags are Java classes, not primitives, then ^Classname is a correct type tag. If you use Eastwood, it can warn about these incorrect type tags, and has some documentation on what works and what does not here: https://github.com/jonase/eastwood#wrong-tag

Also here: https://github.com/jonase/eastwood#unused-meta-on-macro





[CLJ-1671] Clojure socket server Created: 09/Mar/15  Updated: 08/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Alex Miller
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: repl

Attachments: Text File clj-1671-2.patch     Text File clj-1671-3.patch     Text File clj-1671-4.patch     Text File clj-1671-5.patch     Text File clj-1671-6.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Incomplete

 Description   

Programs often want to provide REPLs to users in contexts when a) network communication is desired, b) capturing stdio is difficult, or c) when more than one REPL session is desired. In addition, tools that want to support REPLs and simultaneous conversations with the host are difficult with a single stdio REPL as currently provided by Clojure.

Tooling and users often need to enable a REPL on a program without changing the program, e.g. without asking author or program to include code to start a REPL host of some sort. Thus a solution must be externally and declaratively configured (no user code changes). A REPL is just a special case of a socket service. Rather than provide a socket server REPL, provide a built-in socket server that composes with the existing repl function.

For design background, see: http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/Socket+Server+REPL

Start a socket server by supplying an extra system property:

java -cp clojure.jar:app.jar my.app -Dclojure.server.repl="{:address \"127.0.0.1\" :\port 5555 :accept clojure.repl/repl}"

where options are:

  • address = host or address, defaults to loopback
  • port = port, required
  • accept = namespaced function to invoke on socket accept, required
  • args = sequential collection of args to pass to accept
  • bind-err = defaults to true, binds err to out stream
  • server-daemon = defaults to true, socket server thread doesn't block exit
  • client-daemon = defaults to true, socket client threads don't block exit

If you want to test a repl client with the a repl server, telnet works:

$ telnet 127.0.0.1 5555
Trying 127.0.0.1...
Connected to localhost.
Escape character is '^]'.
user=> (+ 1 1)
2
user=> (/ 1 0)
#error {:cause "Divide by zero",
 :via
 [{:type java.lang.ArithmeticException,
   :message "Divide by zero",
   :at [clojure.lang.Numbers divide "Numbers.java" 158]}],
 :trace
 [[clojure.lang.Numbers divide "Numbers.java" 158]  
  [clojure.lang.Numbers divide "Numbers.java" 3808]
  [user1$eval1 invoke "NO_SOURCE_FILE" 1]
  [clojure.lang.Compiler eval "Compiler.java" 6784]
  [clojure.lang.Compiler eval "Compiler.java" 6747]
  [clojure.core$eval invoke "core.clj" 3078]
  [clojure.main$repl$read_eval_print__8287$fn__8290 invoke "main.clj" 265]
  [clojure.main$repl$read_eval_print__8287 invoke "main.clj" 265]
  [clojure.main$repl$fn__8296 invoke "main.clj" 283]
  [clojure.main$repl doInvoke "main.clj" 283]
  [clojure.lang.RestFn invoke "RestFn.java" 619]
  [clojure.main$socket_repl_server$fn__8342$fn__8344 invoke "main.clj" 450]
  [clojure.lang.AFn run "AFn.java" 22]
  [java.lang.Thread run "Thread.java" 724]]}
user1=> (println "hello")
hello
nil

Patch: clj-1671-6.patch (wip - not yet complete)



 Comments   
Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 09/Mar/15 5:50 PM ]

Could we perhaps keep this as a contrib library? This ticket simply states "The goal is to provide a simple streaming socket repl as part of Clojure." What is the rationale for the "part of Clojure" bit?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 09/Mar/15 7:33 PM ]

We want this to be available as a Clojure.main option. It's all additive - why wouldn't you want it in the box?

Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 09/Mar/15 10:19 PM ]

It never has really been too clear to me why some features are included in core, while others are kept in contrib. I understand that some are simply for historical reasons, but aside from that there doesn't seem to be too much of a philosophy behind it.

However it should be noted that since patches to clojure are much more guarded it's sometimes nice to have certain features in contrib, that way they can evolve with more rapidity than the one release a year that clojure has been going through.

But aside from those issues, I've found that breaking functionality into modules forces the core of a system to become more configurable. Perhaps I would like to use this repl socket feature, but pipe the data over a different communication protocol, or through a different serializer. If this feature were to be coded as a contrib library it would expose extension points that others could use to add additional functionality.

So I guess, all that to say, I'd prefer a tool I can compose rather than a pre-built solution.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 10/Mar/15 6:25 AM ]

Please move discussions on the merits of the idea to the dev list. Comments should be about the work of resolving the ticket, approach taken by the patch, quality/perf issues etc.

Comment by Colin Jones [ 11/Mar/15 1:33 PM ]

I see that context (a) of the rationale is that network communication is desired, which sounds to me like users of this feature may want to communicate across hosts (whether in VMs or otherwise). Is that the case?

If so, it seems like specifying the address to bind to (e.g. "0.0.0.0", "::", "127.0.0.1", etc.) may become important as well as the existing port option. This way, someone who wants to communicate across hosts (or conversely, lock down access to local-only) can make that decision.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Mar/15 2:07 PM ]

Colin - agreed. There are many ways to potentially customize what's in there so we need to figure out what's worth doing, both in the function and via the command line.

I think address is clearly worth having via the function and possibly in the command line too.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 11/Mar/15 5:49 PM ]

I find the exception printing behavior really odd. for a machine you want an exception as data, but you also want some indication of if the data is an error or not, for a human you wanted a pretty printed stacktrace. making the socket repl default to printing errors this way seems to optimize for neither.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 12/Mar/15 12:29 PM ]

Did you miss the #error tag? That indicates the data is an error. It is likely we will pprint the error data, making it not bad for both purposes

Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Mar/15 11:29 AM ]

New -4 patch changes:

  • clojure.core/throwable-as-map now public and named clojure.core/Throwable->map
  • catch and ignore SocketException without printing in socket server repl (for client disconnect)
  • functions to print as message and as data are now: clojure.main/err-print and clojure.main/err->map. All defaults and docs updated.
Comment by David Nolen [ 18/Mar/15 12:44 PM ]

Is there any reason to not allow supplying :eval in addition to :use-prompt? In the case of projects like ClojureCLR + Unity eval generally must happen on the main thread. With :eval as something which can be configured, REPL sessions can queue forms to be eval'ed with the needed context (current ns etc.) to the main thread.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 20/Mar/15 2:12 PM ]

I did see the #error tag, but throwables print with that tag regardless of if they are actually thrown or if they are just the value returned from a function. Admittedly returning exceptions as values is not something generally done, but the jvm does distinguish between a return value and a thrown exception. Having a repl that doesn't distinguish between the two strikes me as an odd design. The repl you get from clojure.main currently prints the message from a thrown uncaught throwable, and on master prints with #error if you have a throwable value, so it distinguishes between an uncaught thrown throwable and a throwable value. That obviously isn't great for tooling because you don't get a good data representation in the uncaught case.

It looks like the most recent patch does pretty print uncaught throwables, which is helpful for humans to distinguish between a returned value and an uncaught throwable.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 25/Mar/15 1:10 PM ]

alex: saying this is all additive, when it has driven changes to how things are printed, using the global print-method, rings false to me

Comment by Sam Ritchie [ 25/Mar/15 1:15 PM ]

This seems like a pretty big last minute addition for 1.7. What's the rationale for adding it here vs deferring to 1.8, or trying it out as a contrib first?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 25/Mar/15 2:13 PM ]

Kevin: changing the fallthrough printing for things that are unreadable to be readable should be useful regardless of the socket repl. It shouldn't be a change for existing programs (unless they're relying on the toString of objects without print formats).

Sam: Rich wants it in the box as a substrate for tools.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Mar/15 10:03 AM ]

Marking incomplete, pending at least the repl exit question.

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 29/Apr/15 2:18 PM ]

Hello, I intend to work on this, if it appears it still has a good probability of being included in clojure 1.7.
There hasn't been much visible activity on it lately.
What is the current status of the pending question, and do you think it will still make it in 1.7?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Apr/15 2:29 PM ]

This has been pushed to 1.8 and is on my plate. The direction has diverged quite a bit from the original description and we don't expect to modify clojure.main as is done in the prior patches. So, I would recommend not working on it as described here.

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 01/May/15 7:24 AM ]

OK thanks for the update.

Is the discussion about the new design / goal (you say the direction has diverged) available somewhere so that I can keep in touch with what the Hammock Time is producing? Because on my own hammock time I'm doing some mental projections for CCW support of this, based on what is publicly available here -

Also, as soon as you have something available for testing please don't hesitate to ping me, I'll see what I can do to help depending on my schedule. Cheers.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 01/May/15 8:44 AM ]

Some design work is here - http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/Socket+Server+REPL.

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 05/May/15 11:41 AM ]

Thanks for the link. It seems that the design is totally revamped indeed. Better to wait then.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 04/Jul/15 1:21 PM ]

Alex, just a note that the Java method getLoopbackAddress [1] appears to have been added with Java 1.7, so your patches that use that method do not compile with Java 1.6. If the plan was for the next release of Clojure to drop support for Java 1.6 anyway, then no worries.

[1] http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/net/InetAddress.html#getLoopbackAddress%28%29

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 08/Jul/15 8:31 AM ]

Lifecycle concerns

1. atoms are weak when actions (starting threads / sockets) are coordinated with recorded state (the map)
2. I see why the plumbing needs access to socket, but what is the motivation for expoosing it to outside code, seems like opportunity to break stuff
3. stating a server has a race condition
4. what happens if somebody wants to call start-server explicitly – how do they know whether that happens before or after config-driven process launches
5. what guarantees about when config-driven launch happens, vis-a-vis other startup-y things
6. is there a use for stop-servers other than shutdown?
7. does Clojure now need a shutdown-clojure-resources? I don't want to have to remember shutdown-agents, plus stop-servers, plus whatever we add next year
8. what happens on misconfiguration (e.g. nonexistent namespace)? will other servers still launch? what thread dies, and where does is report? will the app main process die before even reaching the user?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 08/Jul/15 9:12 AM ]

1. it's not in the patch, but the intention is that in the runtime on startup there is a call to (start-servers (System/getProperties)) and generally you're not starting servers on the fly (although it's broken out to make that possible).
2. just trying to make resources available, not sure how much locking down we want/need
3. I'm expecting this to be a startup thing primarily
4. I'm assuming the config-driven process will start in the runtime and thus it will happen first. Not sure how much we need to support the manual stuff - it just seemed like a good idea to make it possible.
5. dunno, haven't looked at where to do that yet. Probably somewhere similar to data_readers stuff?
6. no
7. the threads are daemons by default meaning that it will shut down regardless. If you set the daemon properties to false, then you're in control and need to call stop-servers where it's appropriate.
8. I thought about these questions and do not have good answers. Lots more of that stuff needs to be handled.





[CLJ-1665] take-nth transducer could be faster without rem Created: 20/Feb/15  Updated: 20/Feb/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Steve Miner Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: performance
Environment:

Mac OS X 10.10.2, JDK 1.8.0_31


Attachments: Text File CLJ-1665-faster-take-nth-transducer-without-rem.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The take-nth transducer is calling rem on each index, which is relatively expensive compared to a zero? test. It could just count down from N instead as the step size is fixed.



 Comments   
Comment by Steve Miner [ 20/Feb/15 12:34 PM ]

Patch attached. It's about 25% faster on a simple test like:

(time (transduce (take-nth 13) + (range 1e7)))
Comment by Steve Miner [ 20/Feb/15 12:41 PM ]

I didn't worry about (take-nth 0) case, but my patch does give a different result. The current implementation gets a divide by zero error (from rem). My patched version returns just the first element once. The regular collection version returns an infinite sequence of the first element. I doubt anyone expects a sensible answer from the 0 case so I didn't try to do anything special with it.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 20/Feb/15 12:55 PM ]

Nice =)

I would say that the transducer version really ought to match the collection version as closely as possible, but I don't think there's actually a way to write a transducer that transforms a finite sequence into an infinite sequence, so no luck there.

Maybe while we're at it we should change both the transducer and the collection arities to throw on zero?





[CLJ-1662] folding over hash-map nested hash-map throws exception Created: 17/Feb/15  Updated: 17/Feb/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Francis Avila Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: reducers
Environment:

JVM 1.7.0_76



 Description   

I got a baffling exception in a recursive function that folds. REPL transcript below:

nREPL server started on port 57818 on host 127.0.0.1 - nrepl://127.0.0.1:57818
REPL-y 0.3.5, nREPL 0.2.6
Clojure 1.7.0-alpha5
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM 1.7.0_76-b13
    Docs: (doc function-name-here)
          (find-doc "part-of-name-here")
  Source: (source function-name-here)
 Javadoc: (javadoc java-object-or-class-here)
    Exit: Control+D or (exit) or (quit)
 Results: Stored in vars *1, *2, *3, an exception in *e

user=> (use 'foldtest.core)
nil
user=> (source leafs)
(defn leafs [xs]
  (->> (r/mapcat (fn [k v]
                   (if (map? v)
                     (leafs v)
                     [[k v]])) xs)
       (r/foldcat)))
nil
user=> (leafs (hash-map :a (hash-map :b 1 :c 2)))

ClassCastException clojure.lang.PersistentHashMap$1 cannot be cast to clojure.lang.IFn  clojure.core.reducers/fjinvoke (reducers.clj:48)
user=> (pst)
ClassCastException clojure.lang.PersistentHashMap$1 cannot be cast to clojure.lang.IFn
	clojure.core.reducers/fjinvoke (reducers.clj:48)
	clojure.lang.PersistentHashMap.fold (PersistentHashMap.java:207)
	clojure.core.reducers/eval1347/fn--1348 (reducers.clj:367)
	clojure.core.reducers/eval1220/fn--1221/G--1211--1232 (reducers.clj:81)
	clojure.core.reducers/folder/reify--1247 (reducers.clj:130)
	clojure.core.reducers/fold (reducers.clj:98)
	clojure.core.reducers/fold (reducers.clj:96)
	clojure.core.reducers/foldcat (reducers.clj:318)
	foldtest.core/leafs (core.clj:5)
	foldtest.core/leafs/fn--1367 (core.clj:7)
	clojure.core.reducers/mapcat/fn--1277/fn--1280 (reducers.clj:185)
	clojure.lang.PersistentHashMap$NodeSeq.kvreduce (PersistentHashMap.java:1127)
nil
user=>

Note that it must be a hash-map nested in a hash-map. Other combinations of array and hash maps seem fine:

user=> (leafs (array-map :a (hash-map :b 1 :c 2)))
[[:c 2] [:b 1]]
user=> (leafs (hash-map :a (array-map :b 1 :c 2)))
[[:b 1] [:c 2]]
user=> (leafs (hash-map :a (hash-map :b 1 :c 2)))

ClassCastException clojure.lang.PersistentHashMap$1 cannot be cast to clojure.lang.IFn  clojure.core.reducers/fjinvoke (reducers.clj:48)
user=> (leafs (array-map :a (array-map :b 1 :c 2)))
[[:b 1] [:c 2]]
user=>

Possibly related: CLJCLR-63

It took me a while to discover this because of this inconsistency (which I am not sure is a bug):

user=> (def a {:a 1})
#'user/a
user=> (type a)
clojure.lang.PersistentHashMap
user=> (let [a {:a 1}] (type a))
clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap
user=> (type {:a 1})
clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap
user=>

(I had put test input in a def, but using the defed var always failed but literals always worked!)






[CLJ-1657] proxy creates bytecode that calls super methods of abstract classes Created: 08/Feb/15  Updated: 18/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Alexander Yakushev Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None
Environment:

Everywhere, but so far relevant only on Android 5.0


Attachments: File CLJ-1657-patch.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

When proxy is used to extend abstract classes (e.g. java.io.Writer), the bytecode it produces include the call to non-existing super methods. For example, here's decompiled method from clojure/pprint/column_writer.clj:

public void close()
    {
        Object obj;
label0:
        {
            obj = RT.get(__clojureFnMap, "close");
            if(obj == null)
                break label0;
            ((IFn)obj).invoke(this);
            break MISSING_BLOCK_LABEL_31;
        }
        JVM INSTR pop ;
        super.close();
    }

As you can see on the last line, super.close() tries to call a non-defined method (because close() is abstract in Writer).

This hasn't been an issue anywhere until Android 5.0 came out. Its bytecode optimizer is very aggressive and rejects such code. Google guys claim that it is a bug in their code, which they already fixed[1]. Still I wonder if having faulty bytecode, that is not valid by Java standards, might cause issues in future (not only on Android, but in other enviroments too).

[1] https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=80687



 Comments   
Comment by Alexander Yakushev [ 18/Mar/15 5:31 AM ]

I attached a patch that resolves the issue. The change makes `generate-proxy` treat abstract methods like interface methods. Which means, if the implementation for the method is not provided, it will throw unsupported exception rather than try to call the parent method (which doesn't exist).

Comment by Michael Blume [ 18/Mar/15 12:50 PM ]

Alexander: Awesome, thanks =)

Note: If you use git format-patch after making a commit, you can generate a patch file with your name/e-mail and a commit message that a clojure maintainer can apply directly to clojure as a new commit.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Mar/15 12:53 PM ]

The patch process is documented here: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Comment by Alexander Yakushev [ 18/Mar/15 4:38 PM ]

Sorry, I should have checked the guidelines first. I uploaded a new patch, hope it is correct now.

Comment by Alexander Yakushev [ 18/Jul/15 10:59 AM ]

Anything that holds this back? Now that Clojure is in volatile after-release state it's a good time to deal with it.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jul/15 12:25 PM ]

No, wasn't in triaged but is now.





[CLJ-1656] Unroll assoc and assoc! for small numbers of arguments Created: 06/Feb/15  Updated: 29/Apr/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7, Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Tom Crayford Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: performance

Attachments: File assoc.diff     Text File assoc-gen-test.patch     Text File CLJ-1656-v1.patch     Text File CLJ-1656-v2.patch     Text File CLJ-1656-v3.patch     Text File CLJ-1656-v4.patch     Text File CLJ-1656-v5.patch     Text File CLJ-1656-v6.patch     Text File CLJ-1656-v7.patch     File cpuinfo     File javaversion     File output     File uname    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Whilst doing performance work recently, I discovered that unrolling to single assoc calls were significantly faster than using multiple keys (~10% for my particular application). Zachary Tellman then pointed out that clojure.core doesn't unroll assoc at all, even for the case of relatively low numbers of keys.

We already unroll other performance critical functions that call things via `apply`, e.g. `update` https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/src/clj/clojure/core.clj#L5914, but `assoc` (which is, I think in the critical path for quite a bunch of applications and libraries), would likely benefit from this.

I have not yet developed patches for this, but I did some standalone benchmarking work:

https://github.com/yeller/unrolling-assoc-benchmarks

benchmark results:

code: https://github.com/yeller/unrolling-assoc-benchmarks/blob/master/src/bench_assoc_unrolling.clj

  1 2 3 4
empty array map (not unrolled) 23ns 93ns 156ns 224ns
empty array map (unrolled assoc) N/A 51ns 80ns 110ns
         
20 element persistent hashmap (not unrolled) 190ns 313ns 551ns 651ns
20 element persistent hashmap (unrolled assoc) N/A 250ns 433ns 524ns
         
record (not unrolled) 12ns 72ns 105ns 182ns
record (unrolled assoc) N/A 21ns 28ns 41ns

Each measurement was made in a separate JVM, to avoid JIT path dependence.

Benchmarks were ran on a commodity server (8 cpus, 32gb ram), with ubuntu 12.04 and a recent release of Java 8. Attached are `cpuinfo`, `uname` and `java -version` output.

Relatively standard JVM production flags were enabled, and care was taken to disable leiningen's startup time optimizations (which disable many of the JIT optimizations).

Benchmarks can be run by cloning the repository, and running `script/bench`

There's one outstanding question for this patch: How far should we unroll these calls? `update` (which is unrolled in the 1.7 alphas) is unrolled to 3 arguments. Adding more unrolling isn't difficult, but it does impact the readability of assoc.

Patch: CLJ-1656-v5.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Tom Crayford [ 09/Feb/15 12:01 PM ]

Ok, attached `assoc.diff`, which unrolls this to a single level more than the current code (so supporting two key/value pairs without recursion). The code's going to get pretty complex in the case with more than the unrolled number of keys if we continue on this way, so I'm unsure if this is a good approach, but the performance benefits seem very compelling.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 09/Feb/15 3:35 PM ]

Since the unroll comes out kind of hairy, why not have a macro write it for us?

Comment by Michael Blume [ 09/Feb/15 4:03 PM ]

Patch v2 includes assoc!

Comment by Tom Crayford [ 09/Feb/15 5:01 PM ]

I benchmarked conj with similar unrolling, across a relatively wide range of datatypes from core (lists, sets, vectors, each one empty and then again with 20 elements):

  1 2 3 4
empty vector (not unrolled) 19ns 57ns 114ns 126ns
empty vector (unrolled conj) N/A 44ns 67ns 91ns
         
20 element vector (not unrolled) 27.35ns 69ns 111ns 107ns
20 element vector (unrolled conj) N/A 54ns 79ns 104ns
         
empty list (not unrolled) 7ns 28ns 53ns 51ns
empty list (unrolled conj) N/A 15ns 20ns 26ns
         
twenty element list (not unrolled) 8.9ns 26ns 49ns 49ns
twenty element list (unrolled) N/A 15ns 19ns 30ns
         
empty set (not unrolled) 64ns 170ns 286ns 290ns
empty set (unrolled) N/A 154ns 249ns 350ns
         
twenty element set (not unrolled) 33ns 81ns 132ns 130ns
twenty element set (unrolled) N/A 69ns 108ns 139ns

Benchmarks were run on the same machine as before. There's a less clear benefit here, except for lists, where the overhead of creating seqs and recursing seems to be clearly dominating the cost of actually doing the conj (which makes sense - conj on any element list should be a very cheap operation). Raw benchmark output is here: https://gist.github.com/tcrayford/51a3cd24b8b0a8b7fd74

Comment by Tom Crayford [ 09/Feb/15 5:04 PM ]

Michael Blume: I like those patches! They read far nicer to me than my original patch. Did you check if any of those macro generated methods blew Hotspot's hot code inlining limit? (it's 235 bytecodes). That'd be my only worry with using macros here - it's easy to generate code that defeats the inliner.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 09/Feb/15 5:57 PM ]

Thanks! This is new for me, so I might be doing the wrong thing, but I just ran nodisassemble over both definitions and the "instruction numbers" next to each line go up to 219 for the varargs arity assoc and up to 251 for assoc!, so, assuming I'm looking at the right thing, maybe that one needs to have an arity taken off? If I remove the highest arity I get 232 for varargs which is just under the line.

I guess alternatively we could call assoc! instead of assoc!* in the varargs arity, which removes a lot of code – in that case it's 176 for varargs and 149 for six pairs.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 09/Feb/15 6:01 PM ]

Gah, I forgot to include coll in the varargs call to assoc!

which reminds me that this patch needs tests.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 09/Feb/15 10:27 PM ]

OK, this has some fixes I made after examining the disassembled output. There's a change to the assoc!* macro to be sure it type-hints correctly – I'm honestly not sure why it didn't type-hint properly before, but it does now. Also, I changed the call to assoc! rolling up the first six entries at the top of the varargs version from a macro call to a function call so it'd fit within the 251 inlineable bytecodes. (This, again, is assuming I'm reading the output correctly).

Comment by Tom Crayford [ 10/Feb/15 6:38 AM ]

Michael: Wanna push a branch with these patches to clojars or something? Then I can rerun the benchmarks with the exact code in the patches.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 10/Feb/15 2:36 PM ]

Hmm, not sure I know how to do that – here's a branch on github though https://github.com/MichaelBlume/clojure/tree/unroll-assoc

Comment by Michael Blume [ 12/Feb/15 1:12 PM ]

v5 marks the helper macros private.

Comment by Tom Crayford [ 13/Feb/15 4:11 AM ]

Michael: was that branch just based off clojure/clojure master? I tried running benchmarks off it, but ran into undefined var errors when building this code (which doesn't happen with alpha5):

(Retrieving com/yellerapp/clojure-unrolled-assoc/1.7.0-unrollassoc-SNAPSHOT/clojure-unrolled-assoc-1.7.0-unrollassoc-20150213.092242-1.pom from clojars)
(Retrieving com/yellerapp/clojure-unrolled-assoc/1.7.0-unrollassoc-SNAPSHOT/clojure-unrolled-assoc-1.7.0-unrollassoc-20150213.092242-1.jar from clojars)
(Retrieving org/clojure/clojure/1.3.0/clojure-1.3.0.jar from central)
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.RuntimeException: Unable to resolve symbol: bench in this context, compiling:(bench_assoc_unrolling.clj:5)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6235)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6177)
at clojure.lang.Compiler$InvokeExpr.parse(Compiler.java:3452)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6411)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6216)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6177)
at clojure.lang.Compiler$BodyExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:5572)
at clojure.lang.Compiler$FnMethod.parse(Compiler.java:5008)

Comment by Michael Blume [ 23/Feb/15 5:08 PM ]

Ok, how are you building? Why the strange clojure group?

Comment by Michael Blume [ 23/Feb/15 5:09 PM ]

The existing version of assoc does runtime checking that an even number of varargs are passed in, but assoc! does not. Do we want to preserve this behavior or do checks in both?

Comment by Michael Blume [ 23/Feb/15 6:00 PM ]

Also, I'm curious how relevant inlining is here – does HotSpot inlining actually work with Var invocation when there's a getRootBinding step in the way?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 23/Feb/15 7:59 PM ]

Yes, inlining works through var invocation.

Comment by Tom Crayford [ 16/Mar/15 7:05 AM ]

Michael,

That group is just an uploaded version of clojure master with your patches applied, built in just the same way as before (you should be able to check out the repo and replicate).

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Apr/15 1:44 PM ]

The patch CLJ-1656-v5.patch doesn't seem to do anything with the old version of assoc (in core.clj around line 179)?

The new one needs to have the arglists and other stuff like that. I'm not sure about the macro/private vars in there either. Did you try leveraging RT.assocN() with a vector?

Are there existing tests in the test suite for assoc with N pairs?

Comment by Michael Blume [ 29/Apr/15 8:46 PM ]

The dependencies in clojure.core were such that assoc needed to be defined well before syntax-quoting, so I just let it be defined twice, once slower, once faster. I'll put up a patch with arglists. Does it need an arglist for every new arity, or are the existing arglists enough? (I'm afraid I'm not 100% solid on what the arglists metadata does) There is an annoying lack of existing tests of assoc. I have a generative test in my tree because that seemed more fun than writing cases for all the different arities. I can post it if it seems useful, it might be overkill though.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 29/Apr/15 9:50 PM ]

Here's the test patch I mentioned, it's even more overkill than I remembered

Comment by Michael Blume [ 29/Apr/15 10:01 PM ]

There, code and test.

This also checks that assoc! is passed an even number of kvs in the varargs case, which is the behavior of assoc. The test verifies that both assoc and assoc! throw for odd arg count.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Apr/15 11:10 PM ]

The existing arglist is fine - it just overrides the generated one for doc purposes.

Did you try any of the RT.assocN() stuff?

I guess another question I have is whether people actually do this enough that it matters?





[CLJ-1643] Generative test for sequence implementations Created: 15/Jan/15  Updated: 15/Jan/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Michael Blume Assignee: Michael Blume
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: generative-test, test

Attachments: Text File clj-1643-gen-seq-test-v1.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

This is an attempt to write a minimal-foreknowledge failing test for CLJ-1633. By minimal-foreknowledge, I mean a test that fails in the presence of the bug, but which one could imagine writing without intimate knowledge of the details of the bug. I suspect that looking for tests like this is a good way to find gaps in test coverage, and produce tests that will uncover novel regressions later on.

Approach: Generate a single list of operations that could be performed on a sequence, changing that sequence. Make two copies of that operation list, and insert what should be identity-preserving operations into each. Run the two lists of operations and verify that the final results are the same.

With CLJ-1633 unfixed, we get this output:

[java] Testing clojure.test-clojure.sequences
     [java]
     [java] FAIL in (seq-gentest) (sequences.clj:135)
     [java] {:acts1 (->> nil (cons :foo) (cons :foo) into-array next (apply list)),
     [java]  :acts2 (->> nil (cons :foo) (cons :foo) next),
     [java]  :result1 (:foo :foo),
     [java]  :result2 (:foo),
     [java]  :pass false}
     [java]
     [java] expected: (:result res)
     [java]   actual: false





[CLJ-1630] Destructuring allows multiple &-params Created: 31/Dec/14  Updated: 01/Jan/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Michael Blume Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File no-multiple-rest-params-v1.patch    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

(let [[foo & bar & baz] []]) compiles and probably shouldn't.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 01/Jan/15 10:17 AM ]

I see:

user=> (defn foo [bar & baz & qux])

CompilerException java.lang.RuntimeException: Invalid parameter list, compiling:(/private/var/folders/7r/_1fj0f517rgcxwx79mn79mfc0000gn/T/form-init3743582784321941885.clj:1:1)

?

Comment by Michael Blume [ 01/Jan/15 12:27 PM ]

Sorry, I was working on memory rather than actually typing the thing I put in the description into a REPL, which was dumb.

user=> (let [[foo & bar & baz] []])
nil





[CLJ-1629] Improve error message when defn form omits parameter declaration Created: 29/Dec/14  Updated: 29/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Sanel Zukan Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: errormsgs
Environment:

Reproducible on all platforms and all clojure versions.


Approval: Triaged

 Description   

When defn form is malformed, Clojure compiler will report meaningless error and in combination with function body, can cause really bad experience. Here is the sample:

(defn foo
  "This is docstring."
  (let [i 1]
    (+ i 1)))

It will report:

IllegalArgumentException Parameter declaration "let" should be a vector  clojure.core/assert-valid-fdecl (core.clj:7123)

However, if is written:

(defn foo "bla")

error report makes more sense:

IllegalArgumentException Parameter declaration missing  clojure.core/assert-valid-fdecl (core.clj:7107)


 Comments   
Comment by Michael Blume [ 29/Dec/14 1:39 PM ]

I don't think this is really meaningless – if you replace the symbol let with a vector, say, [i], you get a perfectly valid function definition

(defn foo
  "This is docstring."
  ([i] [i 1]
    (+ i 1)))
Comment by Sanel Zukan [ 29/Dec/14 2:41 PM ]

Yes and maybe make sense for this case. But in general, the report is misleading for common defn forms (how often you will see function definitions written this way, unless you want multi-arity function) and should have the same report as for second sample; in both cases it is the same cause.





[CLJ-1625] Cannot implement protocol methods of the same name inline Created: 23/Dec/14  Updated: 23/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Tassilo Horn Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: protocols


 Description   

One major benefit of protocols (IMHO) is that the protocol methods are properly namespace qualified. Thus I can have multiple protocols in different namespaces that define a foo method and extend them all (or a subset of them) upon existing types. However, that's not true with extending protocols inline with defrecord and deftype, or with extending protocols on the Java side by implementing their interfaces.

Example:

;; file: protocoltest/foo.clj
(ns prototest.foo)
(defprotocol Foo
  (mymethod [this]))

;; file: protocoltest/bar.clj
(ns prototest.bar)
(defprotocol Bar
  (mymethod [this]))

;; file: protocoltest/core.clj
(ns prototest.core
  (:require [prototest.foo :as foo]
            [prototest.bar :as bar]))

;; inline extension of both mymethod methods doesn't work
(defrecord MyRec [x]
  foo/Foo
  (mymethod [this] :foo)
  bar/Bar
  (mymethod [this] :bar))
;;=> java.lang.ClassFormatError
;;   Duplicate method name&signature in class file prototest/core/MyRec

;; I have to resort to either half-inline-half-dynamic...
(defrecord MyRec [x]
  foo/Foo
  (mymethod [this] :foo))
(extend-type MyRec
  bar/Bar
  (mymethod [this] :bar))

;; ... or fully dynamic extension.
(defrecord MyRec [x])
(extend-type MyRec
  foo/Foo
  (mymethod [this] :foo)
  bar/Bar
  (mymethod [this] :bar))

;; Then things work just fine.
(foo/mymethod (->MyRec 1))
;;=> :foo
(bar/mymethod (->MyRec 1))
;;=> :bar

I know that I get the error because both the Foo and the Bar interfaces backing the protocols have a mymethod method and thus they cannot be implemented both at once (at least not with different behavior).

But why throw away the namespacing advantages we have with protocols? E.g., why is the protocoltest.foo.Foo method not named protocoltest$foo$mymethod (or some other munged name) in the corresponding interface? That way, both methods can be implemented inline where you gain the speed advantage, and you can do the same even from the Java side. (Currently, invoking clojure.core.extend from the Java side using clojure.java.api is no fun because you have to construct maps, intern keywords, define functions, etc.)

Of course, the ship of changing the default method naming scheme has sailed long ago, but maybe a :ns-qualified-method-names option could be added to defprotocol.






[CLJ-1613] :or defaults should refer to enclosing scope in map destructuring Created: 12/Dec/14  Updated: 08/Apr/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Michał Marczyk Assignee: Michał Marczyk
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1613-evaluate-or-defaults-in-enclosing-scope-in-.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Michael Blume noticed that :or defaults can depend on the values of other keys, see https://groups.google.com/d/msg/clojure/6kOhpPOpHWM/ITjWwQFS_VQJ

Michael's Gist https://gist.github.com/MichaelBlume/4891dafdd31f0dcbc727 displays a case where an associative form involving :keys and :or compiles or not depending on the order of symbols in :keys. By tweaking that case one can arrive at expressions which always compile, but produce different values depending on :keys:

(let [foo 1
       bar 2
       {:keys [bar foo]
        :or {foo 3 bar (inc foo)}} {}]
  {:foo foo :bar bar})
;= {:foo 3, :bar 4}

(let [foo 1
      bar 2
      {:keys [foo bar]
       :or {foo 3 bar (inc foo)}} {}]
  {:foo foo :bar bar})
;= {:foo 3, :bar 2}

I believe that the most natural solution is to demand that :or defaults be evaluated in an enclosing scope where none of the destructuring-introduced locals are present. This approach is taken by the 0001 patch.



 Comments   
Comment by Michael Blume [ 12/Dec/14 2:27 AM ]

I suspect that this is the right thing to do but I think it's important to note that this will break existing code https://github.com/ngrunwald/ring-middleware-format/blob/master/src/ring/middleware/format_params.clj#L214

Comment by Michael Blume [ 06/Apr/15 4:43 PM ]

Update on my previous comment – ring-middleware-params has updated so that it doesn't depend on this behavior. I think we should definitely merge this patch so no one else depends on it.

Comment by Max Penet [ 08/Apr/15 10:46 AM ]

Since this involves :or keys evaluation, this might be worth checking if this should/could have an impact on http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1676 as well.





[CLJ-1612] clojure.core.reducers/mapcat can call f1 with undefined arity of 0 arguments? Created: 10/Dec/14  Updated: 10/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: reducers


 Description   

I have not run across this with running code, so perhaps it is impossible for reasons I have not understood. Also not sure whether fixing issues with reducers is of any importance, given transducers. This was found while testing the Eastwood lint tool on some Clojure namespaces, including clojure.core.reducers.

(defcurried mapcat
  "Applies f to every value in the reduction of coll, concatenating the result
  colls of (f val). Foldable."
  {:added "1.5"}
  [f coll]
  (folder coll
   (fn [f1]
     (let [f1 (fn
                ([ret v]
                  (let [x (f1 ret v)] (if (reduced? x) (reduced x) x)))
                ([ret k v]
                  (let [x (f1 ret k v)] (if (reduced? x) (reduced x) x))))]
       (rfn [f1 k]
            ([ret k v]
               (reduce f1 ret (f k v))))))))

The definition of macro rfn expands to a (fn ...) that can call f1 with no arguments, which is not a defined arity for f1.






[CLJ-1611] clojure.java.io/pushback-reader Created: 08/Dec/14  Updated: 26/May/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Phill Wolf Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 6
Labels: io, reader

Attachments: Text File drupp-clj-1611-2.patch     Text File drupp-clj-1611.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Whereas

  • clojure.core/read and clojure.edn/read require a PushbackReader;
  • clojure.java.io/reader produces a BufferedReader, which isn't compatible;
  • the hazard has tripped folks up for years[1];
  • clojure.java.io is pure sugar anyway (and would not be damaged by the addition of a little bit more);
  • clojure.java.io's very existence suggests suitability and fitness for use (wherein by the absence of a read-compatible pushback-reader it falls short);

i.e., in the total absence of clojure.java.io it would not seem "hard" to use clojure.edn, but in the presence of clojure.java.io and its "reader" function, amidst so much else in the API that does fit together, one keeps thinking one is doing it wrong;

and

  • revising the "read" functions to make their own Pushback was considered but rejected [2];

Therefore let it be suggested to add clojure.java.io/pushback-reader, returning something consumable by clojure.core/read and clojure.edn/read.

[1] The matter was discussed on Google Groups:

(2014, "clojure.edn won't accept clojure.java.io/reader?") https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/3HSoA12v5nc

with a reference to an earlier thread

(2009, "Reading... from a reader") https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/_tuypjr2M_A

[2] CLJ-82 and the 2009 message thread



 Comments   
Comment by David Rupp [ 10/Jan/15 4:05 PM ]

Attached patch drupp-clj-1611.patch implements clojure.java.io/pushback-reader as requested.

Comment by David Rupp [ 10/Jan/15 4:07 PM ]

Note that you can always import java.io.PushbackReader and do something like (PushbackReader. (reader my-thing)) yourself; that's really all the patch does.

Comment by Phill Wolf [ 11/Jan/15 7:54 AM ]

clojure.java.io/reader is idempotent, while the patch of 10-Jan-2015 re-wraps an existing PushbackReader twice: first with a new BufferedReader, then with a new PushbackReader.

Leaving a given PushbackReader alone would be more in keeping with the pattern of clojure.java.io.

It also needs a docstring. If pushback-reader were idempotent, the docstring's opening phrase could echo clojure.java.io/reader's, e.g.: Attempts to coerce its argument to java.io.PushbackReader; failing that, (bla bla bla).

Comment by David Rupp [ 11/Jan/15 11:14 AM ]

Adding drupp-clj-1611-2.patch to address previous comments.





[CLJ-1609] Fix an edge case in the Reflector's search for a public method declaration Created: 05/Dec/14  Updated: 12/Mar/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Jeremy Heiler Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: interop

Attachments: Text File reflector_method_bug.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The Reflector was not taking into account that a non-public class can implement an interface, and have a non-public parent class contain an implementation of a method on that interface.

The solution I took is to pass in the target object's class instead of the declaring class of the method object.

I've outlined a small example here: https://github.com/jeremyheiler/clj-reflector-bug

The repo contains a Java example that works, and the same example in Clojure that doesn't work. It also includes a patched version of Clojure 1.6.0, and shows that the patch solves the issue. Also, in `src/foo/m.clj`, there is a real example of this bug occurring by using the Java Debug Interface API in the tools.jar library.

I would have added tests to the patch, but I don't think the test runner compiles test Java code, which is required.

Approach: pass the target objects class instead of the declaring class of the method object
Patch: reflector_method_bug.patch
Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 05/Dec/14 8:48 AM ]

Probably a dupe of CLJ-259. I'll probably dupe that one to this though.

Comment by Jeremy Heiler [ 05/Dec/14 1:33 PM ]

Thanks. Sorry for not finding that myself. CLJ-259 refers to CLJ-126, which I think is covered with this patch.

Comment by Jeremy Heiler [ 06/Dec/14 12:37 PM ]

I was looking into whether or not the target could be null, and it can be when invoking a static method. However, I don't think that code path would make it to the target.getClass() because non-public static methods aren't returned by getMethods().





[CLJ-1599] Add a reset! that returns old value Created: 24/Nov/14  Updated: 02/Mar/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Steven Yi Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: atom

Attachments: File get-and-set.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

DESCRIPTION

This patch adds the equivalent of reset!, here called get-and-set!, to core to allow getting the last value from an atom and setting it to a new value. This is useful for atomically draining an atom of its value and setting to a new value. The implementation delegates to Java's AtomicReference.getAndSet().

The equivalent operation in Clojure code would be:

(defn get-and-set! [atm newv]
(loop [oldv @atm]
(if (compare-and-set! atm oldv newv)
oldv
(recur @atm))))

This is close to a 1:1 translation of the Java code in sun.misc.Unsafe's getAndSetObject, used by AtomicReference (as of current JDK9 source code).

APPLICATIONS

  • User may want to check if an operation has occurred before by using an atom as a flag. I.e.,

(def has-run-once (atom false))
...
(when-not (get-and-set! has-run-once true)
(do something))

  • User may want to use an atom similarly to a java.util.concurrent.LinkedTransferQueue, for the case of pairing up adds by writers and drainTo by readers:

Thread 1: (swap! atm conj item1)
Thread 2: (swap! atm conj item2)
Thread 3: (let [new-vals (get-and-set! atm [])]
(do-something new-vals))

ALTERNATIVES

  • For case of atom as flag, user can use existing compare-and-set!:

(def has-run-once (atom false))
...
(when-not (compare-and-set! has-run-once false true)
(do something))

Argument: get-and-set! is a little clearer in intent as it is using the value of the atom, rather than the success of the cas operation. Also, this would not be applicable to situations where the value stored is not a boolean.

  • User can just go ahead and use LinkedTransferQueue.

Argument: User not fluent in Java may not be readily able to use this.

==

Argument for: This seems like a sufficiently primitive operation to include in core for atoms. I am unsure of the rationale, but assume it was vetted to include into Java's AtomicReference for a reason. Also, if users are using atoms and have this available, they are less likely to try to do this incorrectly, such as:

(let [vals @some-atom]
(reset! some-atom [])
(do-something-with vals))

Argument against: This may not be sufficiently primitive enough to include in core. Users have a workaround to implement the get-and-set! operation in user-code as given above.

Note: This request is similar to CLJ-1454 (http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1454), but differs in that this is not a swap! operation that accepts an IFn argument. Also, I looked to add a test in test/clojure/test_clojure/atoms.clj, but saw that the other operations weren't tested. (I assume this is due to the other operations delegating to AtomicReference and hence not deemed test-worthy.)



 Comments   
Comment by Michael Blume [ 02/Mar/15 5:03 PM ]

I tend to wind up inevitably adding this to my projects, be nice to have it in core

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Mar/15 7:27 PM ]

So CLJ-1454 is swap! and return old and CLJ-1599 is reset! and return old?

Comment by Steven Yi [ 02/Mar/15 7:48 PM ]

Yes, I think that's an accurate interpretation of the two tickets.





[CLJ-1586] Compiler doesn't preserve metadata for LazySeq literals Created: 12/Nov/14  Updated: 12/Mar/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler, metadata, typehints

Attachments: Text File 0001-Compiler-doesn-t-preserve-metadata-for-lazyseq-liter.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The analyzer in Compiler.java forces evaluation of lazyseq literals, but loses the compile time original metadata of that form, meaning that a type hint will be lost.

Example demonstrating this issue:

user=> (set! *warn-on-reflection* true)
true
user=> (list '.hashCode (with-meta (concat '(identity) '("foo")) {:tag 'String}))
(.hashCode (identity "foo"))
user=> (eval (list '.hashCode (with-meta (concat '(identity) '("foo")) {:tag 'String})))
Reflection warning, NO_SOURCE_PATH:1:1 - reference to field hashCode can't be resolved.
101574

Forcing the concat call to an ASeq rather than a LazySeq fixes this issue:

user=> (eval (list '.hashCode (with-meta (seq (concat '(identity) '("foo"))) {:tag 'String})))
101574

This ticket blocks http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1444 since clojure.core/sequence might return a lazyseq.

This bug affected both tools.analyzer and tools.reader and forced me to commit a fix in tools.reader to work around this issue, see: http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/TANAL-99

The proposed patch trivially preserves the form metadata after realizing the lazyseq

Approach: Keep a copy of the original form, and apply its metadata to the realized lazyseq
Patch: 0001-Compiler-doesn-t-preserve-metadata-for-lazyseq-liter.patch
Screened by:






[CLJ-1583] Apply forces the evaluation of one element more than necessary Created: 07/Nov/14  Updated: 09/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-make-RT.boundedLength-lazier.patch    
Patch: Code

 Description   

Given a function with one fixed argument and a vararg, it should be sufficient to force evaluation of 2 elements for apply to know which arity it should select, however it currently forces 3:

user=> (defn x ([a & b]))
#'user/x
user=> (apply x (map println (iterate inc 0)))
0
1
2
nil

This makes lazy functions that use apply (for example mapcat) less lazy than they could be.
The proposed patch makes RT.boundedLength short-circuit immediately after the seq count is greater than the max fixed arity:

user=> (defn x ([a & b]))
#'user/x
user=> (apply x (map println (iterate inc 0)))
0
1
nil


 Comments   
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 09/Nov/14 3:37 PM ]

The patch in this ticket slightly improves the issue reported at http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1218





[CLJ-1582] Overriding in-ns and ns is problematic Created: 07/Nov/14  Updated: 07/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-Allow-overriding-of-clojure.core-in-ns-and-clojure.c.patch    
Patch: Code

 Description   

Currently it is possible to override clojure.core/in-ns and clojure.core/ns, but it is not possible to refer to the namespace-specific vars without fully qualifying them:

user=> (ns foo (:refer-clojure :exclude [in-ns]))
nil
foo=> (def in-ns 1)
#'foo/in-ns
foo=> in-ns
#<clojure.lang.RT$1@76b5e4c5>

After this patch, overriding in-ns and ns works like for every other clojure.core var:

user=> (ns foo (:refer-clojure :exclude [in-ns]))
nil
foo=> (def in-ns 1)
#'foo/in-ns
foo=> in-ns
1


 Comments   
Comment by Reid McKenzie [ 07/Nov/14 11:46 AM ]

This is motivated by https://github.com/jonase/eastwood/issues/100





[CLJ-1553] Parallel transduce Created: 07/Oct/14  Updated: 12/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: transducers

Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Consider how to create a parallel path for transducers, similar to reducers fold.






[CLJ-1552] Consider kv support for transducers (similar to reducers fold) Created: 07/Oct/14  Updated: 12/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: transducers

Approval: Vetted

 Description   

In reducers, fold over a map has special support for kv. Consider whether/how to add this for transducers.



 Comments   
Comment by Marshall T. Vandegrift [ 16/Dec/14 11:13 AM ]

We don't have a JIRA "unvote" feature, but I'd like to register my vote against this proposed enhancement. As a heavy user of clojure.core.reducers, I consider the switch to k-v semantics when reducing a map to be a significant mis-feature. As only an initial transformation function applied directly to a map is able to receive the k-v semantics (a limitation I can’t see how would not carry over to transducers), this behavior crops up most frequently when re-ordering operations and discovering that an intermediate map has now caused an airity error somewhere in the middle of a chain of threaded transformations. I’ve never found cause to invoke it intentionally.





[CLJ-1551] Consider transducer support for primitives Created: 07/Oct/14  Updated: 12/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: transducers

Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Need to consider how we can support primitives for transducers. In particular it may be that IFn needs overloading for L/D in addition to O.






[CLJ-1545] Add unchecked-divide, unchecked-remainder Created: 02/Oct/14  Updated: 06/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Colin Taylor
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: math, newbie

Attachments: File CLJ-1545-2.diff     File CLJ-1545.diff    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

This appears like it might be an oversight that these are missing. There are unchecked-divide-int and unchecked-remainder-int functions, but not equivalents for longs, even though there are equivalents for longs for every other unchecked operation. The JVM has bytecodes for long division and remainder.

The Clojure documentation in the section "Support for Java Primitives" on page http://clojure.org/java_interop has links for unchecked-divide and unchecked-remainder, but since they don't exist in Clojure, the API link targets don't exist.

It seems like a good idea to either add these to Clojure, or remove them from the documentation.



 Comments   
Comment by Colin Taylor [ 03/Oct/14 6:17 PM ]

Having a go at this.

Comment by Colin Taylor [ 04/Oct/14 6:02 AM ]
  • Added tests for unchecked-divide-int and unchecked-remainder-int too.
  • Unchecked fns only support binary arity and will throw CompilerException(ArityException)s where checked will not.
  • Is there any value to (int,long) (long,int) overrides for java interop cases e.g. using java collections from Clojure in high perf code?
Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Oct/14 9:13 AM ]

Thanks for taking this on Colin!

1) When I apply the patch (git apply CLJ-1545.diff), I get a bunch of whitespace errors which will need to be cleaned up but also the patch seems to fail to apply at all on the changes in test/clojure/test_clojure/numbers.clj. It looks like perhaps the diff is just not the right diff format. You might want to check out the instructions at http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches about using git format-patch.

2) If you could put a more useful git commit message, that would be helpful. Something like "CLJ-1545 Adds missing unchecked-divide and unchecked-remainder for primitive longs."

Thanks!

Comment by Colin Taylor [ 04/Oct/14 4:47 PM ]

Uggh, sorry Alex.

New patch with better commit message.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Oct/14 7:24 PM ]

The patch format looks better. Pulling out farther to the ticket itself, afaict Clojure will already use the right byteocode for checked or unchecked so this may not even be needed?

If I compile (without the patch):

(defn foo-div ^long [^long a ^long b]
  (quot a b))

then the bytecode for that fn is:

public final long invokePrim(long, long);
    Code:
       0: lload_1
       1: lload_3
       2: ldiv
       3: lreturn

similarly, quot of two longs yields the same code but with lrem. I think patch has no net effect on the resulting bytecode?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 04/Oct/14 7:42 PM ]

Alex, did you do the testing in your previous comment with *unchecked-math* true or false? If false, then I would think that if CLJ-1254 is judged a bug, then the behavior you saw is a bug, too, that misses the same corner case.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Oct/14 10:19 PM ]

The current results are the same with either unchecked-math setting, but I see your point.

Refreshing my memory of the (/ Long/MIN_VALUE -1) case, I think you're right. The (new) unchecked-divide / remainder should do what the current (checked) forms do and the regular division and remainder cases should be making the overflow check. I think CLJ-1254 should cover the quot changes.

Comment by Colin Taylor [ 04/Oct/14 10:19 PM ]

user=> (dotimes [_ 6] (time (dotimes [_ 50000000] (unchecked-divide 4 (System/currentTimeMillis)))))
"Elapsed time: 1806.942 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 1808.747 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 1865.074 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 1802.777 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 1839.468 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 1830.61 msecs"
nil
user=> (dotimes [_ 6] (time (dotimes [_ 50000000] (/ 4 (System/currentTimeMillis)))))
"Elapsed time: 5003.598 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 4998.182 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 4941.237 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 5036.517 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 4965.867 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 4982.693 msecs"





[CLJ-1536] Remove usage of sun.misc.Signal (which may not be available in Java 9) Created: 26/Sep/14  Updated: 26/Sep/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

It looks like Java 9 will not continue to provide access to "internal" classes like sun.misc.Signal. Clojure currently uses this in the REPL to trap ctrl-c (SIGINT) and cancel current evaluation instead of process shutdown.

There is a page of alternatives here:
https://wiki.openjdk.java.net/display/JDK8/Java+Dependency+Analysis+Tool

But there is no suggested alternative for sun.misc.Signal and I'm not aware of a portable solution to it.






[CLJ-1534] Adding condp-> and condp->> macros to core library Created: 24/Sep/14  Updated: 28/Jan/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Kuldeep Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: enhancement, macro

Attachments: File clj_1534.diff     File condp-threading-macros-25sept2014.diff    
Patch: Code

 Description   

After introduction of cond-> and cond->> macros in 1.5. It makes sense to have condp-> and condp->> macros in the core library.

(condp-> {}
(complement :a) (assoc :a 1)
:a (assoc :b 2)) ;=> {:b 2, :a 1}

In the above example the result of each expr which was evaluated is being passed to the next predicate.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Oct/14 6:37 PM ]

Kuldeep, I cannot comment on whether this change is of interest to the Clojure developers, because I do not know.

I can say that the patch you have attached is not in the expected format. See the page below for instructions on creating a patch in the expected format:

http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Comment by Kuldeep [ 28/Jan/15 11:31 AM ]

Rebased against master and generated patch as described in wiki.





[CLJ-1530] Make foo/bar/baz unreadable Created: 22/Sep/14  Updated: 28/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-fix-LispReader-and-EdnReader-so-that-foo-bar-baz-is-.patch    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

Currently keywords and symbols containing more than one slash are disallowed by the spec, but allowed by the readers.
This trivial patch makes them unreadable by the readers too.

Pre:

user=> :foo/bar/baz
:foo/bar/baz

Post:

user=> :foo/bar/baz
RuntimeException Invalid token: :foo/bar/baz  clojure.lang.Util.runtimeException (Util.java:221)


 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 22/Sep/14 12:14 PM ]

Perhaps overlap with CLJ-1527 ?

Comment by Thomas Engelschmidt [ 28/Oct/14 4:36 AM ]

Please notice that keywords with more than one slash has a different hashcode across clojure version 1.5 and 1.6

This creates a problem when using a datomic version that works with clojure 1.5 under clojure 1.6 and the schema have one or more keys with more than one slash.





[CLJ-1527] Clarify and align valid symbol and keyword rules for Clojure (and edn) Created: 18/Sep/14  Updated: 15/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Herwig Hochleitner Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 11
Labels: reader

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Known areas of under-specificity (http://clojure.org/reader#The%20Reader--Reader%20forms):

  • symbols (and keywords) description do not mention constituent characters that are currently in use by Clojure functions such as <, >, =, $ (for Java inner classes), & (&form and &env in macros), % (stated to be valid in edn spec)
  • keywords currently accept leading numeric characters which is at odds with the spec - see CLJ-1286

References:



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 17/Oct/14 2:13 AM ]

The Clojure reader documentation also does not mention the following symbols as valid constituent characters. They are all mentioned as valid symbol constituent characters in the EDN readme here: https://github.com/edn-format/edn#symbols

dollar sign - used in Clojure/JVM to separate Java subclass names from class names, e.g. java.util.Map$Entry
percent sign - not sure why this is part of edn spec. In Clojure it seems only to be used inside #() for args like % %1 %&
ampersand - like in &form and &env in macro definitions
equals - clojure.core/= and many others
less-than - clojure.core/< clojure.core/<=
greater-than - clojure.core/> clojure.core/>=

I don't know whether Clojure and edn specs should be the same in this regard, but it seemed worth mentioning for this ticket.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Jun/15 12:22 AM ]

Alex, Rich made this comment on CLJ-17 in 2011: "Runtime validation off the table for perf reasons. cemerick's suggestion that arbitrary symbol support will render them valid is sound, but arbitrary symbol support is a different ticket/idea." I am not aware of any tickets that propose the enhancement of allowing arbitrary symbols to be supported by Clojure, e.g. via a syntax like

#|white space and arbitrary #$@)$~))@ chars here|

Do you think it is reasonable to create an enhancement ticket for supporting arbitrary characters in symbols and keywords?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 01/Jun/15 6:36 AM ]

Sure. I looked into this a bit as a digression off of feature expressions and #| has been reserved for this potential use. However, there are many tricky issues with it and I do not expect this to happen soon - more likely to be something we're pushed to do when necessary for some other reason.

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 01/Jun/15 8:46 AM ]

Wrong ticket, but to anybody thinking about #|arbitrary symbols (or strings)|, please do consider making the delimiters configurable, as in mime multipart.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Jun/15 8:54 AM ]

I've created a design page for now. I'm sure it does not list many of the tricky issues you have found. I'd be happy to take a shot at documenting them if you have any notes you are willing to share.

http://dev.clojure.org/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=11862058

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Jun/15 9:01 AM ]

Herwig, can you edit the design page linked in my previous comment, to add a reference or example to precisely how mime multipart allows delimiters to be configurable, and why you believe fixed delimeters would be a bad idea?

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 01/Jun/15 9:46 AM ]

I've commented on the design page.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Jul/15 12:44 PM ]

Removed a couple of issues that have been clarified on the reader page and are no longer issues.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 13/Jul/15 12:45 PM ]

Related to CLJ-1530

Comment by Adam Frey [ 15/Jul/15 11:55 AM ]

Related to this: The Clojure reader will not accept symbols and keywords that contain consecutive colons (See LispReader.java), although that is permitted by the current EDN spec. Here is a GitHub issue regarding consecutive colons. I would like to qualify why consecutive colons are disallowed, and sync up the Clojure Reader and the EDN spec on this.





[CLJ-1520] assoc-in with empty key path assoc-es to nil Created: 05/Sep/14  Updated: 05/Sep/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Francis Avila Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   
(assoc-in {} [] 1) ;=> {nil 1}

This should probably throw an exception.

CLJ-373 has a patch (CLJ-373-nested-ops.patch) which fixes this (by throwing an exception on empty key paths), the related broken behavior of update-in, and documents empty key path behavior in get-in et al. I can pull just the assoc-in stuff out of that into a separate patch, but I am really hoping that all the issues in the patch addresses are resolved at once, I.e.:

(get-in {} [] :notfound) ;=> {} ; ok
(get-in {nil 1} [] :notfound) ;=> {nil 1} ; ok
(assoc-in {} [] 1) ;=> {nil 1} ; wat?
(assoc-in {nil 0} [] 1) ;=> {nil 1} ; wat?
(update-in {} [] identity) ;=> {nil nil} ; wat?
(update-in {nil 0} [] inc) ;=> {nil 1} ; wat?





[CLJ-1519] Added extra arity to clojure.core/ns-* fns Created: 04/Sep/14  Updated: 10/Sep/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Baranosky Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: enhancement, patch

Attachments: Text File new-ns-arity.patch    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

Hello,

Adds another arity where the "ns" parameter is set to a default value of *ns* in these fns:

ns-unmap, ns-resolve, ns-name, ns-map, ns-publics, ns-imports, ns-interns, ns-refers, ns-aliases, ns-unalias

I find I very often use ns-unalias and ns-unmap from the repl, and passing the *ns* arg gets a little tedious.






[CLJ-1504] Add :inline to most core predicates Created: 15/Aug/14  Updated: 15/Aug/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-add-inline-to-some-core-predicates.patch    
Patch: Code

 Description   

This will allow instance? predicates calls to be emitted using the instanceof JVM bytecode and will also allow tools like core.typed or tools.analyzer.jvm to infer the type of a var/local on a per branch basis without having to special-case all the core predicates.



 Comments   
Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 15/Aug/14 1:32 PM ]

Related ticket CLJ-1227 and related quote from Alex:

definline is considered to be an experimental feature and Rich would like to discourage its use as the hope is to remove it in the future. The desired replacement is something like common lisp compiler macros that could allow the compiler to detect special situations and optimize the result but leave behind a function invocation for the case where no special behavior is available.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 15/Aug/14 1:42 PM ]

This patch uses "manual" :inline metadata on functions, it's used by many other core functions (like +,- et), not definline so Rich's comment doesn't apply.





[CLJ-1493] Fast keyword intern Created: 06/Aug/14  Updated: 11/Sep/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: dennis zhuang Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: keywords, performance
Environment:

Mac OS X 10.9.4 / 2.6 GHz Intel Core i5 / 8 GB 1600 MHz DDR3
java version "1.7.0_17"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.7.0_17-b02)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 23.7-b01, mixed mode)


Attachments: File fast_keyword_intern.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Keyword's intern(Symbol) method uses recursive invocation to get a valid keyword instance.I think it can be rewrite into a 'for loop'
to reduce method invocation cost.
So i developed this patch, and make some simple benchmark.Run the following command line three times after 'ant jar':

java -Xms64m -Xmx64m -cp test:clojure.jar clojure.main -e "(time (dotimes [n 10000000] (keyword (str n))))"

Before patched:

"Elapsed time: 27343.827 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 26172.653 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 25673.764 msecs"

After patched:

"Elapsed time: 24884.142 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 23933.423 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 25382.783 msecs"

It looks the patch make keyword's intern a little more fast.

The patch is attached and test.

Thanks.

P.S. I've signed the contributor agreement, and my email is killme2008@gmail.com .



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 07/Aug/14 9:01 AM ]

Looks intriguing (and would be a nice change imo). I ran this on a json parsing benchmark I used for the keyword changes and saw ~3% improvement.

Comment by dennis zhuang [ 07/Aug/14 9:54 PM ]

Updated the patch, remove the 'k == null' clause in for loop,it's not necessary.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 11/Aug/14 1:29 AM ]

Dennis, while JIRA can handle multiple patches with the same name, it can be confusing for people discussing the patches, and for some scripts I have to evaluate them. Please consider giving the patches different names (e.g. with version numbers in them), or removing older ones if they are obsolete.

Comment by dennis zhuang [ 11/Aug/14 9:19 AM ]

Hi,andy

Thank you for reminding me.I deleted the old patch.

Comment by dennis zhuang [ 11/Sep/14 10:34 AM ]

I am glad to see it is helpful.I benchmark the patch with current master branch,it's fine too.





[CLJ-1488] Implement Named over Vars Created: 01/Aug/14  Updated: 28/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Reid McKenzie Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-Implement-clojure.lang.Named-over-Vars.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Vars, while a general reference structure, are used to implement bindings and have special reader and printer notation reflecting this reality. Unlike Keywords and Symbols which share the "namespace/name" notation of Vars, Vars do not implement the clojure.lang.Named interface while they print as if they were Named.

The attached patch implements Named over Vars.

Example:

user=> (name :clojure.core/conj)
"conj"
user=> (namespace :clojure.core/conj)
"clojure.core"
user=> (name 'clojure.core/conj)
"conj"
user=> (namespace 'clojure.core/conj)
"clojure.core"
user=> (name #'clojure.core/conj)
"conj"
user=> (namespace #'clojure.core/conj)
"clojure.core"
user=> (with-local-vars [x 1] (name x))
"--unnamed--"
user=> (with-local-vars [x 1] (namespace x))
nil
user=> (with-local-vars [x 1] (println x))
#<Var: --unnamed-->

This is useful for applications such as the CinC project where Vars are often taken directly as values in which context they would ideally be interchangeable with the Symbols the bound values of which they represent.



 Comments   
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 02/Aug/14 11:42 AM ]

With this patch calling `name` on a unnamed Var will cause a NPE, I don't think this is desiderable.

Comment by Reid McKenzie [ 02/Aug/14 1:39 PM ]

I agree, however this behavior seems to be standard in Core.

Clojure 1.6.0
user=> (name nil)
NullPointerException clojure.core/name (core.clj:1518)
user=> (namespace nil)
NullPointerException clojure.core/namespace (core.clj:1526)

I'm also not convinced that the "name" or "namespace" of an unbound var is meaningful, in which case a NPE is probably acceptable.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 02/Aug/14 1:45 PM ]

I was not talking about unbound Vars, but about anonymous Vars, I'm assuming you miswrote.

I'd agree with you that throwing an exception could be a reasonable behaviour, except I can test for nil before calling name on it while there's no way to test whether a var is named or not, except trying to access directly the .name field which is excatly what this ticket is for.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 02/Aug/14 2:27 PM ]

Me and Reid have been talking about this issue over IRC, here's what's come up:

  • Vars can be either unnamed (as are Vars returned by with-local-vars) or contain both a namespace and a name part( that's the case for interned Vars)
  • there's currently no way to test for the "internedness" of a Var, so accessing either the .name or the .namespace field of the Var testing for nil is the only way to do it currently

given the above, the current patch seems unsatisfactory, here some proposed solutions:

  • make Var Named, make namespace return nil for an unnamed Var and name return "--unnamed--"
  • keep Var not implementing Named, add a "var-symbol" function returning either a namespaced symbol matching the ns+name of the Var or nil for an unnamed Var

Personally, I'd rather have the second solution implemented as I don't feel Var should be Named given that they can be unnamed and that strikes me as a contradicion

Comment by Reid McKenzie [ 02/Aug/14 3:16 PM ]

Added patches explicitly handling the unnamed var cases.

Comment by Reid McKenzie [ 02/Aug/14 3:33 PM ]

Squashed all patches into a single diff and updated attachments.





[CLJ-1473] Badly formed pre/post conditions silently passed Created: 24/Jul/14  Updated: 19/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Brandon Bloom Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: errormsgs, ft

Attachments: Text File 0001-Validate-that-pre-and-post-conditions-are-vectors.patch     Text File CLJ-1473_v02.patch     Text File CLJ-1473_v03.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Before:

user=> ((fn [x] {:pre (pos? x)} x) -5) ; ouch!
-5
user=> ((fn [x] {:pre [(pos? x)]} x) -5) ; meant this
AssertionError Assert failed: (pos? x)  user/eval4075/fn--4076 (form-init5464179453862723045.clj:1)

After:

user=> ((fn [x] {:pre (pos? x)} x) -5)
CompilerException java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Pre and post conditions should be vectors, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:1:2) 
user=> ((fn [x] {:pre [(pos? x)]} x) -5)                                  
AssertionError Assert failed: (pos? x)  user/eval2/fn--3 (NO_SOURCE_FILE:2)
user=> ((fn [x] {:post (pos? x)} x) -5)
CompilerException java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Pre and post conditions should be vectors, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:3:2) 
user=> ((fn [x] {:post [(pos? x)]} x) -5)              
AssertionError Assert failed: (pos? x)  user/eval7/fn--8 (NO_SOURCE_FILE:4)

Patch: CLJ-1473_v03.patch
Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Apr/15 1:54 PM ]

Would be nice to include the bad condition in the error (maybe via ex-info?) and also have tests.

Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 03/May/15 12:11 PM ]

New patch includes tests. Unfortunately, can't call ex-info directly due to bootstrapping concerns. Instead, just calls ExceptionInfo constructor directly.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/May/15 9:41 AM ]

Bug in the reporting: {:post pre} should be {:post post}.

Test should be improved as it could have caught that.

Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 04/May/15 7:25 PM ]

Good catch with the pre/post copy/paste screw up. Didn't enhance the test though, since that would involve creating an ex-info friendly variant of fails-with-cause





[CLJ-1472] The locking macro fails bytecode verification on ART runtime Created: 23/Jul/14  Updated: 11/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Adam Clements Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: None
Environment:

Android ART runtime


Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1472-Locking-macro-without-explicit-monitor-ente.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Android ART runs compile time verification on bytecode and was failing on any usage of the locking macro. Examination of the bytecode as compared to a java synchronized block shows up a number of differences:
https://gist.github.com/AdamClements/2ae6c4919964b71eb470

Having the monitor-enter inside the try block seems wrong to me, as surely if the lock fails to be acquired, it shouldn't be released with monitor-exit. Moving the monitor enter outside the try block seems to have resolved the issue and android no longer complains about usages of locking and all clojure tests still pass.

Java's generated code goes further and catches any exceptions generated by the monitor-exit itself and retries indefinitely (I believe the logic is that then at least your deadlock is in the right place, and not next time something else attempts to acquire a lock on the same object). I don't think that this can be replicated in clojure without getting down to the bytecode emitting level though and it doesn't seem to be an issue for the ART verifier.



 Comments   
Comment by Adam Clements [ 24/Jul/14 11:17 AM ]

After using this a little more, I've found that moving this outside the try block breaks nREPL.

Looking at the bytecode, the monitorenter for the locking in clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.session/session-out and in a few other places ends up in an entirely different method definition and we now get a JVM IllegalMonitorStateException as well as an ART verification error for this function.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Aug/14 9:08 PM ]

Adam, I cannot comment on whether your patch is of interest or not, but it is true that no patch will be committed to Clojure if the author has not signed a Contributor Agreement, which can now be done on-line at http://clojure.org/contributing

Comment by Adam Clements [ 04/Aug/14 4:24 PM ]

Uploaded a new patch (and signed the contributor agreement). This passes both the JVM and ART bytecode verification, The extra try/catch around the monitor exit is optional (verification passes with or without it) but where the java version retries monitor-exit indefinitely and shows the deadlock at the right time, without catching errors in the monitor-exit an undetermined monitor-enter in the future might fail, not showing up the actual bug.

It's not very pretty, but without finer grained control of the generated bytecode, this is the best I could do.

Comment by Adam Clements [ 25/Nov/14 8:31 AM ]

Have just tested with Lollipop, and this patch might no longer be sufficient.

Getting in touch with the ART guys to see if they can shed a little more light and verify whether it will work on the current master branch of AOSP

Comment by Adam Clements [ 25/Nov/14 9:49 AM ]

Bug filed with AOSP project, hopefully they can shed some light on whether it is our problem and if so how we can fix it.

https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=80823

Comment by Adam Clements [ 28/Nov/14 11:03 AM ]

I have uploaded an alternative implementation of the locking macro (0001-CLJ-1472-Locking-macro-without-explicit-monitor-ente.patch) which cheats a little - the synchronized block is actually implemented in Java and so guarantees compatibility. This is at the cost of a little extra indirection and the naming/location could probably be better.

But it does fix the bug and work on all versions of android, android + art and the jvm. Would this approach be acceptable?

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 08/Dec/14 1:12 PM ]

I have yet to see any evidence that the bytecode clojure is generating in some way violates the jvm spec, so I suspect the issue is clojure requires a jvm to run, and android doesn't provide a jvm, just something that looks like one if you don't tread outside the beaten path.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 08/Dec/14 1:27 PM ]

given the structured locking verbiage in https://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jvms/se7/html/jvms-2.html#jvms-2.11.10, `(locking nil)` may generate bytecode whose runtime behavior violates structured locking. the first patch on this issue can cause the compiler to emit monitorenter/exit instructions in different methods, which definitely violates structured locking

Comment by Adam Clements [ 09/Dec/14 10:45 AM ]

Yes, the first patch was definitely wrong, I left it for some context to the conversation, but it's probably best to just remove it for clarity.

For anyone following this conversation who doesn't want to decompile and observe the bytecode, here's a gist with the difference between a java synchronized block and clojure locking https://gist.github.com/AdamClements/2ae6c4919964b71eb470

I'm finding it hard to work out where the deviation from the spec occurs too, though I can see the difference with the Java version, if anything, the Clojure version looks closer to what's described in the spec than the Java one!

If someone with more knowledge than me on the subject could engage on the AOSP bug https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=80823 then perhaps we could settle this as an android bug which is too focussed on the java implementation rather than the JVM spec, or perhaps they'll find something that's wrong with the Clojure implementation. I have uploaded the original clojure behaviour and asked them for some more explanation on why it is failing.

Comment by Adam Clements [ 09/Dec/14 11:09 AM ]

The response from the ART guys about what they think we're violating is:

The section on "Structured locking" contains the following:

"[...] implementations [...] are permitted but not required to enforce
both of the following two rules guaranteeing structured locking. [...]"

ART currently enforces both rules at verification time, including

"At no point during a method invocation may the number of monitor exits
performed by T on M since the method invocation exceed the number of
monitor entries performed by T on M since the method invocation."

Comment by Adam Clements [ 09/Dec/14 11:32 AM ]

If for example instruction https://gist.github.com/AdamClements/2ae6c4919964b71eb470#file-test_locks-class-L24 or the monitor-enter itself on the next line were to fail, couldn't it could end up in the finally clause and attempt to release the lock even though it has never been captured?

I think this violates the structured locking rules in the jvm spec you linked to.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 09/Dec/14 1:15 PM ]

an interesting question about structured locking, is does the specification refer to the static bytecode or the runtime behavior of the bytecode. given the bytecode linked(https://gist.github.com/AdamClements/2ae6c4919964b71eb470#file-test_locks-class-L24), the static bytecode has the same number of entries and exits, but the dynamic behavior may be different. I wonder which one the art guys claim to be enforcing at verification time (it seems like it would have to be the static bytecode, not the dynamic properties, but then they shouldn't be failing to verify this). looking at the google code issue, the comment https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=80823#c6 was made by the same dev as https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=80823#c3, so I sort of suspect there is some miscommunication going on. It is not clear in what context the dev is replying in, since in the previous comment you mention splitting monitor-enter and exit across methods. I think things would be much clearer if all patches, specialized clojure android builds, etc, were gotten rid of, then with a vanilla clojure jar you get a javap dump of what fails to verify, then just take that over to the android issue tracker and ask "hey, this fails to verify, why?"

Comment by Adam Clements [ 11/Dec/14 9:15 AM ]

Yeah, I shouldn't have confused it with the patched versions. The gist and the currently uploaded version use the vanilla clojure version of the locking macro now though.

I think the issue comes from the exception table and the instructions that covers. If line 24 can throw for example, you would end up at runtime with a monitor-exit, having never encountered a monitor-enter.





[CLJ-1467] Implement Comparable in PersistentList Created: 17/Jul/14  Updated: 26/May/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Pascal Germroth Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: collections

Attachments: Text File 0001-first-try-for-adding-compare.patch    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

PersistentVector implements Comparable already.



 Comments   
Comment by Bart Kastermans [ 13/Nov/14 11:17 AM ]

Patch for this issue; done with Jeroen van Dijk and Razvan Petruescu at a clojure meetup. Any feedback welcome; the learning for me here is not the fix, but learning how to deal with ant and jira etc.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 13/Nov/14 12:31 PM ]

Looks like you have navigated the steps for creating a patch in the desired format, and attaching it to a JIRA ticket, just fine. I see your name on the list of contributors, which is a precondition before a patch can be committed to Clojure or a contrib library.

You've gotten past what are actually the easier parts. There is still the issue of whether this ticket is even considered by the Clojure core team to be an enhancement worth making a change to Clojure. Take a look at the JIRA workflow here if you haven't seen it already and are curious: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/JIRA+workflow

If you like Pascal think that this is a change you really want to see in Clojure, you may vote on this or any other JIRA ticket (except ones you create yourself – the creator is effectively the 0th voter for a ticket). Log in and click on the Vote link near the top right, and/or Watch to get email updates of changes.

Comment by Bart Kastermans [ 14/Nov/14 3:12 AM ]

Andy, thanks for the info. I was not aware of the JIRA workflow.





[CLJ-1460] Clojure transforms literals of custom IPersistentCollections not created via deftype/defrecord to their generic clojure counterpart Created: 06/Jul/14  Updated: 28/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Approval: Triaged

 Description   
user=> (class (eval (sorted-map 1 1)))
clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap ;; expected: clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap


 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 06/Jul/14 5:35 PM ]

Seems related to CLJ-1093.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Jul/14 5:51 PM ]

The symptoms are indeed similar but there are differences: CLJ-1093 affects all empty IPersistentCollections, this one affects all {ISeq,IPersistentList,IPersistentMap,IPersistentVector,IPersistentSet} collections that are not IRecord/IType.





[CLJ-1459] records should support transient Created: 05/Jul/14  Updated: 06/Jul/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Yongqian Li Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: defrecord


 Description   

user=> (defrecord R [a])
user.R
user=> (transient (->R nil))
ClassCastException user.R cannot be cast to clojure.lang.IEditableCollection clojure.core/transient (core.clj:3060)






[CLJ-1456] The compiler ignores too few or too many arguments to throw Created: 30/Jun/14  Updated: 04/May/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alf Kristian Støyle Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler, ft

Attachments: Text File clj-1456-4.patch     Text File v3_0001-CLJ-1456-counting-forms-to-catch-malformed-throw-for.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The compiler does not fail on "malformed" throw forms:

user=> (defn foo [] (throw))
#'user/foo

user=> (foo)
NullPointerException   user/foo (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)

user=> (defn bar [] (throw Exception baz))
#'user/bar

user=> (bar)
ClassCastException java.lang.Class cannot be cast to java.lang.Throwable  user/bar (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)

; This one works, but ignored-symbol, should probably not be ignored
user=> (defn quux [] (throw (Exception. "Works!") ignored-symbol))
#'user/quux

user=> (quux)
Exception Works!  user/quux (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)

The compiler can easily avoid these by counting forms.

Patch: clj-1456-4.patch

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Alf Kristian Støyle [ 30/Jun/14 11:56 AM ]

Not sure how to create a test for the attached patch. Will happily do so if anyone has a suggestion.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Jun/14 12:23 PM ]

Re testing, I think the examples you give are good - you should add tests to test/clojure/test_clojure/compilation.clj that eval the form and expect compilation errors. I'm sure you can find similar examples.

Comment by Alf Kristian Støyle [ 30/Jun/14 2:01 PM ]

Newest patch also contains a few tests.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 4:54 PM ]

All patches dated Jun 30 2014 and earlier no longer applied cleanly to latest master after some commits were made to Clojure on Aug 29, 2014. They did apply cleanly before that day.

I have not checked how easy or difficult it might be to update this patch. See section "Updating Stale Patches" on this wiki page for some tips on updating patches: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Alf, it can help avoid confusion if different patches have different file names. JIRA lets you create multiple attachments with the same name, but I wouldn't recommend it.

Comment by Alf Kristian Støyle [ 30/Aug/14 2:18 AM ]

It was easy to fix the patch. Uploaded the new patch v3_0001-CLJ-1456-counting-forms-to-catch-malformed-throw-for.patch, which applies cleanly to the current master.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Jan/15 6:07 PM ]

Alf, while JIRA can handle multiple attachments for the same ticket with the same name, it can get confusing for people trying to determine which one with the same name is meant. Could you remove or rename one of your identically-named attachments? Instructions for deleting patches are in the "Removing patches" section on this wiki page: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Comment by Alf Kristian Støyle [ 10/Jan/15 9:12 AM ]

Removed both obsolete attachments. So shouldn't be confusing any more

Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/May/15 9:31 AM ]

-4 patch is same, just refreshed to apply to master





[CLJ-1454] Add a swap! that returns old value Created: 28/Jun/14  Updated: 02/Mar/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Philip Potter Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 7
Labels: atom

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Sometimes, when mutating an atom, it's desirable to know what the value before the swap happened. The existing swap! function returns the new value, so is unsuitable for this use case. Currently, the only option is to roll your own using a loop and compare-and-set!

An example of this would be where the atom contains a PersistentQueue and you want to atomically remove the head of the queue and process it: if you run (swap! a pop), you have lost the reference to the old head of the list so you can't process it.

It would be good to have a new function swap-returning-old! which returned the old value instead of the new.



 Comments   
Comment by Philip Potter [ 28/Jun/14 4:00 PM ]

Overtone already defines functions like this in overtone.helpers.ref, which get used by overtone.libs.event. These return both the old and the new value, although in all existing use cases only the old value gets used.

flatland/useful defines a trade! fn which returns the old value, although the implementation is less clean than a compare-and-set! based solution would be.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 29/Jun/14 6:23 AM ]

Chris Ford suggested "swap-out!" as a name for this function. I definitely think "swap-returning-old!" isn't the ideal name.

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 30/Jun/14 1:33 AM ]

I propose a switch! name. The verb switch is defined as "substitute (two items) for each other; exchange.", and as you get the old value back, it evokes slightly the exchange of items.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 30/Jun/14 3:03 AM ]

Medley also has a deref-swap! which does the same thing.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Jun/14 8:20 AM ]

I think deref-swap! seems like a morally equivalent name to Java's AtomicReference.getAndSet() which is the same idea.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 30/Jun/14 1:19 PM ]

Funny you say that Alex, because prismatic/plumbing defines a get-and-set! (also defined by other projects), equivalent to deref-reset! in medley. Plumbing also defines swap-pair! which returns both old and new values, like the overtone fn, although once again the only usage I can find only uses the old value.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Jun/14 3:37 PM ]

I think it's important to retain the notion that you are not switching/exchanging values but applying the update model of applying a function to the old value to produce the new value. I don't even particularly like "swap!" as I think that aspect is lost in the name (alter and alter-var-root are better). I like that "deref-swap!" combines two words with existing connotations and orders them appropriately.

Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 30/Jun/14 3:43 PM ]

except that that naming doesn't fit well compared to functions like nfirst which are defined as (comp next first). This function is not (comp deref swap!).





[CLJ-1453] Most Iterator implementations do not correctly implement next failing to throw the required NoSuchElementException Created: 24/Jun/14  Updated: 18/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Meikel Brandmeyer Assignee: Andrew Rosa
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: interop

Attachments: Text File 0001-Fix-iterator-implementations-to-throw-NSEE-when-exha.patch     Text File 0001-Throw-NSEE-in-gvec-iterator.patch     Text File CLJ-1453.patch     Text File CLJ-1453-tests.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Iterators on Clojure's collections should follow the expected JDK behavior of throwing NoSuchElementException on next() when an iterator is exhausted. Current collections have a variety of other behaviors.

Issue encountered in real world code using http://pipes.tinkerpop.com.

To reproduce:

(-> [] .iterator .next)

This throws a NPE instead of NSEE.

(doto (.iterator [1 2]) .next .next .next)

This throws an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException instead of NSEE.

The attached patch fixes the methods by adding a check for hasNext before actually trying to provide the next element. If there is no next element the correct exception is thrown.

Patch: CLJ-1453.patch and tests: CLJ-1453-tests.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Tim McCormack [ 15/Jul/14 9:56 PM ]

To establish a baseline, this piece of code checks all the iterators I could find within Clojure 1.6.0 and makes sure they throw an appropriate exception:

iterator-checker.clj
(defn next-failure
  []
  (let [ok (atom [])]
    (doseq [[tp v]
            (sorted-map
             :vec-0 []
             :vec-n [1 2 3]
             :vec-start (subvec [1 2 3 4] 0 1)
             :vec-end (subvec [1 2 3 4] 3 4)
             :vec-ls-0 (.listIterator [])
             :vec-ls-n (.listIterator [1 2 3])
             :vec-start-ls (.listIterator (subvec [1 2 3 4] 0 1))
             :vec-end-ls (.listIterator (subvec [1 2 3 4] 3 4))
             :seq ()
             :list-n '(1 2 3)
             :set-hash-0 (hash-set)
             :set-hash-n (hash-set 1 2 3)
             :set-sor-0 (sorted-set)
             :set-sor-n (sorted-set 1 2 3)
             :map-arr-0 (array-map)
             :map-arr-n (array-map 1 2, 3 4)
             :map-hash-0 (hash-map)
             :map-hash-n (hash-map 1 2, 3 4)
             :map-sor-n (sorted-map)
             :map-sor-n (sorted-map 1 2, 3 4)
             :map-sor-ks-0 (.keys (sorted-map))
             :map-sor-ks-n (.keys (sorted-map 1 2, 3 4))
             :map-sor-vs-0 (.vals (sorted-map))
             :map-sor-vs-n (.vals (sorted-map 1 2, 3 4))
             :map-sor-rev-0 (.reverseIterator (sorted-map))
             :map-sor-rev-n (.reverseIterator (sorted-map 1 2, 3 4))
             :map-ks-0 (.keySet {})
             :map-ks-n (.keySet {1 2, 3 4})
             :map-vs-0 (.values {})
             :map-vs-n (.values {1 2, 3 4})
             :gvec-int-0 (vector-of :long)
             :gvec-int-n (vector-of :long 1 2 3))]
      (let [it (if (instance? java.util.Iterator v)
                 v
                 (.iterator v))]
        (when-not it
          (println "Null iterator:" tp))
        (try (dotimes [_ 50]
               (.next it))
             (catch java.util.NoSuchElementException nsee
               (swap! ok conj tp))
             (catch Throwable t
               (println tp "threw" (class t))))))
    (println "OK:" @ok)))

The output as of current Clojure master (201a0dd970) is:

:gvec-int-0 threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:gvec-int-n threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-arr-0 threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-arr-n threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-hash-0 threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-ks-0 threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-ks-n threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-sor-ks-0 threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-ks-n threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-n threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-rev-0 threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-rev-n threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-vs-0 threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-vs-n threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-vs-0 threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-vs-n threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-0 threw java.lang.NullPointerException
:vec-end threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-end-ls threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-ls-0 threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-ls-n threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-n threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-start threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-start-ls threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
OK: [:list-n :map-hash-n :seq :set-hash-0 :set-hash-n :set-sor-0 :set-sor-n]
Comment by Tim McCormack [ 15/Jul/14 9:57 PM ]

0001-Fix-iterator-implementations-to-throw-NSEE-when-exha.patch missed one thing: clojure.gvec. With the patch in place, my checker outputs the following:

:gvec-int-0 threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:gvec-int-n threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
OK: [:list-n :map-arr-0 :map-arr-n :map-hash-0 :map-hash-n :map-ks-0 :map-ks-n :map-sor-ks-0 :map-sor-ks-n :map-sor-n :map-sor-rev-0 :map-sor-rev-n :map-sor-vs-0 :map-sor-vs-n :map-vs-0 :map-vs-n :seq :set-hash-0 :set-hash-n :set-sor-0 :set-sor-n :vec-0 :vec-end :vec-end-ls :vec-ls-0 :vec-ls-n :vec-n :vec-start :vec-start-ls]

That should be a quick fix.

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 15/Jul/14 10:01 PM ]

CLJ-1416 includes a fix for gvec's iterator impls (and some other improvements to interop).

Comment by Tim McCormack [ 15/Jul/14 10:17 PM ]

Attaching a fix for the gvec iterator. Combined with the existing patch, this fixes all broken iterators that I could find.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 07/Aug/14 10:25 AM ]

I believe this Clojure commit: https://github.com/clojure/clojure/commit/e7215ce82215bda33f4f0887cb88570776d558a0

introduces more implementations of the java.util.Iterator interface where next() returns null instead of throwing a NoSuchElementException

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Apr/15 11:34 AM ]

Would love to have a patch that:
1) combined patches to date
2) updated to master
3) reviewed for new iterators since this ticket was written
4) added the tests in the comments

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jun/15 3:30 PM ]

Bump - would be happy to screen this for 1.8 if my last comments were addressed.

Comment by Andrew Rosa [ 18/Jul/15 4:38 PM ]

Alex Miller Addressed you comments on the first patch. On the process of applying them to master, I've changed the code to follow a single "format" of bound checking and throw, so everything will be more consistent with the code style of Clojure codebase. The commit themselves still maintain the original authors, to give correct credit.

The second patch includes only the tests for these features, which I used test.check to do them, as I talked to you on clojure-dev channel. If you think they are too much complex or prefer a different style of testing, please let me know - that's why I made a separate patch only for the tests.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jul/15 5:04 PM ]

Thanks Andrew. It will likely be a couple weeks before I have time to look at this.





[CLJ-1452] clojure.core/*rand* for seedable randomness Created: 20/Jun/14  Updated: 19/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Gary Fredericks Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 6
Labels: math

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1452.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Clojure's random functions currently use Math.random and related features, which makes them impossible to seed. This seems like an appropriate use of a dynamic var (compared to extra arguments), since library code that wants to behave randomly could transparently support seeding without any extra effort.

I propose (def ^:dynamic *rand* (java.util.Random.)) in clojure.core, and that rand, rand-int, rand-nth, and shuffle be updated to use *rand*.

I think semantically this will not be a breaking change.

Criterium Benchmarks

I did some benchmarking to try to get an idea of the performance implications of using a dynamic var, as well as to measure the changes to concurrent access.

The code used is at https://github.com/gfredericks/clj-1452-tests; the raw output is in a comment.

rand is slightly slower, while shuffle is insignificantly faster. Using shuffle from 8 threads is insignificantly slower, but switching to a ThreadLocalRandom manually in the patched version results in a 2.5x speedup.

Running on my 8 core Linode VM:

Benchmark Clojure Runtime mean Runtime std dev
rand 1.6.0 61.3ns 7.06ns
rand 1.6.0 + *rand* 63.7ns 1.80ns
shuffle 1.6.0 12.9µs 251ns
shuffle 1.6.0 + *rand* 12.8µs 241ns
threaded-shuffling 1.6.0 151ms 2.31ms
threaded-shuffling 1.6.0 + *rand* 152ms 8.77ms
threaded-local-shuffling 1.6.0 N/A N/A
threaded-local-shuffling 1.6.0 + *rand* 64.5ms 1.41ms

Approach: create a dynamic var *rand* and update rand, rand-int, rand-nth, and shuffle to use *rand*

Patch: CLJ-1452.patch

Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 21/Jun/14 7:50 PM ]

Attached CLJ-1452.patch, with the same code used in the benchmarks.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 23/Jun/14 8:34 AM ]

Should we be trying to make Clojure's random functions thread-local by default while we're mucking with this stuff? We could have a custom subclass of Random that has ThreadLocal logic in it (avoiding ThreadLocalRandom because Java 6), and make that the default value of *rand*.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 28/Dec/14 11:04 AM ]

I think the ThreadLocal question is interesting, not sure re answer.

It would be nice if the description summarized the results of the tests in a table and the criterium output was in the comments instead.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 30/Dec/14 1:26 PM ]

Full output from the test repo (which is summarized in the table in the description):

$ echo "Clojure 1.6.0"; lein with-profile +clj-1.6 run; echo "Clojure 1.6.0 with *rand*"; lein with-profile +clj-1452 run
Clojure 1.6.0

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
;; Testing rand ;;
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
WARNING: Final GC required 1.261632096547911 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 644646900 in 60 samples of 10744115 calls.
             Execution time mean : 61.297605 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 7.057249 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 56.872437 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 84.483045 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 16.319772 ns

Found 6 outliers in 60 samples (10.0000 %)
    low-severe   1 (1.6667 %)
    low-mild     5 (8.3333 %)
 Variance from outliers : 75.5119 % Variance is severely inflated by outliers

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
;; Testing shuffle ;;
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
Evaluation count : 4780800 in 60 samples of 79680 calls.
             Execution time mean : 12.873832 µs
    Execution time std-deviation : 251.388257 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 12.526871 µs ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 13.417559 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 16.319772 ns

Found 3 outliers in 60 samples (5.0000 %)
    low-severe   3 (5.0000 %)
 Variance from outliers : 7.8591 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
;; Testing threaded-shuffling ;;
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
Evaluation count : 420 in 60 samples of 7 calls.
             Execution time mean : 150.863290 ms
    Execution time std-deviation : 2.313755 ms
   Execution time lower quantile : 146.621548 ms ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 155.218897 ms (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 16.319772 ns
Clojure 1.6.0 with *rand*

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
;; Testing rand ;;
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
Evaluation count : 781707720 in 60 samples of 13028462 calls.
             Execution time mean : 63.679152 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 1.798245 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 61.414851 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 67.412204 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 13.008428 ns

Found 3 outliers in 60 samples (5.0000 %)
    low-severe   3 (5.0000 %)
 Variance from outliers : 15.7596 % Variance is moderately inflated by outliers

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
;; Testing shuffle ;;
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
Evaluation count : 4757940 in 60 samples of 79299 calls.
             Execution time mean : 12.780391 µs
    Execution time std-deviation : 240.542151 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 12.450218 µs ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 13.286910 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 13.008428 ns

Found 1 outliers in 60 samples (1.6667 %)
    low-severe   1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 7.8228 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
;; Testing threaded-shuffling ;;
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
Evaluation count : 420 in 60 samples of 7 calls.
             Execution time mean : 152.471310 ms
    Execution time std-deviation : 8.769236 ms
   Execution time lower quantile : 147.954789 ms ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 161.277200 ms (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 13.008428 ns

Found 3 outliers in 60 samples (5.0000 %)
    low-severe   3 (5.0000 %)
 Variance from outliers : 43.4058 % Variance is moderately inflated by outliers

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
;; Testing threaded-local-shuffling ;;
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
Evaluation count : 960 in 60 samples of 16 calls.
             Execution time mean : 64.462853 ms
    Execution time std-deviation : 1.407808 ms
   Execution time lower quantile : 62.353265 ms ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 67.197368 ms (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 13.008428 ns

Found 1 outliers in 60 samples (1.6667 %)
    low-severe   1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 9.4540 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 30/Dec/14 1:28 PM ]

I think using a ThreadLocal is logically independent from adding *rand*, so it could be a separate ticket. I just suggested it here since it would for some uses mitigate any slowdown from *rand* but now that I'm looking at the benchmark results again the slowdown might be insignificant.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 30/Dec/14 5:44 PM ]

Also worth noting that (as I did in the benchmark code) with just the patch's changes (i.e., no ThreadLocal involved) users still gain the ability to do ThreadLocal manually, which is not currently possible.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 19/Jul/15 7:42 AM ]

workaround: data.generators provides seedable random





[CLJ-1451] Add take-until Created: 20/Jun/14  Updated: 09/Jan/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alexander Taggart Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1451-add-take-until.patch     Text File 0002-CLJ-1451-add-drop-until.patch     Text File 0003-let-take-until-and-drop-until-return-transducers.patch     Text File CLJ-1451-drop-until.patch     Text File CLJ-1451-take-until.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Discussion: https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure-dev/NaAuBz6SpkY/discussion

It comes up when I would otherwise use (take-while pred coll), but I need to include the first item for which (pred item) is false.

(take-while pos? [1 2 0 3]) => (1 2)
(take-until zero? [1 2 0 3]) => (1 2 0)

Impl:

(defn take-until
  "Returns a lazy sequence of successive items from coll until
  (pred item) returns true, including that item. pred must be
  free of side-effects."
  [pred coll]
  (lazy-seq
    (when-let [s (seq coll)]
      (if (pred (first s))
        (cons (first s) nil)
        (cons (first s) (take-until pred (rest s)))))))

List of other suggested names: take-upto, take-to, take-through. It is not easy to find something in English that is short and unambiguously means "up to and including". That is one of the dictionary definitions for "through".



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Jun/14 10:21 AM ]

Patch welcome (w/tests).

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 20/Jun/14 2:00 PM ]

Impl and tests for take-until and drop-until, one patch for each.

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 20/Jun/14 3:01 PM ]

Please change :added metadata to "1.7".

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 20/Jun/14 3:12 PM ]

Updated to :added "1.7"

Comment by John Mastro [ 21/Jun/14 6:26 PM ]

I'd like to propose take-through and drop-through as alternative names. I think "through" communicates more clearly how these differ from take-while and drop-while.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Aug/14 2:27 PM ]

Both patches CLJ-1451-drop-until.patch and CLJ-1451-take-until.patch dated Jun 20 2014 no longer apply cleanly to latest Clojure master due to some changes committed earlier today. I haven't checked whether they are straightforward to update, but would guess that they merely require updating a few lines of diff context.

See the section "Updating stale patches" at http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches for suggestions on how to update patches.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 13/Nov/14 11:19 PM ]

Would be nice to cover the transducer case too.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 13/Nov/14 11:54 PM ]

rerolled patches

Comment by Michael Blume [ 14/Nov/14 12:11 AM ]

Covered transducer case =)

Comment by Michael Blume [ 14/Nov/14 12:12 AM ]

Actually I like take/drop-through as well

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 16/Nov/14 12:41 PM ]

Michael, no volatile/state is necessary in the transducer, like take-while. Just wrap in 'reduced to terminate

Comment by Michael Blume [ 17/Dec/14 6:47 PM ]

a) you're clearly right about take-until

b) seriously I don't know what I was thinking with my take-until implementation, I'm going to claim lack of sleep.

c) I'm confused about how to make drop-until work without a volatile

Comment by Michael Blume [ 18/Dec/14 1:52 AM ]

Ghadi and I discussed this and couldn't think of a use case for drop-until. Are there any?

Here's a new take-until patch, generative tests included.

Open questions:

Is take-until a good name? My biggest concern is that take-until makes it sound like a slight modification of take, but this function reverses the sense of the predicate relative to take.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Jan/15 6:06 PM ]

Michael, while JIRA can handle multiple attachments for the same ticket with the same name, it can get confusing for people trying to determine which one with the same name is meant. Could you remove or rename one of your identically-named attachments? Instructions for deleting patches are in the "Removing patches" section on this wiki page: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches





[CLJ-1449] Add clojure.string functions for portability to ClojureScript Created: 19/Jun/14  Updated: 27/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Bozhidar Batsov Assignee: Nola Stowe
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 29
Labels: ft, string

Attachments: Text File add_functions_to_strings-2.patch     Text File add_functions_to_strings-3.patch     Text File add_functions_to_strings-4.patch     Text File add_functions_to_strings-5.patch     Text File add_functions_to_strings-6.patch     Text File add_functions_to_strings.patch     Text File clj-1449-more-v1.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

It would be useful if a few common functions from Java's String were available as Clojure functions for the purposes of increasing portability to other Clojure platforms like ClojureScript.

The functions below also cover the vast majority of cases where Clojure users currently drop into Java interop for String calls - this tends to be an issue for discoverability and learning. While the goal of this ticket is increased portability, improving that is a nice secondary benefit.

Proposed clojure.string fn java.lang.String method
index-of indexOf
last-index-of lastIndexOf
starts-with? startsWith
ends-with? endsWith
includes? contains

Patch:

  • add_functions_to_strings-4.patch - uses -1 to indicate not-found in index-of
  • add_functions_to_strings-6.patch - uses nil to indicate not-found in index-of

Performance: Tested the following with criterium for execution mean time (all times in ns).

Java Clojure Java Clojure (-4 patch) Clojure (-6 patch)
(.indexOf "banana" "n") (clojure.string/index-of "banana" "n") 8.70 9.03 9.27
(.indexOf "banana" "n" 1) (clojure.string/index-of "banana" "n" 1) 7.29 7.61 7.66
(.indexOf "banana" (int \n)) (clojure.string/index-of "banana" \n) 5.34 6.20 6.20
(.indexOf "banana" (int \n) 1) (clojure.string/index-of "banana" \n 1) 5.38 6.19 6.24
(.startsWith "apple" "a") (clojure.string/starts-with? "apple" "a") 4.84 5.71 5.65
(.endsWith "apple" "e") (clojure.string/ends-with? "apple" "e") 4.82 5.68 5.70
(.contains "baked apple pie" "apple") (clojure.string/includes? "baked apple pie" "apple") 10.78 11.99 12.17

Screened by:

Note: In both Java and JavaScript, indexOf will return -1 to indicate not-found, so this is (at least in these two cases) the status quo. The benefit of nil return in Clojure is that it can be used as a found/not-found condition. The benefit of a -1 return is that it matches Java/JavaScript and that the return type can be hinted as a primitive long, allowing you to feed it into some other arithmetic or string operation without boxing.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jun/14 12:53 PM ]

Re substring, there is a clojure.core/subs for this (predates the string ns I believe).

clojure.core/subs
([s start] [s start end])
Returns the substring of s beginning at start inclusive, and ending
at end (defaults to length of string), exclusive.

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 20/Jun/14 3:21 AM ]

As strings are collection of characters, you can use Clojure's sequence facilities to achieve such functionality:

user=> (= (first "asdf") \a)
true
user=> (= (last "asdf") \a)
false
Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Jun/14 8:33 AM ]

Jozef, String.startsWith() checks for a prefix string, not just a prefix char.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 20/Jun/14 9:42 AM ]

Re substring, I know about subs, but it seems very odd that it's not in the string ns. After all most people will likely look for string-related functionality in clojure.string. I think it'd be best if `subs` was added to clojure.string and clojure.core/subs was deprecated.

Comment by Pierre Masci [ 01/Aug/14 5:27 AM ]

Hi, I was thinking the same about starts-with and .ends-with, as well as (.indexOf s "c") and (.lastIndexOf "c").

I read the whole Java String API recently, and these 4 functions seem to be the only ones that don't have an equivalent in Clojure.
It would be nice to have them.

Andy Fingerhut who maintains the Clojure Cheatsheet told me: "I maintain the cheatsheet, and I put .indexOf and .lastIndexOf on there since they are probably the most common thing I saw asked about that is in the Java API but not the Clojure API, for strings."
Which shows that there is a demand.

Because Clojure is being hosted on several platforms, and might be hosted on more in the future, I think these functions should be part of the de-facto ecosystem.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Aug/14 3:39 PM ]

Updating summary line and description to add contains? as well. I can back this off if it changes your mind about triaging it, Alex.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Aug/14 3:40 PM ]

Patch clj-1449-basic-v1.patch dated Aug 30 2014 adds starts-with? ends-with? contains? functions to clojure.string.

Patch clj-1449-more-v1.patch is the same, except it also replaces several Java method calls with calls to these Clojure functions.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 05/Sep/14 1:02 PM ]

Patch clj-1449-basic-v1.patch dated Sep 5 2014 is identical to the patch I added recently called clj-1149-basic-v1.patch. It is simply renamed without the typo'd ticket number in the file name.

Comment by Yehonathan Sharvit [ 02/Dec/14 3:09 PM ]

What about an implementation that works also in cljs?

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 02/Dec/14 3:11 PM ]

Once this is added to Clojure it will be implemented in ClojureScript as well.

Comment by Yehonathan Sharvit [ 02/Dec/14 3:22 PM ]

Great! Any idea when it will be added to Clojure?
Also, will it be automatically added to Clojurescript or someone will have to write a particular code for it.
The suggested patch relies on Java so I am curious to understand who is going to port the patch to cljs.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 02/Dec/14 3:27 PM ]

No idea when/if this will get merged. Upvote the ticket to improve the odds of this happening sooner.
Someone on the ClojureScript team will have to implement this in terms of JavaScript.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Dec/14 4:01 PM ]

Some things that would be helpful:

1) It would be better to combine the two patches into a single patch - I think changing current uses into new users is a good thing to include. Also, please keep track of the "current" patch in the description.
2) Patch needs tests.
3) Per the instructions at the top of the clojure.string ns (and the rest of the functions), the majority of these functions are implemented to take the broader CharSequence interface. Similar to those implementations, you will need to provide a CharSequence implementation while also calling into the String functions when you actually have a String.
4) Consider return type hints - I'm not sure they're necessary here, but I would examine bytecode for typical calling situations to see if it would be helpful.
5) Check performance implications of the new versions vs the old with a good tool (like criterium). You've put an additional var invocation and (soon) type check in the calling path for these functions. I think providing a portable target is worth a small cost, but it would be good to know what the cost actually is.

I don't expect we will look at this until after 1.7 is released.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 02/Dec/14 8:05 PM ]

Alex, all your comments make sense.

If you think a ready-and-waiting patch that does those things would improve the odds of the ticket being vetted by Rich, please let us know.

My guess is that his decision will be based upon the description, not any proposed patches. If that is your belief also, I'll wait until he makes that decision before working on a patch. Of course, any other contributor is welcome to work on one if they like.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Dec/14 8:40 PM ]

Well nothing is certain of course, but I keep a special report of things I've "screened" prior to vetting that makes possible moving something straight from Triaged all the way through into Screened/Ok when Rich is able to look at them. This is a good candidate if things were in pristine condition.

That said, I don't know whether Rich will approve it or not, so it's up to you. I think the argument for portability is a strong one and complements the feature expression.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/May/15 8:55 AM ]

I'd love to have a really high-quality patch on this ticket to consider for 1.8 that took into account my comments above.

Also, it occurred to me that I don't think this should be called "contains?", overlapping the core function with a different meaning (contains value vs contains key). Maybe "includes?"?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 14/May/15 9:14 AM ]

clojure.string already has 2 name conflicts with clojure.core, for which most people probably do something like (require '[clojure.string :as str]) to avoid that:

user=> (use 'clojure.string)
WARNING: reverse already refers to: #'clojure.core/reverse in namespace: user, being replaced by: #'clojure.string/reverse
WARNING: replace already refers to: #'clojure.core/replace in namespace: user, being replaced by: #'clojure.string/replace
nil
Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/May/15 10:05 AM ]

I'm not concerned about overlapping the name. I'm concerned about overlapping it and meaning something different, particularly vs one of the most confusing functions in core already. clojure.core/contains? is better than linear time key search. clojure.string/whatever will be a linear time subsequence match.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/May/15 10:18 AM ]

Ruby uses "include?" for this.

Comment by Devin Walters [ 19/May/15 4:56 PM ]

I agree with Alex's comment about the overlap. Personally, I prefer the way "includes?" reads over "include?", but IMO either one is better than adding to the "contains?" confusion.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 20/May/15 12:10 AM ]

I'm fine with `includes?`. Ruby is famous for the bad English used in its core library.

Comment by Andrew Rosa [ 17/Jun/15 12:29 PM ]

Andy Fingerhut, since you are the author of the original patch do you desire to continue the work on it? If you prefer (or even need) to focus on different stuff, I would like to tackle this issue.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 17/Jun/15 1:08 PM ]

Andrew Rosa, I am perfectly happy if someone else wants to work on a revised patch for this. If you are interested, go for it! And from Alex's comments, I believe my initial patch covers such a small fraction of what he wants, do not worry about keeping my name associated with any patch you submit – if yours is accepted, my patch will not have helped you in getting there.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 03/Jul/15 9:01 AM ]

Andrew Rosa, I am interested on working on this. Are you currently working it?

Comment by Andrew Rosa [ 03/Jul/15 12:08 PM ]

Thanks Andy Fingerhut, didn't saw the answer here. I'm happy that Nola Stowe could take this one.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 08/Jul/15 12:46 PM ]

Updated patch to rename methods as specified and add tests.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 08/Jul/15 3:26 PM ]

A few remarks:

1. added should say 1.8, not 1.9.
2. The docstrings could be improved a bit - normally they should end with a . and refer to all the params of the function in question.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 08/Jul/15 3:29 PM ]

Thanks Bozhidar Batsov .. I will, and I also got feedback from the slack clojure-dev group (Alex, Ghadi, AndrewHr) so I will be submitting an improved patch soon

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 09/Jul/15 11:57 AM ]

Also, I am not sure, but Alex Miller made this comment earlier: "Per the instructions at the top of the clojure.string ns, functions should take the broader CharSequence interface instead of String. Similar to existing clojure.string functions, you will need to provide a CharSequence implementation while also calling into the String functions when you actually have a String."

Looking at the Java classes and interfaces, one of the classes that implements CharSequence is CharBuffer, and it has no indexOf or lastIndexOf methods. If one were to call the proposed index-of or last-index-of with a CharBuffer, I believe you would get an exception for an unknown method.

I don't know if Alex's sentence is essential to any patch to be considered, but wanted to point out that it seems like it effectively means writing your own implementation of each of these methods for some of the classes implementing the CharSequence interface.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 09/Jul/15 4:15 PM ]

Andy, yes you are right. Alex helped me with my current changes (not posted yet) and where needed I cast the value to a string so that it would have the indexOf methods.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 10/Jul/15 7:43 AM ]

Added type hints, using StringBuffer instead of string in tests.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 10/Jul/15 11:53 PM ]

Use critium and did some bench marking, I am not familiar enough to say "hey its good or no, too slow". I tried an optimization but it didn't make much difference.

notes here:

https://www.evernote.com/l/ABLYZbDr8ElIs6fkODAd3poBfIm_Bfr5kLo

Appreciate any feedback

Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Jul/15 10:37 AM ]

Nola, some comments:

1) In index-of and last-index-of, I think we should use (instance? Character value) instead of char? - this will avoid a function invocation.

2) In index-of and last-index-of, in the branches where you know you have a Character, we should just invoke the proper function on the character instance directly rather than calling int. In this case that is (.charValue ^Character value). However, this function returns char so you still want the ^int hint.

3) In index-of and last-index-of, we should do a couple of things to maximally utilize primitive support for from-index. We should type-hint the incoming value as a ^long (only long and double are specialized cases in Clojure, not int). We should then use the function unchecked-int to optimally convert the long primitive to an int primitive.

4) We should type-hint the return value to a primitive long to avoid boxing the return.

Putting 1+2+3+4 together:

(defn index-of
  "Return index of value (string or char) in s, optionally searching forward from from-index."
  {:added "1.8"}
  (^long [^CharSequence s value]
   (if (instance? Character value)
     (.indexOf (.toString s) ^int (.charValue ^Character value))
     (.indexOf (.toString s) ^String value)))
  (^long [^CharSequence s value ^long from-index]
  (if (instance? Character value)
    (.indexOf (.toString s) ^int (.charValue ^Character value) (unchecked-int from-index))
    (.indexOf (.toString s) ^String value (unchecked-int from-index)))))

Similar changes in last-index-of.

5) In starts-with? and ends-with?, I would move the type hint for substr to the parameter declaration. This is more of a style preference on my part, no functional difference I believe.

6) On includes? I would do the same as #5, except .contains actually takes a CharSequence for the substr, so I would change the type hint from ^String to the broader ^CharSequence.

7) Can you edit the description and add a table with the "execution time mean" number for direct Java vs new Clojure fn for the patch after these changes? Please add tests for the from-index variants of index-of and last-index-of as well.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 14/Jul/15 5:46 PM ]

optimizations as suggested by Alex Miller

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 14/Jul/15 5:50 PM ]

Nola, not a big deal, but Rich has requested that patch file names end with ".patch" or ".diff", I think because whatever he uses to view them recognizes that suffix and puts it in a different viewing/editing mode.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 14/Jul/15 6:03 PM ]

Andy, so no need to keep around patches when used in comparisons?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 14/Jul/15 8:31 PM ]

It is ok to have multiple versions of patches attached, but names like add_functions_to_strings-2.patch etc. would be preferred over names like add_functions_to_strings.patch-2, so the suffix is ".patch".

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 14/Jul/15 8:55 PM ]

original patch submitted by Nola

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 14/Jul/15 8:56 PM ]

Optimizations suggested by Alex

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Jul/15 9:44 PM ]

Nola, I re-did the timings on my machine - these were done with Java 1.8 and no Leiningen involved.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Jul/15 9:57 PM ]

-4 patch is identical to -3 but removes one errant ^long type hint

Otherwise, looks good to me!

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Jul/15 10:24 PM ]

Rich, since you didn't put any comments on here, I'm not sure if there's anything else you wanted, so marking screened.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 19/Jul/15 7:36 AM ]

I dislike the approach here for several reasons:

  • floats Java-isms (-1 for missing instead of nil?) up into the Clojure API
  • makes narrow string fns out of things that could/should be seq fns

Stepping back, this is all library work. Why should it be in core? If this started in a contrib, it could evolve much more freely.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jul/15 8:49 AM ]

re Java-isms: totally fair comment worth changing

re narrow string fns: if these were seq fns, they would presumably take seqables of chars and return seqables of chars. When I have strings, I want to work with strings (as with clojure.string/join and clojure.string/reverse vs their seq equivalents).

re library: these particular functions are the most commonly used string functions where current users drop to Java interop. Note that all 5 of these functions have over time been added to the cheatsheet (http://clojure.org/cheatsheet) because they are commonly used. I believe there is significant value in including them in core and standardizing their name and behavior across to CLJS.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 19/Jul/15 10:29 AM ]

I'm obviously biased, but I totally agree with everything Alex said. Having one core string library and a separate contrib string library is just impractical. With clojure.string already part of the language it's much more sensible to extend it where/when needed instead of encouraging the proliferation of tons of alternative libraries (there are already a couple of those out there, mostly because essential functions are missing). Initial designs are rarely perfect, there's nothing wrong in revisiting and improving them.

I believe this is one of the top voted tickets, which clearly indicates that the Clojure community is quite supportive of this additions.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 19/Jul/15 12:26 PM ]

None of these functions return Strings so they could very easily be seq functions which use the String methods as a fast path when called with Strings, the trouble is then they wouldn't necessarily belong in clojure.string.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 19/Jul/15 1:49 PM ]

Such an argument can be made for existing functions like clojure.core/subs and clojure.string/reverse - we could have just went with generic functions that operate on seqs and converted the results to strings, but we didn't. It might be just me, but I'm really thinking this is being overanalysed. Sometimes it's really preferable to deal with some things as strings (not to mention more efficient).

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 20/Jul/15 9:39 AM ]

I completely agree with Alex and Bozhidar re: strings vs seqs. Other langs that have only lists and use them for strings are really bad at strings. So - string-specific fns are ok. What about the Java-isms?

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 20/Jul/15 10:08 AM ]

We should address them for sure. Let's wait for a couple of days for Nola to update the patch. If she's too busy I'll do the update myself.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 20/Jul/15 10:50 AM ]

I will be happy to work on it Saturday. Is nil an acceptable response when index-of "apple" "p" is not found? The other functions return booleans and I think those are ok.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 20/Jul/15 10:55 AM ]

Yep, we should go with nil.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 25/Jul/15 4:33 PM ]

Changed index-of and last-index-of to return nil instead of -1 (java-ism), thus had to remove the type hint for the return value.

Seems to have slowed down the function compared to having the function return -1. My benchmarks: https://www.evernote.com/l/ABL2wead73BJZYAkpH5yxsfX9JM8cpUiNhw

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 25/Jul/15 9:05 PM ]

Updated patch to include return value in doc string for index-of last-index-of, otherwise same as last update.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Jul/15 8:40 AM ]

Removing the hint causes the return type to be Object, which forces boxing in the "found" cases.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 26/Jul/15 8:56 AM ]

Is it worth it to remove the java-ism of returning -1 when not found? Personally, I don't really like a function returning one of two things... found index or nil ... I prefer it being an int at all times.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Jul/15 9:00 AM ]

There is one whitespace issue in the -5 patch:

[~/code/clojure (master)]$ git apply ~/Downloads/add_functions_to_strings-5.patch
/Users/alex/Downloads/add_functions_to_strings-5.patch:34: trailing whitespace.
  (let [result
warning: 1 line adds whitespace errors.

I updated the timings in the description to include both -4 and -5 - the boxing there does have a significant impact.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 26/Jul/15 9:28 AM ]

Fixed whitespace issue.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Jul/15 9:32 AM ]

Added -6 patch and timings that address most of the performance impact.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 27/Jul/15 9:35 AM ]

Alex: Note that all of these functions return numbers and booleans, not strings nor seqs of anything. This is partially why they were left out of the original string implementation.

It isn't clear to me why index-of should be purely a string fn, I regularly need index-of with other things, and both my book and JoC use index-of as an example of a nice-to-have.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 27/Jul/15 9:44 AM ]

Stuart, I don't think the fact that those functions don't return string is really relevant, the important fact is that they operate on strings (just like c.set/superset? or subset? don't return sets) and are frequently used on them.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 27/Jul/15 9:51 AM ]

I'm with Nicola on this one - we have to be practical. There's a reason why this is the top-voted JIRA ticket - Clojure programmers want those functions. That's says plenty.

Anyways, having a generic `index-of` is definitely not a bad idea.





[CLJ-1446] (def v) with no init supplied destroys #'v metadata Created: 13/Jun/14  Updated: 21/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Nahuel Greco Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

(def a) destroys #'a metadata, check this:

(def ^:mykey a 1)

(meta #'a)              ;; ok, :mykey is present

(let [v (def a)]
   [(meta v)            ;; NO :mykey present, metadata destroyed
    (identical? v #'a)  ;; true, we are talking of the same var
   ])

(meta #'a)              ;; NO :mykey present

If this is not a bug but a "feature", then we have at least two problems:

1- The def special form documentation doesn't state this behaviour at all, it needs to be clarified. With the current documentation it seems as doing a def with no init supplied will not make any side-effect at all, and this is not true for the var metadata.

2- defmulti uses this form to lookup the var and check if it already binds to a MultiFn, if that is the case then defmulti does nothing... but it really does something, defmulti will destroy the original var metadata in the (supposedly non-destructive) check. This is the involved defmulti fragment:

(let [v# (def ~mm-name)]
  (when-not (and (.hasRoot v#) (instance? clojure.lang.MultiFn (deref v#)))
   ...


 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Jun/14 4:14 PM ]

I think this is mostly a dupe of CLJ-1148 but I'll leave it as it states the specific problem more precisely.

Comment by Nahuel Greco [ 13/Jun/14 7:35 PM ]

Alex Miller: It seems CLJ-1148 is an special case where this problem shows, but the patches in CLJ-1148 only fixes the issues for defonce, not generally for def, not for defmulti and not clarifies this behaviour in the def special form documentation.





[CLJ-1435] 'numerator and 'denominator fail to handle integral values (i.e. N/1) Created: 30/May/14  Updated: 30/May/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Aaron Brooks Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None


 Description   

Because ratio values reduce to lowest terms and, for integral values where the lowest term is N/1, are auto-converted to BigInts (and formerly Longs), the current behavior of clojure.core/numerator and clojure.core/denominator yield unexpected results.

user=> (numerator 1/3)
1
user=> (numerator (+ 1/3 2/3))

ClassCastException clojure.lang.BigInt cannot be cast to clojure.lang.Ratio  clojure.core/numerator (core.clj:3306)
user=> (denominator 1/3)
3
user=> (denominator (+ 1/3 2/3))

ClassCastException clojure.lang.BigInt cannot be cast to clojure.lang.Ratio  clojure.core/denominator (core.clj:3314)
user=>

The auto-conversion to Longs is not really the problem in my mind. I'd like to see numerator return the original value when presented with a BigInt and denominator always return 1 when presented with a BigInt. It seems reasonable to request the same for Longs.

If desired, I'd be happy to produce a patch.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/May/14 6:35 PM ]

I don't know the official stance on this ticket, but will add some notes.

Aaron, numerator and denominator are pretty clearly documented to work on Ratio types only.

It is pretty easy to write my-numerator and my-denominator that work exactly as you wish, checking for the type of arg and using numerator, denominator for Ratio types, and doing whatever you think is correct for other numeric types.

Comment by Aaron Brooks [ 30/May/14 7:44 PM ]

I'm aware that they are documented as such. Part of my point is that you can be working entirely with Ratio types and, via arithmetic operations between them, sometimes wind up with a non-Ratio number unexpectedly.

Also consider:

user=> (numerator 2/1)
ClassCastException java.lang.Long cannot be cast to clojure.lang.Ratio  clojure.core/numerator (core.clj:3238)

You're then left either implementing a try/catch correction or always checking the type before using numerator or denominator which is a loss in performance.

The patch I have in mind is creating a protocol, extended to Ratio, BigInt and Long which calls the appropriate method (Ratios) or returns either the given number or 1 (numerator/denominator) for the integral types. I expect this to maintain the current level of performance in the cases where it works and behave properly in the cases currently not handled.





[CLJ-1431] Switch from MurmurHash3 to SipHash to prevent DoS collision attack (hash flooding) Created: 25/May/14  Updated: 26/May/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4, Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: James Thornton Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: security


 Description   

Clojure is using Murmur3 throughout:
https://github.com/clojure/clojure/commit/dff9600387b962f16fc78e6477e10e34651fd366

DJB, Jean-Philippe Aumasson, and Martin Boßlet have shown that Murmur3 is not resilient against hash collision attacks:
http://www.ocert.org/advisories/ocert-2012-001.html
https://131002.net/siphash/

"Hash-flooding DoS reloaded: attacks and defenses" talk by DJB, Jean-Philippe Aumasson, and Martin Boßlet
http://media.ccc.de/browse/congress/2012/29c3-5152-en-hashflooding_dos_reloaded_h264.html

"Breaking Murmur: Hash-flooding DoS Reloaded"
http://emboss.github.io/blog/2012/12/14/breaking-murmur-hash-flooding-dos-reloaded/

Python, Ruby, JRuby, Haskell, Rust, Perl, Redis... have all switched to SipHash
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SipHash

Last year Google dropped CityHash from Guava and replaced it with SipHash
https://code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/issues/detail?id=1232

SipHash Guava Implementation
https://code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/source/browse/guava/src/com/google/common/hash/SipHashFunction.java

SipHash Java reference implementation
https://github.com/emboss/siphash-java/blob/master/src/main/java/com/github/emboss/siphash/SipHash.java



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/May/14 12:56 AM ]

Thanks, we've talked about this issue and some possible things we could do, but didn't have a ticket for it yet.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/May/14 1:08 AM ]

While the Java 7 approach relied on (attempting) to properly seed hash maps with string hash codes, that was all dropped in Java 8, which addressed DoS collision hash attacks by instead improving the data structure to switch from linear collisions to a red/black tree (log-time) for collisions. It's possible a similar approach could work in Clojure as well.

One workaround that could be used now is to wrap map keys in a custom type that implements IHashEq and implements an alternate hash function.





[CLJ-1414] sort's docstring should say whether it is stable Created: 02/May/14  Updated: 28/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Phill Wolf Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: collections, docstring, ft

Attachments: Text File clj-1414-v1.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

sort's docstring does not address whether the sort will be stable.

Stability is a useful property. It appears to be customary among programming tools to document whether their sort is stable. Java's Collections javadoc pledges a stable sort. The man-page of GNU coreutils sort in Ubuntu mentions its stability. The perldoc of Perl's sort function indicates it is a stable sort now but was not always.

Pillars of the Clojure community have commented on sort's stability:

(1) A recent book assembled by Cognitect consultants, "Clojure Cookbook", says Clojure's sort function "uses Java's built-in sort" and that "[t]he sort is also stable".

(2) In a 2011 discussion thread, "Clojure sort: is it specified to be stable for all targets?" https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/j3aNAmEJW9A , Stuart Sierra replied that "if it's not specified in the doc string, then it's not a promise. That said, [...] I would generally expect a language built-in `sort` routine to be stable, so take that for what it's worth."

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 05/May/14 10:23 AM ]

Sounds reasonable. Needs patch from contributor.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Aug/14 3:07 PM ]

Patch clj-1414-v1.patch dated Aug 30 2014 adds the sentence "Guaranteed to be stable: equal elements will not be reordered." to the doc strings of both sort and sort-by.





[CLJ-1406] Libs are blindly added into loaded-libs even if an error occurs during loading Created: 17/Apr/14  Updated: 17/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: OHTA Shogo Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-modify-clojure.core-load-lib-so-that-it-removes-the-.patch    
Patch: Code

 Description   

Suppose you have a lib that causes some errors during loading, like the following:

(ns broken-lib)

(} ; this line will cause a reader error

And then, if you require the lib, it would be added into loaded-libs in spite of the reader error, which makes require succeed silently after that.

user=> (contains? (loaded-libs) 'broken-lib)
false
user=> (require 'broken-lib)
CompilerException java.lang.RuntimeException: Unmatched delimiter: }, compiling:(broken_lib.clj:3:3) 
user=> (contains? (loaded-libs) 'broken-lib)
true
user=> (require 'broken-lib)
nil
user=>

Cause:
The patch for CLJ-1116 made the ns macro blindly add the lib being defined into loaded-libs even if an error occurs during loading.

Approach:
Modify clojure.core/load-lib so that it removes the lib from loaded-libs on error.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Apr/14 9:07 AM ]

This patch seems somewhat removed from the cause - is there some way to instead prevent the lib from being added to loaded-libs in the first place?

Comment by OHTA Shogo [ 17/Apr/14 9:21 AM ]

To do so, I think we need to revert CLJ-1116.





[CLJ-1386] Add transient? predicate Created: 17/Mar/14  Updated: 20/Apr/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Devin Walters Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: collections, transient
Environment:

N/A


Attachments: Text File 0004-Add-transient-predicate.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

I've encountered situations where I wanted to check whether something was transient in order to know whether I should call assoc! or assoc, conj! or conj, etc.

This patch adds `transient?` as a predicate fn.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Mar/14 10:21 AM ]

Patch needs a docstring and a test.

Comment by Devin Walters [ 17/Mar/14 4:42 PM ]

Alex: I figured that would be the case! Sorry about that. I've updated the patch. It now includes a docstring and has tests of `transient?` for #{}, [], and {}.

Thanks!

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Mar/14 9:48 PM ]

Thanks - please don't use the labels "patch" or "test" - those are covered by the Patch field.

Comment by Devin Walters [ 18/Mar/14 9:17 AM ]

Ah, sorry for the mixup Alex. I assumed you removed "patch" as a label the first time around to flag this ticket as still needing a vetted patch. My mistake.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 21/Mar/14 1:42 PM ]

Patch 0001-Add-transient-predicate.patch dated Mar 17, 2014 applies cleanly to latest Clojure master, but fails a test because the new function transient? has no :added metadata. See most other Clojure functions in clojure.core for examples.

It also generates a new warning while running tests:

WARNING: transient? already refers to: #'clojure.core/transient? in namespace: clojure.test-clojure.data-structures, being replaced by: #'clojure.test-clojure.data-structures/transient?

There is an older (but equivalent) definition of transient? in test file data_structures.clj that should be removed when adding it to clojure.core

Comment by Devin Walters [ 22/Mar/14 11:29 PM ]

@Andy, the reason I did not add :added metadata is because I do not know if/when this patch will be accepted, and as a result, I don't really know if it will sneak into 1.6.X or 1.7. For now, I've put it in as 1.7. If it's in the running to be added sooner than that, let me know and I'll adjust it.

RE: The warning. Good catch. I've submitted a new patch which removes the private version of transient? from data_structures.clj. All tests pass.

Edit to Add: The latest patch as of this comment is now 0002-Add-transient-predicate.patch.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Aug/14 2:16 PM ]

Patch 0002-Add-transient-predicate.patch dated Mar 22 2014 no longer applies cleanly to latest Clojure master due to some changes committed earlier today. I haven't checked whether this patch is straightforward to update.

Comment by Devin Walters [ 06/Aug/14 4:11 PM ]

I've updated the patch to 0003-Add-transient-predicate.patch. This patch applies cleanly to the latest version of master.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 4:44 PM ]

Patch 0003-Add-transient-predicate.patch dated Aug 6 2013 no longer applied cleanly to latest master after some commits were made to Clojure on Aug 29, 2014. It did apply cleanly before that day.

I have not checked how easy or difficult it might be to update this patch.

Comment by Devin Walters [ 31/Aug/14 12:01 AM ]

I've updated the patch to 0004-Add-transient-predicate.patch. This patch applies cleanly to the latest version of master.





[CLJ-1381] Improve support for extending protocols to primitive arrays Created: 13/Mar/14  Updated: 21/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: protocols

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

It is possible to extend protocols to primitive arrays but specifying the class for the type is a little tricky:

(defprotocol P (p [_]))
(extend-protocol P (Class/forName "[B") (p [_] "bytes"))
(p (byte-array 0))   ;; => "bytes"

However, things go bad if you try to do more than one of these:

(extend-protocol P 
  (Class/forName "[B") (p [_] "bytes")
  (Class/forName "[I") (p [_] "ints"))
CompilerException java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException: nth not supported on this type: Character, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:1:1)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6380)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6322)
	clojure.lang.Compiler$MapExpr.parse (Compiler.java:2879)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6369)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6322)
	clojure.lang.Compiler$InvokeExpr.parse (Compiler.java:3624)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq (Compiler.java:6562)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6361)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6322)
	clojure.lang.Compiler$BodyExpr$Parser.parse (Compiler.java:5708)
	clojure.lang.Compiler$FnMethod.parse (Compiler.java:5139)
	clojure.lang.Compiler$FnExpr.parse (Compiler.java:3751)
Caused by:
UnsupportedOperationException nth not supported on this type: Character
	clojure.lang.RT.nthFrom (RT.java:857)
	clojure.lang.RT.nth (RT.java:807)
	clojure.core/emit-hinted-impl/hint--5951/fn--5953 (core_deftype.clj:758)
	clojure.core/map/fn--4207 (core.clj:2487)
	clojure.lang.LazySeq.sval (LazySeq.java:42)
	clojure.lang.LazySeq.seq (LazySeq.java:60)
	clojure.lang.RT.seq (RT.java:484)
	clojure.lang.RT.countFrom (RT.java:537)
	clojure.lang.RT.count (RT.java:530)
	clojure.lang.Cons.count (Cons.java:49)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6352)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6322)

The code in {parse-impls} is seeing the second {(Class/forName "[I")} as a function, not as a new type. One workaround for this is to only extend the protocol to one type at a time.

It would be even better (moving into enhancement area) if there was a syntax here to specify primitive array types - we already have the syntax of {bytes, ints, longs}, etc for type hints and those seem perfectly good to me.



 Comments   
Comment by Nahuel Greco [ 18/Sep/14 6:08 PM ]

It also breaks when extending only one array type:

(extend-protocol P
  String               (p [_] "string")
  (Class/forName "[B") (p [_] "ints") 
  )

;=> CompilerException java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException: nth not supported on this type ...

But changing the declaration order fixes it:

(extend-protocol P
  (Class/forName "[B") (p [_] "ints") 
  String               (p [_] "string")
  )

;=> OK




[CLJ-1376] Initialize internal maps to more efficient version Created: 11/Mar/14  Updated: 11/Mar/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: performance


 Description   

In reviewing some hashing stuff, I noticed that there are many places internal to Clojure that use maps initialized with PersistentHashMap.EMPTY. Many of these maps are likely to have a small number of entries such that a PersistentArrayMap might be more efficient.

These are the candidates:

src/jvm/clojure/lang/ARef.java
19:private volatile IPersistentMap watches = PersistentHashMap.EMPTY;

src/jvm/clojure/lang/Compiler.java
3009:				IPersistentMap m = PersistentHashMap.EMPTY;
3819:					       KEYWORDS, PersistentHashMap.EMPTY,
3820:					       VARS, PersistentHashMap.EMPTY,
3964:	IPersistentMap closes = PersistentHashMap.EMPTY;
3977:	IPersistentMap keywords = PersistentHashMap.EMPTY;
3978:	IPersistentMap vars = PersistentHashMap.EMPTY;
5121:                            ,CLEAR_SITES, PersistentHashMap.EMPTY
7259:			       KEYWORDS, PersistentHashMap.EMPTY,
7260:			       VARS, PersistentHashMap.EMPTY
7418:			IPersistentMap opts = PersistentHashMap.EMPTY;
7475:			IPersistentMap fmap = PersistentHashMap.EMPTY;
7522:					       KEYWORDS, PersistentHashMap.EMPTY,
7523:					       VARS, PersistentHashMap.EMPTY,
7912:                            ,CLEAR_SITES, PersistentHashMap.EMPTY

src/jvm/clojure/lang/LispReader.java
755:					RT.map(GENSYM_ENV, PersistentHashMap.EMPTY));

src/jvm/clojure/lang/MultiFn.java
39:	this.methodTable = PersistentHashMap.EMPTY;
41:	this.preferTable = PersistentHashMap.EMPTY;
49:		methodTable = methodCache = preferTable = PersistentHashMap.EMPTY;

src/jvm/clojure/lang/Var.java
48:	final static Frame TOP = new Frame(PersistentHashMap.EMPTY, null);
175:	setMeta(PersistentHashMap.EMPTY);
341:	IPersistentMap ret = PersistentHashMap.EMPTY;

Approach: Two possible approaches - initialize to PersistentArrayMap.EMPTY or call RT.map(). The latter requires function invocation so is slightly slower, but has the benefit of localizing map construction into a single place.






[CLJ-1364] Primitive VecSeq does not implement equals or hashing methods Created: 19/Feb/14  Updated: 19/Feb/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: collections


 Description   

VecSeq (as produced by (seq (vector-of :int 1 2 3))) does not implements equals, hashCode, or hasheq and does not play with any other Clojure collections or sequences appropriately in this regard.

user=> (def rs (range 3))
user=> (def vs (seq (vector-of :int 0 1 2)))
user=> rs
(0 1 2)
user=> vs
(0 1 2)
user=> (.equals rs vs)
true
user=> (.equals vs rs)    ;; expect: true
false
user=> (.equiv rs vs)
true
user=> (.equiv vs rs)
true
user=> (.hashCode rs)
29824
user=> (.hashCode vs)     ;; expect to match (.hashCode rs)
2081327893
user=> (System/identityHashCode vs)  ;; show that we're just getting Object hashCode
2081327893
user=> (.hasheq rs)
29824
user=> (.hasheq vs)       ;; expect same as (.hasheq rs) but not implemented at all
IllegalArgumentException No matching field found: hasheq for class clojure.core.VecSeq  clojure.lang.Reflector.getInstanceField (Reflector.java:271)





[CLJ-1360] clojure.string/split strips trailing delimiters Created: 18/Feb/14  Updated: 21/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Tim McCormack Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

clojure.string/split and clojure.string/split-lines inherit the bizarre default behavior of java.lang.String#split(String,int) in stripping trailing consecutive delimiters:

(clojure.string/split "banana" #"an")
⇒ ["b" "" "a"]
(clojure.string/split "banana" #"na")
⇒ ["ba"]
(clojure.string/split "nanabanana" #"na")
⇒ ["" "" "ba"]

In the case of split-lines, processing a file line by line and rejoining results in truncation of trailing newlines in the file. In both cases, the behavior is surprising and cannot be inferred from the docstrings.

This behavior should either be fixed or documented.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 18/Feb/14 10:51 AM ]

Probably documenting would be safer than changing the behavior at this point, given that some people may actually rely on the current behavior after testing, deploying, etc.

I don't currently have a suggestion for a modified doc string, but note that there are examples of this behavior and how one can use an extra "-1" limit argument at the end to get all split strings: http://clojuredocs.org/clojure_core/clojure.string/split

Comment by Crispin Wellington [ 21/May/15 10:46 PM ]

This bug just bit me. +1 to be fixed. If we just document and leave the behavior as is, then we have a surprising and inconsistent behaving split (why are inner empty values kept, but outer ones stripped?) that is different to every other split you've ever used. The optional -1 limit argument looks hacky but a fix could keep this -1 argument working.

EDIT: this looks to be java's string class behavior: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2170557/split-method-of-string-class-does-not-include-trailing-empty-strings
Would be nice if limit defaulted to -1 on that type of clojure.string/split call.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 19/Jul/15 8:03 AM ]

This is really gross, and the original developer has been punched in the neck. (Ow.)

I hate the Java leakage, but given that this is already out there, and that people are likely already relying on both the default and the negative-arg behavior, I think the least bad bet is to document precisely the semantics we have.





[CLJ-1351] Clojure emits an unused "swapThunk" method for functions with keyword callsites Created: 14/Feb/14  Updated: 29/Apr/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler, ft, performance

Attachments: Text File 0001-remove-unused-swapThunk-method-generation.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

This method is no longer used, I did a quick git blame and it look like it was used for an earlier implementation of keyword callsites and forgot to be removed in this commit https://github.com/clojure/clojure/commit/c7af275d4ee33cdc1794c8df8fa1e6d39039ac84

Removing this should reduce a bit the size of compile functions.

Screened by: Alex Miller






[CLJ-1322] doseq with several bindings causes "ClassFormatError: Invalid Method Code length" Created: 10/Jan/14  Updated: 25/Mar/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Miikka Koskinen Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 6
Labels: None
Environment:

Clojure 1.5.1, java 1.7.0_25, OpenJDK Runtime Environment (IcedTea 2.3.10) (7u25-2.3.10-1ubuntu0.12.04.2)


Attachments: Text File doseq-bench.txt     Text File doseq.patch     File script.clj    
Patch: Code
Approval: Incomplete

 Description   

Important Perf Note the new impl is faster for collections that are custom-reducible but not chunked, and is also faster for large numbers of bindings. The original implementation is hand tuned for chunked collections, and wins for larger chunked coll/smaller binding count scenarios, presumably due to the fn call/return tracking overhead of reduce. Details are in the comments.
Screened By
Patch doseq.patch

user=> (def a1 (range 10))
#'user/a1
user=> (doseq [x1 a1 x2 a1 x3 a1 x4 a1 x5 a1 x6 a1 x7 a1 x8 a1] (do))
CompilerException java.lang.ClassFormatError: Invalid method Code length 69883 in class file user$eval1032, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:2:1)

While this example is silly, it's a problem we've hit a couple of times. It's pretty surprising when you have just a couple of lines of code and suddenly you get the code length error.



 Comments   
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 18/Apr/14 12:20 AM ]

reproduces with jdk 1.8.0 and clojure 1.6

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 22/Apr/14 5:35 PM ]

A potential fix for this is to make doseq generate intermediate fns like `for` does instead of expanding all the code directly.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 25/Jun/14 8:39 PM ]

Existing doseq handles chunked-traversal internally, deciding the
mechanics of traversal for a seq. In addition to possibly conflating
concerns, this is causing a code explosion blowup when more bindings are
added, approx 240 bytes of bytecode per binding (without modifiers).

This approach redefs doseq later in core.clj, after protocol-based
reduce (and other modern conveniences like destructuring.)

It supports the existing :let, :while, and :when modifiers.

New is a stronger assertion that modifiers cannot come before binding
expressions. (Same semantics as let, i.e. left to right)

valid: [x coll :when (foo x)]
invalid: [:when (foo x) x coll]

This implementation does not suffer from the code explosion problem.
About 25 bytes of bytecode + 1 fn per binding.

Implementing this without destructuring was not a party, luckily reduce
is defined later in core.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 26/Jun/14 12:25 AM ]

For anyone reviewing this patch, note that there are already many tests for correct functionality of doseq in file test/clojure/test_clojure/for.clj. It may not be immediately obvious, but every test for 'for' defined with deftest-both is a test for 'for' and also for 'doseq'.

Regarding the current implementation of doseq: it in't simply that it is too many bytes per binding, it is that the code size doubles with each additional binding. See these results, which measures size of the macroexpanded form rather than byte code size, but those two things should be fairly linearly related to each other here:

(defn formsize [form]
  (count (with-out-str (print (macroexpand form)))))

user=> (formsize '(doseq [x (range 10)] (print x)))
652
user=> (formsize '(doseq [x (range 10) y (range 10)] (print x y)))
1960
user=> (formsize '(doseq [x (range 10) y (range 10) z (range 10)] (print x y z)))
4584
user=> (formsize '(doseq [x (range 10) y (range 10) z (range 10) w (range 10)] (print x y z w)))
9947
user=> (formsize '(doseq [x (range 10) y (range 10) z (range 10) w (range 10) p (range 10)] (print x y z w p)))
20997

Here are results for the same expressions after Ghadi's patch doseq.patch dated June 25 2014:

user=> (formsize '(doseq [x (range 10)] (print x)))
93
user=> (formsize '(doseq [x (range 10) y (range 10)] (print x y)))
170
user=> (formsize '(doseq [x (range 10) y (range 10) z (range 10)] (print x y z)))
247
user=> (formsize '(doseq [x (range 10) y (range 10) z (range 10) w (range 10)] (print x y z w)))
324
user=> (formsize '(doseq [x (range 10) y (range 10) z (range 10) w (range 10) p (range 10)] (print x y z w p)))
401

It would be good to see some performance results with and without this patch, too.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 28/Jun/14 2:21 PM ]

In the tests below, the new impl is called "doseq2", vs. the original impl "doseq"

(def hund (into [] (range 100)))
(def ten (into [] (range 10)))
(def arr (int-array 100))
(def s "superduper")

;; big seq, few bindings: doseq2 LOSES
(dotimes [_ 5]
  (time (doseq [a (range 100000000)])))
;; 1.2 sec

(dotimes [_ 5]
  (time (doseq2 [a (range 100000000)])))
;; 1.8 sec

;; small unchunked reducible, few bindings: doseq2 wins
(dotimes [_ 5]
  (time (doseq [a s b s c s])))
;; 0.5 sec

(dotimes [_ 5]
  (time (doseq2 [a s b s c s])))
;; 0.2 sec

(dotimes [_ 5]
  (time (doseq [a arr b arr c arr])))
;; 40 msec

(dotimes [_ 5]
  (time (doseq2 [a arr b arr c arr])))
;; 8 msec

;; small chunked reducible, few bindings: doseq2 LOSES
(dotimes [_ 5]
  (time (doseq [a hund b hund c hund])))
;; 2 msec

(dotimes [_ 5]
  (time (doseq2 [a hund b hund c hund])))
;; 8 msec

;; more bindings: doseq2 wins bigger and bigger
(dotimes [_ 5]
  (time (doseq [a ten b ten c ten d ten ])))
;; 2 msec

(dotimes [_ 5]
  (time (doseq2 [a ten b ten c ten d ten ])))
;; 0.4 msec

(dotimes [_ 5]
  (time (doseq [a ten b ten c ten d ten e ten])))
;; 18 msec

(dotimes [_ 5]
  (time (doseq2 [a ten b ten c ten d ten e ten])))
;; 1 msec
Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 28/Jun/14 6:23 PM ]

Hmm, I cannot reproduce your results.

I'm not sure whether you are testing with lein, on what platform, what jvm opts.

Can we test using this little harness instead directly against clojure.jar? I've attached a the harness and two runs of results (one w/ default heap, the other 3GB w/ G1GC)

I added a medium and small (range) too.

Anecdotally, I see doseq2 outperform in all cases except the small range. Using criterium shows a wider performance gap favoring doseq2.

I pasted the results side by side for easier viewing.

core/doseq                          doseq2
"Elapsed time: 1610.865146 msecs"   "Elapsed time: 2315.427573 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2561.079069 msecs"   "Elapsed time: 2232.479584 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2446.674237 msecs"   "Elapsed time: 2234.556301 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2443.129809 msecs"   "Elapsed time: 2224.302855 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2456.406103 msecs"   "Elapsed time: 2210.383112 msecs"

;; med range, few bindings:
core/doseq                          doseq2
"Elapsed time: 28.383197 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 31.676448 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 13.908323 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 11.136818 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 18.956345 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 11.137122 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 12.367901 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 11.049121 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 13.449006 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 11.141385 msecs"

;; small range, few bindings:
core/doseq                          doseq2
"Elapsed time: 0.386334 msecs"      "Elapsed time: 0.372388 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 0.10521 msecs"       "Elapsed time: 0.203328 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 0.083378 msecs"      "Elapsed time: 0.179116 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 0.097281 msecs"      "Elapsed time: 0.150563 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 0.095649 msecs"      "Elapsed time: 0.167609 msecs"

;; small unchunked reducible, few bindings:
core/doseq                          doseq2
"Elapsed time: 2.351466 msecs"      "Elapsed time: 2.749858 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 0.755616 msecs"      "Elapsed time: 0.80578 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 0.664072 msecs"      "Elapsed time: 0.661074 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 0.549186 msecs"      "Elapsed time: 0.712239 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 0.551442 msecs"      "Elapsed time: 0.518207 msecs"

core/doseq                          doseq2
"Elapsed time: 95.237101 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 55.3067 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 41.030972 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 30.817747 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 42.107288 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 19.535747 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 41.088291 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 4.099174 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 41.03616 msecs"      "Elapsed time: 4.084832 msecs"

;; small chunked reducible, few bindings:
core/doseq                          doseq2
"Elapsed time: 31.793603 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 40.082492 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 17.302798 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 28.286991 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 17.212189 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 14.897374 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 17.266534 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 10.248547 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 17.227381 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 10.022326 msecs"

;; more bindings:
core/doseq                          doseq2
"Elapsed time: 4.418727 msecs"      "Elapsed time: 2.685198 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2.421063 msecs"      "Elapsed time: 2.384134 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2.210393 msecs"      "Elapsed time: 2.341696 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2.450744 msecs"      "Elapsed time: 2.339638 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2.223919 msecs"      "Elapsed time: 2.372942 msecs"

core/doseq                          doseq2
"Elapsed time: 28.869393 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 2.997713 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 22.414038 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 1.807955 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 21.913959 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 1.870567 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 22.357315 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 1.904163 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 21.138915 msecs"     "Elapsed time: 1.694175 msecs"
Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 28/Jun/14 6:47 PM ]

It's good that the benchmarks contain empty doseq bodies in order to isolate the overhead of traversal. However, that represents 0% of actual real-world code.

At least for the first benchmark (large chunked seq), adding in some tiny amount of work did not change results signifantly. Neither for (map str [a])

(range 10000000) =>  (map str [a])
core/doseq
"Elapsed time: 586.822389 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 563.640203 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 369.922975 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 366.164601 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 373.27327 msecs"
doseq2
"Elapsed time: 419.704021 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 371.065783 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 358.779231 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 363.874448 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 368.059586 msecs"

nor for intrisics like (inc a)

(range 10000000)
core/doseq
"Elapsed time: 317.091849 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 272.360988 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 215.501737 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 206.639181 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 206.883343 msecs"
doseq2
"Elapsed time: 241.475974 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 193.154832 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 198.757873 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 197.803042 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 200.603786 msecs"

I still see reduce-based doseq ahead of the original, except for small seqs

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 04/Aug/14 2:55 PM ]

A form like the following will not work with this patch:

(go (doseq [c chs] (>! c :foo)))

as the go macro doesn't traverse fn boundaries. The only such code I know is core.async/mapcat*, a private fn supporting a fn that is marked deprecated.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 07/Aug/14 2:09 PM ]

I see #'clojure.core/run! was just added, which has a similar limitation

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 29/Aug/14 8:19 AM ]

Please consider Ghadi's feedback, esp re: closures.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 22/Sep/14 4:36 PM ]

The current expansion of a doseq [1] under a go form is less than ideal due to the amount of control flow. 14 states in the state machine vs. 7 with loop/recur

[1] Comparison of macroexpansion of (go ... doseq) vs (go ... loop/recur)
https://gist.github.com/ghadishayban/639009900ce1933256a1

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 25/Mar/15 6:07 PM ]

Related: CLJ-77





[CLJ-1298] Add more type predicate fns to core Created: 21/Nov/13  Updated: 03/May/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Fowler Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 19
Labels: None

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Add more built-in type predicates:

1) Definitely missing: (atom? x), (ref? x), (deref? x), (named? x), (map-entry? x), (lazy-seq? x).
2) Very good to have: (throwable? x), (exception? x), (pattern? x).

The first group is especially important for writing cleaner code with core Clojure.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 21/Nov/13 8:42 AM ]

In general many of the existing predicates map to interfaces. I'm guessing these would map to checks on the following types:

atom? = Atom (final class)
ref? = IRef (interface)
deref? = IDeref (interface)
named? = Named (interface, despite no I prefix)
map-entry? = IMapEntry (interface)
lazy-seq? = LazySeq (final class)

throwable? = Throwable
exception? = Exception, but this seems less useful as it feels like the right answer when you likely actually want throwable?
pattern? = java.util.regex.Pattern

Comment by Alex Fowler [ 21/Nov/13 9:02 AM ]

Yes, they do, and sometimes the code has many checks like (instance? clojure.lang.Atom x). Ok, you can write a little function (atom? x) but it has either to be written in all relevant namespaces or required/referred there from some extra namespace. All this is just a burden. For example, we have predicates like (var? x) or (future? x) which too map to Java classes, but having them abbreviated often makes possible to write a cleaner code.

I feel the first group to be especially significant for it being about core Clojure concepts like atom and ref. Having to fall to manual Java classes check to work with them feels inorganic. Of course we can, but why then do we have (var? x), (fn? x) and other? Imagine, for example:

(cond
(var? x) (...)
(fn? x) (...)
(instance? clojure.lang.Atom x) (...)
(or (instance? clojure.lang.Named x) (instance? clojure.lang.LazySeq x)) (...))

vs

(cond
(var? x) (...)
(fn? x) (...)
(atom? x) (...)
(or (named? x) (lazy-seq? x)) (...))

The second group is too, essential since these concepts are fundamental for the platform (but you're right with the (exception? x) one).

Comment by Alex Fowler [ 22/Nov/13 6:35 AM ]

Also, obviously I missed the (boolean? x) predicate in the original post. Did not even guess it is absent too until I occasionally got into it today. Currently the most clean way we have is to do (or (true? x) (false? x)). Needles to say, it looks weird next to the present (integer? x) or (float? x).

Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 22/Jul/14 1:02 AM ]

Predicates for core types are also very useful for portability to CLJS.

Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 22/Jul/14 1:05 AM ]

I'd be happy to provide a patch for this, but I'd prefer universal interface support where possible. Therefore, this ticket, in my mind, is behind http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-803 etc.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Jul/14 6:12 AM ]

I don't think it's worth making a ticket for this until Rich has looked at it and determined which parts are wanted.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Dec/14 4:33 PM ]

Someone asked about a boolean? predicate, so throwing this one on the list...

Comment by Reid McKenzie [ 02/Dec/14 4:51 PM ]

uuid? maybe. UUIDs have a bit of a strange position in that we have special printer handling for them built into core implying that they are intentionally part of Clojure, but there is no ->UUID constructor and no functions in core that operate on them so I could see this one being specifically declined.

Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 03/May/15 2:50 PM ]

This has been troubling me again with my first cljc project. So, I've added a whole bunch of tickets (with patches!) for individual predicates in both CLJ and CLJS.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 03/May/15 5:35 PM ]

As I said above, I don't want to mess with specific patches or tickets on this until Rich gets a look at this and we decide which stuff should and should not be included. So I'm going to ignore your other tickets for now...





[CLJ-1295] Speed up dissoc on array-maps Created: 15/Nov/13  Updated: 29/Apr/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: ft, performance

Attachments: File clj-1295-1.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

In latest Clojure master as of Nov 15 2013, the method without() in PersistentArrayMap.java first searches for a matching key using indexOf(key) and saves the result in i.

If a matching key was found, the code then copies the old array to the new smaller one, but unnecessarily repeats the comparison of every key in the map to the key being removed, even though its location is already stored in i.

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 15/Nov/13 7:05 PM ]

The patch clj-1295-1.diff changes PersistentArrayMap's without() to use System.arraycopy to copy only the necessary parts from the current array to newArray, similar to PersistentHashMap's method removePair().

Benchmark 1 has strings for keys, which are relatively slow to compare to each other.

(def m1 (array-map "abcdef" 1 "abcdeg" 2 "abcdeh" 3 "abcdei" 4))
(time (dotimes [i 100000000] (dissoc m1 "abcdei")))

1.6.0-alpha2 with no changes:
"Elapsed time: 29663.443 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 29490.225 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 29600.138 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 29627.948 msecs"

1.6.0-alpha2 with patch clj-1295-1.diff:
"Elapsed time: 6362.006 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 6121.006 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 6163.377 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 6155.299 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 6395.224 msecs"

Averages about 21% of the run time before the change.

Benchmark 2 has keywords for keys, which are compared via Java ==, so as fast as comparison can get.

(def m2 (array-map :abcdef 1 :abcdeg 2 :abcdeh 3 :abcdei 4))
(time (dotimes [i 100000000] (dissoc m2 :abcdei)))

1.6.0-alpha2 with no changes:
"Elapsed time: 5033.863 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 5028.327 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 5045.019 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 5004.751 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 5039.143 msecs"

1.6.0-alpha2 with patch clj-1295-1.diff:
"Elapsed time: 2874.748 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2862.878 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2887.778 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2874.196 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2861.807 msecs"

Averages about 57% of the run time before the change.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 08/Dec/14 9:47 AM ]

A nice boost, but probably obsoleted by CLJ-1517

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Dec/14 11:10 AM ]

Always happy to be obsoleted by something even better

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 08/Dec/14 11:43 AM ]

I dunno, seems like CLJ-1517 phase 1 is just vectors not maps, so this is still easy low-hanging fruit.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 08/Dec/14 1:07 PM ]

There will be a second ticket for maps, both will be targeted for 1.8.





[CLJ-1289] aset-* and aget perform poorly on multi-dimensional arrays even with type hints. Created: 01/Nov/13  Updated: 14/Feb/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Michael O. Church Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: arrays, performance
Environment:

Clojure 1.5.1.

Dependencies: criterium


Attachments: Text File CLJ-1289-p1.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Here's a transcript of the behavior. I don't know for sure that reflection is being done, but the performance penalty (about 1300x) suggests it.

user=> (use 'criterium.core)
nil
user=> (def b (make-array Double/TYPE 1000 1000))
#'user/b
user=> (quick-bench (aget ^"[[D" b 304 175))
WARNING: Final GC required 3.5198021166354323 % of runtime
WARNING: Final GC required 29.172288684474303 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 63558 in 6 samples of 10593 calls.
             Execution time mean : 9.457308 µs
    Execution time std-deviation : 126.220954 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 9.344450 µs ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 9.629202 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 2.477107 ns

One workaround is to use multiple agets.

user=> (quick-bench (aget ^"[D" (aget ^"[[D" b 304) 175))
WARNING: Final GC required 40.59820310542545 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 62135436 in 6 samples of 10355906 calls.
             Execution time mean : 6.999273 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.112703 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 6.817782 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 7.113845 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 2.477107 ns

Cause: The inlined version only applies to arity 2, and otherwise it reflects.



 Comments   
Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 08/Dec/13 9:28 PM ]

A glance at the source makes it obvious that the hypothesis is correct – the inlined version only applies to arity 2, and otherwise it reflects.

I thought this would be as simple as converting the inline function to be variadic (using reduce), but after trying it I realized this is tricky as you have to generate the correct type hints for each step. E.g., given ^"[[D" the inline function needs to type-hint the intermediate result with ^"[D". This isn't difficult if we're just dealing with strings that begin with square brackets, but I don't know for sure that those are the only possibilities.

Comment by Yaron Peleg [ 13/Feb/14 4:44 AM ]

Bump. I just got bitten bad by this.

There are two seperate issues here:
1) (aget 2d-array-doubles 0 0 ) doesn't emit a reflection warning.
2) It seems like the compiler has enough information to avoid the reflective call here.

Note this gets exp. worse as number of dimensions grows, i.e (get doubles3d 0 0 0)
will be 1M slower, etc' Not true, unless you iterate over all elements. it's
simply n_dims*1000x per lookup.

Nasty surprise, especially considering you often go to primitive arrays for speed,
and a common use case is an inner loop(s) that iterate over arrays.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 13/Feb/14 7:08 AM ]

I can probably take a stab at this.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 13/Feb/14 8:34 PM ]

I think the reflection warning problem is pretty much impossible to solve without changing code elsewhere in the compiler, because the reflection done in aget is a different kind than normal clojure reflection – it's explicitly in the function body rather than emitted by the compiler. Since the compiler isn't emitting it, it doesn't reasonably know it's even there. So even if aget is fixed for other arities, you still won't get the warning when it's not inlined.

I can imagine some sort of metadata that you could put on a function telling the compiler that it will reflect if not inlined. Or maybe a more generic not-inlined warning?

The global scope of adding another compiler flag seems about balanced by the seriousness of array functions not being able to warn on reflection.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 13/Feb/14 8:52 PM ]

Attached CLJ-1289-p1.patch which simply inlines variadic calls to aget. It assumes that if it sees a :tag on the array arg that is a string beginning with [, it can assume that the return value from one call to aget can be tagged with the same string with the leading [ stripped off.

I'm not a jvm expert, but having read through the spec a little bit I think this is a reasonable assumption.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Feb/14 3:34 PM ]

I think this probably is actually true, but a more official way to ask that question would be to get the array class and ask for Class.getComponentType() (and less janky than string munging).

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 14/Feb/14 3:40 PM ]

How would you get the array class based on the :tag type hint?

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 14/Feb/14 7:05 PM ]

I see (-> s (Class/forName) (.getComponentType) (.getName)) does the same thing – is that route preferred, or is there another one?





[CLJ-1282] The quote special form should throw an exception if passed more than one form to quote Created: 23/Oct/13  Updated: 13/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Howard Lewis Ship Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: errormsgs, ft, reader

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1282-p1.patch     Text File CLJ-1282-p2.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Quote currently ignores all but the first argument. In the case of being called accidentally with multiple values, it should throw an exception specifying the error.

user> (quote 1 2 3)
1

Patch: CLJ-1282-p2.patch

Screened by: Alex Miller

------- Original: --------

Every once in a while, you can just go down the rabbit hole.

I had an errant expression in my code:

(-> message get-message-values 'DESTINATION_MERCHANT_ID)

One would think this would work; it certainly would if the key was a keyword and not a symbol.

One would expect this to expand to:

('DESTINATION_MERCHANT_ID (get-message-values message))

however, the reader is involved, so it is as if the source were:

(-> message get-message-values (quote DESTINATION_MERCHANT_ID))

which expands to:

(quote (-> message get-message-values) DESTINATION_MERCHANT_ID))

... hilarity ensues! Because quote currently ignores extra parameters, my code gets the quoted value '(clojure.core/-> message get-message-values) rather than the expected string from the map; this shifts us from the "there's a bug in my code" to "the nature of reality is broken".

The correct expression is:

(-> message get-message-values (get 'DESTINATION_MERCHANT_ID))

This took quite a while to track down; if the

special form checked that it was passed exactly one form to quote and threw an exception otherwise, I think I would have caught this much earlier. It could even identify the expression it is quoting, which would provide a lot better understanding of where I went wrong.



 Comments   
Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 23/Oct/13 2:02 PM ]

Sorry, can't edit the description now to correct the formatting errors.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 24/Oct/13 6:09 PM ]

I just wanted to point out that your description is shorter, but makes it appear that such a use is unlikely and therefore unimportant; the detail of my description is to point out a reasonable situation where something explicable, but completely counterintuitive and confusing, does occur.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 24/Oct/13 8:28 PM ]

That's why I left the original in there too.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 09/Dec/13 7:07 AM ]

(quote) currently returns nil. Do we have an opinion about that?

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 09/Dec/13 9:32 AM ]

Attached p1, which throws an IllegalArgumentException (wrapped in a CompilerException of course) for anything but 1 arg, and includes the number of args that were passed.

I can't think of any reason why (quote) would be useful, so I decided to throw on that too. Very easy to change of course.

Also added a test that (eval '(quote 1 2 3)) throws.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 31/Jan/14 12:46 PM ]

I recommend the following changes:

  • throw an ex-info that includes the offending form in its map {:form ...}
  • check only for the map data, not exception type or message, in the tests
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 31/Jan/14 6:31 PM ]

Patch CLJ-1282-p1.patch no longer applies cleanly after commits made to Clojure master on Jan 31 2014, probably due to the patch committed for CLJ-1318, and probably only because some lines of context changed in the test file. That would be trivial to update, but Stu's comments above suggest that more significant changes need to be made.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 01/Feb/14 9:19 AM ]

Throwing an ex-info is easy enough. I don't know how to avoid at least incidentally checking for the exception type, since the ExceptionInfo is wrapped in a CompilerException. I'll make a patch that keeps the class name in the test but doesn't do any checks on the cause aside from the ex-data. Let me know if I should do anything different.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 01/Feb/14 9:58 AM ]

Attached CLJ-1282-p2.patch which is off of the current master and addresses Stu's points.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Feb/14 11:23 PM ]

Moving back to Triaged for more looks.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 16/Feb/14 12:12 PM ]

Currently (quote) returns nil, is it intended that this patch makes that an error or was this by accident?

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 16/Feb/14 12:23 PM ]

I consciously chose to make (quote) an error – I made a comment about that earlier and didn't get any feedback, so I unilaterally decided to make it an error due to the fact that I couldn't think of any possible use for (quote).

It's an easy switch if somebody thinks differently.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 16/Feb/14 1:13 PM ]

I'm sorry I did not notice your previois comment.
I'm asking because I need to know whether I should throw on (quote) for tools.analyzer, currently it is allowed but I too think that (quote) should be an error.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Apr/15 11:51 AM ]

I also think (quote) should throw an error.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 13/Jul/15 5:35 PM ]

This is an API change request, not a defect, and the change recommended here could break (admittedly ill-advised) programs.





[CLJ-1280] Create reusable exception that can carry file/line/col info Created: 18/Oct/13  Updated: 18/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None


 Description   

This concept already exists in multiple places in Clojure - Compiler$CompilerException and the Exception classes buried in EdnReader and LispReader. It would also be useful in other places where IllegalArgument or other other exceptions are thrown.

For example, this protocol exception throws an IllegalArgumentException and could transmit the file, line, and column info at the location of the error but it seems weird to use any of the existing exceptions for this purpose.

(defprotocol Bar (m [this]) (m [this arg]))


 Comments   
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 18/Apr/14 12:09 AM ]

seems like ExceptionInfo can do this





[CLJ-1279] Fix confusing macroexpand1 ArityException handling Created: 16/Oct/13  Updated: 05/Feb/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Coventry Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: Compiler, errormsgs, macro

Attachments: Text File 0001-Edit-macro-ArityException-in-AFn.patch     Text File 0001-Fix-macroexpand1-s-handling-of-ArityException.patch    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

macros can give very confusing error messages when they execute a form which generates an ArityException. clojure.lang.Compiler.macroexpand1 assumes that any ArityException comes from the call to the macro itself, which need not be the case. For instance:

user> (do (defmacro f [] (assoc)) (f))
ArityException Wrong number of args (-2) passed to: core$assoc clojure.lang.Compiler.macroexpand1 (Compiler.java:6488)
user> (use 'clojure.repl) (pst)
nil
ArityException Wrong number of args (-2) passed to: core$assoc
clojure.lang.Compiler.macroexpand1 (Compiler.java:6488)
clojure.lang.Compiler.macroexpand (Compiler.java:6544)
clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6618)
clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6624)
clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6597)
clojure.core/eval (core.clj:2864)
clojure.main/repl/read-eval-print-6596/fn-6599 (main.clj:260)
clojure.main/repl/read-eval-print--6596 (main.clj:260)
clojure.main/repl/fn--6605 (main.clj:278)
clojure.main/repl (main.clj:278)
clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible-eval/evaluate/fn--1251 (interruptible_eval.clj:56)
clojure.core/apply (core.clj:617)
nil

Easy enough to see the source of the problem in this case, but because both the number of arguments actually passed is off by two, and the stacktrace element for the call to assoc has been dropped, this shortcut by macroexpand1 can get super confusing.

The attached patch corrects this behavior. E.g.

user=> (do (defmacro f [] (assoc)) (f))
ArityException Wrong number of args (0) passed to: core$assoc clojure.lang.AFn.throwArity (AFn.java:437)
user=> (use 'clojure.repl) (pst)
nil
ArityException Wrong number of args (0) passed to: core$assoc
user/f (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)
clojure.lang.Var.invoke (Var.java:419)
clojure.lang.Var.applyTo (Var.java:532)
clojure.lang.Compiler.macroexpand1 (Compiler.java:6507)
clojure.lang.Compiler.macroexpand (Compiler.java:6580)
clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6654)
clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6660)
clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6633)
clojure.core/eval (core.clj:2864)
clojure.main/repl/read-eval-print-6594/fn-6597 (main.clj:260)
clojure.main/repl/read-eval-print--6594 (main.clj:260)
clojure.main/repl/fn--6603 (main.clj:278)
nil



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Coventry [ 17/Oct/13 11:01 AM ]

Patch with test

Comment by Alex Coventry [ 23/Oct/13 11:42 PM ]

Amended patch to deal more gracefully with unexpected stack trace structure.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 24/Oct/13 12:09 AM ]

Also see CLJ-397 and CLJ-383.

Comment by Alex Coventry [ 24/Oct/13 2:46 PM ]

Thanks, Alex. It would be easy enough to move most of the logic into ArityException, which would be a compromise between Stu's[1] options 1 and 2. Is that worth doing?

Amending clojure.lang.AFn.throwArity to check whether "this" is a macro and adjust the arg count there accordingly might be the simplest way. I can see why Rich prefers all the logic to go into ArityException, but since ArityExceptions are used for things other than macros, I don't see a way to make an honest error message there without groveling the stack trace.

[1] http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-397?focusedCommentId=24090&page=com.atlassian.jira.plugin.system.issuetabpanels:comment-tabpanel#comment-24090

Comment by Alex Miller [ 24/Oct/13 2:57 PM ]

I would have to take more time than I have to make an informed opinion but I can say that from a general point of view inspecting StackTraceElements does not seem like the right solution to (almost) any problem.

Comment by Alex Coventry [ 24/Oct/13 10:26 PM ]

This patch causes Var.setMacro to set instance attribute AFn.macrop to true, so that AFn.throwArity can reduce the number of arguments reported.

I'm not used to negotiating java class hierarchies, so it's possible there's a cleaner way. Since Var.fn() returns an IFn, I added macrop handling methods IFn.setMacro and IFn.isMacro. These then needed to be implemented in Ref and Keyword, as well as AFn (where I wanted them) because they implement the IFn interface but don't inherit from AFn.

The real drawback I see with this approach is the duplicated state, though: ^{:macro true} vs AFn.macrop==true.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 25/Oct/13 6:33 PM ]

I have not investigated the reason yet, but neither patch applies cleanly after the latest commits to Clojure master on Oct 25 2013. Given that what kinds of solution methods would be acceptable for this issue, it sounds like more thinking and code changes are probably needed anyway before worrying too much about that.





[CLJ-1278] State function's unmunged full name in compiled function's toString() Created: 10/Oct/13  Updated: 17/May/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Howard Lewis Ship Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 9
Labels: errormsgs, interop

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1278-2.patch     Text File CLJ-1528--function-tostring.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Currently function instances print their toString() with the munged Java name:

user=> (ns proj.util-fns)
nil
proj.util-fns=> (defn a->b [a] (inc a))
#'proj.util-fns/a->b
proj.util-fns=> a->b
#object[proj.util_fns$a__GT_b 0x141ba1f1 "proj.util_fns$a__GT_b@141ba1f1"]

For debugging purposes, it would be useful to have the function toString() describe the Clojure-oriented fn name.

Approach: Store the original name in the function instance and use it in the toString() rather than returning the class name.

proj.util-fns=> a->b
#object[proj.util_fns$a__GT_b 0x47d1a507 "proj.util-fns/a->b(NO_SOURCE_FILE:2)"]

Tradeoffs: Increased function instance size for the function name.

Patch: CLJ-1278-2.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 10/Oct/13 8:39 PM ]

Contains changes and updated tests. I don't have any details on if this affects compiler performance or generated code size in any significant or even measurable way.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 11/Oct/13 4:06 PM ]

Howard, sorry I do not have more useful comments on the changes you make in your patch. Right now I only have a couple of minor comments on its form. The preferred format for patches is that created using the instructions shown on this wiki page: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Also, there are several parts of your patch that appear to only make changes in the whitespace of lines. It would be best to leave such changes out of a proposed patch.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 11/Oct/13 5:00 PM ]

Yes, I didn't notice the whitespace changes until after; I must have hit reformat at some point, despite my best efforts. I'll put together a new patch shortly.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 11/Oct/13 6:26 PM ]

Clean patch

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 25/Nov/14 6:00 PM ]

FYI, it's been a year. The correct file is CLJ-1278-2.patch.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 25/Nov/14 6:07 PM ]

... hm, something's changed in recent times.

     [java] FAIL in (fn-toString) (fn.clj:83)
     [java] nested functions
     [java] expected: (= (simple-name (.toString (factory-function))) (str "clojure.test-clojure.fn/" "factory-function/fn"))
     [java]   actual: (not (= "clojure.test-clojure.fn/factory-function/fn__7565" "clojure.test-clojure.fn/factory-function/fn"))
     [java]
     [java] FAIL in (fn-toString) (fn.clj:83)
     [java] nested functions
     [java] expected: (= (simple-name (.toString (named-factory-function))) (str "clojure.test-clojure.fn/" "named-factory-function/a-function-name"))
     [java]   actual: (not (= "clojure.test-clojure.fn/named-factory-function/a-function-name__7568" "clojure.test-clojure.fn/named-factory-function/a-function-name"))

I'd be willing to update my patch if there's any indication that it will ever be picked up. It's been over a year since last update.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 26/Nov/14 10:30 AM ]

The change in behavior you are seeing is most likely due to a fix for ticket CLJ-1330.

And in case you were wondering, no, I am not the person who knows what tickets are of interest. I know that this one has gotten a fair number of votes, and by votes is one of the top ranked enhancement suggestions - look under "enhancements" on this report, or search for 1330: http://jafingerhut.github.io/clj-ticket-status/CLJ-top-tickets-by-weighted-vote.html

The features going into Clojure 1.7 are pretty well decided upon, and a fair number of other fixes and enhancements were delayed to 1.8. A longer than 1 year wait is not unusual, especially for enhancements.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 26/Nov/14 3:06 PM ]

Thanks for the info; don't want to come off as whiny but The Great Silence is off putting to someone who wants to help improve things.

I'll update my patch, and hope to see some motion for 1.8.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Nov/14 3:43 PM ]

There are ~400 open tickets for Clojure. As a printing enhancement, this is generally considered lower priority than defects. Additionally, the proposal changes the compiler, bytecode generation code, and adds fields to generated objects, which has unassessed and potentially wide impacts. The combination of these things means it might be a while before we get around to looking at it.

Things that you could do to help:
1) Simplify the description. Someone coming to this ticket (screeners and ultimately Rich) want to look at the description and get the maximal understanding with the minimal effort. We have some guidelines on this at http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Creating+Tickets if you haven't seen it. For an enhancement, a short (1-2 sentence) description of the problem and an example I can run in the repl is best. Then a proposal (again, as short as possible). Examples: CLJ-1529, CLJ-1325, CLJ-1378. For an enhancement like this, seeing (succinct) before/after versions where a user will see this is often the quickest way for a screener to understand the benefit.

2) Anticipate and remove blockers. As I mentioned above, you are changing the size of every function object. What is the impact on size and construction time? Providing data and/or a test harness saves a screener from doing this work. It's better to leave details in attachments or comments and refer to it in the description if it's lengthy.

3) Have others screen (per http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Screening+Tickets ) - while that is the job a screener (often me) will have to re-do, having more eyeballs on it early helps. Ask on #clojure for someone else to take a look, try it, etc. If there are open questions, leaving those in the description helps guide my work.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 26/Nov/14 4:09 PM ]

Alex, thanks for the advice. I'll follow through. Some of that data is already present, but I can make it more prominent.

I know that I'm overwhelmed by the number of issues (including enhancements and minor improvements) on the Tapestry issue list, so I'm understanding of problem space.

Comment by Steve Miner [ 17/May/15 9:06 AM ]

You could instead implement toString() on something like AFn.java.

public String toString() {
    String name = getClass().getSimpleName();
    return Compiler.demunge(name);
}
Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/May/15 11:06 AM ]

Munge+demunge is a lossy operation. Consider demunge as "best effort", not something to rely on.





[CLJ-1277] Speed up printing of time instants by adding type hints Created: 10/Oct/13  Updated: 03/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: ft, performance

Attachments: Text File clj-1277-1.txt    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

There are several occurrences of reflection in instant.clj that slow down the printing of time instants.

Clojure Google group conversation link: https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?shva=1#label/clojure/1419e1e6f6cc5b3d

The addition of a few type hints is enough to speed the printing of time instants by a factor of about 3 to 4.5, in a few small benchmarks.

Patch: clj-1277-1.txt
Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 10/Oct/13 12:07 AM ]

Patch clj-1277-1.txt adds 4 type hints that eliminate all reflection occurrences in source file instant.clj. Benchmarks show that it speeds up printing of java.util.Date and java.sql.Timestamp objects by a factor of about 3 to 4.5.

Latest Clojure master as of Oct 9 2013:

user=> (time (let [d (java.util.Date.)] (dotimes [i 3000000] (pr-str d))))
"Elapsed time: 24094.282 msecs"
user=> (import 'java.sql.Timestamp)
user=> (time (let [d (java.sql.Timestamp. 1300000000000)] (dotimes [i 2000000] (pr-str d))))
"Elapsed time: 20856.957 msecs"

That version of Clojure plus the patch clj-1277-1.txt:

user=> (time (let [d (java.util.Date.)] (dotimes [i 3000000] (pr-str d))))
"Elapsed time: 5085.847 msecs"
user=> (time (let [d (java.sql.Timestamp. 1300000000000)] (dotimes [i 2000000] (pr-str d))))
"Elapsed time: 7582.233 msecs"

Comment by Alexander Kiel [ 10/Oct/13 4:54 AM ]

Thanks for the patch Andy. But I don't like the (set! warn-on-reflection true). I think its better to use it only in the dev profile in leiningen. Not in real production code.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 10/Oct/13 4:06 PM ]

Alexander, Leiningen is not used for building Clojure itself. The two supported choices are Maven and ant. Several Clojure source files, e.g. core/protocols.clj and core/reducers.clj, set warn-on-reflection to true, I believe so that if code is changed in such a way as to introduce a warning, it will be caught more quickly.

If the screeners or Rich think it is inappropriate, it is easy enough to remove.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Oct/13 4:48 PM ]

Setting that is not uncommon in core clojure code and seems fine to me here.





[CLJ-1272] Agent thread executors do not use the global uncaught exception handler Created: 01/Oct/13  Updated: 05/Feb/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: David Greenberg Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: agents


 Description   

If you use Thread.setDefaultUncaughtExceptionHandler to catch all application exceptions, and then throw an exception in a future, that exception will get swallowed up in deployment environments that don't watch stdout. It seems that the agent's executors ought to delegate to the global handler.

This issue bit us, in that we deploy and monitor our system only through its logs and metrics, and never actually saw that exceptions were being thrown in futures.






[CLJ-1263] Allow static compilation of function invocations Created: 14/Sep/13  Updated: 07/Nov/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Mike Anderson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: compiler


 Description   

This proposal is to allow metadata on functions to prevent a fully dynamic var deref to be used whenever the function is called.

When the function is invoked, JVM "invokevirtual" instruction will be used, which is faster than the current implementation (var deref + IFn cast + invokinterface) and has less restrictions (no need to predefine interfaces to match the function parameters). The JVM is generally able to compile such invokevirtual instructions into extremely efficient code - effectively as fast as pure Java.

This is intended to pave the way to better support for statically compiled, high performance code. In particular, it allow:

  • Supporting arbitrary JVM primitives (float, int, byte, char etc.) as well as just double/long.
  • Supporting typed return values e.g. "String". This could eliminate many casts and type checks.
  • Supporting typed reference arguments (e.g. String).

Suggested usage:

(defn ^:static foo ^int [^String a ^String b]
(+ (count a) (Integer/parseInt b)))

Existing code / semantics should not be affected