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[CLJ-790] Primitive type hints on function names should print error message Created: 10/May/11  Updated: 23/Feb/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alan Dipert Assignee: Alan Dipert
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: errormsgs


 Description   

Functions returning primitives are hinted with metadata on the argument list, not on the function name. Using a primitive type hint on a function name should print an error message.

Currently, misplaced primitive hints are read without error.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Feb/15 9:20 PM ]

One can type hint a primitive value on a Var naming a function, or any value one wants, like so:

(def {:tag 'long} foo 17)

(defn {:tag 'double} bar [x y]
(* 2.0 x y))

I think it is odd that one must use {:tag 'long} instead of ^long, since trying to use ^long ends up giving the useless type hint that is the value of the function clojure.core/long.

However, the Clojure compiler will use the primitive type hints as shown in the examples above to avoid reflection in appropriate Java interop calls, so making them an error seems undesirable.





[CLJ-1793] Clear 'this' before calls in tail position Created: 05/Aug/15  Updated: 30/Mar/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Alex Miller
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: compiler
Environment:

1.8.0-alpha2 - 1.8.0-alpha4


Attachments: Text File 0001-Clear-this-before-calls-in-tail-position.patch     Text File clj-1793-2.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

(This ticket started life as CLJ-1250, was committed in 1.8.0-alpha2, pulled out after alpha4, and this is the new version that fixes the logic about whether in a tail call as well as addresses direct linking added in 1.8.0-alpha3.)

Problem: Original example was with reducers holding onto the head of a lazy seq:

(time (reduce + 0 (map identity (range 1e8))))    ;; works
(time (reduce + 0 (r/map identity (range 1e8))))  ;; oome from holding head of range

Example of regression from CLJ-1250 that now works correctly (doesn't clear this in nested loop) with CLJ-1793:

(let [done (atom false)
        f (future-call
            (fn inner []
              (while (not @done)
                (loop [found []]
                  (println (conj found 1))))))]
    (doseq [elem [:a :b :c :done]]
      (println "queue write " elem))
    (reset! done true)
    @f)

Approach: When invoking a method in a tail call, clear this prior to invoking.

The criteria for when a tail call is a safe point to clear 'this':

1) Must be in return position
2) Not in a try block (might need 'this' during catch/finally)
3) When not direct linked

Return position (#1) isn't simply (context == C.RETURN) because loop bodies are always parsed in C.RETURN context

A new dynvar METHOD_RETURN_CONTEXT tracks whether an InvokeExpr in tail position can directly leave the body of the compiled java method. It is set to RT.T in the outermost parsing of a method body and invalidated (set to null) when a loop body is being parsed where the context for the loop expression is not RETURN parsed. Added clear in StaticInvokeExpr as that is now a thing with direct linking again.

Removes calls to emitClearLocals(), which were a no-op.

Patch: clj-1793-2.patch

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 05/Aug/15 12:16 PM ]

The this ref is cleared prior to the println, but the next time through the while loop it needs the this ref to look up the closed over done field (via getfield).

Adding an additional check to the inTailCall() method to not include tail call in a loop addresses this case:

static boolean inTailCall(C context) {
-    return (context == C.RETURN) && (IN_TRY_BLOCK.deref() == null);
+    return (context == C.RETURN) && (IN_TRY_BLOCK.deref() == null) && (LOOP_LOCALS.deref() == null);
}

But want to check some more things before concluding that's all that's needed.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 05/Aug/15 1:36 PM ]

This change undoes the desired behavior in the original CLJ-1250 (new tests don't pass). For now, we are reverting the CLJ-1250 patch in master.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 05/Aug/15 3:12 PM ]

Loop exit edges are erroneously being identified as places to clear 'this'. Only exits in the function itself or the outermost loop are safe places to clear.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 05/Aug/15 8:43 PM ]

Patch addresses this bug and the regression in CLJ-1250.

See the commit message for an extensive-ish comment.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Aug/15 12:33 PM ]

New patch is same as old, just adds jira id to beginning of commit message.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 24/Aug/15 10:00 AM ]

Not doing this for 1.8, more thought needs to go into whether this is the right solution to the problem. And, what is the problem? This title of this patch is just something to do.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 24/Aug/15 10:21 AM ]

changing to vetted so this is at a valid place in the jira workflow

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 24/Aug/15 10:45 AM ]

Rich the original context is in CLJ-1250 which was a defect/problem. It was merged and revert because of a problem in the impl. This ticket is the continuation of the previous one, but unfortunately the title lost the context and became approach-oriented and not problem-oriented. Blame Alex. (I kid, it's an artifact of the mutable approach to issue management.)

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 23/Mar/16 7:34 AM ]

Just a note that the original ticket for this issue had 10 votes

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 30/Mar/16 8:50 AM ]

The following code currently eventually causes an OOM to happen, the patch in this ticket correctly helps not holding onto the collection and doesn't cause memory to run infinitely

Before patch:

user=> (defn range* [x] (cons x (lazy-seq (range* (inc x)))))
#'user/range*
user=> (reduce + 0 (eduction (range* 0)))
OutOfMemoryError Java heap space  clojure.lang.RT.cons (RT.java:660)

After patch:

user=> (defn range* [x] (cons x (lazy-seq (range* (inc x)))))
#'user/range*
user=> (reduce + 0 (eduction (range* 0)))
;; runs infinitely without causing OOM




[CLJ-1221] Should repackage jsr166 and include known version with Clojure Created: 20/Jun/13  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Alex Miller
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: reducers


 Description   

Clojure 1.5 reducers work with either the JDK version of forkjoin (JDK 1.7+) or with an external jsr166 jar. This causes complexity for users and complexity in the build to deal with the two options.

jsr166 code is public domain and it is common for other projects to repackage the handful of files and ship it with the project (similar to what we do with asm). This would allow us just use a known existing version of jsr166 across all jdks and we could get rid of the custom build wrangling we introduced in Clojure 1.5.

jsr166y is compatible with JDK 1.6+ and is the version that (for example) Scala currently repackages. That's the best choice for JDK 1.6 and 1.7. In JDK 1.8, the best choice will (temporarily) be the built-in version in java.util.concurrent which tracks jsr166e but then as soon as there are updates will become jsr166e. Many fork/join fixes are ported to both y and e right now.

Some choices here for JDK 1.8:

  • go for maximal compatibility just use repackaged jsr166y regardless of JDK (simplest)
  • check for jdk version # and use java.util.concurrent instead
  • check for jdk version # and repackage jsr166e and use it instead

Not sure yet which of these is best choice right now.






[CLJ-1103] Make conj assoc dissoc and transient versions handle args similarly Created: 04/Nov/12  Updated: 12/Oct/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4, Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Alex Miller
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 7
Labels: collections, transient

Attachments: File clj-1103-7.diff     Text File clj-1103-8.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Examples that work as expected:

Clojure 1.7.0-master-SNAPSHOT
user=> (dissoc {})
{}
user=> (disj #{})
#{}
user=> (conj {})
{}
user=> (conj [])
[]

Examples that do not work as desired, but are changed by the proposed patch:

user=> (assoc {})
ArityException Wrong number of args (1) passed to: core/assoc  clojure.lang.AFn.throwArity (AFn.java:429)
user=> (assoc! (transient {}))
ArityException Wrong number of args (1) passed to: core/assoc!  clojure.lang.AFn.throwArity (AFn.java:429)
user=> (dissoc! (transient {}))
ArityException Wrong number of args (1) passed to: core/dissoc!  clojure.lang.AFn.throwArity (AFn.java:429)

I looked through the rest of the code for similar cases, and found that there were some other differences between them in how different numbers of arguments were handled, such as:

+ conj handles an arbitrary number of arguments, but conj! does not.
+ assoc checks for a final key with no value specified (CLJ-1052), but assoc! did not.

History/discussion: A discussion came up in the Clojure Google group about conj giving an error when taking only a coll as an argument, as opposed to disj which works for this case:

https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/clojure/Z9mFxsTYTqQ

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 04/Nov/12 6:04 PM ]

clj-1103-make-conj-assoc-dissoc-handle-args-similarly-v1.txt dated Nov 4 2012 makes conj conj! assoc assoc! dissoc dissoc! handle args similarly to each other.

Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 09/Dec/12 5:30 PM ]

I too ran into this and started an additional discussion here: https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure-dev/wL5hllfhw4M/discussion

In particular, I don't buy the argument that (into coll xs) is sufficient, since into implies conj and there isn't an terse and idiomatic way to write (into map (parition 2 keyvals))

So +1 from me

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Nov/13 10:41 AM ]

Patch clj-1103-2.diff is identical to the previous patch clj-1103-make-conj-assoc-dissoc-handle-args-similarly-v1.txt except it applies cleanly to latest master. The only changes were some changed context lines in a test file.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Nov/13 12:52 AM ]

Patch clj-1103-3.diff is identical to the patch clj-1103-2.diff, except it applies cleanly to latest master. The only changes were some doc strings for assoc! and dissoc! in the context lines of the patch.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 14/Feb/14 12:04 PM ]

Patch clj-1103-4.diff is identical to the previous clj-1103-3.diff, except it updates some context lines so that it applies cleanly to latest Clojure master as of today.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 05/Jun/14 9:29 PM ]

Can someone update the description with some code examples? Or drop them here at least?

Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 05/Jun/14 9:35 PM ]

What do you mean code examples?

These currently work as expected:
(dissoc {})
(disj #{})

The following fail with arity errors:
(assoc {})
(conj {})

Similarly for the transient ! versions.

This is annoying if you ever try to do (apply assoc m keyvals)... it works at first glance, but then one day, bamn! Runtime error because you tried to give it an empty sequence of keyvals.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Aug/14 5:05 PM ]

Patch clj-1103-5.diff dated Aug 6 2014 applies cleanly to latest Clojure master as of today, whereas the previous patch did not. Rich added 1-arg version of conj to 1.7.0-alpha1, so that change no longer is part of this patch.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 6:04 PM ]

Patch clj-1103-6.diff dated Aug 29 2014 is identical to the former patch clj-1103-5.diff (which will be deleted), except it applies cleanly to the latest Clojure master.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 26/May/15 9:00 PM ]

Patch clj-1103-7.diff dated May 25 2015 is identical to the former patch clj-1103-6.diff (which will be deleted), except it applies cleanly to the latest Clojure master.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 12/Oct/15 5:32 PM ]

Updated patch to apply cleanly to master





[CLJ-1385] Docstrings for `conj!` and `assoc!` should suggest using the return value; effect not always in-place Created: 16/Mar/14  Updated: 09/Nov/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: Release 1.9

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Pyry Jahkola Assignee: Alex Miller
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: collections, docstring, ft

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1385-reword-docstrings-on-transient-update-funct-2.patch     Text File CLJ-1385-reword-docstrings-on-transient-update-funct.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

The docstrings of both `assoc!` and `conj!` say "Returns coll.", possibly suggesting the transient edit happens (always) in-place, `coll` being the first argument. However, this is not the case and the returned collection should always be the one that's used.

Approach: Replace "Returns coll." with "Returns an updated collection." in `conj!`, `assoc!`, `pop!` docstrings.

Patch: CLJ-1385-reword-docstrings-on-transient-update-funct-2.patch

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 16/Mar/14 8:49 AM ]

When modifying transient collections, it is required to use the collection returned from functions like assoc!. The ! here indicates its destructive nature. The transients page (http://clojure.org/transients) describes the calling pattern pretty explicitly: "You must capture and use the return value in the next call."

I do not agree that we should be guiding programmers away from using functions like assoc! – transients are used as a performance optimization and using assoc! or conj! in a loop is often the fastest version of that. However I do think it would be helpful to make the docstring more explicit.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 05/Apr/14 10:23 AM ]

Alex I think you must have misread the ticket – the OP is suggesting guiding toward using the return value of assoc!, not avoiding assoc! altogether.

And the docstring is not simply inexplicit, it's actually incorrect specifically in the case that the OP pointed out. conj! and assoc do not return coll at the point where array-maps transition to hash-maps, and the fact that they do otherwise is supposed to be an implementation detail as far as I understand it.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 05/Apr/14 11:55 AM ]

@Gary - you're right, I did misread that.

assoc and conj both explicitly say "return a new collection" whereas assoc! and conj! say "Returns coll." I read that as "returns the modified collection" without regard to whether it's the identical instance, but I can read it your way too.

Would saying "Returns updated collection." transmit the right idea? Using "collection" instead of "coll" removes the concrete tie to the variable and "updated" hints more strongly that you should use the return value.

Comment by Pyry Jahkola [ 05/Apr/14 12:47 PM ]

@Alex, that update makes it sound right to me, FWIW.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 05/Apr/14 2:37 PM ]

Yeah, I think that's better. Thanks Alex. I'd be happy to submit a patch for that but I'm assuming patches are too heavy for this kind of change?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Apr/14 3:35 PM ]

Patches are exactly what has been done in the past for this kind of change, if it is in a doc string and not on the clojure.org web page.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 06/Apr/14 4:13 PM ]

Yup, patch desired.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 06/Apr/14 5:32 PM ]

Glad I asked.

Patch is attached that also updates the docstring for pop! which had the same issue, though arguably it's less important since afaik pop! does always return the identical collection (but I don't think this is part of the contract).

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Aug/14 2:14 PM ]

Patch CLJ-1385-reword-docstrings-on-transient-update-funct.patch dated Apr 6 2014 no longer applies to latest Clojure master cleanly, due to some changes committed earlier today. I suspect it should be straightforward to update the patch to apply cleanly, given that they are doc string changes, but there may have been doc string changes committed to master, too.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 06/Aug/14 3:04 PM ]

Attached a new patch.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 09/Oct/15 8:04 AM ]

I think it could be clearer still, since we want people to know the original coll might have been affected and returned, and the return must be used for subsequent calls. I think some of the language from the transients page should make it into these docstrings.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 24/Oct/15 2:25 PM ]

Would it be correct to say that the collection passed into pop! conj! assoc! etc. has undefined contents after the operation completes, and only the return value has defined contents?

That kind of strong wording may get people's attention.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 24/Oct/15 9:07 PM ]

I'm working on this.





[CLJ-124] GC Issue 120: Determine mechanism for controlling automatic shutdown of Agents, with a default policy and mechanism for changing that policy as needed Created: 17/Jun/09  Updated: 23/Aug/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Chas Emerick Assignee: Alex Miller
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 11
Labels: agents

Attachments: Text File clj-124-daemonthreads-v1.patch     Text File clj-124-v1.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Vetted
Waiting On: Rich Hickey

 Description   

The original description when this ticket was vetted is below, starting with "Reported by cemer...@snowtide.com, June 01, 2009". This prefix attempts to summarize the issue and discussion.

Description:

Several Clojure functions involving agents and futures, such as future, pmap, clojure.java.shell/sh, and a few others, create non-daemon threads in the JVM in an ExecutorService called soloExecutor created via Executors#newCachedThreadPool. The javadocs for this method here http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/Executors.html#newCachedThreadPool%28%29 say "Threads that have not been used for sixty seconds are terminated and removed from the cache." This causes a 60-second wait after a Clojure program is done before the JVM process exits. Questions about this confusing behavior come up a couple of times per year on the Clojure Google group. Search for "shutdown-agents" to find most of these occurrences, since calling (shutdown-agents) at the end of one's program typically eliminates this 60-second wait.

Example:

% java -cp clojure.jar clojure.main -e "(println 1)"
1
[ this case exits quickly ]

% java -cp clojure.jar clojure.main -e "(println @(future 1))"
1
[ 60-second pause before process exits, at least on many platforms and JVMs ]

Summary of comments before July 2014:

Most of the comments on this ticket on or before August 23, 2010 were likely spread out in time before being imported from the older ticket tracking system into JIRA. Most of them refer to an older suggested patch that is not in JIRA, and compilation problems it had with JDK 1.5, which is no longer supported by Clojure 1.6.0. I think these comments can be safely ignored now.

Alex Miller blogged about this and related issues here: http://tech.puredanger.com/2010/06/08/clojure-agent-thread-pools/

Since then, two of the suggestions Alex raised have been addressed. One by CLJ-378 and one by the addition of set-agent-send-executor! and similar functions to Clojure 1.5.0: https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/changes.md#23-clojurecoreset-agent-send-executor-set-agent-send-off-executor-and-send-via

One remaining issue is the topic of this ticket, which is how best to avoid this 60-second pause.

Approach #1: automatically shut down agents

One method is mentioned in Chas Emerick's original description below, suggested by Rich Hickey, but perhaps long enough ago he may no longer endorse it: Create a Var *auto-shutdown-agents* that when true (the default value), clojure.lang.Agent shutdown() is called after the clojure.main entry point. This removes the surprising wait for common methods of starting Clojure, while allowing expert users to change that value to false if desired.

Approach #2: create daemon threads by default

Another method mentioned by several people in the comments is to change the threads created in agent thread pools to daemon threads by default, and perhaps to deprecate shutdown-agents or modify it to be less dangerous. That approach is discussed a bit more in Alex's blog post linked above, and in a comment from Alexander Taggart on July 11, 2011 below.

Approach #3:

The only other comment before 2014 that is not elaborated in this summary is shoover's suggestion: There are already well-defined and intuitive ways to block on agents and futures. Why not deprecate shutdown-agents and force users to call await and deref if they really want to block? In the pmap situation one would have to evaluate the pmap form.

Approach #4: Create a cached thread pool with a timeout much lower than 60 seconds

This could be done by using one of the ThreadPoolExecutor constructors with a keepAliveTime parameter of the desired time.

Patch: clj-124-v1.patch clj-124-daemonthreads-v1.patch

At most one of these patches should be considered, depending upon the desired approach to take.

Patch clj-124-v1.patch implements appproach #1 using *auto-shutdown-agents*. See the Jul 31 2014 comment when this patch was added for some additional details.

Patch clj-124-daemonthreads-v1.patch implements approach #2 and is straightforward.

Reported by cemer...@snowtide.com, Jun 01, 2009

There has been intermittent chatter over the past months from a couple of
people on the group (e.g.
http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/409054e3542adc1f)
and in #clojure about some clojure scripts hanging, either for a constant
time (usually reported as a minute or so with no CPU util) or seemingly
forever (or until someone kills the process).

I just hit a similar situation in our compilation process, which invokes
clojure.lang.Compile from ant.  The build process for this particular
project had taken 15 second or so, but after adding a couple of pmap calls,
that build time jumped to ~1:15, with roughly zero CPU utilization over the
course of that last minute.

Adding a call to Agent.shutdown() in the finally block in
clojure.lang.Compile/main resolved the problem; a patch including this
change is attached.  I wouldn't suspect anyone would have any issues with
such a change.

-----
In general, it doesn't seem like everyone should keep tripping over this
problem in different directions.  It's a very difficult thing to debug if
you're not attuned to how clojure's concurrency primitives work under the
hood, and I would bet that newer users would be particularly affected.

After discussion in #clojure, rhickey suggested adding a
*auto-shutdown-agents* var, which:

- if true when exiting one of the main entry points (clojure.main, or the
legacy script/repl entry points), Agent.shutdown() would be called,
allowing for the clean exit of the application

- would be bound by default to true

- could be easily set to false for anyone with an advanced use-case that
requires agents to remain active after the main thread of the application
exits.

This would obviously not help anyone initializing clojure from a different
entry point, but this may represent the best compromise between
least-surprise and maximal functionality for advanced users.

------

In addition to the above, it perhaps might be worthwhile to change the
keepalive values used to create the Threadpools used by c.l.Actor's
Executors.  Currently, Actor uses a default thread pool executor, which
results in a 60s keepalive.  Lowering this to something much smaller (1s?
5s?) would additionally minimize the impact of Agent's threadpools on Java
applications that embed clojure directly (and would therefore not benefit
from *auto-shutdown-agents* as currently conceived, leading to puzzling
'hanging' behaviour).  I'm not in a position to determine what impact this
would have on performance due to thread churn, but it would at least
minimize what would be perceived as undesirable behaviour by users that are
less familiar with the implementation details of Agent and code that
depends on it.

Comment 1  by cemer...@snowtide.com, Jun 01, 2009

Just FYI, I'd be happy to provide patches for either of the suggestions mentioned
above...


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/124
Attachments:
compile-agent-shutdown.patch - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/a56S2ow4ur3O2PeJe5afGb/download/a56S2ow4ur3O2PeJe5afGb
124-compilation.diff - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/aqn0IGxZSr3RUGeJe5aVNr/download/aqn0IGxZSr3RUGeJe5aVNr

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

oranenj said: [file:a56S2ow4ur3O2PeJe5afGb]

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #19, #30, #31, #126, #17, #42, #47, #50, #61, #64, #69, #71, #77, #79, #84, #87, #89, #96, #99, #103, #107, #112, #113, #114, #115, #118, #119, #121, #122, #124)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

cemerick said: (In [[r:fa3d24973fc415b35ae6ec8d84b61ace76bd4133]]) Add a call to Agent.shutdown() at the end of clojure.lang.Compile/main Refs #124

Signed-off-by: Chouser <chouser@n01se.net>

Branch: master

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

chouser@n01se.net said: I'm closing this ticket to because the attached patch solves a specific problem. I agree that the idea of an auto-shutdown-agents var sounds like a positive compromise. If Rich wants a ticket to track that issue, I think it'd be best to open a new ticket (and perhaps mention this one there) rather than use this ticket to track further changes.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

scgilardi said: With both Java 5 and Java 6 on Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard I'm getting an error when compiling with this change present.

Java 1.5.0_19
Java 1.6.0_13

For example, when building clojure using "ant" from within my clone of the clojure repo:

[java] java.security.AccessControlException: access denied (java.lang.RuntimePermission modifyThread)
[java] at java.security.AccessControlContext.checkPermission(AccessControlContext.java:264)
[java] at java.security.AccessController.checkPermission(AccessController.java:427)
[java] at java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor.shutdown(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:894)
[java] at clojure.lang.Agent.shutdown(Agent.java:34)
[java] at clojure.lang.Compile.main(Compile.java:71)

I reproduced this on two Mac OS X 10.5 machines. I'm not aware of having any enhanced security policies along these lines on my machines. The compile goes fine for me with Java 1.6.0_0 on an Ubuntu box.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

chouser@n01se.net said: I had only tested it on my ubuntu box – looks like that was openjdk 1.6.0_0. I'll test again with sun-java5 and sun-java6.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

chouser@n01se.net said: 1.6.0_13 worked fine for me on ubuntu, but 1.5.0_18 generated an the exception Steve pasted. Any suggestions? Should this patch be backed out until someone has a fix?

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

achimpassen said: [file:aqn0IGxZSr3RUGeJe5aVNr]

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

chouser@n01se.net said: With Achim's patch, clojure compiles for me on ubuntu using java 1.5.0_18 from sun, and still works on 1.6.0_13 sun and 1.6.0_0 openjdk. I don't know anything about ant or the security error, but this is looking good to me.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

achimpassen said: It works for me on 1.6.0_13 and 1.5.0_19 (32 and 64 bit) on OS X 10.5.7.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

chouser@n01se.net said: (In [[r:895b39dabc17b3fd766fdbac3b0757edb0d4b60d]]) Rev fa3d2497 causes compile to fail on some VMs – back it out. Refs #124

Branch: master

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

mikehinchey said: I got the same compile error on both 1.5.0_11 and 1.6.0_14 on Windows. Achim's patch fixes both.

See the note for "permissions" on http://ant.apache.org/manual/CoreTasks/java.html . I assume ThreadPoolExecutor.shutdown is the problem, it would shutdown the main Ant thread, so Ant disallows that. Forking avoids the permissions limitation.

In addition, since the build error still resulted in "BUILD SUCCESSFUL", I think failonerror="true" should also be added to the java call so the build would totally fail for such an error.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

chouser@n01se.net said: I don't know if the <java fork=true> patch is a good idea or not, or if there's a better way to solve the original problem.

Chas, I'm kicking back to you, but I guess if you don't want it you can reassign to "nobody".

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #42, #113, #2, #20, #94, #96, #104, #119, #124, #127, #149, #162)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

shoover said: I'd like to suggest an alternate approach. There are already well-defined and intuitive ways to block on agents and futures. Why not deprecate shutdown-agents and force users to call await and deref if they really want to block? In the pmap situation one would have to evaluate the pmap form.

The System.exit problem goes away if you configure the threadpools to use daemon threads (call new ThreadPoolExecutor and pass a thread factory that creates threads and sets daemon to true). That way the user has an explicit means of blocking and System.exit won't hang.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:45 AM ]

alexdmiller said: I blogged about these issues at:
http://tech.puredanger.com/2010/06/08/clojure-agent-thread-pools/

I think that:

  • agent thread pool threads should be named (see ticket #378)
  • agent thread pools must be daemon threads by default
  • having ways to specify an customized executor pool for an agent send/send-off is essential to customize threading behavior
  • (shutdown-agents) should be either deprecated or made less dangerous
Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 11/Jul/11 9:33 PM ]

Rich, what is the intention behind using non-daemon threads in the agent pools?

If it is because daemon threads could terminate before their work is complete, would it be acceptable to add a shutdown hook to ensure against such premature termination? Such a shutdown hook could call Agent.shutdown(), then awaitTermination() on the pools.

Comment by Christopher Redinger [ 27/Nov/12 3:47 PM ]

Moving this ticket out of approval "OK" status, and dropping the priority. These were Assembla import defaults.

Also, Chas gets to be the Reporter now.

Comment by Chas Emerick [ 27/Nov/12 5:56 PM ]

Heh, blast from the past.

The comment import appears to have set their timestamps to the date of the import, so the conversation is pretty hard to follow, and obviously doesn't benefit from the intervening years of experience. In addition, there have been plenty of changes to agents, including some recent enhancements that address some of the pain points that Alex Miller mentioned above.

I propose closing this as 'invalid' or whatever, and opening one or more new issues to track whatever issues still persist (presumably based on fresh ML discussion, etc).

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 27/Nov/12 6:11 PM ]

Rereading the original description of this ticket, without reading all of the comments that follow, that description is still right on target for the behavior of latest Clojure master today.

People send messages to the Clojure Google group every couple of months hitting this issue, and one even filed CLJ-959 because of hitting it. I have updated the examples on ClojureDocs.org for future, and also for pmap and clojure.java.shell/sh which use future in their implementations, to warn people about this and explain that they should call (shutdown-agents), but making it unnecessary to call shutdown-agents would be even better, at least as the default behavior. It sounds fine to me to provide a way for experts on thread behavior to change that default behavior if they need to.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 31/Jul/14 6:39 PM ]

Patch clj-124-v1.patch dated Jul 31 2014 implements the approach of calling clojure.lang.Agent#shutdown when the new Var *auto-shutdown-agents* is true, which is its default value.

I don't see any benefit to making this Var dynamic. Unless I am missing something, only the root binding value is visible after clojure.main/main returns, not any binding that would be pushed on top of that if it were dynamic. It seems to require alter-var-root to change it to false in a way that this patch would avoid calling clojure.lang.Agent#shutdown.

This patch only adds the shutdown call to clojure.main#main, but can easily be added to the legacy_repl and legacy_script methods if desired.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Aug/14 11:49 AM ]

Patch clj-124-daemonthreads-v1.patch dated Aug 23 2014 simply modifies the ThreadFactory so that every thread created in an agent thread pool is a daemon thread.





[CLJ-706] make use of deprecated namespaces/vars easier to spot Created: 05/Jan/11  Updated: 11/Mar/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Stuart Halloway Assignee: Cezary Kosko
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 19
Labels: errormsgs

Attachments: File 706-deprecated-ns-var-warnings-tested-2.diff     File 706-deprecated-ns-var-warnings-tested-3.diff     File 706-deprecated-ns-var-warnings-tested.diff     File 706-deprecated-var-warning.diff     Text File 706-deprecated-var-warning-patch-v2.txt     File 706-fix-deprecation-warnings-agents.diff     File 706-fix-deprecation-warnings-on-replicate.diff     File 706-fix-deprecation-warning-test-junit.diff     File 706-warning-on-deprecated-ns.diff    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Prescreened

 Description   

From the mailing list http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/msg/c41d909bd58e4534. It is easy to use deprecated namespaces or vars without knowing you are doing so. The documentation warnings are small, and there is no compiler warning.

Proposed:

  • Add new *warn-on-deprecated* dynamic var, defaulted to false
  • Warn to stderr when {:deprecated true} namespace is loaded.
  • Warn to stderr when {:deprecated true} var is analyzed.
  • Warn to stderr when {:deprecated true} macro is expanded.
  • New system property clojure.compiler.warn-on-deprecated
  • Compile Clojure itself with clojure.compiler.warn-on-deprecated
  • Fix deprecation warnings inside Clojure (replicate, clear-agent-errors)
  • Mark clojure.parallel as deprecated with :deprecation tag

Examples:

(set! *warn-on-deprecated* true)

;; use of a deprecated var (on compile)
(defn ^:deprecated f [x] x)
(f 5)
;;=> Deprecation warning, NO_SOURCE_PATH:7:1 : var #'user/f is deprecated

;; use of a deprecated macro (on macro expansion)
(defmacro ^:deprecated m [x] x)
(m 5)
;;=> Deprecation warning, NO_SOURCE_PATH:7:1 : macro #'user/m is deprecated

;; use of a deprecated namespace (on load)
(ns foo {:deprecated "1.1"})
(ns bar (:require foo))
;;=> Deprecation warning: loading deprecated namespace `foo` from namespace `bar`

Patch: 706-deprecated-ns-var-warnings-tested-3.diff

Questions: Should default for deprecation warnings be true instead? People upgrading are likely to see new warnings which might be surprising.

  • Should default be to warn or not warn on deprecated?


 Comments   
Comment by Rich Hickey [ 07/Jan/11 9:38 AM ]

I don't mind warning to stderr

Comment by Luke VanderHart [ 26/Oct/12 1:37 PM ]

706-deprecated-var-warning.diff adds warnings when using deprecated vars. The other three patches clean up deprecation warnings.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 26/Oct/12 2:23 PM ]

Great stuff. I looked through the first patch, and didn't see anything in there that lets someone disable deprecation warnings from the command line, the way that warn-on-reflection can today be set to true with a command line option.

Is that something important to have for deprecation warnings?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 28/Oct/12 4:57 PM ]

I was hoping it would be quick and easy to add source file, line, and column info to the deprecation warning messages. It isn't as easy as adding them to the format() call, because the method analyzeSymbol doesn't receive these values as args. Is this deprecation check being done in a place where it is not easy to relate it to the source file, line, and column? Could it be done in a place where that info is easily available?

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 29/Oct/12 1:02 AM ]

Another patch - this time to warn on loading deprecated namespaces, instead of vars. This patch requires the first one.

Re: line/column, I'll figure out how to thread the compile context through if it's desired.

Re: Compile flag. I have a patch for this also, but I'm still verifying how to invoke. How is warn-on-reflection set by command line?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Oct/12 1:43 AM ]

Re: Compile flag. Don't hold off on implementing a flag if you want to, but it might be worth hearing from others whether such a command line option is even desired. I was asking in hopes of eliciting such a response.

For the way that it is handled in the Clojure compiler, search for REFLECTION_WARNING_PROP and related code in Compile.java. If you invoke the Clojure compiler directly via a Java command line, use -Dclojure.compile.warn-on-reflection=true (default is false). See the recent email thread sent to Clojure Dev Google group if you want to know how to do it via ant or Maven. Link: https://mail.google.com/mail/?shva=1#label/clojure-dev/13aa0e34530196c3

There is also a separate command-line flag called compiler-options (see Compile.java) that is implemented as a map inside the compiler. It was added more recently than warn-on-reflection, and might be the preferred method to add more such options, to avoid having to continue to add more arguments to the pushThreadBindings calls done in several places.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 29/Oct/12 10:36 AM ]

Thanks, Andy.

Alternately for the last ns patch, it is equivalent to call (print-method msg err), rather than binding out to err, may be more readable. I'll be glad to send that in if it's preferable.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 13/Feb/13 12:38 AM ]

706-deprecated-var-warning-patch-v2.txt dated Feb 12 2013 is identical to 706-deprecated-var-warning.diff dated Oct 26 2012, except it applies cleanly to latest master.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Feb/15 8:21 PM ]

For the information of anyone examining this ticket wishing for this feature, the Eastwood lint tool reports calls to deprecated Clojure functions, and also to deprecated Java methods. https://github.com/jonase/eastwood

Comment by Alex Miller [ 25/Jan/16 12:32 PM ]

I'm interested in considering this for Clojure 1.9 but I need some help getting it ready. Some comments I have on the current state: - Ticket needs to have more details about the current approach

  • I prefer *warn-on-deprecated* over *warn-on-deprecation* because it echoes the keyword you use to mark deprecated vars
  • The warning message does not tell you a location, which is grr - should be similar to the reflection messages
  • Needs tests - see test/clojure/test_clojure/compilation.clj and test/clojure/test_helper.clj (should-not-reflect) for examples
  • clojure itself has some instances of deprecated usage - it would be nice to clean those up in the patch too. That may need to be in a separate patch, depends if they are easy to fix or not. If there are cases in test/ that are actually good to leave, can set *warn-on-deprecated* to false in that namespace.
  • Current default is true - should probably be false instead to match the reflection warning default.
Comment by Vijay Kiran [ 26/Jan/16 3:10 AM ]

Alex Miller I can give this a shot.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Jan/16 8:51 AM ]

Hey Vijay, Andrew Rosa assigned it to himself so please coordinate with him as he was starting to work on it.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 26/Jan/16 10:52 AM ]

Just one small remark - isn't it more common to have deprecation warnings enabled by default? One could argue they are way more important than reflection warnings, as your code might get broken in the future because you didn't notice you were using deprecated stuff.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Jan/16 2:01 PM ]

Bozhidar Batsov I'm on the fence. My main hesitation in making it the default is that people will suddenly have a bunch of new warnings (which could be either good or bad I suppose). Depends how strongly we want people to care about deprecations I guess.

Comment by Phill Wolf [ 26/Jan/16 9:33 PM ]

A deprecation warning that is off by default does not address the first and primary problem given in this ticket: "It is easy to use deprecated namespaces without knowing you are doing so."

It's unlike the reflection warning. You may focus on speed at any time, at your leisure. But the eventual removal of at-risk features will be a sudden, unpleasant surprise; a warning would be helpful.

But - Suppose I wrote 300 lines of Clojure and use a million lines that come from jars. Will any deprecation problems in my own code be buried in a tsunami of warnings about those jars? Worse, the tsunami will likely linger for weeks or months, until the libraries' respective authors catch up. Inasmuch as the jars are covered (much more expediently) by 'lein ancient' and similar, I would prefer to be able to limit deprecation warnings to just my stuff, perhaps by namespace prefix if from-a-jar-or-not is inconvenient from the compiler's point of view.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Jan/16 10:35 PM ]

There is a middle ground here to turn it off by default in the compiler, but to turn it on by default in the tools (like lein). But there's a reasonable chance that whatever I prefer, Rich will have a preference that overrules it when it gets to him.

I think creating more complexity around namespace prefixes is unlikely to help this ticket move forward.

Comment by Cezary Kosko [ 07/Mar/16 9:18 PM ]

Uploaded a patch that coalesces var/ns-related patches by Luke & adds tests.
The patch does not, however, warn the user about deprecated macros, I assume I should adjust it, then?

Also, I'm not able adjust the description, so how do I take care of Alex's list's first bullet?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Mar/16 1:05 AM ]

Cezary, I have bumped up your permissions on JIRA so you should be able to edit tickets now. Please reload the page and try again.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Mar/16 10:54 AM ]
  • The if in the first change in core.clj should be a when instead.
  • Can namespace deprecation warning include more about where this is occurring?
  • I'm having a hard time reproducing the deprecated ns warning in a manual test (see below). There seems to be something weird about the binding+printf as the conditions appear to be satisfied. I'm thinking it has something to do with flushing *err*? Seems like (println "Warning: loading deprecated ns" lib) would be better there.
(set! *warn-on-deprecated* true)
(ns foo {:deprecated true})
(ns bar (:require foo))
  • src/jvm/clojure/lang/Compile.java needs added support for clojure.compile.warn-on-deprecated RT flag
  • I think we should turn on warn-on-deprecated in the Clojure build itself (in build.xml)
  • If you do that, the following deprecation warnings exist in the Clojure build itself and we should fix those:

[java] Deprecation warning, clojure/core_proxy.clj:112:75 : var #'clojure.core/replicate is tagged as deprecated
[java] Deprecation warning, clojure/genclass.clj:149:41 : var #'clojure.core/replicate is tagged as deprecated
[java] Deprecation warning, clojure/genclass.clj:235:65 : var #'clojure.core/replicate is tagged as deprecated
[java] Deprecation warning, clojure/test/junit.clj:118:22 : var #'clojure.test/file-position is tagged as deprecated

  • Mark clojure.parallel as deprecated in the ns meta
Comment by Cezary Kosko [ 11/Mar/16 5:40 AM ]

Uploaded a new diff addressing the comments & added warning on macroexpansion.

As far as the namespace deprecation warning goes, though, the code's only printing the current namespace, did not know whether there was a decent way to get a file/line combo.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Mar/16 8:53 AM ]

One more (hopefully final) round and then I think we're good:

  • The docstring for warn-on-deprecated should be updated now that we've expanded scope to cover ns too.
  • In the deprecated ns warning message, can we make it: "Deprecation warning: loading deprecated namespace `foo` from namespace `bar`."
  • In the macro and var warnings can we change "is tagged as deprecated" to just "is deprecated"?
  • Clean up the hanging parens in test/clojure/test_clojure/compilation/deprecated.clj

Thanks for the work on this!!

Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Mar/16 1:49 PM ]

Marking pre-screened for Rich to look at.





[CLJ-1797] Mention cljc when require fails Created: 10/Aug/15  Updated: 09/Mar/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Mike Fikes Assignee: Cezary Kosko
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: errormsgs

Attachments: Text File clj-1797.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Prescreened

 Description   

If you attempt to require a namespace for which the code cannot be located, now that cljc files are considered when locating code, it could be mentioned in the list of files considered on the classpath.

$ java -jar clojure-1.7.0.jar 
Clojure 1.7.0
user=> (require 'foo.bar)
FileNotFoundException Could not locate foo/bar__init.class or foo/bar.clj on classpath.  clojure.lang.RT.load (RT.java:449)

Note: FWIW, ClojureScript has similar error messages, and the order listed in the error message is the order tried when loading. If this were followed, I suspect the text of the error message above would end up looking like:

Could not locate foo/bar__init.class, foo/bar.clj, or foo/bar.cljc on classpath.

Patch: clj-1797.patch
Approach: add info about cljcfile not found in exception thrown from load
Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Cezary Kosko [ 18/Jan/16 6:21 AM ]

Hey,

I'm a newbie, so I thought I'd do that one (even though it's not vetted yet, but seems it 's bound to be), to get a tad more familiar w/ the sources.

Kind regards,
Cezary

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jan/16 6:53 AM ]

Go for it!





[CLJ-129] Add documentation to sorted-set-by detailing how the provided comparator may change set membership semantics Created: 18/Jun/09  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: In Progress
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Chas Emerick
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: docstring


 Description   

To start, let's look at some simple default sorted-set behaviour (which uses PersistentHashMap via PersistentHashSet, and therefore uses equality/hashCode to determine identity):

user=> (sorted-set [1 2] [-5 10] [1 5])
#{[-5 10] [1 2] [1 5]}
</code></pre>

sorted-set-by uses PersistentTreeMap via PersistentTreeSet though, which implies that the comparator provided to sorted-set-by will be used to determine identity, and therefore member in the set.  This can lead to (IMO) non-intuitive behaviour:

<pre><code>
user=> (sorted-set-by #(> (first %) (first %2)) [1 2] [-5 10] [1 5])
#{[1 2] [-5 10]}

Notice that because the provided comparison fn determines that [1 2] and [1 5] have the same sort order, the latter value is considered identical to the former, and not included in the set. This behaviour could be very handy, but is also likely to cause confusion when what the user almost certainly wants is to maintain the membership semantics of the original set (e.g. relying upon equality/hashCode), but only modify the ordering.

(BTW, yes, I know there's far easier ways to get the order I'm indicating above over a set of vectors thanks to vectors being comparable via the compare fn. The examples are only meant to be illustrative. The same non-intuitive result would occur, with no easy fallback (like the 'compare' fn when working with vectors) when the members of the set are non-Comparable Java object, and the comparator provided to sorted-set-by is defining a sort over some values returned by method calls into those objects.)

I'd be happy to change the docs for sorted-set-by, but I suspect that there are others who could encapsulate what's going on here more correctly and more concisely than I.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 7:45 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/129

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 7:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#127, #128, #129, #130)





[CLJ-457] lazy recursive definition giving incorrect results Created: 13/Oct/10  Updated: 03/Aug/15

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Assembla Importer Assignee: Christophe Grand
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: File CLJ-457-2.diff     File clj-457-3.diff    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

If you define a global data var in terms of a lazy sequence referring to that same var, you can get different results depending on the chunkiness of laziness of the functions being used to build the collection.

Clojure's lazy sequences don't promise to support this, but they shouldn't return wrong answers. In the example given in http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/1c342fad8461602d (and repeated below), Clojure should not return bad data. An error message would be good, and even an infinite loop would be more reasonable than the current behavior.

(Similar issue reported here: https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure/yD941fIxhyE/discussion)

(def nums (drop 2 (range Long/MAX_VALUE)))
(def primes (cons (first nums)
             (lazy-seq (->>
               (rest nums)
               (remove
                 (fn [x]
                   (let [dividors (take-while #(<= (* % %) x)
primes)]
                     (println (str "primes = " primes))
                     (some #(= 0 (rem x %)) dividors))))))))
(take 5 primes)

It prints out:
(primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
2 3 5 7 9)


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 13/Oct/10 3:00 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/457

Comment by Aaron Bedra [ 10/Dec/10 9:08 AM ]

Stu and Rich talked about making this an error, but it would break some existing code to do so.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 17/Dec/10 8:03 AM ]

Is there a specific question on this?

Comment by Aaron Bedra [ 05/Jan/11 9:05 PM ]

Stu, you and I went over this but I can't remember exactly what the question was here.

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 28/Nov/12 12:24 PM ]

Tentative patch attached.
Have you an example of existing code which is broken by such a patch (as mention by Aaron Bedra)?

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 30/Nov/12 9:43 AM ]

The patch intends to do what? We have only a problem description and code. Please enumerate the plan rather than make us decipher the patch.

As a first principle, I don't want Clojure to promise that such recursively defined values are possible.

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 30/Nov/12 10:23 AM ]

The proposal here is to catch recursive seq realization (ie when computing the body of a lazy-seq attempts to access the same seq) and throw an exception.

Currently when such a case happens, the recursive access to the seq returns nil. This results in incorrect code seemingly working but producing incorrect results or even incorrect code producing correct results out of luck (see https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure/yD941fIxhyE/discussion for such an example).

So this patch moves around the modification to the LazySeq state (f, sv and s fields) before all potentially recursive method call (.sval in the while of .seq and .invoke in .sval) so that, upon reentrance, the state of the LazySeq is coherent and able to convey the fact the seq is already being computed.

Currently a recursive call may find f and sv cleared and concludes the computation is done and the result is in s despite s being unaffected yet.

Currently:

State f sv s
Unrealized not null null null
Realized null null anything
Being realized/recursive call from fn.invoke not null null null
Being realized/recursive call from ls.sval null null null

Note that "Being realized" states overlap with Unrealized or Realized.
(NB: "anything" includes null)

With the patch:

State f sv s
Unrealized not null null null
Realized null null anything but this
Being realized null null this
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Nov/12 2:06 PM ]

That last comment, Christophe, goes a long way to explaining the idea to me, at least. Any chance comments with similar content could be added as part of the patch?

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 03/Dec/12 11:18 AM ]

New patch with a comment explaining the expected states.
Note: I tidied the states table up.

// Before calling user code (f.invoke() in sval and, indirectly,
// ((LazySeq)ls).sval() in seq -- and even RT.seq() in seq), ensure that 
// the LazySeq state is in one of these states:
//
// State            f          sv
// ================================
// Unrealized       not null   null
// Realized         null       null
// Being realized   null       this

CLJ-1119 is also fixed by this patch.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Nov/13 12:35 AM ]

Patch clj-457-3.diff is identical to Christophe's CLJ-457-2.diff, except it has been updated to no longer conflict with the commit made for CLJ-949 on Nov 22, 2013, which basically removed the try/catch in method sval(). It passes tests, and I don't see anything wrong with it, but it would be good if Christophe could give it a look, too.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Aug/15 7:46 PM ]

No longer reproducible

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 03/Aug/15 10:01 AM ]

Alex, the posted example is no longer reproducible because `(range)` does not produce a chunked-seq anymore.
OTOH `(range n)` does so replacing `(range)` with something like `(range Long/MAX_VALUE)` in the code example in the ticket description is sufficient to resurface the bug:

Clojure 1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT
user=> (def nums (drop 2 (range Long/MAX_VALUE)))
#'user/nums
(def primes (cons (first nums)
             (lazy-seq (->>
               (rest nums)
               (remove
                 (fn [x]
                   (let [dividors (take-while #(<= (* % %) x)
primes)]
                     (println (str "primes = " primes))
                     (some #(= 0 (rem x %)) dividors))))))))
#'user/primes
user=> (take 5 primes)
(primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
2 3 5 7 9)




[CLJ-1096] Make destructuring emit direct keyword lookups Created: 29/Oct/12  Updated: 11/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4, Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Christophe Grand Assignee: Christophe Grand
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: destructuring, performance

Attachments: File desctructure-keyword-lookup.diff     File inline-get-keyword.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Currently associative destructuring emits calls to get. The attached patch modify desctruture to emit direct keyword lookups when possible.

Approved here https://groups.google.com/d/msg/clojure-dev/MaYcHQck8VA/nauMus4mzPgJ



 Comments   
Comment by Christophe Grand [ 04/Sep/13 3:40 AM ]

Rethinking about this patch now, it may be too specific: get's inline expansion should be modified when the key is a literal keyword.

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 04/Sep/13 3:41 AM ]

More generic patch (inline-get-keyword.diff): all get calls with literal keywords as keys are inlined to direct keyword lookup.

Comment by John Hume [ 19/May/14 1:14 PM ]

Is this only stalled out of lack of interest?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 19/May/14 6:13 PM ]

There are currently about 50 tickets "triaged", i.e. marked for Rich to look at and decide whether they are things he is interested in seeing a patch for, and another 25 or so that were triaged and he has "vetted" them, and they are in various stages of having patches written for them, screened, etc. That doesn't mean anything for this ticket in particular – just wanted to make it clear that there are a bunch of other tickets that are getting some attention, and a bunch of others that are not.

What gets triaged depends somewhat upon how severe the issue appears. You can vote on the ticket, and try to persuade others to do so as well, if they think this would enhance the performance of some commonly-written types of Clojure code. You could also consider doing some benchmarking with & without these patches to see how much performance they can gain.





[CLJ-326] add :as-of option to refer Created: 30/Apr/10  Updated: 26/Jul/13

Status: In Progress
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Backlog

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Christophe Grand Assignee: Christophe Grand
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Discussed here: http://groups.google.com/group/clojure-dev/msg/74af612909dcbe56

:as-of allows library authors to specify a known subset of vars to refer from clojure (or any other library which would use :added metadata).

(ns foo (:refer-clojure :as-of "1.1")) is equivalent to (ns foo (:refer-clojure :only [public-documented-vars-which-already-existed-in-1.1]))



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 10:19 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/326
Attachments:
add-as-of-to-refer.patch - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/a8SumUvcOr37SmeJe5cbLA/download/a8SumUvcOr37SmeJe5cbLA

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 10:19 AM ]

cgrand said: [file:a8SumUvcOr37SmeJe5cbLA]: requires application of #325

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 10:19 AM ]

richhickey said: Do we still need this?





[CLJ-1545] Add unchecked-divide, unchecked-remainder Created: 02/Oct/14  Updated: 06/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Colin Taylor
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: math, newbie

Attachments: File CLJ-1545-2.diff     File CLJ-1545.diff    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

This appears like it might be an oversight that these are missing. There are unchecked-divide-int and unchecked-remainder-int functions, but not equivalents for longs, even though there are equivalents for longs for every other unchecked operation. The JVM has bytecodes for long division and remainder.

The Clojure documentation in the section "Support for Java Primitives" on page http://clojure.org/java_interop has links for unchecked-divide and unchecked-remainder, but since they don't exist in Clojure, the API link targets don't exist.

It seems like a good idea to either add these to Clojure, or remove them from the documentation.



 Comments   
Comment by Colin Taylor [ 03/Oct/14 6:17 PM ]

Having a go at this.

Comment by Colin Taylor [ 04/Oct/14 6:02 AM ]
  • Added tests for unchecked-divide-int and unchecked-remainder-int too.
  • Unchecked fns only support binary arity and will throw CompilerException(ArityException)s where checked will not.
  • Is there any value to (int,long) (long,int) overrides for java interop cases e.g. using java collections from Clojure in high perf code?
Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Oct/14 9:13 AM ]

Thanks for taking this on Colin!

1) When I apply the patch (git apply CLJ-1545.diff), I get a bunch of whitespace errors which will need to be cleaned up but also the patch seems to fail to apply at all on the changes in test/clojure/test_clojure/numbers.clj. It looks like perhaps the diff is just not the right diff format. You might want to check out the instructions at http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches about using git format-patch.

2) If you could put a more useful git commit message, that would be helpful. Something like "CLJ-1545 Adds missing unchecked-divide and unchecked-remainder for primitive longs."

Thanks!

Comment by Colin Taylor [ 04/Oct/14 4:47 PM ]

Uggh, sorry Alex.

New patch with better commit message.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Oct/14 7:24 PM ]

The patch format looks better. Pulling out farther to the ticket itself, afaict Clojure will already use the right byteocode for checked or unchecked so this may not even be needed?

If I compile (without the patch):

(defn foo-div ^long [^long a ^long b]
  (quot a b))

then the bytecode for that fn is:

public final long invokePrim(long, long);
    Code:
       0: lload_1
       1: lload_3
       2: ldiv
       3: lreturn

similarly, quot of two longs yields the same code but with lrem. I think patch has no net effect on the resulting bytecode?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 04/Oct/14 7:42 PM ]

Alex, did you do the testing in your previous comment with *unchecked-math* true or false? If false, then I would think that if CLJ-1254 is judged a bug, then the behavior you saw is a bug, too, that misses the same corner case.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Oct/14 10:19 PM ]

The current results are the same with either unchecked-math setting, but I see your point.

Refreshing my memory of the (/ Long/MIN_VALUE -1) case, I think you're right. The (new) unchecked-divide / remainder should do what the current (checked) forms do and the regular division and remainder cases should be making the overflow check. I think CLJ-1254 should cover the quot changes.

Comment by Colin Taylor [ 04/Oct/14 10:19 PM ]

user=> (dotimes [_ 6] (time (dotimes [_ 50000000] (unchecked-divide 4 (System/currentTimeMillis)))))
"Elapsed time: 1806.942 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 1808.747 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 1865.074 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 1802.777 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 1839.468 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 1830.61 msecs"
nil
user=> (dotimes [_ 6] (time (dotimes [_ 50000000] (/ 4 (System/currentTimeMillis)))))
"Elapsed time: 5003.598 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 4998.182 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 4941.237 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 5036.517 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 4965.867 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 4982.693 msecs"





[CLJ-1817] Allow AssertionError messages for function :pre and :post conditions to be specified. Created: 23/Sep/15  Updated: 03/Apr/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Tristan Strange Assignee: Colin Taylor
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: error-reporting
Environment:

All Clojure platforms


Attachments: Text File CLJ-1817.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

A failing in a predicate in a list of :pre or :post conditions currently causes messages similar to one below to be displayed:

(defn must-be-a-map [m] {:pre [(map? m)]} m)
(must-be-a-map [])
;;=> AssertionError Assert failed: (map? m)  user/must-be-a-map (form-init.....clj:1)

These exception messages could be made significantly more descriptive by allowing specific messages strings to be associated with each predicate in :pre and :post conditions.

Predicate functions and there associated messages strings could be specified as a pair of values in a map:

(defn must-be-a-map 
  [m]
  {:pre [{(map? m) "m must be a map due to some domain specific reason."}]}
  m)

The following would then produce an error message as follows:

(must-be-a-map 10)
AssertionError Assert failed: m must be a map due to some domain specific reason.
(map? m) user/must-be-a-map (form-init.....clj:1)

This would allow predicates without messages to specified alongside pairs of associated predicate message pairs as follows:

(defn n-and-m [n m] {:pre [(number? n) {(map? m) "You must provide a map!"}]})

This change would not break any existing functionality and still allow for predicates to be predefined elsewhere in code.

As a result pre and post conditions could provide a natural means of further documenting the ins and outs of a function, simplify the process of providing meaningful output when developing libraries and perhaps make the language better suited to teaching environments[1]

[1] http://wiki.science.ru.nl/tfpie/images/2/22/TFPIE2013_Steps_Towards_Teaching_Clojure.pdf



 Comments   
Comment by Colin Taylor [ 03/Apr/16 5:26 PM ]

Attached approach differs from that advocated for in the description by not requiring a map. The existing spec of :

{:pre [pre-expr*]
 :post [post-expr*]}

in effect becoming :

{:pre [(pre-expr assert-msg?)*]
 :post [(pre-expr assert-msg?)*]}

where assert-msg is a String. Note this means a (presumably erroneous) second String after an expression would be treated as a truthy pre-expr.

Contrived example :

(defn print-if-alphas-and-nums [arg] {:pre [(hasAlpha arg) "No alphas"
                                            (hasNum arg) "No numbers"
                                            (canPrint arg)]}
  (println arg))

user=> (print-if-alphas-and-nums "a5%")
a5%
nil
user=> (print-if-alphas-and-nums "$$%")
AssertionError Assert failed: No alphas
(hasAlpha arg)  user/print-if-alphas-and-nums (NO_SOURCE_FILE:19)

I have considered extending the spec further to (pre-expr assert-msg? data-map)* perhaps supported by ex-info, ex-data analogues in assert-info, assert-data to convey diagnostic info (locals?). A map could contain a :msg key or perhaps the map is additional to the message string. I thought I'd wait for input though at this point.

I also considered allowing % substitution for the fn return value in the message as in :post conds, but how to escape?

Comment by Colin Taylor [ 03/Apr/16 6:17 PM ]

I should point out that the tests include the currently uncovered existing functionality too.





[CLJ-976] Implement reader literal and print support for PersistentQueue data structure Created: 27/Apr/12  Updated: 28/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Fogus Assignee: Fogus
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: data-structures, queue, reader, tagged-literals

Attachments: File CLJ-976-queue-literal-eval-and-synquote.diff     Text File clj-976-queue-literal-eval-and-synquote-patch-v3.txt     File CLJ-976-queue-literal-eval.diff    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

Clojure's PersistentQueue structure has been in the language for quite some time now and has found its way into a fair share of codebases. However, the creation of queues is a two step operation often of the form:

(conj clojure.lang.PersistentQueue/EMPTY :a :b :c)

;=> #<PersistentQueue clojure.lang.PersistentQueue@78d5f6bc>

A better experience might be the following:

#queue [:a :b :c]

;=> #queue [:a :b :c]

(pop #queue [:a :b :c])

;=> #queue [:b :c]

This syntax is proposed and discussed in the Clojure-dev group at https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!topic/clojure-dev/GQqus5Wycno

Open question: Should the queue literal's arguments eval? The implications of this are illustrated below:

;; non-eval case
#queue [1 2 (+ 1 2)]

;=> #queue [1 2 (+ 1 2)]


;; eval case
#queue [1 2 (+ 1 2)]

;=> #queue [1 2 3]

The answer to this open question will determine the implementation.



 Comments   
Comment by Steve Miner [ 27/Apr/12 10:18 AM ]

I think the non-eval behavior would be consistent with the other reader literals in Clojure 1.4. It's definitely better for interop where some other language implementation could be expected to handle a few literal representations, but not the evaluation of Clojure expressions. Use a regular function if the args need evaluation.

Comment by Chas Emerick [ 27/Apr/12 10:19 AM ]

The precedent of records seems relevant:

=> (defrecord A [b])
user.A
=> #user.A[(+ 4 5)]
#user.A{:b (+ 4 5)}
=> #user.A{:b (+ 4 5)}
#user.A{:b (+ 4 5)}

This continues to make sense, as otherwise queues would need to print with an extra (quote …) form around lists — which records neatly avoid:

=> (A. '(+ 4 5))
#user.A{:b (+ 4 5)}

Does this mean that a queue fn (analogous to vector, maybe) will also make an appearance? It'd be handy for HOF usage.

Comment by Fogus [ 27/Apr/12 11:00 AM ]

Added a patch for the tagged literal support ONLY. This is only one part of the total solution. This provides the read-string and printing capability. I'd like more discussion around the eval side before I get dive into the compiler.

Comment by Paul Michael Bauer [ 27/Apr/12 6:45 PM ]

In addition to Chas' observations on consistency with record literals, would eval in queue literals open up the same security hole as #=, needing to respect *read-eval*?
When needing eval inside a queue literal, embedding a #= seems more apropos.

Comment by Fogus [ 04/May/12 1:14 PM ]

Evalable queue literal support.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 10/May/12 5:54 PM ]

Neither of the patches CLJ-976-queue-literal-tagged-parse-support-only.diff dated Apr 27, 2012 nor CLJ-976-queue-literal-eval.diff dated May 4, 2012 apply cleanly to latest master as of May 10, 2012.

Comment by Fogus [ 11/May/12 10:15 AM ]

Updated patch file to merge with latest master.

Comment by Fogus [ 20/Jul/12 1:14 PM ]

New patch with support fixed for syntax-quote.

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 17/Aug/12 12:41 PM ]

Patch does not apply as of commit f5f4faf95051f794c9bfa0315e4457b600c84cef

Comment by Fogus [ 17/Aug/12 3:06 PM ]

Weird. I was able to download the CLJ-976-queue-literal-eval-and-synquote.diff patch and apply it to HEAD as of just now (f5f4faf95051f794c9bfa0315e4457b600c84cef). There were whitespace warnings, but the patch applied, compiles and passes all tests.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 17/Aug/12 7:29 PM ]

With latest head I was able to successfully apply patch CLJ-976-queue-literal-eval-and-synquote.diff with this command:

git am --keep-cr -s < CLJ-976-queue-literal-eval-and-synquote.diff

with some warnings, but successfully applied. If I try it without the --keep-cr option, the patch fails to apply. I believe this is often a sign that either one of the files being patched, or the patch itself, contains CR/LF line endings, which some of the Clojure source files definitely do.

The command above (with --keep-cr) is currently the one recommended for applying patches on page http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/JIRA+workflow in section "Screening Tickets". I added the suggested --keep-cr option after running across another patch that applied with the option, but not without it.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 28/Aug/12 5:45 PM ]

Presumptuously changing Approval from Incomplete back to Test, since the latest patch does apply cleanly if --keep-cr option is used.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 08/Sep/12 6:48 AM ]

this needs more time

Comment by Fogus [ 18/Sep/12 8:15 AM ]

Rich,

Do you mind providing a little more detail? I would be happy to make any changes if needed. However, if it's just a matter of its relationship to EDN and/or waiting until the next release then I am happy to wait. In either case, I'd like to complete this or push it to the back of my mind. Thanks.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 05/Oct/12 7:49 AM ]

clj-976-queue-literal-eval-and-synquote-patch-v2.txt dated Oct 5 2012 is identical to Fogus's patch CLJ-976-queue-literal-eval-and-synquote.diff dated Jul 20 2012. It simply removes one line addition to clojure.iml that Rich has since added in a different commit, so that this patch now applies cleanly to latest master.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 16/Oct/12 12:20 PM ]

clj-976-queue-literal-eval-and-synquote-patch-v3.txt dated oct 16 2012 is identical to Fogus's patch CLJ-976-queue-literal-eval-and-synquote.diff dated Jul 20 2012. It simply removes one line addition to clojure.iml that Rich has since added in a different commit, so that this patch now applies cleanly to latest master.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 20/Oct/12 12:26 PM ]

Fogus, with the recent commit of a patch for CLJ-1070, my touched-up patch clj-976-queue-literal-eval-and-synquote-patch-v3.txt dated Oct 16 2012 doesn't apply cleanly. In this case it isn't simply a few lines of context that have changed, it is the interfaces that PersistentQueue implements have been changed. It might be best if you take a look at the latest code and the patch and consider how it should be updated.

Comment by Steve Miner [ 06/Apr/13 8:07 AM ]

Related to CLJ-1078.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Aug/13 10:38 PM ]

Moving back to Triaged as Rich has not vetted.





[CLJ-1004] ArrayChunk implements Seqable Created: 28/May/12  Updated: 25/Mar/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Jim Blomo Assignee: Jim Blomo
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: File arraychunk-seq-10004.diff    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

I've found it helpful to be able to iterate over ArrayChunks. Implementing Seqable means they can be used by most collections functions.



 Comments   
Comment by Jim Blomo [ 28/May/12 7:55 PM ]

2012-05-28 implements the seq method for vec and vector-of. It uses the array backing ArrayChunk to construct a sequence. Simple tests are included.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 01/Mar/13 9:44 AM ]

Please add discussion of motivating use cases.

Comment by Jim Blomo [ 25/Mar/13 11:10 PM ]

This was motivated by the desire to implement chunk-sequence-aware functions in Clojure elegantly. Currently, dealing with ArrayChunks in Clojure is clumsy because few of the functions dealing with collections will work with non-seqables. This functionality will mostly be used by implementers since end users shouldn't care if their sequence is chunked or not.





[CLJ-248] Add support for subsets and submaps to sorted Sets/Maps Created: 27/Jan/10  Updated: 27/Jul/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Jim Blomo
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File clj-248-SortedMap-SortedSet-interfaces-patch2.txt     File SortedMap-SortedSet-interfaces-248.diff    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

Currently we can have a subseq of a sorted-set|map-by, but this returns a seq and
not a Set or Map.
Implementing the interfaces java.util.SortedSet and java.util.SortedMap would give
us support for calling .subSet and .subMap.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:05 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/248

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:05 AM ]

awizzard said: Another nice addition could be java.util.NavigableMap, though this is available only since Java 6.

Comment by Jim Blomo [ 11/May/12 1:13 AM ]

SortedSet-SortedMap-interfaces-248.diff 2012-05-10 is a first pass at the SortedMap interface. If there are no objections, I'll build on the SortedMap implementation to add SortedSet support.

Comment by Jim Blomo [ 18/May/12 12:33 AM ]

SortedMap-interfaces-248.diff 2012-05-10 supersedes the last diff. It implements and tests the SortedMap interface.

Additionally it includes tests for `sorted-map`, which didn't seem to be tested yet.

Comment by Jim Blomo [ 18/May/12 1:56 AM ]

SortedMap-SortedSet-interfaces-248.diff 2012-05-18 supersedes the last diff. It implements and tests both SortedMap and SortedSet.

(Concurrent)NavigableMap is not implemented because I think 1.5 is still targeted. In any case, it probably should have its own ticket.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 24/May/12 10:25 PM ]

clj-248-SortedMap-SortedSet-interfaces-patch2.txt dated May 24, 2012 is simply an updated version of SortedMap-SortedSet-interfaces-248.diff dated May 17, 2012. The latter patch no longer applied cleanly.

The new patch combines what was internally multiple git commits into one, simply because it was easier for me to create the patch that way. I left out the addition of *.swp and *.swo files to the .gitignore file. Builds and tests cleanly on Oracle/Apple JDK 1.6 on Mac OS X 10.6.8.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 25/May/12 12:27 AM ]

I don't know why Priority changed to Blocker when I changed Patch to "Code and Test". I didn't try to do that – suspect that something with the web UI is doing that automatically somehow.

Comment by Jim Blomo [ 02/Jun/12 7:08 PM ]

Added CLJ-1008 for NavigableMap interface enhancement.





[CLJ-862] pmap level of parallelism inconsistent for chunked vs non-chunked input Created: 23/Oct/11  Updated: 16/Jan/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.1, Release 1.2, Release 1.3, Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Marshall T. Vandegrift Assignee: Jim Blomo
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: File pmap-chunking-862.diff    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

The code of pmap creates futures for the set of map operations it needs to perform with (map #(future %) coll), then acts on that sequence in a fashion obviously intended to keep only #CPUs+2 unfinished futures realized at any given time. It works exactly this way for non-chunked input seqs, but when pmap is passed a chunked seq, the seq of futures also becomes chunked. This causes an arbitrary number of futures to be realized as the #CPUs+2 window and chunk-size window interact.

The doc-string for pmap doesn't promise any particular level of parallelism, but I think the inconsistent parallelism for chunked vs non-chunked input comprises a bug.



 Comments   
Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 25/Oct/11 6:51 PM ]

Next person to take a deep look at pmap should probably also think through fork/join.

Comment by Jim Blomo [ 19/May/12 12:31 AM ]

fork/join is a Java 7 feature. Would a proposed patch need to be able to fall back to Java 5 features?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 19/May/12 1:06 AM ]

Clojure/core folks can say more authoritatively, but I believe with the recent reduce enhancements that rely on jsr166 code, Clojure 1.5 will most likely require Java 6 or later, and Java 5 will no longer be supported.

Comment by Jim Blomo [ 28/May/12 5:29 PM ]

Spinning up more threads than CPU cores is not a good idea when the work is CPU bound. Currently (1.4) pmap uses an unbounded thread pool, so chunked sequences will create more threads than intended. The least invasive change is to use a fixed sized thread pool (ForkJoinPool being one example). pmap is differentiated from core.reducers by the fact that it is lazy. This implies a one-at-a-time ThreadPool.submit model, instead of the recursive fork/join model. Tradeoffs include:

Enforce look-ahead even on chunked sequences:

  • + no threadPool changes
  • - working against chunking, which is presumably being used for a reason

Move to a fixed size thread pool:

  • + reduce contention for cpu-bound functions on chunked sequences
  • - increase total realization time for io-bound functions

Use ForkJoinPool for fixed thread pool (instead of newFixedThreadPool):

  • + automatic and dynamic parallelism
  • - more complex setup (picking Java 6 vs 7 implementation, sharing pool with core.reducers)

I think using a traditional fixed size thread pool is the right option. Most of the time all of pmap's results will be realized, so I don't think it's worth saving work by being strict about the look-ahead size. This is also the decision map has made. Since we're not using ForkJoin's main strength (recursive work queuing), I don't think it is worth setting it up in clojure.core.

I'll use Agent/pooledExecutor as the fixed size thread.

Let me know if I forgot or misunderstood anything.

Comment by Jim Blomo [ 28/May/12 7:59 PM ]

2012-05-28 pmap-chunking-862.diff uses a fixed size thread pool for pmap functions.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 11/Jan/14 2:42 PM ]

Patch pmap-chunking-862.diff dated May 28, 2012 no longer applies cleanly after latest commits to Clojure master on Jan 11, 2014. I think the only issue is that the tests added have changed context lines, so should be a quick fix if someone wants to update the patch.

Comment by Jim Blomo [ 16/Jan/14 7:48 PM ]

Thanks for the update, Andy. I'll take a crack at it this month.





[CLJ-970] extend/implement parameterized types (generics) Created: 10/Apr/12  Updated: 06/May/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Jim Blomo Assignee: Jim Blomo
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: interop

Attachments: Text File clj-970-extend-implement-parameterized-types-patch2.txt     File extend-implement-parameterized-types.diff    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

When extending parameterized types, class files can track the original signatures of the superclass and super interfaces so that the original types can be obtained at run time. This runtime reflection is used in some Java frameworks, and implementing it in Clojure can enable interop. See http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/5efd692804df3f47/1336e591c2eedfa1 for examples of this request.

This proposal checks the :parameters keyword in type meta information. If a parameter is found, it is added to the class signature.



 Comments   
Comment by Jim Blomo [ 14/Apr/12 11:30 AM ]

2012-04-14 extend-implement-parameterized-types.diff is the correctly formatted `git format-patch master` for this change. It supersedes clojure-parameterized-generics.diff from 2012-04-10.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 19/Aug/12 5:00 AM ]

Patch clj-970-extend-implement-parameterized-types-patch2.txt dated Aug 19 2012 is identical to Jim Blomo's patch extend-implement-parameterized-types.diff dated Apr 14 2012, except it has updated context lines so that it applies cleanly to latest master as of today.





[CLJ-1383] Should name throw on nil? Created: 14/Mar/14  Updated: 15/Mar/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: John Chijioke Assignee: Jozef Wagner
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: File clj-1383.diff    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

The name function throws NullPointerException on nil. Since the name function is about obtaining the string form of a specific object it should not throw on nil. It should just return the nil object as the str fn does.



 Comments   
Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 15/Mar/14 3:23 AM ]

added patch with test





[CLJ-163] Enhance = and == docs Created: 30/Jul/09  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Laurent Petit
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: docstring


 Description   

Enhance = and == docs as far as numbers handling is concerned (make them self referenced, make clear what == offers beyond = -except that it will only work for numbers)



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:04 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/163
Attachments:
fixbug163.diff - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/bH0XMCFjur3PLMeJe5aVNr/download/bH0XMCFjur3PLMeJe5aVNr

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:04 PM ]

laurentpetit said: [file:bH0XMCFjur3PLMeJe5aVNr]

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:04 PM ]

richhickey said: I don't want to recommend, in = doc, that people should prefer == for any case. People should always prefer =. If there is a perf, difference we can make that go away. Then the only difference with == is that it will fail on non-numbers, and that should be the only reason to choose it.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:04 PM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#94, #96, #104, #119, #163)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:04 PM ]

laurentpetit said: Richn, by "will fail on non-numbers", do you mean "should throw an exception" (and thus the patch must change the code), or just as it works today :

(== :a :a)
false

?

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:04 PM ]

richhickey said: I've fixed the code so == on non-numbers throws





[CLJ-200] Extend cond to support inline let, much like for Created: 18/Oct/09  Updated: 22/Oct/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Mark Engelberg
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 9
Labels: None

Attachments: File clj-200-cond-let-clauses-fixed-test-v2.diff     Text File clj-200-cond-let-clauses-fixed-test-v2-patch.txt    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

I find it occasionally very useful to do a few tests in a cond, then introduce some new symbols (for both clarity and efficiency) that can be referenced in later tests (or matching expressions). This parallels similar functionality inside the for macro, where the :let keyword is matched against a vector of symbol bindings and forms an implicit let around the remainder of the comprehension.

I'll be adding a patch for this shortly.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:51 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/200

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:51 PM ]

hlship said: Trickier than I thought because cond is really wired into other fundamentals, like let.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:51 PM ]

cgrand said: Howard, what do you think of http://gist.github.com/432712 ?

Comment by Mark Engelberg [ 23/Nov/12 2:33 AM ]

Patch cond-let-clauses.diff on 23/Nov/12 adds inline :let clauses to cond, implementing CLJ-200. The code is based off of code by cgrand, with some tweaks so the implementation only relies on constructs defined earlier in core.clj, since when cond is defined, things aren't yet fully bootstrapped. Also added a test to control.clj.

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 23/Nov/12 3:06 AM ]

Some comments: the docstring is missing, I believe you don't have to modify the original cond (except the docstring maybe), just redefine it later on once most of the language is defined – a bit like what is done for let for example.

There is still the unlikely eventuality that some code uses :let as :else. What about shipping a cond which complains on keywords (in test position) other than :else?

Comment by Mark Engelberg [ 23/Nov/12 3:47 AM ]

cond-let-clauses-with-docstring.diff contains the same patches as cond-let-clauses, but includes the original docstring for cond along with an additional sentence about the :let bindings.

Comment by Mark Engelberg [ 23/Nov/12 3:54 AM ]

Cgrand, I did see your example of redefining cond after most of the language is defined, but since I was able to figure out how to do it in the proper place, that makes the :let bindings available for users of cond downstream and avoids any unforeseen complications that might come from rebinding.

As for your other point, I think it is highly improbable that someone would have used :let in the :else position. However I can imagine someone intentionally using something like :true or :default. I think the idea of warning for other keywords is actually more likely to cause complications than the unlikely problem it is meant to solve.

I did resubmit the patch with the docstring restored. Thanks for pointing out that problem. I'm excited about this patch – I use :let bindings within the cond in my own code all the time. Thanks again for the blog post that started me on that path.

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 23/Nov/12 4:13 AM ]

True, it's :unlikely for :let to happen.
However once :let is officially blessed, it may be better to provision for future other "special" keywords and thus to warn on "unsupported" keywords. Plus it will help out-of-order typists (like myself) to catch earlier a :elt instead of a :let
This is only my point of view. Thanks for trying to get :let in cond supported.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Nov/12 8:46 PM ]

Mark, could you remove the obsolete earlier patch now that you have added the one with the doc string? Instructions for removing patches are under the heading "Removing Patches" on this page: http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/JIRA+workflow

Comment by Mark Engelberg [ 29/Nov/12 10:50 PM ]

Done.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Nov/12 1:24 AM ]

I haven't figured out what is going wrong yet. I can apply the patch cond-let-clauses-with-docstring.diff to the latest Clojure master just fine. I can do "ant jar" and it will build a jar. When I do "ant", it fails with the new test for cond with :let, throwing a StackOverflowException. I can enter that same form into the REPL and it evaluates just as the test says it should. I can comment out that new test and all of the rest pass. But the new test doesn't pass when inside of the control.clj file. Anyone know why?

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 30/Nov/12 4:54 AM ]

It's because of the brutal replacement performed by test/are: the placeholders for this are form are x and y but in Mark's test there are used as local names and are tries to substitute them recursively...
If one changes the local names to a and b for example it works.

Comment by Mark Engelberg [ 02/Dec/12 8:20 AM ]

cond-let-clauses-fixed-test.diff on 02/Dec/12 contains the same patch, but with the x,y locals in the test case changed to a,b so that it works properly in the are clause which uses x and y.

Comment by Mark Engelberg [ 02/Dec/12 8:27 AM ]

On Windows, I can't get Clojure's test suite task to work, either via ant or maven, which has made it difficult for me to verify the part of the patch that applies to the test suite works as expected; I had tested it as best I could in the REPL, using a version of Clojure built with the patch applied, but using this process, I missed the subtle interaction between are and the locals in the test case. Sorry about that. If someone can double-check that the test suite task now works with the newest patch, that would be great, and then I'll go ahead and remove the obsoleted patch. Thanks.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 02/Dec/12 6:29 PM ]

clj-200-cond-let-clauses-fixed-test-v2-patch.txt dated Dec 2 2012 is identical to Mark Engelberg's cond-let-clauses-fixed-test.diff of the same date, except it applies cleanly to the latest Clojure master.

I've verified that it compiles and passes all tests with latest Clojure master as of this date.

Mark, I've made sure to keep your name in the patch, since you wrote it. You should be able to remove your two attachments now, so the screener won't be confused which patch should be examined.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 02/Dec/12 6:31 PM ]

Mark, besides general issues with Windows not being used much (or maybe not at all?) by Clojure developers, there is the issue right now filed as CLJ-1076 that not all tests pass when run on Windows due to CR-LF line ending differences that cause several Clojure tests to fail, regardless of whether you use ant or maven to run them.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 22/Oct/13 8:01 PM ]

clj-200-cond-let-clauses-fixed-test-v2.diff is identical to earlier patch clj-200-cond-let-clauses-fixed-test-v2-patch.txt, except it removes unnecessarily trailing whitespace that causes warnings when applying the patch, and with .diff suffix for easier diff-style viewing in some editors.





[CLJ-1776] Test that collections are valid statements Created: 08/Jul/15  Updated: 08/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Michael Blume Assignee: Michael Blume
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler, test

Attachments: Text File clj-1776-v1.patch    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

It's possible to break the compiler such that vectors are emitted incorrectly when they're in statement position (I accidentally did this). This doesn't break any part of the Clojure test suite, but does break valid Clojure code (for me it hit taoensso's encore). Add tests to the test suite so defects of this kind are caught.






[CLJ-1643] Generative test for sequence implementations Created: 15/Jan/15  Updated: 12/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Michael Blume Assignee: Michael Blume
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: generative-test, test

Attachments: Text File clj-1643-gen-seq-test-v1.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

This is an attempt to write a minimal-foreknowledge failing test for CLJ-1633. By minimal-foreknowledge, I mean a test that fails in the presence of the bug, but which one could imagine writing without intimate knowledge of the details of the bug. I suspect that looking for tests like this is a good way to find gaps in test coverage, and produce tests that will uncover novel regressions later on.

Approach: Generate a single list of operations that could be performed on a sequence, changing that sequence. Make two copies of that operation list, and insert what should be identity-preserving operations into each. Run the two lists of operations and verify that the final results are the same.

With CLJ-1633 unfixed, we get this output:

[java] Testing clojure.test-clojure.sequences
     [java]
     [java] FAIL in (seq-gentest) (sequences.clj:135)
     [java] {:acts1 (->> nil (cons :foo) (cons :foo) into-array next (apply list)),
     [java]  :acts2 (->> nil (cons :foo) (cons :foo) next),
     [java]  :result1 (:foo :foo),
     [java]  :result2 (:foo),
     [java]  :pass false}
     [java]
     [java] expected: (:result res)
     [java]   actual: false





[CLJ-1416] Support transients in gvec Created: 06/May/14  Updated: 02/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Michał Marczyk Assignee: Michał Marczyk
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: collections, transient

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1416-transients-hash-caching-for-gvec-Object-met.patch     Text File 0002-CLJ-1416-transients-hash-caching-interop-improvement.patch     Text File 0003-CLJ-1416-transients-hash-caching-interop-improvement.patch     Text File 0004-CLJ-1416-transients-hash-caching-interop-improvement.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Vectors of primitives produced by vector-of do not support transients.

core.rrb-vector implements transient support for vectors of primitives. Such transient-enabled vectors of primitives can be obtained in a number of ways: (1) using a gvec instance as an argument to fv/catvec (if RRB concatenation happens, which is not guaranteed) or fv/subvec; (2) passing a gvec instance to fv/vec, which as of core.rrb-vector 0.0.11 will simply rewrap the gvec tree in an RRB wrapper; (3) using fv/vector-of instead of clojure.core/vector-of. Native support in gvec would still be useful as part of an effort to make supported functionality consistent across vector flavours (see CLJ-787 in this connection); gvec is also simpler and still has (and is likely to maintain) a performance edge.

A port of core.rrb-vector's transient support to gvec is available here:

https://github.com/michalmarczyk/clojure/tree/transient-gvec

I'll bring it up to date with current master shortly.

See the clojure-dev thread for some benchmarks:

https://groups.google.com/d/msg/clojure-dev/9ozYI1e5SCM/BAIazVOkUmcJ



 Comments   
Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 13/May/14 5:32 AM ]

Here's the current version of the patch (0001-CLJ-1416-transients-hash-caching-for-gvec-Object-met.patch). It includes a few additional changes – here's the commit message:

CLJ-1416: transients, hash caching for gvec, Object methods for gvec seqs

  • Adds transient support to gvec
  • Adds hash{eq,Code} caching to gvec and gvec seqs
  • Implements hashCode, equals, toString for gvec seqs

https://github.com/michalmarczyk/clojure/tree/transient-gvec-1.6

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 05/Jul/14 2:59 AM ]

Here's an updated patch with some additional interop-related improvements.

The new commit message:

CLJ-1416: transients, hash caching, interop improvements for gvec

  • Adds transient support to gvec
  • Adds hash{eq,Code} caching to gvec and gvec seqs
  • Implements hashCode, equals, toString for gvec seqs
  • Correctly implements iterator-related methods for gvec and gvec seqs
  • Introduces throw-unsupported and caching-hash (both marked private)
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 4:48 PM ]

Patch 0002-CLJ-1416-transients-hash-caching-interop-improvement.patch dated Jul 5 2014 no longer applied cleanly to latest master after some commits were made to Clojure on Aug 29, 2014. It did apply cleanly before that day.

I have not checked how easy or difficult it might be to update this patch. See section "Updating Stale Patches" on this wiki page for some tips on updating patches: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 29/Aug/14 5:07 PM ]

Patch updated to apply cleanly to master.

Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 02/Oct/14 12:28 PM ]

Maybe this should be another ticket, but it would affect this patch, so I'll mention it here:

The ArrayManager interface is an incomplete abstraction. The original gvec code plus the new transients codepaths rely on System/arraycopy, rather than .arraycopy on the manager object. This means that it's impossible to create gvecs backed by non-JVM arrays. Or, in my case, to create a gvec of nibbles backed by an array of longs. See https://gist.github.com/brandonbloom/441a4b5712729dec7467

Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 02/Oct/14 1:34 PM ]

The current patch has a bug on line 762:

(let [node ^clojure.core.VecNode (.ensureEditable this node)

There is no such signature, only these:

(ensureEditable [this]
(ensureEditable [this node shift]

I discovered this problem using https://github.com/ztellman/collection-check

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 02/Oct/14 2:46 PM ]

Thanks for the catch! Fixed patch attached. (There was in fact one more bug in editableArrayFor, also fixed in this version.)

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 02/Oct/14 2:57 PM ]

As for gvecs of nibbles, could that be a separate ticket with patches building on top of this one?

On a separate note, core.rrb-vector could support vectors of nibbles as an extra feature (and adopt built-in gvec's representation if indeed the built-in gvec comes to support this feature at some point). Do you think that'd be useful?

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 02/Oct/14 3:01 PM ]

Of course vectors of nibbles could be implemented today with a separate vector type wrapping a gvec of longs, but the implementation would be more involved. I wonder what kind of performance difference there would be between the wrapper approach and the "nibble AM" approach…





[CLJ-1317] clojure.zip/seq-zip returns spurious nils during traversal Created: 31/Dec/13  Updated: 10/Feb/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Michał Marczyk Assignee: Michał Marczyk
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: zip

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1317-fix-seq-zip-to-avoid-spurious-nils.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Problem reported by Lee Spector on the mailing list:

https://groups.google.com/d/msg/clojure/8TL7IGmE7N0/u1xfgTOLDRgJ

Here's a quote from Lee's post describing the problem:

Here's an illustration, stepping through '(() 0) with next and printing the node at each step: 

(loop [z (zip/seq-zip '(() 0))] 
  (if (zip/end? z) 
    :done 
    (do (println (zip/node z)) 
      (recur (zip/next z))))) 

That produces: 

(() 0) 
() 
nil 
0 
:done 

I don't expect the nil to be there. 

The underlying cause is that seq-zip passes identity as the children argument to zipper. Applied to (), this returns (), which is truthy, leading zipper to descend into a non-existent subtree.

One natural solution would be to use seq in place of identity:

(defn seq-zip [root]
  (zipper seq?
          seq  ;; changed
          (fn [node children] (with-meta children (meta node)))
          root))

With this change, no nil is produced in the example above. Patch with this change forthcoming.



 Comments   
Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 31/Dec/13 5:52 PM ]

Note that the docstring of clojure.zip/zipper asks that the children argument return a seq of children. The rest of clojure.zip, however, expects nil to be returned when there are no children, as evidenced by this problem.

One could argue that this behaviour of the rest of clojure.zip should be fixed, but I think it makes sense and is convenient. Perhaps the docstring should be adjusted, though.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 08/Feb/16 4:36 PM ]

Michał, can I ask why you assigned this to yourself - was there something you planned to add?

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 10/Feb/16 9:09 AM ]

Hey Alex, I was going to attach a separate patch with a proposal for a docstring adjustment along the lines suggested above (will do that tonight). No change to the code, though, and I guess not worth assigning the ticket – sorry about the unnecessary ping.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Feb/16 9:38 AM ]

No worries, just wanted to know if something was still pending - I will wait to prescreen it.





[CLJ-1613] :or defaults should refer to enclosing scope in map destructuring Created: 12/Dec/14  Updated: 11/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Michał Marczyk Assignee: Michał Marczyk
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: destructuring

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1613-evaluate-or-defaults-in-enclosing-scope-in-.patch     Text File CLJ-1613-v2.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Michael Blume noticed that :or defaults can depend on the values of other keys, see https://groups.google.com/d/msg/clojure/6kOhpPOpHWM/ITjWwQFS_VQJ

Michael's Gist https://gist.github.com/MichaelBlume/4891dafdd31f0dcbc727 displays a case where an associative form involving :keys and :or compiles or not depending on the order of symbols in :keys. By tweaking that case one can arrive at expressions which always compile, but produce different values depending on :keys:

(let [foo 1
       bar 2
       {:keys [bar foo]
        :or {foo 3 bar (inc foo)}} {}]
  {:foo foo :bar bar})
;= {:foo 3, :bar 4}

(let [foo 1
      bar 2
      {:keys [foo bar]
       :or {foo 3 bar (inc foo)}} {}]
  {:foo foo :bar bar})
;= {:foo 3, :bar 2}

I believe that the most natural solution is to demand that :or defaults be evaluated in an enclosing scope where none of the destructuring-introduced locals are present. This approach is taken by the 0001 patch.



 Comments   
Comment by Michael Blume [ 12/Dec/14 2:27 AM ]

I suspect that this is the right thing to do but I think it's important to note that this will break existing code https://github.com/ngrunwald/ring-middleware-format/blob/master/src/ring/middleware/format_params.clj#L214

Comment by Michael Blume [ 06/Apr/15 4:43 PM ]

Update on my previous comment – ring-middleware-params has updated so that it doesn't depend on this behavior. I think we should definitely merge this patch so no one else depends on it.

Comment by Max Penet [ 08/Apr/15 10:46 AM ]

Since this involves :or keys evaluation, this might be worth checking if this should/could have an impact on http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1676 as well.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 30/Jul/15 11:11 AM ]

This is a behavior change, the docs do not promise the requested behavior and existing code may depend on the current behavior.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Jul/15 12:47 PM ]

Isn't this a case where if existing code works, it works by accident of the seq order of an unordered map? If so, any code that depends upon the existing behavior sometimes breaks, sometimes does not break, when the Clojure seq order on maps changes, which occurred Clojure 1.5.1 to Clojure 1.6.0, and again from 1.6.0 to 1.7.0.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 30/Jul/15 1:08 PM ]

Yes, it does, and I've seen existing code break due to those changes, hence the discussion that lead to this ticket.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 11/Sep/15 1:00 PM ]

Updating this patch

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 11/Sep/15 1:41 PM ]

@Stuart:

To substantiate what was said above, here is the same code snippet evaluated at a Clojure 1.6 REPL and then again at a Clojure 1.7 REPL, both REPLs freshly started, with different results:

Clojure 1.6.0
(let [foo 1 bar 2
      {:keys [foo bar]
       :or {foo 3 bar (inc foo)}} {}]
  [foo bar])
[3 2]

Clojure 1.7.0
(let [foo 1 bar 2
      {:keys [foo bar]
       :or {foo 3 bar (inc foo)}} {}]
  [foo bar])
[3 4]

It is certainly not promised in the docs that there will be no surprising interactions between :or and :keys, but as demonstrated above, any existing code that depended on 1.6 behaviour has already been broken by 1.7. Specifying some behaviour and sticking to it in the future would prevent such surprises going forward.

I also think that the current behaviour is "random" in the sense that there is no principled reason why one might expect it – hence the proposal to make :or defaults refer to the enclosing scope that I've implemented in the patch.





[CLJ-1120] Introduce ex-message and ex-cause to abstract away the platform in dealing with ExceptionInfo Created: 06/Dec/12  Updated: 21/Dec/12

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Michał Marczyk Assignee: Michał Marczyk
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1120-ex-message-ex-cause.patch    
Patch: Code

 Description   

As described in the title. See CLJS-429.



 Comments   
Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 06/Dec/12 6:23 AM ]

The attached patch implements ex-message and ex-cause to work on arbitrary Throwables.





[CLJ-1059] PersistentQueue doesn't implement java.util.List, causing nontransitive equality Created: 03/Sep/12  Updated: 11/Aug/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Philip Potter Assignee: Philip Potter
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: queue

Attachments: File 001-clj-1059-make-persistentqueue-implement-list.diff     File 002-clj-1059-asequential-rebased-to-cached-hasheq.diff    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

PersistentQueue implements Sequential but doesn't implement java.util.List. Lists form an equality partition, as do Sequentials. This means that you can end up with nontransitive equality:

(def q (conj clojure.lang.PersistentQueue/EMPTY 1 2 3))
;=> #user/q
(def al (doto (java.util.ArrayList.) (.add 1) (.add 2) (.add 3)))
;=> #user/al
(def v [1 2 3])
;=> #user/v
(= al v)
;=> true
(= v q)
;=> true
(not= al q)
;=> true

This happens because PersistentQueue is a Sequential but not a List, ArrayList is a List but not a Sequential, and PersistentVector is both.



 Comments   
Comment by Philip Potter [ 15/Sep/12 3:41 AM ]

Whoops, according to http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/JIRA+workflow I should have emailed clojure-dev before filing this ticket. Here is the discussion:

https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure-dev/ME3-Ke-RbNk/discussion

Comment by Philip Potter [ 15/Sep/12 2:37 PM ]

Attached 001-make-PersistentQueue-implement-List.diff, 15/Sep/12

Note that this patch has a minor conflict with the one I added to CLJ-1070, because both add an extra interface to PersistentQueue - List in this case, IHashEq in CLJ-1070.

Comment by Chouser [ 18/Sep/12 1:04 AM ]

Philip, patch looks pretty good – thanks for doing this. A couple notes:

This is only my opinion, but I prefer imports be listed without wildcards, even if it means an extra couple lines at the top of a .java file.

I noticed the "List stuff" code is a copy of what's in ASeq and EmptyList. I suppose this is copied because EmptyList and PersistentQueue extend Obj and therefore can't extend ASeq. Is this the only reason? It seems a shame to duplicate these method definitions, but I don't know of a better solution, do you?

It would also be nice if the test check a couple of the List methods you've implemented.

Comment by Chouser [ 18/Sep/12 1:08 AM ]

oh, also "git am" refused to apply the patch, but I'm not sure why. "patch -p 1" worked perfectly.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 18/Sep/12 1:19 AM ]

did you use the --keep-cr option to git am?

I struggled to know whether I should be adding CRs or not to line endings, because the files I was editing weren't consistent in their usage. If you open them in emacs, half the lines have ^M at the end.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 18/Sep/12 1:21 AM ]

Will submit another patch, with the import changed. I'll have a think about the list implementation and see what ideas I can come up with.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 18/Sep/12 3:17 PM ]

Attached 002-make-PersistentQueue-implement-Asequential.diff

This patch is an alternative to 001-make-PersistentQueue-implement-List.diff

So I took on board what you said about ASeq, but it didn't feel right making PersistentQueue directly implement ISeq, somehow.

So I split ASeq into two parts – ASequential, which implements j.u.{Collection,List} and manages List-equality and hashcodes; and ASeq, which... doesn't seem to be doing much anymore, to be honest.

As a bonus, this patch fixes CLJ-1070 too, so I went and added the tests from that ticket in to demonstrate this fact. It also tidies up PersistentQueue by removing all equals/hashcCode stuff and all Collection stuff.

(It turns out that because ASeq was already implementing Obj, the fact that PersistentQueue was implementing Obj was no barrier to using it.)

Would appreciate comments on this approach, and how it differs from the previous patch here and the patch on CLJ-1070.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 18/Sep/12 3:44 PM ]

Looking at EmptyList's implementation of List, it is a duplicate of the others, but it shouldn't be. I think its implementation of indexOf is the biggest culprit - it should just be 'return -1;' but it has a great big for loop! But this is beyond the scope of this ticket, so I won't patch that here.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 20/Oct/12 12:29 PM ]

Philip, now that the patch for CLJ-1070 has been applied, these patches no longer apply cleanly. Would you be willing to update them? If so, please remove the obsolete patches.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 22/Oct/12 5:10 AM ]

Andy, thanks so much for your efforts to make people aware of these things. I will indeed submit new patches, hopefully later this week.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 03/Nov/12 12:23 PM ]

Replaced existing patches with new ones which apply cleanly to master.

There are two patches:

001-clj-1059-make-persistentqueue-implement-list.diff

This fixes equality by making PersistentQueue implement List directly. I also took the opportunity to remove the wildcard import and to add tests for the List methods, as compared with the previous version of the patch.

002-clj-1059-asequential.diff

This fixes equality by creating a new abstract class ASequential, and making PersistentQueue extend this.

My preferred solution is still the ASequential patch, but I'm leaving both here for comparison.

Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 30/Nov/12 3:37 PM ]

Vetting.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 11/Dec/12 12:50 PM ]

Philip, this time I think it was patches that were committed for CLJ-1000 that make your patch 002-clj-1059-asequential.diff not apply cleanly. I often fix up stale patches where the change is straightforward and mechanical, but in this case you are moving some methods that CLJ-1000's patch changed the implementation of, so it would be best if someone figured out a way to update this patch in a way that doesn't clobber the CLJ-1000 changes.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 11/Dec/12 1:57 PM ]

Thanks Andy. Submitted a new patch, 002-clj-1059-asequential-rebased-to-cached-hasheq.diff, which supersedes 002-clj-1059-asequential.diff.

The patch 001-clj-1059-make-persistentqueue-implement-list.diff still applies cleanly, and is still an alternative to 002-clj-1059-asequential-rebased-to-cached-hasheq.diff.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Jan/14 4:50 PM ]

With the commits to Clojure master made in the week leading up to Jan 30 2014, particularly changes to hasheq, patch 002-clj-1059-asequential-rebased-to-cached-hasheq.diff no longer applies cleanly.

Patch 001-clj-1059-make-persistentqueue-implement-list.diff still does.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 31/Mar/14 5:33 PM ]

This issue was run into again and a duplicate ticket CLJ-1374 created – later closed as a duplicate of this one. Just wanted to record that this issue is being hit by others besides those originally reporting it.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 11/Aug/14 1:37 AM ]

One or more commits made to Clojure master between Aug 1 2014 and Aug 10 2014 conflict with the patch 001-clj-1059-make-persistentqueue-implement-list.diff, and it no longer applies cleanly.





[CLJ-704] range function has missing documentation Created: 04/Jan/11  Updated: 14/Jun/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.2
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Trivial
Reporter: Maarten Hus Assignee: Plínio Balduino
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: docstring
Environment:

All


Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The range function's documentation does indicate the following usage:

(range 10 0 -1) -> (10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1)

Current doc:

Returns a lazy seq of nums from start (inclusive) to end
(exclusive), by step, where start defaults to 0, step to 1, and end
to infinity.

Suggestion:

Returns a lazy seq of nums from start (inclusive) to end
(exclusive), by step, where start defaults to 0, step to 1, and end
to infinity.

Its also possible to step down rather than up, for example counting
backwards from 10 by -1: (range 10 0 -1).



 Comments   
Comment by Rasmus Svensson [ 15/Jan/11 7:39 AM ]

The current doc actually mentions the 'step' parameter briefly:

"[...] to end (exclusive), by step, where start [...]"

But as this might be easy to miss, an addition to the doc is still a good idea, I think.

My suggestion:

Returns a lazy seq of nums from start (inclusive) to end
(exclusive), by step, where start defaults to 0, step to 1, and end
to infinity. Step may be negative to count backwards.

Comment by Plínio Balduino [ 13/Jun/14 10:59 PM ]

There was any news about it?

Could I assign it to me?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 13/Jun/14 11:11 PM ]

No, no news about this one. It is in the 'open' state, meaning that there is currently no judgement as to whether Clojure screeners or Rich Hickey are interested in such a change. http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/JIRA+workflow

That said, it seems like it should not take a lot of time to create a patch. Detailed instructions are given here: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Jun/14 7:34 AM ]

Go for it!

Comment by Plínio Balduino [ 14/Jun/14 10:57 AM ]

I cannot reproduce this: "When step is equal to 0, returns an infinite sequence of start."

https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/src/clj/clojure/core.clj#L2726-L2729

Is this correct?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 14/Jun/14 2:47 PM ]

The last time range was modified was due to ticket CLJ-1018. See the attached patch there, which I believe is the one that was applied after Clojure 1.5 but before Clojure 1.6.

Perhaps that change does not do what it claimed to do in the doc string. I haven't looked at it in detail yet.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 14/Jun/14 2:54 PM ]

In Clojure 1.6, it appears that it may be more accurate if the last two sentences in the doc string were modified. range's doc string is currently:

Returns a lazy seq of nums from start (inclusive) to end
(exclusive), by step, where start defaults to 0, step to 1, and end to
infinity. When step is equal to 0, returns an infinite sequence of
start. When start is equal to end, returns empty list.

It might be more accurate to say:

Returns a lazy seq of nums from start (inclusive) to end
(exclusive), by step, where start defaults to 0, step to 1, and end to
infinity. When start is equal to end, returns empty list. When step
is equal to 0 and start and end differ, returns an infinite sequence of
start.





[CLJ-440] java method calls cannot omit varargs Created: 27/Sep/10  Updated: 03/Feb/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Alexander Taggart Assignee: Ragnar Dahlen
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 8
Labels: interop

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-440-Allow-calling-vararg-Java-methods-without-va.patch    
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Problem

Clojure calls to Java vararg methods require creating an object array for the final arg. This is a frequent source of confusion when doing interop.

E.g., trying to call java.util.Collections.addAll(Collection c, T... elements):

user=> (Collections/addAll [] (object-array 0))
false
user=> (Collections/addAll [])
IllegalArgumentException No matching method: addAll  clojure.lang.Compiler$StaticMethodExpr.<init> (Compiler.java:1401)

The Method class provides an isVarArg() method, which could be used to inform the compiler to process things differently.

From http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/7d0d6cb32656a621

Latest patch: Removed because incomplete and goal not clear

Varargs in Java

As currently stated, the scope of this ticket is only to omit varargs, but this is only one case where Clojures handling of varargs differs from Java. For completeness, here is a brief survey of how Java handles vararg methods, which could hopefully inform a discussion for how Clojure could do things differently, and what the goal of this ticket should be.

Given the following setup:

VarArgs.java
public class VarArgs {

    public static class SingleVarargMethod {
        public static void m(String arg1, String... args) {}
    }

    public static class MultipleVarargMethods {
        public static void m(String... args) {}
        public static void m(String arg1) {}
        public static void m(String arg1, String... args) {}
    }
}
Java Possible clojure equivalent? Comments
VarArgs.SingleVarargMethod.m("a"); (SingleVarargMethod/m "a")  
VarArgs.SingleVarargMethod.m("a", "b"); (SingleVarargMethod/m "a" "b")  
VarArgs.SingleVarargMethod.m("a", "b", "c"); (SingleVarargMethod/m "a" "b" "c")  
VarArgs.SingleVarargMethod.m("a", new String[]{"b", "c"}); (SingleVarargMethod/m "a" (object-array ["b" "c"]))  
VarArgs.MultipleVarargMethods.m(); (MultipleVarargMethods/m)  
VarArgs.MultipleVarargMethods.m((String) null); (MultipleVarargMethods/m nil) Use type hints to disambiguate?
VarArgs.MultipleVarargMethods.m((String[]) null); (MultipleVarargMethods/m nil) Use type hints to disambiguate?
VarArgs.MultipleVarargMethods.m("a", null); (MultipleVarargMethods/m "a" nil)  
VarArgs.MultipleVarargMethods.m("a", new String[]{}); (MultipleVarargMethods/m "a" (object-array 0))  
VarArgs.MultipleVarargMethods.m(new String[]{"a"}); (MultipleVarargMethods/m (object-array ["a"]))  
VarArgs.MultipleVarargMethods.m("a", new String[]{"b", "c"}); (MultipleVarargMethods/m "a" (object-array ["b" "c"]))  


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 27/Sep/10 8:19 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/440

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 01/Apr/11 11:16 PM ]

Patch adds support for varargs. Builds on top of patch in CLJ-445.

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 05/Apr/11 5:45 PM ]

Patch updated to current CLJ-445 patch.

Comment by Nick Klauer [ 29/Oct/12 8:12 AM ]

Is this ticket on hold? I find myself typing (.someCall arg1 arg2 (into-array SomeType nil)) alot just to get the right method to be called. This ticket sounds like it would address that extraneous into-array arg that I use alot.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Oct/12 10:45 AM ]

fixbug445.diff uploaded on Oct 29 2012 was written Oct 23 2010 by Alexander Taggart. I am simply copying it from the old Assembla ticket tracking system to here to make it more easily accessible. Not surprisingy, it doesn't apply cleanly to latest master. I don't know how much effort it would be to update it, but only a few hunks do not apply cleanly according to 'patch'. See the "Updating stale patches" section on the JIRA workflow page here: http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/JIRA+workflow

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Oct/12 10:56 AM ]

Ugh. Deleted the attachment because it was for CLJ-445, or at least it was named that way. CLJ-445 definitely has a long comment history, so if one or more of its patches address this issue, then you can read the discussion there to see the history.

I don't know of any "on hold" status for tickets, except for one or two where Rich Hickey has explicitly said in a comment that he wants to wait a while before making the change. There are just tickets that contributors choose to work on and ones that screeners choose to screen.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Feb/16 11:47 AM ]

I would love to see an updated patch on this ticket that specifically addressed the varargs issue without building on the other mentioned ticket and patch (which is of lower priority).

Comment by Ragnar Dahlen [ 03/Feb/16 8:01 AM ]

I had a stab at this, have attached an initial patch, parts of which I'm not too sure/happy about so feedback would be appreciated.

The patch takes the following approach:

  1. Teach Reflector/getMethods how to find matching vararg methods. In addition to the current constraints, a method can also match if it is a varargs method, and the arity of the method is one more than the requested arity. That means it's a varargs method we could call, but the user hasn't provided the varargs argument.
  2. In MethodExpr/emitTypedArgs we handle the case were there is one more argument in the method being called than there were arguments provided. The only case were that should happen is when it is a varargs method and the last argument was not provided. In that case we push a new empty object array to the stack.

I'm not to sure about my implementation of the second part. It could open up for some hard to understand bugs in the future. One option would be to be more defensive, and make sure it's really the last argument for instance, or even pass along the Method object (or a varargs flag) so we know what we can expect and need to do.

Comment by Ragnar Dahlen [ 03/Feb/16 8:49 AM ]

I realised my patch is missing two important cases; the interface handling in Reflector and handling multiple matching methods. I'll look into that too, but would still appreciate feedback on the approach in MethodExpr/emitTypedArgs.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 03/Feb/16 9:00 AM ]

I am in favor of using isVarArg() to explicitly handle this case rather than guessing if we're in this situation. We should check the behavior (and add tests where it seems needed) for calling a var args method with too few args, too many args, etc. And also double-check that non vararg cases have not changed behavior.

Also, keep in mind that as a general rule, existing AOT compiled code may rely on calling into public Reflector methods, so if you change the signatures of public Reflector methods, you should leave a version with the old arity that has some default behavior for backwards compatibility.





[CLJ-700] contains? broken for transient collections Created: 01/Jan/11  Updated: 14/Dec/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.2
Fix Version/s: Release 1.9

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Herwig Hochleitner Assignee: Rich Hickey
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 19
Labels: transient

Attachments: Java Source File 0001-Refactor-of-some-of-the-clojure-.java-code-to-fix-CL.patch     File clj-700-7.diff     File clj-700-8.diff     Text File clj-700-9.patch     File clj-700.diff     Text File clj-700-patch4.txt     Text File clj-700-patch6.txt     Text File clj-700-rt.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Incomplete

 Description   

Behavior with Clojure 1.6.0:

user=> (contains? (transient {:x "fine"}) :x)
IllegalArgumentException contains? not supported on type: clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap$TransientArrayMap  clojure.lang.RT.contains (RT.java:724)
;; expected: true

user=> (contains? (transient (hash-map :x "fine")) :x)
IllegalArgumentException contains? not supported on type: clojure.lang.PersistentHashMap$TransientHashMap  clojure.lang.RT.contains (RT.java:724)
;; expected: true

user=> (contains? (transient [1 2 3]) 0)
IllegalArgumentException contains? not supported on type: clojure.lang.PersistentVector$TransientVector  clojure.lang.RT.contains (RT.java:724)
;; expected: true

user=> (contains? (transient #{:x}) :x)
IllegalArgumentException contains? not supported on type: clojure.lang.PersistentHashSet$TransientHashSet  clojure.lang.RT.contains (RT.java:724)
;; expected: true

user=> (:x (transient #{:x}))
nil
;; expected: :x

user=> (get (transient #{:x}) :x)
nil
;; expected: :x

Cause: This is caused by expectations in clojure.lang.RT regarding the type of collections for some methods, e.g. contains() and getFrom(). Checking for contains looks to see if the instance passed in is Associative (a subinterface of PersistentCollection), or IPersistentSet.

Approach: Expand the types that RT.getFrom(), RT.contains(), and RT.find() can handle to cover the additional transient interfaces.

Alternative: Other older patches (prob best exemplified by clj-700-8.diff) restructure the collections type hierarchy. That is a much bigger change than the one taken here but is perhaps a better long-term path. That patch refactors several of the Clojure interfaces so that logic abstract from the issue of immutability is pulled out to a general interface (e.g. ISet, IAssociative), but preserves the contract specified (e.g. Associatives only return Associatives when calling assoc()). With more general interfaces in place the contains() and getFrom() methods were then altered to conditionally use the general interfaces which are agnostic of persistence vs. transience.

Screening Notes

  • the extra conditions in RT add branches to some key functions. get already has a getFrom optimization, but there is no similar containsFrom or findFrom. Is it worth measuring the possible impact of these?
  • I believe the interface refactoring approach (not taken here) is worth separate consideration as an enhancement. If this is done, I think leveraging valAt would be simpler, e.g. allowing HashMap and ArrayMap to share code
  • it is not evident (to me anyway) why some API fns consume ILookup and others do not, among e.g. contains?, get, and find. Possible doc enhancement?
  • there is test code already in place (data_structures.clj) that could easily be expanded to cover transients. It would be nice to do this, or better yet get some test.check tests in place

Patch: clj-700-9.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 01/Jan/11 8:01 PM ]

the same is also true for TransientVectors

{{(contains? (transient [1 2 3]) 0)}}

false

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 01/Jan/11 8:25 PM ]

As expected, TransientSets have the same issue; plus an additional, probably related one.

(:x (transient #{:x}))

nil

(get (transient #{:x}) :x)

nil

Comment by Alexander Redington [ 07/Jan/11 2:07 PM ]

This is caused by expectations in clojure.lang.RT regarding the type of collections for some methods, e.g. contains() and getFrom(). Checking for contains looks to see if the instance passed in is Associative (a subinterface of PersistentCollection), or IPersistentSet.

This patch refactors several of the Clojure interfaces so that logic abstract from the issue of immutability is pulled out to a general interface (e.g. ISet, IAssociative), but preserves the contract specified (e.g. Associatives only return Associatives when calling assoc()).

With more general interfaces in place the contains() and getFrom() methods were then altered to conditionally use the general interfaces which are agnostic of persistence vs. transience. Includes tests in transients.clj to verify the changes fix this problem.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 28/Jan/11 10:35 AM ]

Rich: Patch doesn't currently apply, but I would like to get your take on approach here. In particular:

  1. this represents working back from the defect to rethinking abstractions (good!). Does it go far enough?
  2. what are good names for the interfaces introduced here?
Comment by Alexander Redington [ 25/Mar/11 7:44 AM ]

Rebased the patch off the latest pull of master as of 3/25/2011, it should apply cleanly now.

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 17/Feb/12 2:59 PM ]

Latest patch does not apply as of f5bcf647

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 17/Feb/12 5:59 PM ]

clj-700-patch2.txt does patch cleanly to latest Clojure head as of a few mins ago. No changes to patch except in context around changed lines.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 07/Mar/12 3:23 AM ]

Sigh. Git patches applied via 'git am' are fragile beasts indeed. Look at them the wrong way and they fail to apply.

clj-700-patch3.txt applies cleanly to latest master as of Mar 7, 2012, but not if you use this command:

git am -s < clj-700-patch3.txt

I am pretty sure this is because of DOS CR/LF line endings in the file src/jvm/clojure/lang/Associative.java. The patch does apply cleanly if you use this command:

git am --keep-cr -s < clj-700-patch3.txt

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Mar/12 6:34 PM ]

This ticket was changed to Incomplete and waiting on Rich when Stuart Halloway asked for feedback on the approach on 28/Jan/2011. Stuart Sierra changed it to not waiting on Rich on 17/Feb/2012 when he noted the patch didn't apply cleanly. Latest patch clj-700-patch3.txt does apply cleanly, but doesn't change the approach used since the time Stuart Halloway's concern was raised. Should it be marked as waiting on Rich again? Something else?

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 08/Jun/12 12:44 PM ]

Patch 4 incorporates patch 3, and brings it up to date on hashing (i.e. uses hasheq).

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Jun/12 12:52 PM ]

Removed clj-700-patch3.txt in favor of Stuart Halloway's improved clj-700-patch4.txt dated June 8, 2012.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 18/Jun/12 3:06 PM ]

clj-700-patch5.txt dated June 18, 2012 is the same as Stuart Halloway's clj-700-patch4.txt, except for context lines that have changed in Clojure master since Stuart's patch was created. clj-700-patch4.txt no longer applies cleanly.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 19/Aug/12 4:47 AM ]

Adding clj-700-patch6.txt, which is identical to Stuart Halloway's clj-700-patch4.txt, except that it applies cleanly to latest master as of Aug 19, 2012. Note that as described above, you must use the --keep-cr option to 'git am' when applying this patch for it to succeed. Removing clj-700-patch5.txt, since it no longer applies cleanly.

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 24/Aug/12 1:08 PM ]

Patch fails as of commit 1c8eb16a14ce5daefef1df68d2f6b1f143003140

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 24/Aug/12 1:53 PM ]

Which patch did you try, and what command did you use? I tried applying clj-700-patch6.txt to the same commit, using the following command, and it applied, albeit with the warning messages shown:

% git am --keep-cr -s < clj-700-patch6.txt
Applying: Refactor of some of the clojure .java code to fix CLJ-700.
/Users/jafinger/clj/latest-clj/clojure/.git/rebase-apply/patch:29: trailing whitespace.
public interface Associative extends IPersistentCollection, IAssociative{
warning: 1 line adds whitespace errors.
Applying: more CLJ-700: refresh to use hasheq

Note the --keep-cr option, which is necessary for this patch to succeed. It is recommended in the "Screening Tickets" section of the JIRA workflow wiki page here: http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/JIRA+workflow

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 28/Aug/12 5:48 PM ]

Presumptuously changing Approval from Incomplete back to None, since the latest patch does apply cleanly if the --keep-cr option is used. It was in Screened state recently, but I'm not so presumptuous as to change it to Screened

Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Aug/13 12:26 PM ]

I think through a series of different hands on this ticket it got knocked way back in the list. Re-marking vetted as it's previously been all the way up through screening. Should also keep an eye on CLJ-787 as it may have some collisions with this one.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Nov/13 10:14 AM ]

clj-700-7.diff is identical to clj-700-patch6.txt, except it applies cleanly to latest master. Only some lines of context in a test file have changed.

When I say "applies cleanly", I mean that there is one warning when using the proper "git am" command from the dev wiki page. This is because one line replaced in Associative.java has a CR/LF at the end of the line, because all lines in that file do.

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 17/Feb/14 9:54 AM ]

Since clojure 1.5, contains? throws an IllegalArgumentException on transients.
In 1.6.0-beta1, transients are no longer marked as alpha.

Does this mean, that we won't be able to distinguish between a nil value and no value on a transient?

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 27/Jun/14 10:20 AM ]

Request for someone to (1) update patch to apply cleanly, and (2) summarize approach so I don't have to read through the comment history.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 27/Jun/14 11:02 AM ]

The latest patch is clj-700-7.diff dated Nov 8, 2013. I believe it is impossible to create a patch that applies any more cleanly using git for source files that have carriage returns in them, which at least one modified source file does. Here is the command I used on latest Clojure master as of today (Jun 27 2014), which is the same as that of March 25 2014:

% git am -s --keep-cr --ignore-whitespace < ~/clj/patches/clj-700-7.diff 
Applying: Refactor of some of the clojure .java code to fix CLJ-700.
/Users/admin/clj/latest-clj/clojure/.git/rebase-apply/patch:29: trailing whitespace.
public interface Associative extends IPersistentCollection, IAssociative{
warning: 1 line adds whitespace errors.
Applying: more CLJ-700: refresh to use hasheq

If you want a patch that doesn't have the 'trailing whitespace' warning in it, I think someone would have to commit a change that removed the carriage returns from file Associative.java. If you want such a patch, let me know and we can remove all of them from every source file and be done with this annoyance.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 27/Jun/14 11:19 AM ]

Updated description to contain a copy of only those comments that seemed 'interesting'. Most comments have simply been "attached an updated patch that applies cleanly", or "changed the state of this ticket for reason X".

Comment by Alex Miller [ 27/Jun/14 1:19 PM ]

Looks like Andy did as requested, moving back to Screenable.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 4:27 PM ]

Patch clj-700-7.diff dated Nov 8 2013 no longer applied cleanly to latest master after some commits were made to Clojure on Aug 29, 2014. It did apply cleanly before that day.

I have not checked how easy or difficult it might be to update this patch.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Sep/14 3:59 AM ]

Patch clj-700-8.diff dated Sep 1 2014 is identical to clj-700-7.diff, except that it applies "cleanly" to latest master, by which I mean it applies as cleanly as I think it is possible to apply for a git patch to a file with carriage return/line feed line endings, as one of the modified files still does.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Dec/14 3:12 PM ]

Added new patch with alternate approach that just makes RT know about transients instead of refactoring the class hierarchy.

clj-700-rt.patch

In some ways I think the class hierarchy refactoring is due, but I'm not totally on board with all the changes in those patches and it has impacts on collections outside Clojure itself that are hard to reason about.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 31/Jul/15 11:35 AM ]

I'd like to look at the type hierarchy myself

Comment by Tim McCormack [ 14/Dec/15 1:09 PM ]

Workaround: Use ternary get with an acceptable sentinal value:

(get (transient {:x 5}) :y :no)
:no




[CLJ-2] Scopes Created: 15/Jun/09  Updated: 27/Jul/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Assembla Importer Assignee: Rich Hickey
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File scopes-spike.patch    

 Description   

Add the scope system for dealing with resource lifetime management



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 11:43 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/2

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 11:43 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #42, #113, #2, #20, #94, #96, #104, #119, #124, #127, #149, #162)

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 12/Jul/11 8:26 AM ]

Patch demonstrates idea, not ready for prime time.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 23/Dec/11 7:37 AM ]

I think the decision of having to specify either a Closeable resource or a close function for an existing non-Closeable resource in with-open is quite awkward, because they have completely different meaning.

  (let [foo (open-my-custom-resource "foo.bar")]
    (with-open [r (reader "foo.txt")
                foo #(.terminate foo)]
      (do-stuff r foo)))

I think a CloseableResource protocol that can be extended to custom types as implemented in the patch to CLJ-308 is somewhat easier to use. Extend it once, and then you can use open-my-custom-resource in with-open just like reader/writer and friends...

That said, Scopes can still be useful, but I'd vote for handling the "how should that resource be closed" question by a protocol. Then the with-open helper can simply add

(swap! *scope* conj (fn [] (clojure.core.protocols/close ~(bindings 0))))

and cleanup-scope only needs to apply each fn without having to distinguish Closeables from fns.





[CLJ-84] GC Issue 81: compile gen-class fail when class returns self Created: 17/Jun/09  Updated: 27/Jul/13

Status: In Progress
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Backlog
Fix Version/s: Backlog

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Assembla Importer Assignee: Rich Hickey
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Approval: Vetted
Waiting On: Chouser

 Description   
Reported by davidhaub, Feb 14, 2009

When attempting to compile the following program, clojure fails with a
ClassNotFoundException.  It occurs because one of the methods returns the
same class that is being generated.  If the returnMe method below is
changed to return an Object, the compile succeeds.

Beware when testing! If the classpath contains a class file (say from a
prior successful build when the returnMe method was changed to return an
object), the compile will succeed.  Always clear out the
clojure.compile.path prior to compiling.

;badgenclass.clj
(ns badgenclass
  (:gen-class
     :state state
     :methods
     [[returnMe [] badgenclass]]
     :init init))
(defn -init []
  [[] nil])

(defn -returnMe [this]
  this)

#!/bin/sh
rm -rf classes
mkdir classes
java -cp lib/clojure.jar:classes:. -Dclojure.compile.path=classes \
clojure.lang.Compile badgenclass


Comment 1 by chouser, Mar 07, 2009

Attached is a patch that accepts strings or symbols for parameter and return class
names, and generates the appropriate bytecode without calling Class/forName.  It
fixes this issue, but because 'ns' doesn't resolve :gen-class's arguments, class
names aren't checked as early anymore.  :gen-class-created classes with invalid
parameter or return types can even be instantiated, and no error will be reported
until the broken method is called.

One possible alternative would be to call Class/forName on any symbols given, but
allow strings to use the method given by this patch.  To return your own type, you'd
need a method defined like:

  [returnMe [] "badgenclass"]

Any thoughts?


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 5:09 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/84
Attachments:
genclass-allow-unresolved-classname.patch - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/cWS6Aww30r3RbzeJe5afGb/download/cWS6Aww30r3RbzeJe5afGb

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 5:09 PM ]

oranenj said: [file:cWS6Aww30r3RbzeJe5afGb]: on comment 1

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 5:09 PM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #19, #30, #31, #126, #17, #42, #47, #50, #61, #64, #69, #71, #77, #79, #84, #87, #89, #96, #99, #103, #107, #112, #113, #114, #115, #118, #119, #121, #122, #124)

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 30/Oct/10 11:58 AM ]

The approach take in the initial patch (delaying resolution of symbols into classes) is fine: gen-class makes no promise about when this happens, and the dynamic approach feels more consistent with Clojure. I think the proposed (but not implemented) use of string/symbol to control when class names are resolved is a bad idea: magical and not implied by the types.

Needed:

  • update the patch to apply cleanly
  • consider whether totype could live in clojure.reflect.java. (Beware load order dependencies.)
Comment by Chouser [ 30/Oct/10 9:29 PM ]

Wow, 18-month-old patch, back to haunt me for Halloway'een

So what does it mean that the assignee is Rich, but it's waiting on me?

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 01/Nov/10 9:17 AM ]

I am using Approval = Incomplete plus Waiting On = Someone to let submitters know that there is feedback waiting, and that they can move the ticket forward by acting on it. The distinction is opportunity to contribute (something has been provided to let you move forward) vs. expectation of contribution.





[CLJ-1920] Create an easy way to gracefully shutdown agents Created: 03/May/16  Updated: 03/May/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Ruslan Al-Fakikh Assignee: Ruslan Al-Fakikh
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: agents


 Description   

Currently there is no easy way to shutdown agents while making sure all the submitted actions are completed and no new actions are sent.

Here is the naive approach:

(shutdown-agents)

There are two problems with that:
1) It will discard all the actions that have already been submitted, but haven't been started.
2) It won't prohibit from sending further actions to agents (no explicit error will be thrown, just silent ignoring).

Here is the proof:

(def my-agent (agent 1))

(defn sleep-and-inc [number]
  (Thread/sleep 3000)
  (println "action number" number "complete")
  (inc number))

(println "sending off 2 times")
(send-off my-agent sleep-and-inc)
(send-off my-agent sleep-and-inc)
(println "sending off complete")

(shutdown-agents)
(println "shutdown requested")

(println "sending off a 3rd time")
(send-off my-agent sleep-and-inc)
(println "sending off complete")

Here is the output:

sending off 2 times
sending off complete
shutdown requested
sending off a 3rd time
sending off complete
action number 1 complete

As you can see - the 2nd action got discarded, the 3rd action got ignored.

And btw, the shutdown-agents' docstring is misleading (not clear):
"...Running actions will complete, but no new actions will be accepted"
1) It doesn't say anything about already submitted actions
2) "no new actions will be accepted" sounds like there should be an error, but it's silently ignored.
So, the better docstring should be "...Running actions will complete, waiting actions will be discarded and new actions will be ignored"

A similar naive approach works perfectly well in Java:

ExecutorService executor = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();

        executor.submit(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(3000);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    throw new RuntimeException(e);
                }
                System.out.println("Action 1 complete");
            }
        });
        executor.submit(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(3000);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    throw new RuntimeException(e);
                }
                System.out.println("Action 2 complete");
            }
        });

        executor.shutdown();
        System.out.println("Shutdown requested");

//        //will throw RejectedExecutionException
//        executor.submit(new Runnable() {
//            @Override
//            public void run() {
//                try {
//                    Thread.sleep(3000);
//                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
//                    throw new RuntimeException(e);
//                }
//                System.out.println("Action 3 complete");
//            }
//        });

Output:

Shutdown requested
Action 1 complete
Action 2 complete

By "perfectly well" I mean:
1) It will complete all the waiting tasks (not just running)
2) It will throw an error on a new task after "shutdown" was called.

So, back to Clojure - currently we are only left with this idiom (not trivial!):

(await my-agent)
(shutdown-agents)

It is not a trivial and straightforward idiom, because:
1) You need to keep track of all the agents in the system. Becomes close to impossible if you are dealing with third-party code that uses agents.
2) Still doesn't even throw an exception if you happen to send another action while waiting or shutting down.

Proposal
(inspired by Java):
1) Create a new function called "shutdown-agents-gracefully" which will do 2 additional things:
1.1) Put the agents system to "shutting down" state
1.2) Completes the running actions as well as the waiting actions
2) Modify "send" and "send-off" so that they throw an error in case the agent system is in "shutting down" state.
3) Fix the docstring of "shutdown-agents" (see above)

I'll start developing a patch when this jira ticket is validated.






[CLJ-113] GC Issue 109: RT.load's "don't load if already loaded" mechanism breaks ":reload-all" Created: 17/Jun/09  Updated: 26/Aug/13

Status: In Progress
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Stephen C. Gilardi
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   
Reported by scgilardi, Apr 24, 2009

What (small set of) steps will reproduce the problem?

"require" and "use" support a ":reload-all" flag that is intended to  
cause the specified libs to be reloaded along with all libs on which  
they directly or indirectly depend. This is implemented by temporarily  
binding a "loaded-libs" var to the empty set and then loading the  
specified libs.

AOT compilation added another "already loaded" mechanism to  
clojure.lang.RT.load() which is currently not sensitive to a "reload-
all" being in progress and breaks its operation in the following case:

        A, B, and C are libs
        A depends on B. (via :require in its ns form)
        B depends on C. (via :require in its ns form)
        B has been compiled (B.class is on classpath)

        At the repl I "require" A which loads A, B, and C (either from
class files or clj files)
        I modify C.clj
        At the repl I "require" A with the :reload-all flag, intending to  
pick up the changes to C
        C is not reloaded because RT.load() skips loading B: B.class
exists, is already loaded, and B.clj hasn't changed since it was compiled.


What is the expected output? What do you see instead?

I expect :reload-all to be effective. It isn't.

What version are you using?

svn 1354, 1.0.0RC1

Was this discussed on the group? If so, please provide a link to the
discussion:

http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_frm/thread/9bbc290321fd895f/e6a967250021462a#e6a967250021462a

Please provide any additional information below.

I'll upload a patch soon that creates a "*reload-all*" var with a  
root binding of nil and code to bind it to true when the current  
thread has a :reload-all call pending. When *reload-all* is true,  
RT.load() will (re)load all libs from their ".clj" files even if  
they're already loaded.

The fix for this may need to be coordinated with a fix for issue #3.


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/113

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #19, #30, #31, #126, #17, #42, #47, #50, #61, #64, #69, #71, #77, #79, #84, #87, #89, #96, #99, #103, #107, #112, #113, #114, #115, #118, #119, #121, #122, #124)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #42, #113, #2, #20, #94, #96, #104, #119, #124, #127, #149, #162)

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 08/Aug/11 7:40 PM ]

seems like the code that is emitted in the static init for namespace classes could be emitted into a init_ns() static method and the static init could call init_ns(). then RT.load could call init_ns() to get the behavior of reloading an AOT compiled namespace.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 09/Aug/11 8:31 PM ]

looking at the compiler it looks like most of what I mentioned above is already implemented, just need RT to reflectively call load() on the namespace class in the right place





[CLJ-42] GC Issue 38: When using AOT compilation, "load"ed files are not reloaded on (require :reload 'name.space) Created: 17/Jun/09  Updated: 26/Aug/13

Status: In Progress
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Stephen C. Gilardi
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   
Reported by m...@kotka.de, Jan 07, 2009
What (small set of) steps will reproduce the problem?

1. Create a file src/foo.clj

cat >src/foo.clj <<EOF
(ns foo (:load "bar"))
EOF

2. Create a file src/bar.clj

cat >src/bar.clj <<EOF
(clojure.core/in-ns 'foo)
(def x 8)
EOF

3. Start Clojure Repl: java -cp src:classes clojure.main -r

4. Compile the namespace.

user=> (compile 'foo)
foo

5. Require the namespace
user=> (require :reload-all :verbose 'foo)
(clojure.core/load "/foo")
(clojure.core/load "/bar")

What is the expected output? What do you see instead?

6. Re-Require the namespace

user=> (require :reload-all :verbose 'foo)
(clojure.core/load "/foo")

Only the "master" file is loaded, but not the bar file.
Expected would have been to also load the bar file.
Changes to bar.clj are not reflected, and depending
on the setting (eg. using multimethods in foo from
a different namespace) code may be corrupted.

What version are you using?

SVN rev. 1195


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:44 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/42

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:44 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #19, #30, #31, #126, #17, #42, #47, #50, #61, #64, #69, #71, #77, #79, #84, #87, #89, #96, #99, #103, #107, #112, #113, #114, #115, #118, #119, #121, #122, #124)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:44 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#42, #71)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:44 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #42, #113, #2, #20, #94, #96, #104, #119, #124, #127, #149, #162)





[CLJ-1239] faster, more flexible dispatch for clojure.walk Created: 29/Jul/13  Updated: 26/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Stuart Sierra Assignee: Stuart Sierra
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 8
Labels: walk

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1239-protocol-dispatch-for-clojure.walk.patch     Text File 0002-CLJ-1239-protocol-dispatch-for-clojure.walk.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The conditional dispatch in clojure.walk is slow and not open to extension. Prior to CLJ-1105 it did not support records.

Approach: Reimplement clojure.walk using protocols. The public API does not change. Users can extend the walk protocol to other types (for example, Java collections) if desired. As in CLJ-1105, this version of clojure.walk supports records.

Patch: 0002-CLJ-1239-protocol-dispatch-for-clojure.walk.patch

Performance: My tests indicate this is 1.5x-2x the speed of the original clojure.walk. See https://github.com/stuartsierra/clojure.walk2 for benchmarks.

Risks: This approach carries some risk of breaking user code that relied on type-specific behavior of the old clojure.walk. When running the full Clojure test suite, I discovered (and fixed) some breakages that did not show up in clojure.walk's unit tests. See, for example, commit 730eb75 in clojure.walk2



 Comments   
Comment by Vjeran Marcinko [ 19/Oct/13 12:32 PM ]

It looks, as it is now, that walking the tree and replacing forms doesn't preserve original meta-data contained in data structures.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Nov/13 1:11 AM ]

Patch 0001-CLJ-1239-protocol-dispatch-for-clojure.walk.patch no longer applies cleanly to latest Clojure master since the patch for CLJ-1105 was committed on Nov 22, 2013. From the description, it appears the intent was either that patch or this one, not both, so I am not sure what should happen with this patch, or even this ticket.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 23/Nov/13 1:52 AM ]

This patch and ticket are still candidates for future release.

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 20/Dec/13 9:14 AM ]

Added new patch that applies on latest master after CLJ-1105.

Comment by Chouser [ 27/Feb/14 10:26 AM ]

The way this patch behaves can be surprising compared to regular maps:

(clojure.walk/prewalk-replace {[:a 1] nil} {:a 1, :b 2})
;=> {:b 2}

(defrecord Foo [a b])
(clojure.walk/prewalk-replace {[:a 1] nil} (map->Foo {:a 1, :b 2}))
;=> #user.Foo{:a 1, :b 2}

Note how the [:a 1] entry is removed from the map, but not from the record.

Here's an implementation that doesn't suffer from that problem, though it does scary class name munging instead: https://github.com/LonoCloud/synthread/blob/a315f861e04fd33ba5398adf6b5e75579d18ce4c/src/lonocloud/synthread/impl.clj#L66

Perhaps we could add to the defrecord abstraction to support well the kind of things that synthread code is doing clumsily, and then walk could take advantage of that.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 27/Feb/14 2:11 PM ]

@Chouser, can you file a new ticket related to this? It's hard to manage work on something from comments on a closed ticket.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 27/Feb/14 3:54 PM ]

@Chouser - Never mind! I was thinking this was the change that went into 1.6. Carry on.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 27/Feb/14 5:17 PM ]

Alex, for what it matters clojure-1.6.0 after CLJ-1105 exibits the same behaviour as described by Chouser for this patch





[CLJ-1107] 'get' should throw exception on non-Associative argument Created: 13/Nov/12  Updated: 26/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Stuart Sierra Assignee: Stuart Sierra
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 17
Labels: checkargs

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1107-Throw-exception-for-get-called-on-unsupport.patch     Text File 0003-CLJ-1107-Throw-exception-for-get-on-unsupported-type.patch     Text File clj-1107-throw-on-unsupported-get-v4.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The implementation of clojure.core/get returns nil if its argument is not an associative collection.

This behavior can obscure common programmer errors such as:

(def a (atom {:a 1 :b 2})

(:foo a)   ; forgot to deref a
;;=> nil

Calling get on something which is neither nil nor an Associative collection is almost certainly a bug, and should be indicated by an exception.

CLJ-932 was accepted as a similar enhancement to clojure.core/contains?

Patch: 0003-CLJ-1107-Throw-exception-for-get-on-unsupported-type.patch

Approach: Throw IllegalArgumentException as final fall-through case in RT.getFrom instead of returning nil.

Also see: CLJ-969



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 24/May/13 12:31 PM ]

Patch clj-1107-throw-on-get-for-unsupported-types-patch-v2.txt dated May 24 2013 is identical to 0001-CLJ-1107-Throw-exception-for-get-called-on-unsupport.patch dated Nov 13 2012, except it applies cleanly to latest master. A recent commit for CLJ-1099 changed many IllegalArgumentException occurrences to Throwable in the tests, which is the only thing changed in this updated patch.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Jan/14 5:01 PM ]

Patch clj-1107-throw-on-get-for-unsupported-types-patch-v2.txt applied cleanly to latest Clojure master as of Jan 23 2014, but no longer does with commits made to Clojure between then and Jan 30 2014. I have not checked to see how difficult or easy it may be to update this patch.

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 11/Feb/14 7:23 AM ]

New patch 0003-CLJ-1107-Throw-exception-for-get-on-unsupported-type.patch created from master at 5cc167a.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 26/Mar/14 11:55 AM ]

Patch clj-1107-throw-on-unsupported-get-v4.patch dated Mar 26 2014 is identical to Stuart Sierra's patch 0003-CLJ-1107-Throw-exception-for-get-on-unsupported-type.patch, and retains his authorship. The only difference is in one line of diff context required in order to make it apply cleanly to latest master.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 10/Jun/14 10:54 AM ]

This would be a breaking change

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 17/Jun/14 6:59 PM ]

Arguably so was CLJ-932 (contains?), which did "break" some things that were already broken.

This is a more invasive change than CLJ-932, but I believe it is more likely to expose hidden bugs than to break intentional behavior.

Comment by Andy Sheldon [ 07/Oct/14 5:40 AM ]

Is it more idiomatic to use "({:a 1}, :a)" and a safe replacement to boot? E.g. could you mass replace "(get " with "(" in a code base, in order to find bugs? I am still learning the language, and not young anymore, and couldn't reliably remember the argument order. So, I found it easier to avoid (get) with maps anyways. Without it I can put the map first or second.





[CLJ-1240] Clarify limits of clojure.walk/macroexpand-all in docstring Created: 29/Jul/13  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Trivial
Reporter: Stuart Sierra Assignee: Stuart Sierra
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: walk

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1240-Note-limits-of-clojure.walk-macroexpand-all.patch    
Patch: Code

 Description   

The clojure.walk/macroexpand-all function appears to be a general recursive macroexpansion, but it is not because it doesn't understand special forms such as let.

Current patch: 0001-CLJ-1240-Note-limits-of-clojure.walk-macroexpand-all.patch

The modified docstring in this patch notes that clojure.walk/macroexpand-all is not identical to macroexpansion by the Clojure compiler and should be used for development only.






[CLJ-346] (pprint-newline :fill) is not handled correctly Created: 12/May/10  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Backlog

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Assembla Importer Assignee: Tom Faulhaber
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: print

Approval: Vetted
Waiting On: Tom Faulhaber

 Description   

Filled pretty printing (where we try to fit as many elements on a line as possible) is being too aggressive as we can see when we try to print the following array:

user> (binding [*print-right-margin* 20] (pprint (int-array (range 10))))

Produces:

[0,
1,
2,
3,
4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

Rather than

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4,
5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

or something like that. (I haven't worked through the exact correct representation for this case).

We currently only use :fill style newlines for native java arrays.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 8:01 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/346
Attachments:
0347-pprint-update-2.diff - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/diLxv6y4Sr35GVeJe5cbLr/download/diLxv6y4Sr35GVeJe5cbLr

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 8:01 AM ]

stu said: [file:diLxv6y4Sr35GVeJe5cbLr]

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 8:01 AM ]

stu said: The second patch includes the first, and adds another test.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 8:01 AM ]

tomfaulhaber said: This patch was attached to the wrong bug. It should be attached to bug #347. There is no fix for this bug yet.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 05/Nov/10 8:07 AM ]

Is this current?

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 29/Nov/10 8:48 PM ]

Tom, this patch doesn't apply, and I am not sure why. Can you take a look?





[CLJ-1610] Unrolled small maps Created: 08/Dec/14  Updated: 22/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Zach Tellman
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 9
Labels: collections


 Description   

Placeholder for unrolled small maps enhancement (companion for vectors at CLJ-1517).



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 09/Jul/15 10:59 PM ]

Is there an expectation that these would perform better that PersistentArrayMap?

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 09/Jul/15 11:53 PM ]

Yes, in some cases significantly so, for three reasons (in rough order of importance):

  • positional constructors, without any need for array instantiation/population
  • short-circuiting equality checks using hash comparisons
  • no iteration on any operation

There are a series of benchmarks at https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections/blob/master/test/cambrian_collections/map_test.clj#L64-L148, which compare operations against maps with both keywords (which don't benefit from the hash comparisons) and symbols (which do). The 7-entry map cases cause the unrolled maps to overflow, so they only exist to test the overflow mechanism.

I've run the benchmark suite on my laptop, and the results are at https://gist.github.com/ztellman/961001e1a77e4f76ee1d. Some notable results:

The rest of the benchmarks are marginally faster due to unrolling, but most of the performance benefits are from the above behaviors. In a less synthetic benchmark, I found that Cheshire JSON decoding (which is 33% JSON lexing and 66% data structure building) was sped up roughly 30-40%.





[CLJ-1620] Constants are leaked in case of a reentrant eval Created: 18/Dec/14  Updated: 19/Oct/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Release 1.9

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Christophe Grand Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: aot, compiler

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1620-avoid-constants-leak-in-static-initalizer.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1620-avoid-constants-leak-in-static-initalizer-v2.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1620-avoid-constants-leak-in-static-initalizer-v3.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1620-avoid-constants-leak-in-static-initalizer-v4.patch     Text File clj-1620-v5.patch     Text File eval-bindings.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Incomplete

 Description   

Compiling a function that references a non loaded (or uninitialized) class triggers its init static. When the init static loads clojure code, some constants (source code I think) are leaked into the constants pool of the function under compilation.

It prevented CCW from working in some environments (Rational) because the static init of the resulting function was over 64K.

Steps to reproduce:

Load the leak.main ns and run the code in comments: the first function has 15 extra fields despite being identical to the second one.

(ns leak.main)

(defn first-to-load []
  leak.Klass/foo)

(defn second-to-load []
  leak.Klass/foo)

(comment
=> (map (comp count #(.getFields %) class) [first-to-load second-to-load])
(16 1)
)
package leak;
 
import clojure.lang.IFn;
import clojure.lang.RT;
import clojure.lang.Symbol;
 
public class Klass {
  static {
    RT.var("clojure.core", "require").invoke(Symbol.intern("leak.leaky"));
  }
  public static IFn foo = RT.var("leak.leaky", "foo");
}
(ns leak.leaky)

(defn foo
  "Some doc"
  []
  "hello")

(def unrelated 42)

https://gist.github.com/cgrand/5dcb6fe5b269aecc6a5b#file-main-clj-L10

Patch: clj-1620-v5.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Christophe Grand [ 18/Dec/14 3:56 PM ]

Patch from Nicola Mometto

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 18/Dec/14 4:01 PM ]

Attached the same patch with a more informative better commit message

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 18/Dec/14 4:03 PM ]

I'd like to thank Christophe and Alex for their invaluable help in understanding what was happening, formulating the right hypothesis and then finding a fix.

I would also mention that even if non IBM rational environments where not affected by the bug to the point were CCW would not work, they were still affected. For instance the class for a one-liner function wrapping an interop call weighs 700bytes once the patch is applied, when it weighed 90kbytes with current 1.6 or 1.7.

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 18/Dec/14 5:07 PM ]

In CCW for the initial problematic function, the -v2 patch produces exactly the same bytecode as if the referenced class does not load any namespace in its static initializers.
That is, the patch is valid. I will test it live in the IBM Rational environment ASAP.

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 19/Dec/14 12:10 AM ]

I confirm the patch fixes the issue detected initially in the IBM Rational environment

Comment by Michael Blume [ 06/Jan/15 4:03 PM ]

I have absolutely no idea why, but if I apply this patch, and the patch for CLJ-1544 to master, and then try to build a war from this test project https://github.com/pdenhaan/extend-test I get a scary-looking traceback:

$ lein do clean, war!
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoSuchFieldError: __thunk__0__, compiling:(route.clj:1:1)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$InvokeExpr.eval(Compiler.java:3606)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.compile1(Compiler.java:7299)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.compile1(Compiler.java:7289)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.compile(Compiler.java:7365)
	at clojure.lang.RT.compile(RT.java:398)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:438)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:411)
	at clojure.core$load$fn__5415.invoke(core.clj:5823)
	at clojure.core$load.doInvoke(core.clj:5822)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
	at clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj:5613)
	at clojure.core$load_lib$fn__5362.invoke(core.clj:5668)
	at clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj:5667)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj:5706)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj:5789)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:436)
	at extend_test.core.handler$loading__5301__auto____66.invoke(handler.clj:1)
	at clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:152)
	at clojure.lang.AFn.applyTo(AFn.java:144)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$InvokeExpr.eval(Compiler.java:3601)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.compile1(Compiler.java:7299)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.compile1(Compiler.java:7289)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.compile(Compiler.java:7365)
	at clojure.lang.RT.compile(RT.java:398)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:438)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:411)
	at clojure.core$load$fn__5415.invoke(core.clj:5823)
	at clojure.core$load.doInvoke(core.clj:5822)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
	at clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj:5613)
	at clojure.core$load_lib$fn__5362.invoke(core.clj:5668)
	at clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj:5667)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj:5706)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj:5789)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:421)
	at extend_test.core.servlet$loading__5301__auto____7.invoke(servlet.clj:1)
	at clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:152)
	at clojure.lang.AFn.applyTo(AFn.java:144)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$InvokeExpr.eval(Compiler.java:3601)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.compile1(Compiler.java:7299)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.compile1(Compiler.java:7289)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.compile1(Compiler.java:7289)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.compile(Compiler.java:7365)
	at clojure.lang.RT.compile(RT.java:398)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:438)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:411)
	at clojure.core$load$fn__5415.invoke(core.clj:5823)
	at clojure.core$load.doInvoke(core.clj:5822)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
	at clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj:5613)
	at clojure.core$compile$fn__5420.invoke(core.clj:5834)
	at clojure.core$compile.invoke(core.clj:5833)
	at user$eval5.invoke(form-init180441230737245034.clj:1)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6776)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6765)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6766)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:7203)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.loadFile(Compiler.java:7159)
	at clojure.main$load_script.invoke(main.clj:274)
	at clojure.main$init_opt.invoke(main.clj:279)
	at clojure.main$initialize.invoke(main.clj:307)
	at clojure.main$null_opt.invoke(main.clj:342)
	at clojure.main$main.doInvoke(main.clj:420)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:421)
	at clojure.lang.Var.invoke(Var.java:383)
	at clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:156)
	at clojure.lang.Var.applyTo(Var.java:700)
	at clojure.main.main(main.java:37)
Caused by: java.lang.NoSuchFieldError: __thunk__0__
	at instaparse.core__init.load(Unknown Source)
	at instaparse.core__init.<clinit>(Unknown Source)
	at java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method)
	at java.lang.Class.forName(Class.java:344)
	at clojure.lang.RT.loadClassForName(RT.java:2141)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:430)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:411)
	at clojure.core$load$fn__5415.invoke(core.clj:5823)
	at clojure.core$load.doInvoke(core.clj:5822)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
	at clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj:5613)
	at clojure.core$load_lib$fn__5362.invoke(core.clj:5668)
	at clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj:5667)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj:5706)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj:5789)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:436)
	at clout.core$loading__5301__auto____273.invoke(core.clj:1)
	at clout.core__init.load(Unknown Source)
	at clout.core__init.<clinit>(Unknown Source)
	at java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method)
	at java.lang.Class.forName(Class.java:344)
	at clojure.lang.RT.loadClassForName(RT.java:2141)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:430)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:411)
	at clojure.core$load$fn__5415.invoke(core.clj:5823)
	at clojure.core$load.doInvoke(core.clj:5822)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
	at clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj:5613)
	at clojure.core$load_lib$fn__5362.invoke(core.clj:5668)
	at clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj:5667)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj:5706)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj:5789)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:482)
	at compojure.core$loading__5301__auto____68.invoke(core.clj:1)
	at compojure.core__init.load(Unknown Source)
	at compojure.core__init.<clinit>(Unknown Source)
	at java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method)
	at java.lang.Class.forName(Class.java:344)
	at clojure.lang.RT.loadClassForName(RT.java:2141)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:430)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:411)
	at clojure.core$load$fn__5415.invoke(core.clj:5823)
	at clojure.core$load.doInvoke(core.clj:5822)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
	at clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj:5613)
	at clojure.core$load_lib$fn__5362.invoke(core.clj:5668)
	at clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj:5667)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj:5706)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj:5789)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:457)
	at compojure.route$loading__5301__auto____1508.invoke(route.clj:1)
	at clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:152)
	at clojure.lang.AFn.applyTo(AFn.java:144)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$InvokeExpr.eval(Compiler.java:3601)
	... 75 more
Subprocess failed
Comment by Michael Blume [ 06/Jan/15 4:06 PM ]

https://github.com/MichaelBlume/clojure/tree/no-field
https://github.com/MichaelBlume/extend-test/tree/no-field

mvn clean install in the one, lein ring uberwar in the other.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Jan/15 6:09 PM ]

Michael, thanks for the report, I've tried investigating this a bit but the big amount of moving parts involved make it really hard to figure out why the combination of the two patches causes this issue.

A helpful minimal case would require no lein and no external dependencies, I'd appreciate some help in debugging this issue if anybody has time.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 06/Jan/15 10:56 PM ]

Ok, looks like the minimal case is

(ns foo (:require [instaparse.core]))

(ns bar (:require [foo]))

and then attempt to AOT-compile both foo and bar.

I don't yet know what's special about instaparse.core.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 06/Jan/15 11:30 PM ]

Well, not a minimal case, of course, but one without lein, at least.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 06/Jan/15 11:51 PM ]

ok, problem is instaparse's defclone macro, I've extracted it to a test repo

https://github.com/MichaelBlume/thunk-fail

lein do clean, compile will get you a failure, but the repo has no dependencies so I'm sure there's a way to do that without lein.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 06/Jan/15 11:56 PM ]

Sorry for the barrage of questions, but these classloader bugs are subtle (and close to being solved I hope). Your report is immensely valuable, and yet it will help to be even more specific. There are a cluster of these bugs – and keeping them laser-focused is key.

The minimal case to which you refer is the NoSuchFieldError?
How are is this being invoked this without lein?
What are you calling to AOT? (compile 'bar) ?
What is the classpath? When you invoke originally, is ./target/classes empty?
Does the problem go away with CLJ-979-7 applied?

Comment by Michael Blume [ 07/Jan/15 12:16 AM ]

I have tried and failed to replicate without leiningen. When I just run

java -Dclojure.compile.path=target -cp src:../clojure/target/clojure-1.7.0-aot-SNAPSHOT.jar clojure.lang.Compile thunk-fail.first thunk-fail.second

everything works fine.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 07/Jan/15 12:30 AM ]

The NoSuchFieldError is related to the keyword lookup sites.

Replacing defclone's body with
`(do (:foo {})) is enough to trigger it, with the same ns structure.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 07/Jan/15 4:47 AM ]

I have updated the patch for CLJ-1544, now the combination of the new patch + the patch from this ticket should not cause any exception.

That said, a bug in this patch still exists since while the patch for CLJ-1544 had a bug, it was causing a perfectly valid (albeit hardly reproducible) compilation scenario so we should keep debugging this patch with the help of the bugged patch for CLJ-1544.

I guess the first thing to do is figure out what lein compile is doing differently than clojure.Compile

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 07/Jan/15 4:49 AM ]

Also Ghadi is right, infact replacing the whole body of thunk-fail.core with (:foo {}) is enough.

It would seem like the issue is with AOT (re)compiling top-level keyword lookup sites, my guess is that for some reason this patch is preventing correct generation of the __init static initializer.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 07/Jan/15 5:35 AM ]

I still have absolutely no idea what lein compile is doing but I figured out the issue.
The updated patch binds (in eval) the appropriate vars only when already bounded.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 07/Jan/15 9:00 AM ]

Would it be worth using transients on the bindings map now?

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 07/Jan/15 9:11 AM ]

Makes sense, updated the patch to use a transient map

Comment by Michael Blume [ 07/Jan/15 12:25 PM ]

Is there a test we can add that'll fail in the presence of the v2 patch? preferably independent of the CLJ-1544 patch? I can try to write one myself, but I don't have a lot of familiarity with the Clojure compiler internals.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 07/Jan/15 12:32 PM ]

I'll have to think about a way to reproduce that bug, it's not a simple scenario to reproduce.
It involves compiling a namespace from an evaluated context.

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 15/Apr/15 11:14 AM ]

Hello, is there any chance left that this issue will make it to 1.7 ?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 15/Apr/15 11:18 AM ]

Wasn't planning on it - what's the impact for you?

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 29/Apr/15 2:14 PM ]

The impact is that I need to use a patched version of Clojure for CCW.
While it's currently not that hard to follow clojure's main branch and regularly rebase on it or reapply the patch, it's still a waste of time.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Apr/15 2:31 PM ]

I will check with Rich whether it can be screened for 1.7 before we get to RC.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Apr/15 3:49 PM ]

same as v4 patch, but just has more diff context

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 01/May/15 7:25 AM ]

the file mentioned in the patch field is not the right one IMHO

Comment by Alex Miller [ 01/May/15 8:42 AM ]

which one is?

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 01/May/15 8:58 AM ]

I think you previous comment relates to clj-1620-v5.patch, but at the end of the description there's the following line:

Patch: 0001-CLJ-1620-avoid-constants-leak-in-static-initalizer-v4.patch

Comment by Alex Miller [ 01/May/15 9:30 AM ]

Those patches are equivalent with respect to the change they introduce; they just differ in how much diff context they have.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/May/15 2:25 PM ]

Rich has ok'ed screening this one for 1.7 but I do not feel that I can mark it screened without understanding it much better than I do. The description, code, and cause information here is not sufficient for me to understand what the problem actually is or why the fix is the right one. The fix seems to address the symptom but I worry that it is just a symptom and that a better understanding of the actual cause would lead to a different or better fix.

The evolution of the patches was driven by bugs in CLJ-1544 (a patch which has been pulled out for being suspect for other reasons). Starting fresh, were those modifications necessary and correct?

Why does this set of vars need to push clean impls into the bindings? Why not some of the other vars (like those pushed in load())? The set chosen here seems to match that from the ReifyParser - why? Why should they only be pushed if they are bound (that is, why is "not bound" not the same as "bound but empty")? Are we affecting performance?

Popping all the way out, is the thing being done by CCW even a thing that should be doable? The description says "Compiling a function that references a non loaded (or uninitialized) class triggers its init static" - should this load even happen? Can we get an example that actually demonstrates what CCW was doing originally?

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 19/May/15 7:12 AM ]

Alex, the question of "should what CCW is doing be doable" can be answered if you answer it on the given example, I think.

The question "should the initialization of the class occur when it could just be loaded" is a good one. Several reports have been made on the Clojure list about this problem, and I guess there is at least one CLJ issue about changing some more classForName into classForNameNonLoading here and there in Clojure.
For instance, it prevents referencing java classes which have code in their static initializers as soon as the code does some supposition about the runtime it is initialized in. This is a problem with Eclipse / SWT, this a problem with Cursive as I remember Colin mentioning a similar issue. And will probably is a problem that can appear each time one tries to AOT compile clojure code interoperating with java classes who happen to have, somewhere within static initializers triggered by the compilation (and this is transitive), assumptions that they are initialized in the proper target runtime environment.

What I don't know is if preventing the initialization to occur in the first place would be sufficient to get rid of the class of problems this bug and the proposed patch tried to solve. I do not claim to totally what is happening either (Christophe and Nicolas were of great help to analyze the issue and create the patch), but as I understand it, it's a kind of "Inception-the-movie-like" bug. Compiling a fn which triggers compiling another fn (here through the loading of clojure namespaces via a java initializer).

If preventing the initialization of class static methods when they are referenced (through interop calls - constructor, field, method, static field, static method-) is the last remaining bit that could cause such "compilation during compilation" scenario, then yes, protecting the compilation process like Nicolas tried to do may not be necessary, and just fixing the undesired loading may be enough.





[CLJ-1152] PermGen leak in multimethods and protocol fns when evaled Created: 30/Jan/13  Updated: 19/Oct/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: Release 1.9

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Chouser Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 9
Labels: memory, protocols

Attachments: File naive-lru-for-multimethods-and-protocols.diff     File protocol_multifn_weak_ref_cache.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Incomplete

 Description   

There is a PermGen memory leak that we have tracked down to protocol methods and multimethods called inside an eval, because of the caches these methods use. The problem only arises when the value being cached is an instance of a class (such as a function or reify) that was defined inside the eval. Thus extending IFn or dispatching a multimethod on an IFn are likely triggers.

Reproducing: The easiest way that I have found to test this is to set "-XX:MaxPermSize" to a reasonable value so you don't have to wait too long for the PermGen spaaaaace to fill up, and to use "-XX:+TraceClassLoading" and "-XX:+TraceClassUnloading" to see the classes being loaded and unloaded.

leiningen project.clj
(defproject permgen-scratch "0.1.0-SNAPSHOT"
  :dependencies [[org.clojure/clojure "1.5.0-RC1"]]
  :jvm-opts ["-XX:MaxPermSize=32M"
             "-XX:+TraceClassLoading"
             "-XX:+TraceClassUnloading"])

You can use lein swank 45678 and connect with slime in emacs via M-x slime-connect.

To monitor the PermGen usage, you can find the Java process to watch with "jps -lmvV" and then run "jstat -gcold <PROCESS_ID> 1s". According to the jstat docs, the first column (PC) is the "Current permanent space capacity (KB)" and the second column (PU) is the "Permanent space utilization (KB)". VisualVM is also a nice tool for monitoring this.

Multimethod leak

Evaluating the following code will run a loop that eval's (take* (fn foo [])).

multimethod leak
(defmulti take* (fn [a] (type a)))

(defmethod take* clojure.lang.Fn
  [a]
  '())

(def stop (atom false))
(def sleep-duration (atom 1000))

(defn run-loop []
  (when-not @stop
    (eval '(take* (fn foo [])))
    (Thread/sleep @sleep-duration)
    (recur)))

(future (run-loop))

(reset! sleep-duration 0)

In the lein swank session, you will see many lines like below listing the classes being created and loaded.

[Loaded user$eval15802$foo__15803 from __JVM_DefineClass__]
[Loaded user$eval15802 from __JVM_DefineClass__]

These lines will stop once the PermGen space fills up.

In the jstat monitoring, you'll see the amount of used PermGen space (PU) increase to the max and stay there.

-    PC       PU        OC          OU       YGC    FGC    FGCT     GCT
 31616.0  31552.7    365952.0         0.0      4     0    0.000    0.129
 32000.0  31914.0    365952.0         0.0      4     0    0.000    0.129
 32768.0  32635.5    365952.0         0.0      4     0    0.000    0.129
 32768.0  32767.6    365952.0      1872.0      5     1    0.000    0.177
 32768.0  32108.2    291008.0     23681.8      6     2    0.827    1.006
 32768.0  32470.4    291008.0     23681.8      6     2    0.827    1.006
 32768.0  32767.2    698880.0     24013.8      8     4    1.073    1.258
 32768.0  32767.2    698880.0     24013.8      8     4    1.073    1.258
 32768.0  32767.2    698880.0     24013.8      8     4    1.073    1.258

A workaround is to run prefer-method before the PermGen space is all used up, e.g.

(prefer-method take* clojure.lang.Fn java.lang.Object)

Then, when the used PermGen space is close to the max, in the lein swank session, you will see the classes created by the eval'ing being unloaded.

[Unloading class user$eval5950$foo__5951]
[Unloading class user$eval3814]
[Unloading class user$eval2902$foo__2903]
[Unloading class user$eval13414]

In the jstat monitoring, there will be a long pause when used PermGen space stays close to the max, and then it will drop down, and start increasing again when more eval'ing occurs.

-    PC       PU        OC          OU       YGC    FGC    FGCT     GCT
 32768.0  32767.9    159680.0     24573.4      6     2    0.167    0.391
 32768.0  32767.9    159680.0     24573.4      6     2    0.167    0.391
 32768.0  17891.3    283776.0     17243.9      6     2   50.589   50.813
 32768.0  18254.2    283776.0     17243.9      6     2   50.589   50.813

The defmulti defines a cache that uses the dispatch values as keys. Each eval call in the loop defines a new foo class which is then added to the cache when take* is called, preventing the class from ever being GCed.

The prefer-method workaround works because it calls clojure.lang.MultiFn.preferMethod, which calls the private MultiFn.resetCache method, which completely empties the cache.

Protocol leak

The leak with protocol methods similarly involves a cache. You see essentially the same behavior as the multimethod leak if you run the following code using protocols.

protocol leak
(defprotocol ITake (take* [a]))

(extend-type clojure.lang.Fn
  ITake
  (take* [this] '()))

(def stop (atom false))
(def sleep-duration (atom 1000))

(defn run-loop []
  (when-not @stop
    (eval '(take* (fn foo [])))
    (Thread/sleep @sleep-duration)
    (recur)))

(future (run-loop))

(reset! sleep-duration 0)

Again, the cache is in the take* method itself, using each new foo class as a key.

Workaround: A workaround is to run -reset-methods on the protocol before the PermGen space is all used up, e.g.

(-reset-methods ITake)

This works because -reset-methods replaces the cache with an empty MethodImplCache.

Patch: protocol_multifn_weak_ref_cache.diff

Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Chouser [ 30/Jan/13 9:10 AM ]

I think the most obvious solution would be to constrain the size of the cache. Adding an item to the cache is already not the fastest path, so a bit more work could be done to prevent the cache from growing indefinitely large.

That does raise the question of what criteria to use. Keep the first n entries? Keep the n most recently used (which would require bookkeeping in the fast cache-hit path)? Keep the n most recently added?

Comment by Jamie Stephens [ 18/Oct/13 9:35 AM ]

At a minimum, perhaps a switch to disable the caches – with obvious performance impact caveats.

Seems like expensive LRU logic is probably the way to go, but maybe don't have it kick in fully until some threshold is crossed.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Oct/13 4:28 PM ]

A report seeing this in production from mailing list:
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/_n3HipchjCc

Comment by Adrian Medina [ 10/Dec/13 11:43 AM ]

So this is why we've been running into PermGen space exceptions! This is a fairly critical bug for us - I'm making extensive use of multimethods in our codebase and this exception will creep in at runtime randomly.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/14 9:52 PM ]

it might be better to split this in to two issues, because at a very abstract level the two issues are the "same", but concretely they are distinct (protocols don't really share code paths with multimethods), keeping them together in one issue seems like a recipe for a large hard to read patch

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 26/Jul/14 5:49 PM ]

naive-lru-method-cache-for-multimethods.diff replaces the methodCache in multimethods with a very naive lru cache built on PersistentHashMap and PersistentQueue

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 28/Jul/14 7:09 PM ]

naive-lru-for-multimethods-and-protocols.diff creates a new class clojure.lang.LRUCache that provides an lru cache built using PHashMap and PQueue behind an IPMap interface.

changes MultiFn to use an LRUCache for its method cache.

changes expand-method-impl-cache to use an LRUCache for MethodImplCache's map case

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 30/Jul/14 3:10 PM ]

I suspect my patch naive-lru-for-multimethods-and-protocols.diff is just wrong, unless MethodImplCache really is being used as a cache we can't just toss out entries when it gets full.

looking at the deftype code again, it does look like MethidImplCache is being used as a cache, so maybe the patch is fine

if I am sure of anything it is that I am unsure so hopefully someone who is sure can chime in

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 31/Jul/14 11:02 AM ]

I haven't looked at your patch, but I can confirm that the MethodImplCache in the protocol function is just being used as a cache

Comment by dennis zhuang [ 08/Aug/14 6:21 AM ]

I developed a new patch that convert the methodCache in MultiFn to use WeakReference for dispatch value,and clear the cache if necessary.

I've test it with the code in ticket,and it looks fine.The classes will be unloaded when perm gen is almost all used up.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Aug/14 4:55 PM ]

I don't know which to evaluate here. Does multifn_weak_method_cache.diff supersede naive-lru-for-multimethods-and-protocols.diff or are these alternate approaches both under consideration?

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 22/Aug/14 8:26 PM ]

the most straight forward thing, I think, is to consider them as alternatives, I am not a huge fan of weakrefs, but of course not using weakrefs we have to pick some bounding size for the cache, and the cache has a strong reference that could prevent a gc, so there are trade offs. My reasons to stay away from weak refs in general are using them ties the behavior of whatever you are building to the behavior of the gc pretty strongly. that may be considered a matter of personal taste

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 4:31 PM ]

All patches dated Aug 8 2014 and earlier no longer applied cleanly to latest master after some commits were made to Clojure on Aug 29, 2014. They did apply cleanly before that day.

I have not checked how easy or difficult it might be to update the patches.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 29/Aug/14 7:00 PM ]

I've updated naive-lru-for-multimethods-and-protocols.diff to apply to the current master

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 7:34 PM ]

Thanks, Kevin. While JIRA allows multiple attachments to a ticket with the same filename but different contents, that can be confusing for people looking for a particular patch, and for a program I have that evaluates patches for things like whether they apply and build cleanly. Would you mind removing the older one, or in some other way making all the names unique?

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 29/Aug/14 8:43 PM ]

I deleted all of my attachments accept for my latest and greatest

Comment by dennis zhuang [ 30/Aug/14 9:51 AM ]

I updated multifn_weak_method_cache2.diff patch too.

I think using weak reference cache is better,because we have to keep one cache per multifn.When you have many multi-functions, there will be many LRU caches in memory,and they will consume too much memory and CPU for evictions. You can't choose a proper threshold for LRU cache in every environment.
But i don't have any benchmark data to support my opinion.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Sep/14 2:38 PM ]

I'm going to set the LRU cache patch aside. I don't think it's possible to find a "correct" size for it and it seems weird to me to extend APersistentMap to build such a thing anyways.

I think it makes more sense to follow the same strategy used for other caches (such as the Keyword cache) - a combination ConcurrentHashMap with WeakReferences and a ReferenceQueue for clean-up. I don't see any compelling reason not to take the same path as other internal caches.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Sep/14 3:44 PM ]

Stepping back a little to think about the problem.... our requirements are:
1) cache map of dispatch value (could be any Object) to multimethod function (IFn)
2) do we want keys to be compared based on equality or identity? identity-based opens up more reference-based caching options and is fine for most common dispatch types (Class, Keyword), but reduces (often eliminates?) cache hits for all other types where values are likely to be equiv but not identical (vector of strings for example)
3) concurrent access to cache
4) cache cannot grow without bound
5) cache cannot retain strong references to dispatch values (the cache keys) because the keys might be instances of classes that were loaded in another classloader which will prevent GC in permgen

multifn_weak_method_cache.diff uses a ConcurrentHashMap (#3) that maps RefWrapper around keys to IFn (#1). The patch uses Util.equals() (#2) for (Java) equality-based comparisons. The RefWrapper wraps them in WeakReferences to avoid #5. Cache clearing based on the ReferenceQueue is used to prevent #4.

A few things definitely need to be fixed:

  • Util.equals() should be Util.equiv()
  • methodCache and rq should be final
  • Why does RefWrapper have obj and expect rq to possibly be null?
  • RefWrapper fields should all be final
  • Whitespace errors in patch

Another idea entirely - instead of caching dispatch value, cache based on hasheq of dispatch value then equality check on value. Could then use WeakHashMap and no RefWrapper.

This patch does not cover the protocol cache. Is that just waiting for the multimethod case to look good?

Comment by dennis zhuang [ 10/Sep/14 7:18 PM ]

Hi, alex, thanks for your review.But the latest patch is multifn_weak_method_cache2.diff. I will update the patch soon by your review, but i have a few questions to be explained.

1) I will use Util.equiv() instead of Util.equals().But what's the difference of them?
2) When the RefWrapper is retained as key in ConcurrentHashMap, it wraps the obj in WeakReference.But when trying to find it in ConcurrentHashMap, it uses obj directly as strong reference, and create it with passing null ReferenceQueue.Please look at the multifn_weak_method_cache2.diff line number 112. It short, the patch stores the dispatch value as weak reference in cache,but uses strong reference for cache getting.

3) If caching dispatch value based on hasheq , can we avoid hasheq value conflicts? If two different dispatch value have a same hasheq( or why it doesn't happen?), we would be in trouble.

Sorry, the patch doesn't cover the protocol cache, i will add it ASAP.

Comment by dennis zhuang [ 11/Sep/14 2:02 AM ]

The new patch 'protocol_multifn_weak_ref_cache.diff' is uploaded.

1) Using Util.equiv() instead of Util.equals()
2) Moved the RefWrapper and it's associated methods to Util.java, and refactor the code based on alex's review.
3) Fixed whitespace errors.
4) Fixed PermGen leak in protocol fns.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 03/Oct/14 10:35 AM ]

I screened this ticket again with Brenton Ashworth and had the following comments:

1) We need to have a performance test to verify that we have not negatively impacted performance of multimethods or protocol invocation.
2) Because there are special cases around null keys in the multimethod cache, please verify that there are existing example tests using null dispatch values in the existing test coverage.
3) In Util$RefWrapper.getObj() - why does this return this.ref at the end? It was not clear to me that the comment was correct or that this was useful in any way.
4) In Util$RefWrapper.clearRefWrapCache() - can k == null in that if check? If not, can we omit that? Also, if you explicitly create the Iterator from the entry set, you can call .remove() on it more efficiently than calling .remove() on the cache itself.
5) In core_deftype / MethodImplCache, it appears that you are modifying a now-mutable field rather than the prior version that was going to great lengths to stay immutable. It's not clear to me what the implications of this change are and that concerns me. Can it use a different collection or code to stay immutable?
6) Please update the description of this ticket to include an approach section that describes the changes we are making.

Thanks!





[CLJ-1522] Enhance multimethods metadata Created: 08/Sep/14  Updated: 26/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Bozhidar Batsov Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 17
Labels: metadata

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

I think that multimethod metadata can be extended a bit with some property indicating the var in question is referring to a multimethod (we have something similar for macros) and some default arglists property.

I'm raising this issue because as a tool writer (CIDER) I'm having hard time determining if something is a multimethod (I have to resort to code like (instance? clojure.lang.MultiFn obj) which is acceptable, but not ideal I think (compared to macros and special forms)). There's also the problem that I cannot provide the users with eldoc (function signature) as it's not available in the metadata (this issue was raised on the mailing list as well https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/crje_RLTWdk).

I feel that we really have a problem with the missing arglist and we should solve it somehow. I'm not sure I'm suggesting the best solution and I'll certainly take any solution.



 Comments   
Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 09/Sep/14 4:24 AM ]

Btw, I failed to mention this as I thought it was obvious, but I think we should use the dispatch function's arglist in the multimethod metadata.





[CLJ-1611] clojure.java.io/pushback-reader Created: 08/Dec/14  Updated: 26/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Phill Wolf Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 6
Labels: io, reader

Attachments: Text File drupp-clj-1611-2.patch     Text File drupp-clj-1611.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Whereas

  • clojure.core/read and clojure.edn/read require a PushbackReader;
  • clojure.java.io/reader produces a BufferedReader, which isn't compatible;
  • the hazard has tripped folks up for years[1];
  • clojure.java.io is pure sugar anyway (and would not be damaged by the addition of a little bit more);
  • clojure.java.io's very existence suggests suitability and fitness for use (wherein by the absence of a read-compatible pushback-reader it falls short);

i.e., in the total absence of clojure.java.io it would not seem "hard" to use clojure.edn, but in the presence of clojure.java.io and its "reader" function, amidst so much else in the API that does fit together, one keeps thinking one is doing it wrong;

and

  • revising the "read" functions to make their own Pushback was considered but rejected [2];

Therefore let it be suggested to add clojure.java.io/pushback-reader, returning something consumable by clojure.core/read and clojure.edn/read.

[1] The matter was discussed on Google Groups:

(2014, "clojure.edn won't accept clojure.java.io/reader?") https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/3HSoA12v5nc

with a reference to an earlier thread

(2009, "Reading... from a reader") https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/_tuypjr2M_A

[2] CLJ-82 and the 2009 message thread



 Comments   
Comment by David Rupp [ 10/Jan/15 4:05 PM ]

Attached patch drupp-clj-1611.patch implements clojure.java.io/pushback-reader as requested.

Comment by David Rupp [ 10/Jan/15 4:07 PM ]

Note that you can always import java.io.PushbackReader and do something like (PushbackReader. (reader my-thing)) yourself; that's really all the patch does.

Comment by Phill Wolf [ 11/Jan/15 7:54 AM ]

clojure.java.io/reader is idempotent, while the patch of 10-Jan-2015 re-wraps an existing PushbackReader twice: first with a new BufferedReader, then with a new PushbackReader.

Leaving a given PushbackReader alone would be more in keeping with the pattern of clojure.java.io.

It also needs a docstring. If pushback-reader were idempotent, the docstring's opening phrase could echo clojure.java.io/reader's, e.g.: Attempts to coerce its argument to java.io.PushbackReader; failing that, (bla bla bla).

Comment by David Rupp [ 11/Jan/15 11:14 AM ]

Adding drupp-clj-1611-2.patch to address previous comments.





[CLJ-1289] aset-* and aget perform poorly on multi-dimensional arrays even with type hints. Created: 01/Nov/13  Updated: 26/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Michael O. Church Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: arrays, performance
Environment:

Clojure 1.5.1.

Dependencies: criterium


Attachments: Text File CLJ-1289-p1.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Here's a transcript of the behavior. I don't know for sure that reflection is being done, but the performance penalty (about 1300x) suggests it.

user=> (use 'criterium.core)
nil
user=> (def b (make-array Double/TYPE 1000 1000))
#'user/b
user=> (quick-bench (aget ^"[[D" b 304 175))
WARNING: Final GC required 3.5198021166354323 % of runtime
WARNING: Final GC required 29.172288684474303 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 63558 in 6 samples of 10593 calls.
             Execution time mean : 9.457308 µs
    Execution time std-deviation : 126.220954 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 9.344450 µs ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 9.629202 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 2.477107 ns

One workaround is to use multiple agets.

user=> (quick-bench (aget ^"[D" (aget ^"[[D" b 304) 175))
WARNING: Final GC required 40.59820310542545 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 62135436 in 6 samples of 10355906 calls.
             Execution time mean : 6.999273 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.112703 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 6.817782 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 7.113845 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 2.477107 ns

Cause: The inlined version only applies to arity 2, and otherwise it reflects.



 Comments   
Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 08/Dec/13 9:28 PM ]

A glance at the source makes it obvious that the hypothesis is correct – the inlined version only applies to arity 2, and otherwise it reflects.

I thought this would be as simple as converting the inline function to be variadic (using reduce), but after trying it I realized this is tricky as you have to generate the correct type hints for each step. E.g., given ^"[[D" the inline function needs to type-hint the intermediate result with ^"[D". This isn't difficult if we're just dealing with strings that begin with square brackets, but I don't know for sure that those are the only possibilities.

Comment by Yaron Peleg [ 13/Feb/14 4:44 AM ]

Bump. I just got bitten bad by this.

There are two seperate issues here:
1) (aget 2d-array-doubles 0 0 ) doesn't emit a reflection warning.
2) It seems like the compiler has enough information to avoid the reflective call here.

Note this gets exp. worse as number of dimensions grows, i.e (get doubles3d 0 0 0)
will be 1M slower, etc' Not true, unless you iterate over all elements. it's
simply n_dims*1000x per lookup.

Nasty surprise, especially considering you often go to primitive arrays for speed,
and a common use case is an inner loop(s) that iterate over arrays.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 13/Feb/14 7:08 AM ]

I can probably take a stab at this.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 13/Feb/14 8:34 PM ]

I think the reflection warning problem is pretty much impossible to solve without changing code elsewhere in the compiler, because the reflection done in aget is a different kind than normal clojure reflection – it's explicitly in the function body rather than emitted by the compiler. Since the compiler isn't emitting it, it doesn't reasonably know it's even there. So even if aget is fixed for other arities, you still won't get the warning when it's not inlined.

I can imagine some sort of metadata that you could put on a function telling the compiler that it will reflect if not inlined. Or maybe a more generic not-inlined warning?

The global scope of adding another compiler flag seems about balanced by the seriousness of array functions not being able to warn on reflection.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 13/Feb/14 8:52 PM ]

Attached CLJ-1289-p1.patch which simply inlines variadic calls to aget. It assumes that if it sees a :tag on the array arg that is a string beginning with [, it can assume that the return value from one call to aget can be tagged with the same string with the leading [ stripped off.

I'm not a jvm expert, but having read through the spec a little bit I think this is a reasonable assumption.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Feb/14 3:34 PM ]

I think this probably is actually true, but a more official way to ask that question would be to get the array class and ask for Class.getComponentType() (and less janky than string munging).

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 14/Feb/14 3:40 PM ]

How would you get the array class based on the :tag type hint?

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 14/Feb/14 7:05 PM ]

I see (-> s (Class/forName) (.getComponentType) (.getName)) does the same thing – is that route preferred, or is there another one?





[CLJ-1872] empty? is broken for transient collections Created: 26/Dec/15  Updated: 12/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Leonid Bogdanov Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: collections

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Couldn't find whether it was brought up earlier, but it seems that empty? predicate is broken for transient collections

user=> (empty? (transient []))
IllegalArgumentException Don't know how to create ISeq from: clojure.lang.PersistentVector$TransientVector  clojure.lang.RT.seqFrom (RT.java:528)

user=> (empty? (transient ()))
ClassCastException clojure.lang.PersistentList$EmptyList cannot be cast to clojure.lang.IEditableCollection  clojure.core/transient (core.clj:3209)

user=> (empty? (transient {}))
IllegalArgumentException Don't know how to create ISeq from: clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap$TransientArrayMap  clojure.lang.RT.seqFrom (RT.java:528)

user=> (empty? (transient #{}))
IllegalArgumentException Don't know how to create ISeq from: clojure.lang.PersistentHashSet$TransientHashSet  clojure.lang.RT.seqFrom (RT.java:528)

The workaround is to use (zero? (count (transient ...))) check instead.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Dec/15 9:58 PM ]

Probably similar to CLJ-700.





[CLJ-1891] New socket server startup proactively loads too much code, slowing boot time Created: 09/Feb/16  Updated: 09/Feb/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: server

Attachments: Text File clj-1891.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Prescreened

 Description   

In the new socket server code, clojure.core.server is proactively loaded (regardless of whether servers are in the config), which will also load clojure.edn and clojure.string.

Approach: Delay loading of this code until the first server config is found. This improves startup time when not using the socket server about 0.05 s.

Patch: clj-1891.patch






[CLJ-1458] Enhance the performance of map merges Created: 04/Jul/14  Updated: 01/Feb/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Yongqian Li Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 7
Labels: performance

Attachments: Text File 0001-very-simple-test-of-the-merge-function.patch     Text File clj-1458-4.patch     Text File CLJ-1458-5.patch     Text File CLJ-1458-6.patch     Text File CLJ-1458-transient-merge2.patch     Text File CLJ-1458-transient-merge3.patch     Text File CLJ-1458-transient-merge.patch     Text File merge-test-2.patch     File transient-merge.diff    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

It would be nice if merge used transients.

Patch

  • clj-1458-6.patch

Approach
Migrate c.c/merge later in core after transients & reduce. Leave older version as merge1 for use in cases the precede the newer definition. Make APersistentMap/conj & ATransientMap/cons aware of IKVReduce.

The attached patch preserves two existing behaviors of merge

  • metadata propagation
  • the right hand side of the merges can be a Map.Entry, an IPersistentVector where size=2, and regular maps.

Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Jason Wolfe [ 13/Sep/14 5:09 PM ]

I will take a crack at a patch today.

Comment by Jason Wolfe [ 13/Sep/14 5:42 PM ]

This patch (transient-merge.diff) makes merge, merge-with, and zipmap (since it was right there and could obviously benefit from transients as well) use transients.

Three potential issues:

  • I had to move the functions, since they depend on transient and friends. I assume this is preferable to a forward declaration. This was the best place I could find, but happy to move them elsewhere.
  • I added multiple arities, to avoid potential performance cost of transient-ing a single argument. Happy to undo this if desired.
  • I had to slightly alter the logic in merge-with, since transient maps don't support contains? (or find).
Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 14/Sep/14 12:43 PM ]

I posted a separate ticket for zipmap, with patch, on 30/May/12: CLJ-1005.

Comment by Jason Wolfe [ 14/Sep/14 5:28 PM ]

Ah, sorry if I overstepped then. Happy to remove that change from this patch then if that will simplify things – just let me know.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 28/Dec/14 10:07 PM ]

alternate approach attached delaying merge until after protocols load, and then using transducers.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 28/Dec/14 11:50 PM ]

Looks like you're doing (get m k) twice – shouldn't that be thrown in a local?

Comment by Michael Blume [ 29/Dec/14 1:41 PM ]

um, put, in a local, I mean, 'throw' was a bad choice of word.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 29/Dec/14 2:14 PM ]

Yeah there's that – won't be using get anyways after CLJ-700 gets committed.

We should add performance tests too. merging two maps, three, many maps, also varying the sizes of the maps, and for merge-with, varying the % of collisions.

Need to go back to the (some identity) logic, otherwise metadata is propagated from maps other than the first provided. I'll fix later.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 29/Dec/14 2:49 PM ]

I don't know if this is supposed to be allowed, but this breaks

(merge {} [:foo 'bar])

which is used in the wild by compojure-api

Comment by Michael Blume [ 29/Dec/14 2:49 PM ]

https://github.com/metosin/compojure-api/blob/0.16.6/src/compojure/api/meta.clj#L198

Comment by Michael Blume [ 29/Dec/14 2:54 PM ]

Ghadi, contains? uses get under the covers, so it's still two gets, right? It seems like it'd be more performant to stick with the ::none trick.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 29/Dec/14 5:36 PM ]

This calls for if-let + find.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 29/Dec/14 10:37 PM ]

new patch addressing concerns so far

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 29/Dec/14 10:48 PM ]

CLJ-1458-transient-merge3.patch removes silly inlining macro, uses singleton fns instead.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 29/Dec/14 11:14 PM ]

Nice =)

This should come with tests. If we want to preserve the ability to merge with a MapEntry, we should test it. This isn't so much a weakness of the patch as of the existing tests. I see merge and merge-with being used a few times in the test suite, but I see no test whose purpose is to test their behavior.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 29/Dec/14 11:17 PM ]

Extremely simple merge test, we need more than this, but this is a start

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Jun/15 10:11 AM ]

clj-1458-4.patch refreshed to apply to master, no changes.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 09/Jan/16 5:09 PM ]

I'd like to reevaluate the scope of this ticket. Can we address 'merge' only and defer 'merge-with'? It's by far the more common function. I've attached a new simplified patch.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 09/Jan/16 9:50 PM ]

CLJ-1458-6.patch is yet another cleaner approach

Comment by Alex Miller [ 01/Feb/16 5:17 AM ]

Can you update the ticket approach section to discuss the APersistentMap.cons / ASSOC changes. Also, can you add a before / after perf test for one or more common cases?





[CLJ-1454] Add deref-swap! and deref-reset! (swap! and reset! that return prior value) Created: 28/Jun/14  Updated: 10/Mar/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Philip Potter Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 9
Labels: atom

Attachments: File deref-swap-deref-reset-extending-IAtom.diff     File deref-swap-deref-reset-with-IAtomDeref-and-tests.diff    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Prescreened

 Description   

Sometimes, when swapping or resetting an atom, it's desirable to know the value before the update. The existing swap! and reset! functions return the new value instead. Currently, the only option is to roll your own using a loop and compare-and-set!

Example use cases:

  • When an atom contains a PersistentQueue and you want to atomically remove the head of the queue and process it: if you run (swap! q pop), you have lost the reference to the old head of the list so you can't process it.
  • Want to check if an operation has occurred before by using atom as a flag (this can be achieved with compare-and-set! but reads a little easier this way).
    (def has-run-once (atom false))
    ...
    (when-not (get-and-set! has-run-once true)
    (do something))
  • Want to use an atom similarly to a java.util.concurrent.LinkedTransferQueue, for the case of pairing up adds by writers and drainTo y readers:
    Thread 1: (swap! atm conj item1)
    Thread 2: (swap! atm conj item2)
    Thread 3: (let [new-vals (get-and-set! atm [])] 
    (do-something new-vals))

Approach:

  • Extends clojure.lang.IAtom with derefReset and derefSwap with the exact same arities as their original variants, .reset and .swap. The deref-methods returns the old (deref-ed) value of the atom after a successful mutation of the atom.
  • Added clojure.core/deref-reset! - just like reset! it unconditionally changes values of atoms but returns
    the old atom value. Based on Steven Yi's get-and-set! in ticket CLJ-1599, patch named get-and-set.diff
  • Added clojure.core/deref-swap! - just like swap! but returns the old atom value.

Patch: deref-swap-deref-reset-with-IAtomDeref-and-tests.diff



 Comments   
Comment by Philip Potter [ 28/Jun/14 4:00 PM ]

Overtone already defines functions like this in overtone.helpers.ref, which get used by overtone.libs.event. These return both the old and the new value, although in all existing use cases only the old value gets used.

flatland/useful defines a trade! fn which returns the old value, although the implementation is less clean than a compare-and-set! based solution would be.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 29/Jun/14 6:23 AM ]

Chris Ford suggested "swap-out!" as a name for this function. I definitely think "swap-returning-old!" isn't the ideal name.

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 30/Jun/14 1:33 AM ]

I propose a switch! name. The verb switch is defined as "substitute (two items) for each other; exchange.", and as you get the old value back, it evokes slightly the exchange of items.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 30/Jun/14 3:03 AM ]

Medley also has a deref-swap! which does the same thing.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Jun/14 8:20 AM ]

I think deref-swap! seems like a morally equivalent name to Java's AtomicReference.getAndSet() which is the same idea.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 30/Jun/14 1:19 PM ]

Funny you say that Alex, because prismatic/plumbing defines a get-and-set! (also defined by other projects), equivalent to deref-reset! in medley. Plumbing also defines swap-pair! which returns both old and new values, like the overtone fn, although once again the only usage I can find only uses the old value.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Jun/14 3:37 PM ]

I think it's important to retain the notion that you are not switching/exchanging values but applying the update model of applying a function to the old value to produce the new value. I don't even particularly like "swap!" as I think that aspect is lost in the name (alter and alter-var-root are better). I like that "deref-swap!" combines two words with existing connotations and orders them appropriately.

Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 30/Jun/14 3:43 PM ]

except that that naming doesn't fit well compared to functions like nfirst which are defined as (comp next first). This function is not (comp deref swap!).

Comment by Linus Ericsson [ 29/Feb/16 11:03 AM ]

The patch deref-swap-deref-reset-extending-IAtom.diff addresses CLJ-1454 and CLJ-1599 "Add deref-reset! (reset! that returns old value)".

The patch extends IAtom with .derefSwap and .derefReset methods with identical signatures as to .swap and .reset but are intended to return the derefed (old) value of the atom upon successful mutation of the atom.

The commit message (could be used as an updated description of this ticket, or a new one)

Extends clojure.lang.IAtom with derefReset and derefSwap with the
exact same arities as their original variants, .reset and .swap.

The deref-methods returns the old (derefed) value of the atom after
a successful mutation of the atom.

Added functions:

clojure.core/deref-reset!
Just like reset! it unconditionally changes values of atoms but returns
the old atom value.

clojure.core/deref-swap!
Just like swap! but returns the old atom value.

The deref-reset is based on Steven Yi's get-and-set! in ticket CLJ-1599,
patch named get-and-set.diff

Comment by Alex Miller [ 01/Mar/16 8:46 AM ]

Review:

  • remove ":static true" in the new fns, this is dead
  • as mentioned on the mailing list, I think we need to consider that we are introducing a breaking change here. Rather than modifying IAtom we should add the methods in a new interface IAtomDeref that Atom implements. The Clojure functions should then type-hint to IAtomDeref instead.
Comment by Alex Miller [ 01/Mar/16 8:47 AM ]

Oh, and needs tests!

Comment by Linus Ericsson [ 02/Mar/16 2:14 PM ]

Alex, in deref-swap-deref-reset-with-IAtomDeref-and-tests.diff you'll find a patch with the differences

  • removed ":static true"
  • added an IAtomDeref interface instead of extending IAtom
  • 2 test cases for deref-reset!
  • 1 test case for deref-swap!

Please especially have a look at the test-cases. I tried to catch the various arities of deref-swap! but I don't know if binding warn-on-reflection true actually affects the test cases in any way. Suggestions on how to test wether "arity works" - if even worth the effort to test - are most welcome.

Given the nature of atoms, a suite of generative tests would probably be the best idea. Until then, simple functional tests for the other atom functions should be added, but that's for another ticket.

Comment by Linus Ericsson [ 02/Mar/16 2:34 PM ]

(the second patch is independent from the first one)

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Mar/16 9:13 AM ]

Looks good to me, marking prescreened.





[CLJ-1451] Add take-until Created: 20/Jun/14  Updated: 11/Mar/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Alexander Taggart Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 6
Labels: transducers

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1451-add-take-until.patch     Text File 0002-CLJ-1451-add-drop-until.patch     Text File 0003-let-take-until-and-drop-until-return-transducers.patch     Text File CLJ-1451-drop-until.patch     Text File clj-1451.patch     Text File CLJ-1451-take-until.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Prescreened

 Description   

Discussion: https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure-dev/NaAuBz6SpkY/discussion

It comes up when I would otherwise use (take-while pred coll), but I need to include the first item for which (pred item) is false.

(take-while pos? [1 2 0 3]) => (1 2)
(take-until zero? [1 2 0 3]) => (1 2 0)

Patch: clj-1451.patch

  • Includes transducer arity of take-until
  • Includes inclusion in transducer generative tests

Prescreened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Jun/14 10:21 AM ]

Patch welcome (w/tests).

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 20/Jun/14 2:00 PM ]

Impl and tests for take-until and drop-until, one patch for each.

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 20/Jun/14 3:01 PM ]

Please change :added metadata to "1.7".

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 20/Jun/14 3:12 PM ]

Updated to :added "1.7"

Comment by John Mastro [ 21/Jun/14 6:26 PM ]

I'd like to propose take-through and drop-through as alternative names. I think "through" communicates more clearly how these differ from take-while and drop-while.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Aug/14 2:27 PM ]

Both patches CLJ-1451-drop-until.patch and CLJ-1451-take-until.patch dated Jun 20 2014 no longer apply cleanly to latest Clojure master due to some changes committed earlier today. I haven't checked whether they are straightforward to update, but would guess that they merely require updating a few lines of diff context.

See the section "Updating stale patches" at http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches for suggestions on how to update patches.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 13/Nov/14 11:19 PM ]

Would be nice to cover the transducer case too.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 13/Nov/14 11:54 PM ]

rerolled patches

Comment by Michael Blume [ 14/Nov/14 12:11 AM ]

Covered transducer case =)

Comment by Michael Blume [ 14/Nov/14 12:12 AM ]

Actually I like take/drop-through as well

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 16/Nov/14 12:41 PM ]

Michael, no volatile/state is necessary in the transducer, like take-while. Just wrap in 'reduced to terminate

Comment by Michael Blume [ 17/Dec/14 6:47 PM ]

a) you're clearly right about take-until

b) seriously I don't know what I was thinking with my take-until implementation, I'm going to claim lack of sleep.

c) I'm confused about how to make drop-until work without a volatile

Comment by Michael Blume [ 18/Dec/14 1:52 AM ]

Ghadi and I discussed this and couldn't think of a use case for drop-until. Are there any?

Here's a new take-until patch, generative tests included.

Open questions:

Is take-until a good name? My biggest concern is that take-until makes it sound like a slight modification of take, but this function reverses the sense of the predicate relative to take.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Jan/15 6:06 PM ]

Michael, while JIRA can handle multiple attachments for the same ticket with the same name, it can get confusing for people trying to determine which one with the same name is meant. Could you remove or rename one of your identically-named attachments? Instructions for deleting patches are in the "Removing patches" section on this wiki page: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Mar/16 2:49 PM ]

The patch was slightly stale so I updated to apply to master, but it's almost identical. Attribution retained.

Marked as prescreened.





[CLJ-308] protocol-ize with-open Created: 21/Apr/10  Updated: 26/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Assembla Importer Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 9
Labels: io

Attachments: Text File 0001-Added-ClosableResource-protocol-for-with-open.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Good use (and documentation example) of protocols: make with-open aware of a Closable protocol for APIs that use a different close convention. See http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/86c87e1fc4b1347c



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 4:39 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/308

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 23/Dec/11 5:11 AM ]

Added a CloseableResource protocol and extended it on java.io.Closeable (implemented by all Readers, Writers, Streams, Channels, Sockets). Use it in with-open.

All tests pass.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 23/Dec/11 7:14 AM ]

Seems to be related to Scopes (http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-2).

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 08/Mar/12 3:59 AM ]

Updated patch.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 02/Apr/12 12:11 PM ]

Patch 0001-Added-ClosableResource-protocol-for-with-open.patch dated 08/Mar/12 applies, builds, and tests cleanly on latest master as of Apr 2 2012. Tassilo has signed a CA.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 13/Apr/12 11:23 AM ]

Updated patch to apply cleanly against master again.

Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 22/Jul/14 9:00 PM ]

I looked up this ticket because I ran in to a reflection warning: with-open does not hint it's binding with java.io.Closeable

Some feedback on the patch:

1) This is a breaking change for anyone relying on the close method to be duck-typed.

2) CloseableResource is a bit long. clojure.core.protocols.Closeable is plenty unambiguous.

3) Rather than extending CloseableResource to java.io.Closeable, you can use the little known (undocumented? unsupported?) :on-interface directive:

(defprotocol Closeable
  :on-interface java.io.Closeable
  (close [this]))

That would perform much better than the existing patch.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 23/Jul/14 7:12 AM ]

Hi Brandon, two questions:

Could 1) be circumvented somehow by providing a default implementation somehow? I guess the protocol could be extended upon Object with implementation (.close this), but that would give a reflection warning since Object has no close method. Probably one could extend upon Object and in the implementation search a "close" method using java.lang.reflect and throw an exception if none could be found?

Could you please tell me a bit more about the :on-interface option? How does that differ from extend? And how do I add the implementation, i.e., (.close this) with that option?





[CLJ-1914] Range realization has a race during concurrent execution Created: 14/Apr/16  Updated: 14/Apr/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7, Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Ghadi Shayban Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: range

Attachments: Text File clj-1914-2.patch     Text File clj-1914-3.patch     Text File CLJ-1914.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Prescreened

 Description   

LongRange, which has some complex chunked seq caching, has a race in forceChunk.

chunkedMore, which calls forceChunk(), then checks for the existence of _chunkNext:

One thread calling forceChunk() can stop between these two lines:
https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/src/jvm/clojure/lang/LongRange.java#L131-L132

While another thread thinks the first is done
https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/src/jvm/clojure/lang/LongRange.java#L117

Thanks to Kyle Kingsbury for the reproducing case https://gist.github.com/aphyr/8746181beeac6a728a3aa018804d56f6

Approach: Swap order of setting _chunk and _chunkNext so _chunk serves as a gate after both pieces of state have been set.

Patch: clj-1914-3.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Apr/16 11:13 PM ]

It's not necessary to synchronize here - just swapping these two lines should address the race I think: https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/src/jvm/clojure/lang/LongRange.java#L131-L132

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 14/Apr/16 11:22 PM ]

Good call. That's super subtle.

It appears all mutable assignment occurs in forceChunk() except for https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/src/jvm/clojure/lang/LongRange.java#L145 which should be OK (famous last words).





[CLJ-1744] Unused destructured local not cleared, causes memory leak Created: 03/Jun/15  Updated: 21/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 15
Labels: compiler, destructuring, locals-clearing, memory

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1744-clear-unused-locals.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1744-clear-unused-locals-v2.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Prescreened

 Description   

Clojure currently doesn't clear unused locals. This is problematic as some form of destructuring can generate unused/unusable locals that the compiler cannot clear and thus can cause head retention:

;; this works
user=> (loop [xs (repeatedly 2 #(byte-array (quot (.maxMemory (Runtime/getRuntime)) 10)))] (when (seq xs) (recur (rest xs))))
nil
;; this doesn't
user=>  (loop [[x & xs] (repeatedly 200 #(byte-array (quot (.maxMemory (Runtime/getRuntime)) 10)))] (when (seq xs) (recur xs)))
OutOfMemoryError Java heap space  clojure.lang.Numbers.byte_array (Numbers.java:1252)

Here's a macroexpansion that exposes this issue:

user=> (macroexpand-all '(loop [[a & b] c] [a b]))
(let* [G__21 c 
       vec__22 G__21
       a (clojure.core/nth vec__22 0 nil)
       b (clojure.core/nthnext vec__22 1)]
 (loop* [G__21 G__21]
   (let* [vec__23 G__21
          a (clojure.core/nth vec__23 0 nil)
          b (clojure.core/nthnext vec__23 1)]
     [a b])

Cause: The first two bindings of a and b will hold onto the head of c since they are never used and not accessible from the loop body they cannot be cleared.

Approach: Track whether local bindings are used. After evaluating the binding expression, if the local binding is not used and can be cleared, then pop the result rather than storing it.

Patch: 0001-CLJ-1744-clear-unused-locals-v2.patch

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Michael Blume [ 03/Jun/15 12:57 PM ]

Nice =)

Comment by James Henderson [ 18/Nov/15 6:12 AM ]

FYI - we've hit this as a memory leak in our production system:

(defn write-response! [{:keys [products merchant-id] :as search-result} writer response-type]
  ;; not using `search-result` throughout this fn - kept in to document intent
  ;; hangs on to `products`, a large lazy-seq, until it's completely consumed, causes memory leak

  ...
  (case response-type
    "application/edn" (print-method products writer)
    ...))
(defn write-response! [{:keys [products merchant-id]} writer response-type]
  ;; fine, releases earlier elements in products as it flies through the response

  ...
  (case response-type
    "application/edn" (print-method products writer)
    ...))

The work-around in our case is easy enough - removing the unused symbol - but, given we assumed including an unused symbol would be a no-op, it did take us a while to find!

Cheers,

James

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 15/Dec/15 11:47 AM ]

While investigating an unrelated memory leak on core.async (ASYNC-138) I discovered that this bug also affects code inside a `go` macro, since it often emits unreachable bindings

clojure.core.async> (macroexpand '(go (let [test (range 1e10)]
                                        (str test (<! (chan))))))
(let*
 [c__15123__auto__ (clojure.core.async/chan 1) captured-bindings__15124__auto__ (clojure.lang.Var/getThreadBindingFrame)]
 (clojure.core.async.impl.dispatch/run
  (fn*
   []
   (clojure.core/let
    [f__15125__auto__
     (clojure.core/fn
      state-machine__14945__auto__
      ([] (clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/aset-all! (java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicReferenceArray. 9) 0 state-machine__14945__auto__ 1 1))
      ([state_17532]
       (clojure.core/let
        [old-frame__14946__auto__
         (clojure.lang.Var/getThreadBindingFrame)
         ret-value__14947__auto__
         (try
          (clojure.lang.Var/resetThreadBindingFrame (clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/aget-object state_17532 3))
          (clojure.core/loop
           []
           (clojure.core/let
            [result__14948__auto__
             (clojure.core/case
              (clojure.core/int (clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/aget-object state_17532 1))
              1
              (clojure.core/let
               [inst_17525 (clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/aget-object state_17532 7) inst_17525 (range 1.0E10) test inst_17525 inst_17526 str test inst_17525 inst_17527 (chan) state_17532 (clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/aset-all! state_17532 7 inst_17525 8 inst_17526)]
               (clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/take! state_17532 2 inst_17527))
              2
              (clojure.core/let
               [inst_17525 (clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/aget-object state_17532 7) inst_17526 (clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/aget-object state_17532 8) inst_17529 (clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/aget-object state_17532 2) inst_17530 (inst_17526 inst_17525 inst_17529)]
               (clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/return-chan state_17532 inst_17530)))]
            (if (clojure.core/identical? result__14948__auto__ :recur) (recur) result__14948__auto__)))
          (catch java.lang.Throwable ex__14949__auto__ (clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/aset-all! state_17532 clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/CURRENT-EXCEPTION ex__14949__auto__) (clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/process-exception state_17532) :recur)
          (finally (clojure.lang.Var/resetThreadBindingFrame old-frame__14946__auto__)))]
        (if (clojure.core/identical? ret-value__14947__auto__ :recur) (recur state_17532) ret-value__14947__auto__))))
     state__15126__auto__
     (clojure.core/-> (f__15125__auto__) (clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/aset-all! clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/USER-START-IDX c__15123__auto__ clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/BINDINGS-IDX captured-bindings__15124__auto__))]
    (clojure.core.async.impl.ioc-macros/run-state-machine-wrapped state__15126__auto__))))
 c__15123__auto__)




[CLJ-1870] Reloading a defmulti nukes metadata on the var Created: 22/Dec/15  Updated: 18/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: ft, metadata, multimethods

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1870-don-t-destroy-defmulti-metadata-on-reload.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Prescreened

 Description   

Reloading a defmulti expression destroys any existing (or new) metadata on that multimethod's var:

user=> (defmulti foo "docstring" :op)
#'user/foo
user=> (-> #'foo meta :doc)
"docstring"
user=> (defmulti foo "docstring" :op)
nil
user=> (-> #'foo meta :doc)
nil

This is highly problematic for tools.analyzer, since it relies on such metadata to convey information to the pass scheduler about pass dependencies.

This means that any code that uses core.async cannot be reloaded using `require :reload-all`, since it will cause tools.analyzer to reload and the passes to scheduled in a random order. See ASYNC-154 for one example.

Cause: defmulti has defonce semantics and the first def does not re-apply meta.

Approach: Re-apply meta before first def.

After patch:

user=> (defmulti foo "docstring" :op)
#'user/foo
user=> (-> #'foo meta :doc)
"docstring"
user=> (defmulti foo "docstring" :op)
nil
user=> (-> #'foo meta :doc)
"docstring"

Patch: 0001-CLJ-1870-don-t-destroy-defmulti-metadata-on-reload.patch

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 23/Dec/15 10:16 AM ]

Related: CLJ-900 CLJ-1446

Comment by Alex Miller [ 23/Dec/15 10:42 AM ]

This patch doesn't compile for me: RuntimeException: Unable to resolve symbol: mm in this context, compiling:(clojure/core.clj:1679:17)

Also, please build the patch with more context - use -U10 with git format-patch to expand it.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 23/Dec/15 11:06 AM ]

Updated patch fixing the typo & using -U10

Comment by Alex Miller [ 23/Dec/15 11:17 AM ]

Now:

java.lang.RuntimeException: Too many arguments to def, compiling:(clojure/core.clj:3561:1)

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 23/Dec/15 11:22 AM ]

whoops. Sorry for this, here's the updated (and working) patch





[CLJ-1517] Unrolled small vectors Created: 01/Sep/14  Updated: 18/May/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Backlog

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Zach Tellman Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 22
Labels: collections, performance

Attachments: File unrolled-collections-2.diff     File unrolled-collections.diff     Text File unrolled-vector-2.patch     Text File unrolled-vector.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Incomplete

 Description   

As discussed on the mailing list [1], this patch has two unrolled variants of vectors and maps, with special inner classes for each cardinality. Currently both grow to six elements before spilling over into the general versions of the data structures, which is based on rough testing but can be easily changed. At Rich's request, I haven't included any integration into the rest of the code, and there are top-level static create() methods for each.

The sole reason for this patch is performance, both in terms of creating data structures and performing operations on them. This can be seen as a more verbose version of the trick currently played with PersistentArrayMap spilling over into PersistentHashMap. Based on the benchmarks, which can be run by cloning cambrian-collections [2] and running 'lein test :benchmark', this should supplant PersistentArrayMap. Performance is at least on par with PAM, and often much faster. Especially noteworthy is the creation time, which is 5x faster for maps of all sizes (lein test :only cambrian-collections.map-test/benchmark-construction), and on par for 3-vectors, but 20x faster for 5-vectors. There are similar benefits for hash and equality calculations, as well as calls to reduce().

This is a big patch (over 5k lines), and will be kind of a pain to review. My assumption of correctness is based on the use of collection-check, and the fact that the underlying approach is very simple. I'm happy to provide a high-level description of the approach taken, though, if that will help the review process.

I'm hoping to get this into 1.7, so please let me know if there's anything I can do to help accomplish that.

[1] https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure-dev/pDhYoELjrcs
[2] https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections

Patch: unrolled-vector-2.patch

Screener Notes: The approach is clear and understandable. Given the volume of generated code, I believe that best way to improve confidence in this code is to get people using it asap, and add collection-test [3] to the Clojure test suite. I would also like to get the generator [4] included in the Clojure repo. We don't need to necessarily automate running it, but would be nice to have it nearby if we want to tweak something later.

[3] https://github.com/ztellman/collection-check/blob/master/src/collection_check.clj
[4] https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections/blob/master/generate/cambrian_collections/vector.clj



 Comments   
Comment by Zach Tellman [ 01/Sep/14 10:13 PM ]

Oh, I forgot to mention that I didn't make a PersistentUnrolledSet, since the existing wrappers can use the unrolled map implementation. However, it would be moderately faster and more memory efficient to have one, so let me know if it seems worthwhile.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 02/Sep/14 5:23 AM ]

Zach, the patch you added isn't in the correct format, they need to be created using `git format-patch`

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 02/Sep/14 5:31 AM ]

Also, I'm not sure if this is on-scope with the ticket but those patches break with *print-dup*, as it expects a static create(x) method for each inner class.

I'd suggest adding a create(Map x) static method for the inner PersistentUnrolledMap classes and a create(ISeq x) one for the inner PersistentUnrolledVector classes

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Sep/14 8:14 AM ]

Re making patches, see: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 02/Sep/14 9:16 AM ]

I wonder what is the overhead of having meta and 2 hash fields in the class. Have you considered a version where the hash is computed on the fly and where you have two sets of collections, one with meta field and one without, using former when the actual metadata is attached to the collection?

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 02/Sep/14 12:13 PM ]

I've attached a patch using the proper method. Somehow I missed the detailed explanation for how to do this, sorry. I know the guidelines say not to delete previous patches, but since the first one isn't useful I've deleted it to minimize confusion.

I did the print-dup friendly create methods, and then realized that once these are properly integrated, 'pr' will just emit these as vectors. I'm fairly sure the create methods aren't necessary, so I've commented them out, but I'm happy to add them back in if they're useful for some reason I can't see.

I haven't given a lot of thought to memory efficiency, but I think caching the hashes are worthwhile. I can see an argument for creating a "with-meta" version of each collection, but since that would double the size of an already enormous patch, I think that should probably wait.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 03/Sep/14 4:31 PM ]

I found a bug! Like PersistentArrayMap, I have a special code path for comparing keywords, but my generators for collection-check were previously using only integer keys. There was an off-by-one error in the transient map implementation [1], which was not present for non-keyword lookups.

I've taken a close look for other gaps in my test coverage, and can't find any. I don't think this substantively changes the risk of this patch (an updated version of which has been uploaded as 'unrolled-collections-2.diff'), but obviously where there's one bug, there may be others.

[1] https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections/commit/eb7dfe6d12e6774512dbab22a148202052442c6d#diff-4bf78dbf5b453f84ed59795a3bffe5fcR559

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 03/Oct/14 2:34 PM ]

As an additional data point, I swapped out the data structures in the Cheshire JSON library. On the "no keyword-fn decode" benchmark, the current implementation takes 6us, with the unrolled data structures takes 4us, and with no data structures (just lexing the JSON via Jackson) takes 2us. Other benchmarks had similar results. So at least in this scenario, it halves the overhead.

Benchmarks can be run by cloning https://github.com/dakrone/cheshire, unrolled collections can be tested by using the 'unrolled-collections' branch. The pure lexing benchmark can be reproduced by messing around with the cheshire.parse namespace a bit.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 06/Oct/14 1:31 PM ]

Is there no way to get this into 1.7? It's an awfully big win to push off for another year.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 07/Oct/14 2:08 PM ]

Hey Zach, it's definitely considered important but we have decided to drop almost everything not fully done for 1.7. Timeframe for following release is unknown, but certainly expected to be significantly less than a year.

Comment by John Szakmeister [ 30/Oct/14 2:53 PM ]

You are all free to determine the time table, but I thought I'd point out that Zach is not entirely off-base. Clojure 1.4.0 was released April 5th, 2012. Clojure 1.5.0 was released March 1st, 2013 with 1.6.0 showing up March 25th, 2014. So it appears that the current cadence is around a year.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Oct/14 3:40 PM ]

John, there is no point to comments like this. Let's please keep issue comments focused on the issue.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 13/Nov/14 12:23 PM ]

I did a small write-up on this patch which should help in the eventual code review: http://blog.factual.com/using-clojure-to-generate-java-to-reimplement-clojure

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 07/Dec/14 10:34 PM ]

Per my conversation with Alex at the Conj, here's a patch that only contains the unrolled vectors, and uses the more efficient constructor for PersistentVector when spilling over.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 08/Dec/14 1:10 PM ]

Zach, I created a new placeholder for the map work at http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1610.

Comment by Jean Niklas L'orange [ 09/Dec/14 1:52 PM ]

It should probably be noted that core.rrb-vector will break for small vectors by this patch, as it peeks into the underlying structure. This will also break other libraries which peeks into the vector implementation internals, although I'm not aware of any other – certainly not any other contrib library.

Also, two comments on unrolled-vector.patch:

private transient boolean edit = true;
in the Transient class should probably be
private volatile boolean edit = true;
as transient means something entirely different in Java.

conj in the Transient implementation could invalidate itself without any problems (edit = false;) if it is converted into a TransientVector (i.e. spills over) – unless it has a notable overhead. The invalidation can prevent some subtle bugs related to erroneous transient usage.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 09/Dec/14 1:58 PM ]

Jean - understanding the scope of the impact will certainly be part of the integration process for this patch. I appreciate the heads-up. While we try to minimize breakage for things like this, it may be unavoidable for libraries that rely on implementation internals.

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 09/Dec/14 2:03 PM ]

I'll add support for unrolled vectors to core.rrb-vector the moment they land on master. (Probably with some conditional compilation so as not to break compatibility with earlier versions of Clojure – we'll see when the time comes.)

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 09/Dec/14 2:06 PM ]

I should say that it'd be possible to add generic support for any "vector lookalikes" by pouring them into regular vectors in linear time. At first glance it seems to me that that'd be out of line with the basic promise of the library, but I'll give it some more thought before the changes actually land.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 09/Dec/14 5:43 PM ]

Somewhat predictably, the day after I cut the previous patch, someone found an issue [1]. In short, my use of the ArrayChunk wrapper applied the offset twice.

This was not caught by collection-check, which has been updated to catch this particular failure. It was, however, uncovered by Michael Blume's attempts to merge the change into Clojure, which tripped a bunch of alarms in Clojure's test suite. My own attempt to do the same to "prove" that it worked was before I added in the chunked seq functionality, hence this issue persisting until now.

As always, there may be more issues lurking. I hope we can get as many eyeballs on the code between now and 1.8 as possible.

[1] https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections/commit/2e70bbd14640b312db77590d8224e6ed0f535b43
[2] https://github.com/MichaelBlume/clojure/tree/test-vector

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 10/Jul/15 1:54 PM ]

As a companion to the performance analysis in the unrolled map issue, I've run the benchmarks and posted the results at https://gist.github.com/ztellman/10e8959501fb666dc35e. Some notable results:

Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Jul/15 9:02 AM ]

Stu: I do not think this patch should be marked "screened" until the actual integration and build work (if the generator is integrated) has been completed.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Jul/15 4:33 PM ]

FYI, we have "reset" all big features for 1.8 for the moment (except the socket repl work). We may still include it - that determination will be made later.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 14/Jul/15 4:43 PM ]

Okay, any idea when the determination will be made? I was excited that we seemed to be finally moving forward on this.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Jul/15 4:51 PM ]

No, but it is now on my work list.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 15/Jul/15 8:17 AM ]

I wonder if all of the overriding of APersistentVector yields important benefits - e.g. iterator, hashcode etc.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 15/Jul/15 11:51 AM ]

In the case of hashcode, definitely: https://gist.github.com/ztellman/10e8959501fb666dc35e#file-gistfile1-txt-L1013-L1076. This was actually one of the original things I wanted to speed up.

In the case of the iterator, probably not. I'd be fine removing that.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 16/Jul/15 5:17 PM ]

So am I to infer from https://github.com/clojure/clojure/commit/36d665793b43f62cfd22354aced4c6892088abd6 that this issue is defunct? If so, I think there's a lot of improvements being left on the table for no particular reason.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 16/Jul/15 6:34 PM ]

Yes, that commit covers this functionality. It takes a different approach from the patch in building up from a small core, and maximizing improvements to the bases rather than having a lot of redundant definitions per class. That also allowed for immediate integration without as much concern for correctness, as there is little new code. It also emphasizes the use case for tuples, e.g. small vectors used as values that won't be changed, thus de-emphasizing the 'mutable' functions. I disagree that many necessary improvements are being left out. The patch 'optimized' many things that don't matter. Further, there are not big improvements to the pervasive inlining. In addition, the commit includes the integration work at a fraction of the size of the patch. In all, it would have taken much more back and forth to get the patch to conform with this approach than to just get it all done, but I appreciate the inspiration and instigation - thanks!

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 16/Jul/15 6:46 PM ]

That said, this commit need not be the last word - it can serve as a baseline for further optimization. But I'd rather that be driven by need. Clojure could become 10x as large optimizing things that don't matter.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 19/Jul/15 1:36 PM ]

What is our reference for "relevant" performance? I (or anyone else) can provide microbenchmarks for calculating hashes or whatever else, but that doesn't prove that it's an important improvement. I previously provided benchmarks for JSON decoding in Cheshire, but that's just one of many possible real-world benchmarks. It might be useful to have an agreed-upon list of benchmarks that we can use when debating what is and isn't useful.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 19/Jul/15 11:14 PM ]

I was interested in this implementation so created a branch that integrates Zach's unrolled vectors on top of clojure 1.8.0-alpha2. I also simplified some of the code (I don't think the metadata handling or unrolled seqs are worthwhile, for example)

Github branch: https://github.com/mikera/clojure/tree/clj-1517

Then I ran a set of micro-benchmarks created by Peter Taoussanis

Results: https://gist.github.com/mikera/72a739c84dd52fa3b6d6

My findings from this testing:

  • Performance is comparable (within +/- 20%) on the majority of tests
  • Zach's approach is noticeably faster (by 70-150%) for 4 operations (reduce, mapv, into, equality)

My view is that these additional optimisations are worthwhile. In particular, I think that reduce and into are very important operations. I also care about mapv quite a lot for core.matrix (It's fundamental to many numerical operations on arrays implemented using Clojure vectors).

Happy to create a patch along these lines if it would be acceptable.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 19/Jul/15 11:45 PM ]

The `reduce` improvements are likely due to the unrolled reduce and kvreduce impls, but the others are probably because of the unrolled transient implementation. The extra code required to add these would be pretty modest.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 20/Jul/15 9:20 PM ]

I actually condensed the code down to a single implementation for `Transient` and `TupleSeq`. I don't think these really need to be fully unrolled for each Tuple type. That helps by making the code even smaller (and probably also helps performance, given JVM inline caching etc.)

Comment by Peter Taoussanis [ 21/Jul/15 11:46 AM ]

Hey folks,

Silly question: is there actually a particular set of reference benchmarks that everyone's currently using to test the work on tuples? It took me a while to notice how bad the variance was with my own set of micro benchmarks.

Bumping all the run counts up till the noise starts ~dying down, I'm actually seeing numbers now that don't seem to agree with others here .

Google Docs link: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1QHY3lehVF-aKrlOwDQfyDO5SLkGeb_uaj85NZ7tnuL0/edit?usp=sharing
gist with the benchmarks: https://gist.github.com/ptaoussanis/0a294809bc9075b6b02d

Thanks, cheers!

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 21/Jul/15 6:52 PM ]

Hey Peter, I can't reproduce your results, and some of them are so far off what I'd expect that I have to think there was some data gathering error. For instance, the assoc operation being slower is kind of inexplicable, considering the unrolled version doesn't do any copying, etc. Also, all of your numbers are significantly slower than the ones on my 4 year old laptop, which is also a bit strange.

Just to make sure that we're comparing apples to apples, I've adapted your benchmarks into something that pretty-prints the mean runtime and variance for 1.7, 1.8-alpha2, and Mike's 1517 fork. It can be found at https://github.com/ztellman/tuple-benchmark, and the results of a run at https://gist.github.com/ztellman/3701d965228fb9eda084.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 22/Jul/15 2:24 AM ]

Hey Zach just looked at your benchmarks and they are definitely more consistent with what I am seeing. The overall nanosecond timings look about right from my experience with similar code (e.g. working with small vectors in vectorz-clj).

Comment by Peter Taoussanis [ 22/Jul/15 2:41 AM ]

Hi Zach, thanks for that!

Have updated the results -
Gist: https://gist.github.com/ptaoussanis/0a294809bc9075b6b02d
Google docs: https://goo.gl/khgT83

Note that I've added an extra sheet/tab to the Google doc for your own numbers at https://gist.github.com/ztellman/3701d965228fb9eda084.

Am still struggling to produce results that show any consistent+significant post-JIT benefit to either of the tuple implementations against the micro benchmarks and one larger small-vec-heavy system I had handy.

It's looking to me like it's maybe possible that the JIT's actually optimising away most of the non-tuple inefficiencies in practice?

Of course it's very possible that my results are off, or my expectations wrong. The numbers have been difficult to pin down.

It definitely helped to have a standardised reference micro benchmark to work against (https://github.com/ztellman/tuple-benchmark). Could I perhaps suggest a similar reference macro benchmark (maybe something from core.matrix, Mike?)

Might also be a good idea to define a worthwhile target performance delta for ops like these that run in the nanosecond range (or for the larger reference macro benchmark)?

Just some thoughts from someone passing through in case they're at all useful; know many of you have been deeply involved in this for some time so please feel free to ignore any input that's not helpful

Appreciate all the efforts, cheers!

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 22/Jul/15 9:24 AM ]

I think everyone should back off on their enthusiasm for this approach. After much analysis, I am seeing definite negative impacts to tuples, especially the multiple class approach proposed by Zach. What happens in real code is that the many tuple classes cause call sites that see different sized vectors to become megamorphic, and nothing gets adequately optimized. In particular, call sites that will see tuple-sized and large vectors (i.e. a lot of library code) will optimize differently depending upon which they see often first. So, if you run your first tight loop on vector code that sees tuples, that code could later do much worse (50-100%) on large vectors than before the tuples patch was in place. Being much slower on large collections is a poor tradeoff for being slightly faster on small ones.

Certainly different tuple classes for arity 0-6 is a dead idea. You get as good or better optimization (at some cost in size) from a single class e.g. one with four fields, covering sizes 0-4. I have a working version of this in a local branch. It is better in that sites that include pvectors are only bi-morphic, but I am still somewhat skittish given what I've seen.

The other takeaway is that the micro benchmarks are nearly worthless for detecting these issues.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 22/Jul/15 11:07 AM ]

I'm pretty sure that all of my real-world applications of the tuples (via clj-tuple) have been fixed cardinality, and wouldn't have surfaced any such issue. Thanks for putting the idea through its paces.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 22/Jul/15 10:37 PM ]

Rich these are good insights - do you have a benchmark that you are using as representative of real world code?

I agree that it is great if we can avoid call sites becoming megamorphic, though I also believe the ship has sailed on that one already when you consider the multiple types of IPersistentVector that already exist (MapEntry, PersistentVector, SubVector plus any library-defined IPersistentVector instances such as clojure.core.rrb-vector). As a consequence, the JVM is usually not going to be able to prove that a specific IPersistentVector interface invocation is monomorphic, which is when the really big optimisations happen.

In most of the real world code that I've been working with, the same size/type of vector gets used repeatedly (Examples: iterating over map entries, working with a sequence of size-N vectors), so in such cases we should be able to rely on the polymorphic inline cache doing the right thing.

The idea of a single Tuple class for sizes 0-4 is interesting, though I can't help thinking that a lot of the performance gain from this may stem from the fact that a lot of code does stuff like (reduce conj [] .....) or the transient equivalent which is a particularly bad use case for Tuples, at least from the call site caching perspective. There may be a better way to optimise such cases rather than simply trying to make Tuples faster.... e.g. calling asTransient() on a Tuple0 could perhaps switch straight into the PersistentVector implementation.

Comment by Colin Fleming [ 18/May/16 8:32 PM ]

Here's a relevant issue from Google's Guava project, where they also found serious performance degradation with fixed-size collections: https://github.com/google/guava/issues/1268. It has a lot of interesting detail about how the performance breaks down.





[CLJ-1544] AOT bug involving namespaces loaded before AOT compilation started Created: 01/Oct/14  Updated: 19/Oct/15

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Release 1.9

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Allen Rohner Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 12
Labels: aot

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1544-force-reloading-of-namespaces-during-AOT-co.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1544-force-reloading-of-namespaces-during-AOT-co-v2.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1544-force-reloading-of-namespaces-during-AOT-co-v3.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1641-disallow-circular-dependencies-even-if-the-.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Incomplete

 Description   

If namespace "a" that is being AOT compiled requires a namespace "b" that has been loaded but not AOT compiled, the classfile for that namespace will never be emitted on disk, causing errors when compiling uberjars or in other cases.

A minimal reproducible case is described in the following comment: http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1544?focusedCommentId=36734&page=com.atlassian.jira.plugin.system.issuetabpanels:comment-tabpanel#comment-36734

Other examples of the bug:
https://github.com/arohner/clj-aot-repro
https://github.com/methylene/class-not-found

A real issue triggered by this bug: https://github.com/cemerick/austin/issues/23

Related ticket: CLJ-1641 contains descriptions and comments about some potentially unwanted consequences of applying proposed patch 0001-CLJ-1544-force-reloading-of-namespaces-during-AOT-co-v3.patch

Approach: The approach taken by the attached patch is to force reloading of namespaces during AOT compilation if no matching classfile is found in the compile-path or in the classpath

Patch: 0001-CLJ-1544-force-reloading-of-namespaces-during-AOT-co-v3.patch

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Dec/14 12:45 PM ]

Possibly related: CLJ-1457

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 05/Dec/14 4:51 AM ]

Has anyone been able to reproduce this bug from a bare clojure repl? I have been trying to take lein out of the equation for an hour but I don't seem to be able to reproduce it – this makes me think that it's possible that this is a lein/classlojure/nrepl issue rather than a compiler/classloader bug

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Dec/14 4:20 PM ]

I was actually able to reproduce and understand this bug thanks to a minimal example reduced from a testcase for CLJ-1413.

>cat error.sh
#!/bin/sh

rm -rf target && mkdir target

java -cp src:clojure.jar clojure.main - <<EOF
(require 'myrecord)
(set! *compile-path* "target")
(compile 'core)
EOF

java -cp target:clojure.jar clojure.main -e "(use 'core)"

> cat src/core.clj
(in-ns 'core)
(clojure.core/require 'myrecord)
(clojure.core/import myrecord.somerecord)

>cat src/myrecord.clj
(in-ns 'myrecord)
(clojure.core/defrecord somerecord [])

> ./error.sh
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ExceptionInInitializerError
	at java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method)
	at java.lang.Class.forName(Class.java:344)
	at clojure.lang.RT.classForName(RT.java:2113)
	at clojure.lang.RT.classForName(RT.java:2122)
	at clojure.lang.RT.loadClassForName(RT.java:2141)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:430)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:411)
	at clojure.core$load$fn__5403.invoke(core.clj:5808)
	at clojure.core$load.doInvoke(core.clj:5807)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
	at clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj:5613)
	at clojure.core$load_lib$fn__5352.invoke(core.clj:5653)
	at clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj:5652)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj:5691)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:630)
	at clojure.core$use.doInvoke(core.clj:5785)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
	at user$eval212.invoke(NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6767)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6730)
	at clojure.core$eval.invoke(core.clj:3076)
	at clojure.main$eval_opt.invoke(main.clj:288)
	at clojure.main$initialize.invoke(main.clj:307)
	at clojure.main$null_opt.invoke(main.clj:342)
	at clojure.main$main.doInvoke(main.clj:420)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:421)
	at clojure.lang.Var.invoke(Var.java:383)
	at clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:156)
	at clojure.lang.Var.applyTo(Var.java:700)
	at clojure.main.main(main.java:37)
Caused by: java.io.FileNotFoundException: Could not locate myrecord__init.class or myrecord.clj on classpath.
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:443)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:411)
	at clojure.core$load$fn__5403.invoke(core.clj:5808)
	at clojure.core$load.doInvoke(core.clj:5807)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
	at clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj:5613)
	at clojure.core$load_lib$fn__5352.invoke(core.clj:5653)
	at clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj:5652)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj:5691)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj:5774)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
	at core__init.load(Unknown Source)
	at core__init.<clinit>(Unknown Source)
	... 33 more

This bug also has also affected Austin: https://github.com/cemerick/austin/issues/23

Essentially this bug manifests itself when a namespace defining a protocol or a type/record has been JIT loaded and a namespace that needs the protocol/type/record class is being AOT compiled later. Since the namespace defining the class has already been loaded the class is never emitted on disk.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Dec/14 6:51 PM ]

I've attached a tentative patch fixing the issue in the only way I found reasonable: forcing the reloading of namespaces during AOT compilation if the compiled classfile is not found in the compile-path or in the classpath

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Dec/14 7:30 PM ]

Updated patch forces reloading of the namespace even if a classfile exists in the compile-path but the source file is newer, mimicking the logic of clojure.lang.RT/load

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Dec/14 7:39 PM ]

Further testing demonstrated that this bug is not only scoped to deftypes/defprotocols but can manifest itself in the general case of a namespace "a" requiring a namespace "b" already loaded, and AOT compiling the namespace "a"

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 08/Dec/14 4:46 AM ]

I'm also affected by this bug. Is there some workaround I can apply in the meantime, e.g., by dictating the order in which namespaces are going to be loaded/compiled in project.clj?

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 15/Dec/14 10:58 AM ]

Tassilo, if you don't have control over whether or not a namespace that an AOT namespace depends on has already been loaded before compilation starts, requiring those namespaces with :reload-all should be enough to work around this issue

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 15/Dec/14 11:36 AM ]

Nicola, thanks! But in the meantime I've switched to using clojure.java.api and omit AOT-compilation. That works just fine, too.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 15/Dec/14 5:05 PM ]

Tassilo, that's often a good solution, another is to use a shim clojure class

(ns myproject.main-shim (:gen-class))

(defn -main [& args]
  (require 'myproject.main)
  ((resolve 'myproject.main) args))

then your shim namespace is AOT-compiled but nothing else in your project is.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 16/Dec/14 1:07 AM ]

Thanks Michael, that's a very good suggestion. In fact, I've always used AOT only as a means to export some functions to Java-land. Basically, I did as you suggest but required the to-be-exported fn's namespace in the ns-form which then causes AOT-compilation of that namespace and its own deps recursively. So your approach seems to be as convenient from the Java side (no need to clojure.java.require `require` in order to require the namespace with the fn I wanna call ) while still omitting AOT. Awesome!

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Jan/15 6:07 PM ]

I'm marking this as incomplete to prevent further screening until the bug reported here: http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1620?focusedCommentId=37232&page=com.atlassian.jira.plugin.system.issuetabpanels:comment-tabpanel#comment-37232 is figured out

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 07/Jan/15 4:43 AM ]

Fixed the patch, I'm re marking the tickets as Vetted as it was before.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 16/Jan/15 12:54 PM ]

This patch is being rolled back for 1.7.0-alpha6 pending further investigation into underlying problems and possible solutions.

Comment by Colin Fleming [ 19/Jan/15 4:41 AM ]

I'm not 100% sure, but this looks a lot like Cursive issue 369. It had a case that I could reproduce with JDK 7 but not JDK 8, has the same mysterious missing namespace class symptom, and involves mixed AOT/non-AOT namespaces. However it's happening at runtime, not at compile time, which doesn't seem consistent.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jan/15 7:29 AM ]

My error report above was incorrectly tied to this issue (see CLJ-1636). I will delete the comment.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 29/Jan/15 12:23 PM ]

Since ticket CLJ-1641 has been closed, I'll repost here a comment I posted in that ticket + the patch I proposed, arguing why I think the patch I proposed for this ticket should not have been reverted:

Zach, I agree that having different behaviour between AOT and JIT is wrong.

But I also don't agree that having clojure error out on circular dependencies should be considered a bug, I would argue that the way manifold used to implement the circular dependency between manifold.stream and manifold.stream.graph was a just a hack around lack of validation in require.

My proposal to fix this disparity between AOT and JIT is by making require/use check for circular dependencies before checking for already-loaded namespaces.

This way, both under JIT and AOT code like

(ns foo.a (:require foo.b))
(ns foo.b)
(require 'foo.a)

will fail with a circular depdenency error.

This is what the patch I just attached (0001-CLJ-1641disallow-circular-dependencies-even-if-the.patch) does.





[CLJ-1527] Clarify and align valid symbol and keyword rules for Clojure (and edn) Created: 18/Sep/14  Updated: 26/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Herwig Hochleitner Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 12
Labels: reader

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Known areas of under-specificity (http://clojure.org/reader#The%20Reader--Reader%20forms):

  • symbols (and keywords) description do not mention constituent characters that are currently in use by Clojure functions such as <, >, =, $ (for Java inner classes), & (&form and &env in macros), % (stated to be valid in edn spec)
  • keywords currently accept leading numeric characters which is at odds with the spec - see CLJ-1286

References:



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 17/Oct/14 2:13 AM ]

The Clojure reader documentation also does not mention the following symbols as valid constituent characters. They are all mentioned as valid symbol constituent characters in the EDN readme here: https://github.com/edn-format/edn#symbols

dollar sign - used in Clojure/JVM to separate Java subclass names from class names, e.g. java.util.Map$Entry
percent sign - not sure why this is part of edn spec. In Clojure it seems only to be used inside #() for args like % %1 %&
ampersand - like in &form and &env in macro definitions
equals - clojure.core/= and many others
less-than - clojure.core/< clojure.core/<=
greater-than - clojure.core/> clojure.core/>=

I don't know whether Clojure and edn specs should be the same in this regard, but it seemed worth mentioning for this ticket.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Jun/15 12:22 AM ]

Alex, Rich made this comment on CLJ-17 in 2011: "Runtime validation off the table for perf reasons. cemerick's suggestion that arbitrary symbol support will render them valid is sound, but arbitrary symbol support is a different ticket/idea." I am not aware of any tickets that propose the enhancement of allowing arbitrary symbols to be supported by Clojure, e.g. via a syntax like

#|white space and arbitrary #$@)$~))@ chars here|

Do you think it is reasonable to create an enhancement ticket for supporting arbitrary characters in symbols and keywords?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 01/Jun/15 6:36 AM ]

Sure. I looked into this a bit as a digression off of feature expressions and #| has been reserved for this potential use. However, there are many tricky issues with it and I do not expect this to happen soon - more likely to be something we're pushed to do when necessary for some other reason.

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 01/Jun/15 8:46 AM ]

Wrong ticket, but to anybody thinking about #|arbitrary symbols (or strings)|, please do consider making the delimiters configurable, as in mime multipart.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Jun/15 8:54 AM ]

I've created a design page for now. I'm sure it does not list many of the tricky issues you have found. I'd be happy to take a shot at documenting them if you have any notes you are willing to share.

http://dev.clojure.org/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=11862058

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Jun/15 9:01 AM ]

Herwig, can you edit the design page linked in my previous comment, to add a reference or example to precisely how mime multipart allows delimiters to be configurable, and why you believe fixed delimeters would be a bad idea?

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 01/Jun/15 9:46 AM ]

I've commented on the design page.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Jul/15 12:44 PM ]

Removed a couple of issues that have been clarified on the reader page and are no longer issues.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 13/Jul/15 12:45 PM ]

Related to CLJ-1530

Comment by Adam Frey [ 15/Jul/15 11:55 AM ]

Related to this: The Clojure reader will not accept symbols and keywords that contain consecutive colons (See LispReader.java), although that is permitted by the current EDN spec. Here is a GitHub issue regarding consecutive colons. I would like to qualify why consecutive colons are disallowed, and sync up the Clojure Reader and the EDN spec on this.

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 31/Jul/15 8:03 AM ]

The updated reader spec says that a symbol can contain a single / to separate the namespace. It also mentions a bare / to be the division function.
So what about clojure.core//? That still got to be a readable symbol right? So is that an exception to the 'single /' rule?
Will foo.bar// also be readable? What about foo//bar?

Comment by Francis Avila [ 10/Sep/15 9:26 AM ]

Another source of ambiguity I see is that it's unclear whether the first colon of a keyword is the first character of the keyword (and therefore of the symbol) or whether it is something special and the spec really describes what happens from the second character onward. This matters because the specification for a keyword is (in both edn and reader specs) given in terms of differences from symbols. I think many of the strange keyword edge cases (including legality of :1 vs :a/1) stem from this ambiguity, and different tickets/patches seem to choose one or the other underlying assumption. See this comment for more examples.

Possibly we can use tagged literals for keywords and symbols to create or print these forms when they are not readable and simplify the reader spec for their literal forms. E.g. instead of producing complicated parse rules to ensure clojure.core// or :1 are legal, just make the literal form simple and have users write something like #sym["clojure.core" "/"] or #kyw "1" (and have the printer print these) when they hit these edge cases.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Sep/15 9:44 AM ]

I would say : (and : are syntactic markers and the spec describes the characters following it. But I agree it would be nice for this to be more explicit. The (incorrect) regex in LispReader does not help either.

The tagged literal idea is an interesting alternative to the | | syntax that has been reserved for possible future support for invalid characters in keywords and symbols. But I think the idea is out of scope for this ticket, which is really about clarifying the spec.





[CLJ-1743] Avoid compile-time static initialization of classes when using inheritance Created: 02/Jun/15  Updated: 26/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Abe Fettig Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: aot, compiler, interop

Attachments: Text File 0001-Avoid-compile-time-class-initialization-when-using-g.patch     Text File clj-1743-2.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

I'm working on a project using Clojure and RoboVM. We use AOT compilation to compile Clojure to JVM classes, and then use RoboVM to compile the JVM classes to native code. In our Clojure code, we call Java APIs provided by RoboVM, which wrap the native iOS APIs.

But we've found an issue with inheritance and class-level static initialization code. Many iOS APIs require inheriting from a base object and then overriding certain methods. Currently, Clojure runs a superclass's static initialization code at compile time, whether using ":gen-class" or "proxy" to create the subclass. However, RoboVM's base "ObjCObject" class [1], which most iOS-specific classes inherit from, requires the iOS runtime to initialize, and throws an error at compile time since the code isn't running on a device.

CLJ-1315 addressed a similar issue by modifying "import" to load classes without running static initialization code. I've written my own patch which extends this behavior to work in ":gen-class" and "proxy" as well. The unit tests pass, and we're using this code successfully in our iOS app.

Patch: clj-1743-2.patch

Here's some sample code that can be used to demonstrate the current behavior (Full demo project at https://github.com/figly/clojure-static-initialization):

Demo.java
package clojure_static_initialization;

public class Demo {
  static {
    System.out.println("Running static initializers!");
  }
  public Demo () {
  }
}
gen_class_demo.clj
(ns clojure-static-initialization.gen-class-demo
  (:gen-class :extends clojure_static_initialization.Demo))
proxy_demo.clj
(ns clojure-static-initialization.proxy-demo)

(defn make-proxy []
  (proxy [clojure_static_initialization.Demo] []))

[1] https://github.com/robovm/robovm/blob/master/objc/src/main/java/org/robovm/objc/ObjCObject.java



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jun/15 3:01 PM ]

No changes from previous, just updated to apply to master as of 1.7.0-RC2.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jun/15 3:03 PM ]

If you had a sketch to test this with proxy and gen-class, that would be helpful.

Comment by Abe Fettig [ 22/Jun/15 8:31 AM ]

Sure, what form would you like for the sketch code? A small standalone project? Unit tests?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Jun/15 8:40 AM ]

Just a few lines of Java (a class with static initializer that printed) and Clojure code (for gen-class and proxy extending it) here in the test description that could be used to demonstrate the problem. Should not have any dependency on iOS or other external dependencies.

Comment by Abe Fettig [ 01/Jul/15 8:49 PM ]

Sample code added, let me know if I can add anything else!

Comment by Abe Fettig [ 27/Jul/15 2:21 PM ]

Just out of curiosity, what are the odds this could make it into 1.8?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 27/Jul/15 6:06 PM ]

unknown.

Comment by Didier A. [ 20/Nov/15 7:11 PM ]

I'm affected by this bug too. A function in a namespace calls a static Java variable which is initialized in place. Another namespace which is genclassed calls that function. Now at compile time, the static java is initialized and it makes building fail, because that static java initialization needs resources which don't exist on the build machine.





[CLJ-1814] Make `satisfies?` as fast as a protocol method call Created: 11/Sep/15  Updated: 07/Jun/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: performance, protocols

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1814-cache-protocol-impl-satisfies-as-fast-as-me.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1814-cache-protocol-impl-satisfies-as-fast-as-me-v2.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1814-cache-protocol-impl-satisfies-as-fast-as-me-v3.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Currently `satisfies?` doesn't use the same impl cache used by protocol methods, making it too slow for real world usage.

With:

user=> (defprotocol p (f [_]))
p
user=> (deftype x [])
user.x
user=> (deftype y [])
user.y
user=> (extend-type x p (f [_]))
nil

Before patch:

user=> (let [x (x.)] (bench (satisfies? p x)))
Evaluation count : 548182380 in 60 samples of 9136373 calls.
             Execution time mean : 108.856460 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 4.151711 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 103.306368 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 117.597299 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.681820 ns
nil
user=> (let [y (y.)] (bench (satisfies? p y)))
Evaluation count : 20220420 in 60 samples of 337007 calls.
             Execution time mean : 3.325396 µs
    Execution time std-deviation : 277.917798 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 3.035664 µs ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 3.915870 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.681820 ns
nil

After patch:

user=> (let [x (x.)] (bench (satisfies? p x)))
Evaluation count : 3091276560 in 60 samples of 51521276 calls.
             Execution time mean : 19.048289 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.724232 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 17.558597 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 20.067082 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.639685 ns
niluser=> (let [y (y.)] (bench (satisfies? p y)))
Evaluation count : 2699888040 in 60 samples of 44998134 calls.
             Execution time mean : 20.968108 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.658803 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 20.336564 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 22.508062 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.639685 ns
nil

Patch: 0001-CLJ-1814-cache-protocol-impl-satisfies-as-fast-as-me-v3.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Michael Blume [ 11/Sep/15 4:17 PM ]

Nice. Honeysql used to spend 80-90% of its time in satisfies? calls before we refactored them out.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 24/Sep/15 3:55 PM ]

I realize this is a deeply annoying bug to reproduce, but if I clone core.match, point its Clojure dependency to 1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT, start a REPL, connect to the REPL from vim, and reload clojure.core.match, I get

|| java.lang.Exception: namespace 'clojure.tools.analyzer.jvm.utils' not found, compiling:(clojure/tools/analyzer/jvm.clj:9:1)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5647| clojure.core$throw_if.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5733| clojure.core$load_lib.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5765| clojure.core$load_libs.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5787| clojure.core$require.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:703)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.analyzer.jvm/0.6.5/tools.analyzer.jvm-0.6.5.jar::clojure/tools/analyzer/jvm.clj|9| clojure.tools.analyzer.jvm$eval4968$loading__5561__auto____4969.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.analyzer.jvm/0.6.5/tools.analyzer.jvm-0.6.5.jar::clojure/tools/analyzer/jvm.clj|9| clojure.tools.analyzer.jvm$eval4968.invokeStatic
|| clojure.tools.analyzer.jvm$eval4968.invoke(jvm.clj)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6934)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6923)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:7381)
|| clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:372)
|| clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:363)
|| clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:453)
|| clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:419)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5883| clojure.core$load$fn__5669.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5882| clojure.core$load.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5683| clojure.core$load_one.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5728| clojure.core$load_lib$fn__5618.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5727| clojure.core$load_lib.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5765| clojure.core$load_libs.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5787| clojure.core$require.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:457)
src/main/clojure/clojure/core/match.clj|1| clojure.core.match$eval4960$loading__5561__auto____4961.invoke
src/main/clojure/clojure/core/match.clj|1| clojure.core.match$eval4960.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core.match$eval4960.invoke(match.clj)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6934)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6923)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:7381)
|| clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:372)
|| clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:363)
|| clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:453)
|| clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:419)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5883| clojure.core$load$fn__5669.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5882| clojure.core$load.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5683| clojure.core$load_one.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5728| clojure.core$load_lib$fn__5618.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5727| clojure.core$load_lib.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5765| clojure.core$load_libs.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5787| clojure.core$require.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:421)
|| clojure.core.match$eval4949.invokeStatic(form-init2494799382238714928.clj:1)
|| clojure.core.match$eval4949.invoke(form-init2494799382238714928.clj)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6934)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6897)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|3096| clojure.core$eval.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$eval.invoke(core.clj)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|240| clojure.main$repl$read_eval_print__7404$fn__7407.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|240| clojure.main$repl$read_eval_print__7404.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|258| clojure.main$repl$fn__7413.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|258| clojure.main$repl.invokeStatic
|| clojure.main$repl.doInvoke(main.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:1523)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|58| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$evaluate$fn__637.invoke
|| clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:152)
|| clojure.lang.AFn.applyTo(AFn.java:144)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|645| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|1874| clojure.core$with_bindings_STAR_.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$with_bindings_STAR_.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:425)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|56| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$evaluate.invokeStatic
|| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$evaluate.invoke(interruptible_eval.clj)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|191| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$interruptible_eval$fn__679$fn__682.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|159| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$run_next$fn__674.invoke
|| clojure.lang.AFn.run(AFn.java:22)
|| java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor.runWorker(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:1142)
|| java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor$Worker.run(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:617)
|| java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:745)

Same thing with reloading a namespace in my own project which depends on clojure.core.match

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 24/Sep/15 3:59 PM ]

is it possible that AOT is involved?

Comment by Michael Blume [ 24/Sep/15 5:31 PM ]

Narrowed it down a little, if I check out tools.analyzer.jvm, open a REPL, and do (require 'clojure.tools.analyzer.jvm.utils) I get

|| java.lang.ClassCastException: java.lang.Class cannot be cast to clojure.asm.Type, compiling:(utils.clj:260:13)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler$InvokeExpr.eval(Compiler.java:3642)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler$InvokeExpr.eval(Compiler.java:3636)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler$DefExpr.eval(Compiler.java:450)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6939)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:7381)
|| clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:372)
|| clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:363)
|| clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:453)
|| clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:419)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5883| clojure.core$load$fn__5669.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5882| clojure.core$load.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5683| clojure.core$load_one.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5728| clojure.core$load_lib$fn__5618.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5727| clojure.core$load_lib.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5765| clojure.core$load_libs.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5787| clojure.core$require.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:421)
|| clojure.tools.analyzer.jvm.utils$eval4392.invokeStatic(form-init8663423518975891793.clj:1)
|| clojure.tools.analyzer.jvm.utils$eval4392.invoke(form-init8663423518975891793.clj)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6934)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6897)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|3096| clojure.core$eval.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$eval.invoke(core.clj)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|240| clojure.main$repl$read_eval_print__7404$fn__7407.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|240| clojure.main$repl$read_eval_print__7404.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|258| clojure.main$repl$fn__7413.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|258| clojure.main$repl.invokeStatic
|| clojure.main$repl.doInvoke(main.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:1523)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|58| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$evaluate$fn__637.invoke
|| clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:152)
|| clojure.lang.AFn.applyTo(AFn.java:144)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|645| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|1874| clojure.core$with_bindings_STAR_.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$with_bindings_STAR_.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:425)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|56| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$evaluate.invokeStatic
|| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$evaluate.invoke(interruptible_eval.clj)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|191| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$interruptible_eval$fn__679$fn__682.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|159| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$run_next$fn__674.invoke
|| clojure.lang.AFn.run(AFn.java:22)
|| java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor.runWorker(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:1142)
|| java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor$Worker.run(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:617)
|| java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:745)

I don't see where AOT would be involved?

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 27/Sep/15 2:28 PM ]

Michael Blume The updated patch should fix the issue you reported

Comment by Michael Blume [ 28/Sep/15 12:39 PM ]

Cool, thanks =)

New patch no longer deletes MethodImplCache, which is not used – is that deliberate?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Nov/15 3:08 PM ]

It would be cool if there was a bulleted list of the things changed in the patch in the description. For example: "Renamed MethodImplCache to ImplCache", etc. That helps makes it easier to review.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 02/Nov/15 3:35 PM ]

Attached is an updated patch that doesn't replace MethodImplCache with ImplCache but simply reuses MethodImplCache, reducing the impact of this patch and making it easier (and safer) to review.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 07/Jun/16 11:42 AM ]

Bumping priority as this is used in new inst? predicate - see https://github.com/clojure/clojure/commit/58227c5de080110cb2ce5bc9f987d995a911b13e





[CLJ-1224] Records do not cache hash like normal maps Created: 24/Jun/13  Updated: 10/Nov/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Release 1.9

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Brandon Bloom Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 20
Labels: defrecord, performance

Attachments: Text File 0001-cache-hasheq-and-hashCode-for-records.patch     Text File 0001-cache-hasheq-and-hashCode-for-records-v2.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1224-cache-hasheq-and-hashCode-for-records.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1224-cache-hasheq-and-hashCode-for-records-v2.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Screened

 Description   

Records do not cache their hash codes like normal Clojure maps, which affects their performance. This problem has been fixed in CLJS, but still affects JVM CLJ.

Approach: Cache hash values in record definitions, similar to maps.

Timings:

coll 1.8.0-master 1.8.0-master+patch
small record 99 ns 9 ns
big record 455 ns 9 ns
(defrecord R [a b])  ;; small
(def r  (R. (range 1e3) (range 1e3)))
(bench (hash r))
(defrecord R [a b c d e f g h i j])  ;; big
(def r (map->R (zipmap [:a :b :c :d :e :f :g :h :i :j] (repeat (range 1e3)))))
(bench (hash r))

Patch: 0001-CLJ-1224-cache-hasheq-and-hashCode-for-records-v2.patch

Screened by: Alex Miller

Also see: http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJS-281



 Comments   
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 14/Feb/14 5:46 PM ]

I want to point out that my patch breaks ABI compatibility.
A possible approach to avoid this would be to have 3 constructors instead of 2, I can write the patch to support this if desired.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 27/Jun/14 11:09 AM ]

The patch 0001-CLJ-1224-cache-hasheq-and-hashCode-for-records.patch is broken in at least two ways:

  • The fields __hash and __hasheq are adopted by new records created by .assoc and .without, which will cause those records to have incorrect (and likely colliding) hash values
  • The addition of the new fields breaks the promise of defrecord, which includes an N+2 constructor taking meta and extmap. With the patch, defrecords get an N+4 constructor letting callers pick hash codes.

I found these problems via the following reasoning:

  • Code has been touched near __extmap
  • Grep for all uses of __extmap and see what breaks
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 27/Jun/14 2:53 PM ]

Patch 0001-cache-hasheq-and-hashCode-for-records.patch fixes both those issues, reintroducing the N+2 arity constructor

Comment by Alex Miller [ 27/Jun/14 4:08 PM ]

Questions addressed, back to Vetted.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 4:32 PM ]

All patches dated Jun 7 2014 and earlier no longer applied cleanly to latest master after some commits were made to Clojure on Aug 29, 2014. They did apply cleanly before that day.

I have not checked how easy or difficult it might be to update this patch.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Aug/14 4:40 PM ]

Would be great to get this one updated as it's otherwise ready to screen.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 29/Aug/14 4:58 PM ]

Updated patch to apply to lastest master

Comment by Alex Miller [ 16/Jun/15 4:06 PM ]

1) hash and hasheq are stored as Objects, which seems kind of gross. It would be much better to store them as primitive longs and check whether they'd been calculated by comparing to 0. We still end up with a long -> int conversion but at least we'd avoid boxing.

2) assoc wrongly copies over the __hash and __hasheq to the new instance:

(defrecord R [a])
(def r (->R "abc"))
(hash r)                   ;; -1544829221
(hash (assoc r :a "def"))  ;; -1544829221

3) Needs some tests if they don't already exist:

  • with-meta on a record should not affect hashcode
  • modifying a record with assoc or dissoc should affect hashcode
  • maybe something else?

4) Needs some perf tests with a handful of example records (at least: 1 field, many fields, extmap, etc).

Nicola, I'm happy to let you continue to do dev on this patch with me doing the screening if you have time. Or if you don't have time, let me know and I (or someone else) can work on the dev parts. Would like to get this prepped and clean for 1.8.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 16/Jun/15 5:56 PM ]

Updated patch addresses the issues raised, will add some benchmarks later

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 16/Jun/15 5:59 PM ]

Alex, regarding point 1, I stored __hash and __hasheq as ints rather than longs and compared to -1 rather than 0, to be consistent with how it's done elsewhere in the clojure impl

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Jun/15 11:39 AM ]

Looking at the bytecode for hashcode and hasheq, I had two questions:

1) the -1 there is a long and requires an upcast of the private field from int to long. I'm sure that's not a big deal, but wish there was a way to avoid it. I didn't try it but maybe (int -1) would help the compiler out?

2) I wonder whether something like this would perform better:

`(hasheq [this#] 
   (if (== -1 ~'__hasheq)
     (set! ~'__hasheq (int (bit-xor ~type-hash (clojure.lang.APersistentMap/mapHasheq this#)))))
   ~'__hasheq)

The common case will be a failed compare and then the field can be loaded and returned directly without any casting.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 17/Jun/15 11:54 AM ]

1- there's no Numbers.equiv(int, int) so even casting -1 to an int wouldn't solve this. a cast is always necessary. if we were to make hasheq a long, we'd need l2i in the return path, making hasheq an int we need an i2l in the comparison.
2- that doesn't remove any casting, it just replaces a load from the local variable stack with a field load:

;; current version
0: ldc2_w        #203                // long -1l
3: aload_0
4: getfield      #236                // Field __hasheq:I
7: i2l
8: lcmp
9: ifne          38
12: ldc2_w        #267                // long 1340417398l
15: aload_0
16: checkcast     #16                 // class clojure/lang/IPersistentMap
19: invokestatic  #274                // Method clojure/lang/APersistentMap.mapHasheq:(Lclojure/lang/IPersistentMap;)I
22: i2l
23: lxor
24: invokestatic  #278                // Method clojure/lang/RT.intCast:(J)I
27: istore_1
28: aload_0
29: iload_1
30: putfield      #236                // Field __hasheq:I
33: iload_1
34: goto          42
37: pop
38: aload_0
39: getfield      #236                // Field __hasheq:I
42: ireturn
;; your version
0: ldc2_w        #203                // long -1l
3: aload_0
4: getfield      #236                // Field __hasheq:I
7: i2l
8: lcmp
9: ifne          35
12: aload_0
13: ldc2_w        #267                // long 1340417398l
16: aload_0
17: checkcast     #16                 // class clojure/lang/IPersistentMap
20: invokestatic  #274                // Method clojure/lang/APersistentMap.mapHasheq:(Lclojure/lang/IPersistentMap;)I
23: i2l
24: lxor
25: invokestatic  #278                // Method clojure/lang/RT.intCast:(J)I
28: putfield      #236                // Field __hasheq:I
31: goto          37
34: pop
35: aconst_null
36: pop
37: aload_0
38: getfield      #236                // Field __hasheq:I
41: ireturn
Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Jun/15 12:01 PM ]

Fair enough! Looks pretty good to me, still needs the perf numbers.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 17/Jun/15 1:00 PM ]
coll 1.7.0-RC2 1.7.0-RC2+patch
big record ~940ns ~10ns
small record ~150ns ~11ns
;; big record, 1.7.0-RC2
user=> (use 'criterium.core)
nil
user=> (defrecord R [a b c d e f g h i j])
user.R
user=> (def r (map->R (zipmap [:a :b :c :d :e :f :g :h :i :j] (repeat (range 1e3)))))
#'user/r
user=> (bench (hash r))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.291182176566658 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 63385020 in 60 samples of 1056417 calls.
             Execution time mean : 943.320293 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 44.001842 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 891.919381 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 1.033894 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.980453 ns

;; big record, 1.7.0-RC2 + patch
user=> (defrecord R [a b c d e f g h i j])
user.R
user=> (def r (map->R (zipmap [:a :b :c :d :e :f :g :h :i :j] (repeat (range 1e3)))))
#'user/r
user=> (bench (hash r))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.0097162582088168 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 4820968380 in 60 samples of 80349473 calls.
             Execution time mean : 10.657581 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.668011 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 9.975656 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 12.190471 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 2.235715 ns

;; small record 1.7.0-RC2
user=> (defrecord R [a b])
user.R
user=> (def r  (R. (range 1e3) (range 1e3)))
#'user/r
user=> (bench (hash r))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.456092401467115 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 423779160 in 60 samples of 7062986 calls.
             Execution time mean : 147.154359 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 8.148340 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 138.052054 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 165.573489 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.629944 ns

;; small record 1.7.0-RC2+patch
user=> (defrecord R [a b])
user.R
user=> (def r  (R. (range 1e3) (range 1e3)))
#'user/r
user=>  (bench (hash r))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.720638384341818 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 4483195020 in 60 samples of 74719917 calls.
             Execution time mean : 11.696574 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.506482 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 10.982760 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 12.836103 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 2.123801 ns
Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Jun/15 3:36 PM ]

Screened for 1.8.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Jun/15 8:38 AM ]

Note that using -1 for the uncomputed hash value can cause issues with transient lazily computed hash codes on serialization (CLJ-1766). In this case, the defrecord cached code is not transient so I don't think it's a problem, but something to be aware of. Using 0 would avoid this potential issue.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 17/Jul/15 12:00 PM ]

So, why not use 0? You won't need initialization then either

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 17/Jul/15 7:50 PM ]

Updated patch so that it applies on current master and changed the default hash value from -1 to 0.

Rich, we still need initialization since all the record ctors delegate to the ctor arity with explicit __hash and __hasheq, following the approach of the alt ctors for __extmap and __meta

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Jul/15 10:30 PM ]

Moving back to vetted for screening

Comment by Alex Miller [ 28/Jul/15 6:17 PM ]

Hey Nicola, two comments on the hasheq/hashcode impl:

1) I don't think there's any reason to use == in the check instead of =, and = seems better (I think the resulting bytecode is same either way though).

2) The generated bytecode in these cases will call getfield twice in the cached case (once for the check, and once for the return):

public int hasheq();
    Code:
       0: lconst_0      
       1: aload_0       
       2: getfield      #232                // Field __hasheq:I     ;; <-- HERE
       5: i2l           
       6: lcmp          
       7: ifne          36
      10: ldc2_w        #263                // long -989260517l
      13: aload_0       
      14: checkcast     #16                 // class clojure/lang/IPersistentMap
      17: invokestatic  #270                // Method clojure/lang/APersistentMap.mapHasheq:(Lclojure/lang/IPersistentMap;)I
      20: i2l           
      21: lxor          
      22: invokestatic  #274                // Method clojure/lang/RT.intCast:(J)I
      25: istore_1      
      26: aload_0       
      27: iload_1       
      28: putfield      #232                // Field __hasheq:I
      31: iload_1       
      32: goto          40
      35: pop           
      36: aload_0       
      37: getfield      #232                // Field __hasheq:I   ;; <-- HERE
      40: ireturn

Letting a local will avoid that:

`(hasheq [this#] (let [hv# ~'__hasheq]     ;; ADDED
                                  (if (= 0 hv#)           ;; USED
                                    (let [h# (int (bit-xor ~type-hash (clojure.lang.APersistentMap/mapHasheq this#)))]
                                      (set! ~'__hasheq h#)
                                      h#)
                                    hv#)))                ;; USED

Output bytecode:

public int hasheq();
    Code:
       0: aload_0       
       1: getfield      #227                // Field __hasheq:I
       4: istore_1      
       5: lconst_0      
       6: iload_1       
       7: i2l           
       8: lcmp          
       9: ifne          38
      12: ldc2_w        #258                // long -989260517l
      15: aload_0       
      16: checkcast     #16                 // class clojure/lang/IPersistentMap
      19: invokestatic  #265                // Method clojure/lang/APersistentMap.mapHasheq:(Lclojure/lang/IPersistentMap;)I
      22: i2l           
      23: lxor          
      24: invokestatic  #269                // Method clojure/lang/RT.intCast:(J)I
      27: istore_2      
      28: aload_0       
      29: iload_2       
      30: putfield      #227                // Field __hasheq:I
      33: iload_2       
      34: goto          39
      37: pop           
      38: iload_1       
      39: ireturn

For me, this was about 2% faster in bench too.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 28/Jul/15 6:18 PM ]

Equivalent change in hashCode too.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 29/Jul/15 4:06 AM ]

Updated patch takes into account Alex's last notes





[CLJ-1209] clojure.test does not print ex-info in error reports Created: 11/May/13  Updated: 14/May/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Thomas Heller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 6
Labels: clojure.test

Attachments: Text File 0002-CLJ-1209-show-ex-data-in-clojure-test.patch     File clj-test-print-ex-data.diff     Text File output-with-0002-patch.txt    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

clojure.test does not print the data attached to ExceptionInfo in error reports.

(use 'clojure.test)
(deftest ex-test (throw (ex-info "err" {:some :data})))
(ex-test)

ERROR in (ex-test) (core.clj:4591)
Uncaught exception, not in assertion.
expected: nil
  actual: clojure.lang.ExceptionInfo: err
 at clojure.core$ex_info.invoke (core.clj:4591)
    user/fn (NO_SOURCE_FILE:2)
    clojure.test$test_var$fn__7666.invoke (test.clj:704)
    clojure.test$test_var.invoke (test.clj:704)
    ...

Approach: In clojure.stacktrace, which clojure.test uses for printing exceptions, add a check for ex-data and pr it.

After:

ERROR in (ex-test) (core.clj:4591)
Uncaught exception, not in assertion.
expected: nil
  actual: clojure.lang.ExceptionInfo: err
{:some :data}
 at clojure.core$ex_info.invoke (core.clj:4591)
    user/fn (NO_SOURCE_FILE:3)
    clojure.test$test_var$fn__7667.invoke (test.clj:704)
    clojure.test$test_var.invoke (test.clj:704)

Patch: 0002-CLJ-1209-show-ex-data-in-clojure-test.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Dec/13 9:53 AM ]

Great idea, thx for the patch!

Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Dec/13 9:54 AM ]

Would be great to see a before and after example of the output.

Comment by Ivan Kozik [ 12/Jul/14 10:35 PM ]

Attaching sample output

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 05/Sep/14 3:24 PM ]

As pointed out on IRC, there's a possible risk of trying to print an infinite lazy sequence that happened to be included in ex-data.

To mitigate, consider binding *print-length* and *print-level* to small numbers around the call to pr.

Comment by Stephen C. Gilardi [ 13/May/15 2:39 PM ]

http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1716 may cover this well enough that this issue can be closed.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/May/15 8:35 AM ]

I don't think 1716 covers it at all as clojure.test/clojure.stacktrace don't use the new throwable printing. But they could! And that might be a better solution than the patch here.

For example, the existing patch does not consider what to do about nested exceptions, some of which might have ex-data. The new printer handles all that in a consistent way.





[CLJ-705] Make sorted maps and sets implement j.u.SortedMap and SortedSet interfaces Created: 05/Jan/11  Updated: 02/Jun/12

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Rich Hickey Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 02/Jun/12 2:29 PM ]

This might be a duplicate of CLJ-248. See that one before working on this one, at least.





[CLJ-1108] Allow to specify an Executor instance to be used with future-call Created: 18/Nov/12  Updated: 27/Dec/12

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Max Penet Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File bac37b91230d8e4ab3a1e6042a6e8c4b7e9cbf53.patch     Text File clj-1108-enhance-future-call-patch-v2.txt    
Patch: Code

 Description   

This adds an arity to future-call that expects a java.util.concurrent/ExecutorService instance to be used instead of clojure.lang.Agent/soloExecutor.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 26/Dec/12 4:50 PM ]

Rich Hickey committed a change on Dec 21, 2012 to the future-call function that made the patch bac37b91230d8e4ab3a1e6042a6e8c4b7e9cbf53.patch dated Nov 18 2012 no longer apply cleanly.

clj-1108-enhance-future-call-patch-v2.txt dated Dec 26 2012 is identical to that earlier patch, except it has been updated to apply cleanly to the latest master.

It would be best if Max Penet, author of the earlier patch, could verify I've merged his patch to the latest Clojure master correctly.

Comment by Max Penet [ 27/Dec/12 2:25 AM ]

It's verified, it applies correctly to the latest master 00978c76edfe4796bd6ebff3a82182e235211ed0 .

Thanks Andy.