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[CLJ-700] contains? broken for transient collections Created: 01/Jan/11  Updated: 17/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.2
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Herwig Hochleitner Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 14
Labels: transient

Attachments: Java Source File 0001-Refactor-of-some-of-the-clojure-.java-code-to-fix-CL.patch     File clj-700-7.diff     File clj-700-8.diff     File clj-700.diff     Text File clj-700-patch4.txt     Text File clj-700-patch6.txt     Text File clj-700-rt.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Behavior with Clojure 1.6.0:

user=> (contains? (transient {:x "fine"}) :x)
IllegalArgumentException contains? not supported on type: clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap$TransientArrayMap  clojure.lang.RT.contains (RT.java:724)
;; expected: true

user=> (contains? (transient (hash-map :x "fine")) :x)
IllegalArgumentException contains? not supported on type: clojure.lang.PersistentHashMap$TransientHashMap  clojure.lang.RT.contains (RT.java:724)
;; expected: true

user=> (contains? (transient [1 2 3]) 0)
IllegalArgumentException contains? not supported on type: clojure.lang.PersistentVector$TransientVector  clojure.lang.RT.contains (RT.java:724)
;; expected: true

user=> (contains? (transient #{:x}) :x)
IllegalArgumentException contains? not supported on type: clojure.lang.PersistentHashSet$TransientHashSet  clojure.lang.RT.contains (RT.java:724)
;; expected: true

user=> (:x (transient #{:x}))
nil
;; expected: :x

user=> (get (transient #{:x}) :x)
nil
;; expected: :x

Behavior with latest Clojure master as of Jun 27 2014 (same as Clojure 1.6.0) plus patch clj-700-7.diff. In all cases it matches the expected results shown in comments above:

user=> (contains? (transient {:x "fine"}) :x)
true
user=> (contains? (transient (hash-map :x "fine")) :x)
true
user=> (contains? (transient [1 2 3]) 0)
true
user=> (contains? (transient #{:x}) :x)
true
user=> (:x (transient #{:x}))
:x
user=> (get (transient #{:x}) :x) 
:x

Analysis by Alexander Redington: This is caused by expectations in clojure.lang.RT regarding the type of collections for some methods, e.g. contains() and getFrom(). Checking for contains looks to see if the instance passed in is Associative (a subinterface of PersistentCollection), or IPersistentSet.

This patch refactors several of the Clojure interfaces so that logic abstract from the issue of immutability is pulled out to a general interface (e.g. ISet, IAssociative), but preserves the contract specified (e.g. Associatives only return Associatives when calling assoc()).

With more general interfaces in place the contains() and getFrom() methods were then altered to conditionally use the general interfaces which are agnostic of persistence vs. transience. Includes tests in transients.clj to verify the changes fix this problem.

Questions on this approach from Stuart Halloway to Rich Hickey:

1. this represents working back from the defect to rethinking abstractions (good!). Does it go far enough?

2. what are good names for the interfaces introduced here?

Alex Miller: Should also keep an eye on CLJ-787 as it may have some collisions with this one.

Patch: clj-700-8.diff

One 'trailing whitespace' warning is perfectly normal when applying this patch to latest Clojure master as of Sep 1 2014, as shown below. This is simply because of carriage returns at the end of lines in file Associative.java. I know of no way to avoid such a warning without removing CRs from all Clojure source files (e.g. CLJ-1026):

% git am -s --keep-cr --ignore-whitespace < ~/clj/patches/clj-700-8.diff
Applying: Refactor of some of the clojure .java code to fix CLJ-700.
/Users/andy/clj/latest-clj/clojure/.git/rebase-apply/patch:29: trailing whitespace.
public interface Associative extends IPersistentCollection, IAssociative{
warning: 1 line adds whitespace errors.
Applying: more CLJ-700: refresh to use hasheq

------

Adding an addendum here for now. Needs more discussion and clean up before screening. I added clj-700-rt.patch which is a completely different approach to solving this issue in a less invasive way - clj-700-rt.patch. - Alex M



 Comments   
Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 01/Jan/11 8:01 PM ]

the same is also true for TransientVectors

{{(contains? (transient [1 2 3]) 0)}}

false

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 01/Jan/11 8:25 PM ]

As expected, TransientSets have the same issue; plus an additional, probably related one.

(:x (transient #{:x}))

nil

(get (transient #{:x}) :x)

nil

Comment by Alexander Redington [ 07/Jan/11 2:07 PM ]

This is caused by expectations in clojure.lang.RT regarding the type of collections for some methods, e.g. contains() and getFrom(). Checking for contains looks to see if the instance passed in is Associative (a subinterface of PersistentCollection), or IPersistentSet.

This patch refactors several of the Clojure interfaces so that logic abstract from the issue of immutability is pulled out to a general interface (e.g. ISet, IAssociative), but preserves the contract specified (e.g. Associatives only return Associatives when calling assoc()).

With more general interfaces in place the contains() and getFrom() methods were then altered to conditionally use the general interfaces which are agnostic of persistence vs. transience. Includes tests in transients.clj to verify the changes fix this problem.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 28/Jan/11 10:35 AM ]

Rich: Patch doesn't currently apply, but I would like to get your take on approach here. In particular:

  1. this represents working back from the defect to rethinking abstractions (good!). Does it go far enough?
  2. what are good names for the interfaces introduced here?
Comment by Alexander Redington [ 25/Mar/11 7:44 AM ]

Rebased the patch off the latest pull of master as of 3/25/2011, it should apply cleanly now.

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 17/Feb/12 2:59 PM ]

Latest patch does not apply as of f5bcf647

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 17/Feb/12 5:59 PM ]

clj-700-patch2.txt does patch cleanly to latest Clojure head as of a few mins ago. No changes to patch except in context around changed lines.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 07/Mar/12 3:23 AM ]

Sigh. Git patches applied via 'git am' are fragile beasts indeed. Look at them the wrong way and they fail to apply.

clj-700-patch3.txt applies cleanly to latest master as of Mar 7, 2012, but not if you use this command:

git am -s < clj-700-patch3.txt

I am pretty sure this is because of DOS CR/LF line endings in the file src/jvm/clojure/lang/Associative.java. The patch does apply cleanly if you use this command:

git am --keep-cr -s < clj-700-patch3.txt

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Mar/12 6:34 PM ]

This ticket was changed to Incomplete and waiting on Rich when Stuart Halloway asked for feedback on the approach on 28/Jan/2011. Stuart Sierra changed it to not waiting on Rich on 17/Feb/2012 when he noted the patch didn't apply cleanly. Latest patch clj-700-patch3.txt does apply cleanly, but doesn't change the approach used since the time Stuart Halloway's concern was raised. Should it be marked as waiting on Rich again? Something else?

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 08/Jun/12 12:44 PM ]

Patch 4 incorporates patch 3, and brings it up to date on hashing (i.e. uses hasheq).

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Jun/12 12:52 PM ]

Removed clj-700-patch3.txt in favor of Stuart Halloway's improved clj-700-patch4.txt dated June 8, 2012.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 18/Jun/12 3:06 PM ]

clj-700-patch5.txt dated June 18, 2012 is the same as Stuart Halloway's clj-700-patch4.txt, except for context lines that have changed in Clojure master since Stuart's patch was created. clj-700-patch4.txt no longer applies cleanly.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 19/Aug/12 4:47 AM ]

Adding clj-700-patch6.txt, which is identical to Stuart Halloway's clj-700-patch4.txt, except that it applies cleanly to latest master as of Aug 19, 2012. Note that as described above, you must use the --keep-cr option to 'git am' when applying this patch for it to succeed. Removing clj-700-patch5.txt, since it no longer applies cleanly.

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 24/Aug/12 1:08 PM ]

Patch fails as of commit 1c8eb16a14ce5daefef1df68d2f6b1f143003140

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 24/Aug/12 1:53 PM ]

Which patch did you try, and what command did you use? I tried applying clj-700-patch6.txt to the same commit, using the following command, and it applied, albeit with the warning messages shown:

% git am --keep-cr -s < clj-700-patch6.txt
Applying: Refactor of some of the clojure .java code to fix CLJ-700.
/Users/jafinger/clj/latest-clj/clojure/.git/rebase-apply/patch:29: trailing whitespace.
public interface Associative extends IPersistentCollection, IAssociative{
warning: 1 line adds whitespace errors.
Applying: more CLJ-700: refresh to use hasheq

Note the --keep-cr option, which is necessary for this patch to succeed. It is recommended in the "Screening Tickets" section of the JIRA workflow wiki page here: http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/JIRA+workflow

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 28/Aug/12 5:48 PM ]

Presumptuously changing Approval from Incomplete back to None, since the latest patch does apply cleanly if the --keep-cr option is used. It was in Screened state recently, but I'm not so presumptuous as to change it to Screened

Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Aug/13 12:26 PM ]

I think through a series of different hands on this ticket it got knocked way back in the list. Re-marking vetted as it's previously been all the way up through screening. Should also keep an eye on CLJ-787 as it may have some collisions with this one.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Nov/13 10:14 AM ]

clj-700-7.diff is identical to clj-700-patch6.txt, except it applies cleanly to latest master. Only some lines of context in a test file have changed.

When I say "applies cleanly", I mean that there is one warning when using the proper "git am" command from the dev wiki page. This is because one line replaced in Associative.java has a CR/LF at the end of the line, because all lines in that file do.

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 17/Feb/14 9:54 AM ]

Since clojure 1.5, contains? throws an IllegalArgumentException on transients.
In 1.6.0-beta1, transients are no longer marked as alpha.

Does this mean, that we won't be able to distinguish between a nil value and no value on a transient?

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 27/Jun/14 10:20 AM ]

Request for someone to (1) update patch to apply cleanly, and (2) summarize approach so I don't have to read through the comment history.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 27/Jun/14 11:02 AM ]

The latest patch is clj-700-7.diff dated Nov 8, 2013. I believe it is impossible to create a patch that applies any more cleanly using git for source files that have carriage returns in them, which at least one modified source file does. Here is the command I used on latest Clojure master as of today (Jun 27 2014), which is the same as that of March 25 2014:

% git am -s --keep-cr --ignore-whitespace < ~/clj/patches/clj-700-7.diff 
Applying: Refactor of some of the clojure .java code to fix CLJ-700.
/Users/admin/clj/latest-clj/clojure/.git/rebase-apply/patch:29: trailing whitespace.
public interface Associative extends IPersistentCollection, IAssociative{
warning: 1 line adds whitespace errors.
Applying: more CLJ-700: refresh to use hasheq

If you want a patch that doesn't have the 'trailing whitespace' warning in it, I think someone would have to commit a change that removed the carriage returns from file Associative.java. If you want such a patch, let me know and we can remove all of them from every source file and be done with this annoyance.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 27/Jun/14 11:19 AM ]

Updated description to contain a copy of only those comments that seemed 'interesting'. Most comments have simply been "attached an updated patch that applies cleanly", or "changed the state of this ticket for reason X".

Comment by Alex Miller [ 27/Jun/14 1:19 PM ]

Looks like Andy did as requested, moving back to Screenable.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 4:27 PM ]

Patch clj-700-7.diff dated Nov 8 2013 no longer applied cleanly to latest master after some commits were made to Clojure on Aug 29, 2014. It did apply cleanly before that day.

I have not checked how easy or difficult it might be to update this patch.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Sep/14 3:59 AM ]

Patch clj-700-8.diff dated Sep 1 2014 is identical to clj-700-7.diff, except that it applies "cleanly" to latest master, by which I mean it applies as cleanly as I think it is possible to apply for a git patch to a file with carriage return/line feed line endings, as one of the modified files still does.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Dec/14 3:12 PM ]

Added new patch with alternate approach that just makes RT know about transients instead of refactoring the class hierarchy.

clj-700-rt.patch

In some ways I think the class hierarchy refactoring is due, but I'm not totally on board with all the changes in those patches and it has impacts on collections outside Clojure itself that are hard to reason about.





[CLJ-703] Improve writeClassFile performance Created: 04/Jan/11  Updated: 08/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.3
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Jürgen Hötzel Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 19
Labels: Compiler, performance

Attachments: Text File 0001-use-File.mkdirs-instead-of-mkdir-every-single-direct.patch     Text File 0002-Ensure-atomic-creation-of-class-files-by-renaming-a-.patch     Text File improve-writeclassfile-perf.patch     Text File remove-flush-and-sync-only.patch     Text File remove-sync-only.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

This Discussion about timing issues when writing class files led to the the current implementation of synchronous writes to disk. This leads to bad performance/system-load when compiling Clojure code.

This Discussion questioned the current implentation.

Synchronous writes are not necessary and also do not ensure (crash while calling write) valid classfiles.

These Patches (0001 is just a code cleanup for creating the directory structure) ensures atomic creation of classfiles by using File.renameTo()



 Comments   
Comment by David Powell [ 17/Jan/11 2:16 PM ]

Removing sync makes clojure build much faster. I wonder why it was added in the first place? I guess only Rich knows? I assume that it is not necessary.

If we are removing sync though, I wouldn't bother with the atomic rename stuff. Doing that sort of thing can cause problems on some platforms, eg with search indexers and virus checkers momentarily locking files after they are created.

The patch seems to be assuming that sync is there for some reason, but my initial assumption would be that sync isn't necessary - perhaps it was working around some issue that no longer exists?

Comment by Jürgen Hötzel [ 19/Jan/11 2:05 PM ]

Although its unlikely: there is a possible race condition "loading a paritally written classfile"?:

https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/src/jvm/clojure/lang/RT.java#L393

Comment by John Szakmeister [ 25/May/12 4:22 AM ]

The new improve-writeclassfile-perf version of the patch combines the two previous patches into a single patch file and brings them up-to-date with master. I can split the two changes back out into separate patch files if desired, but I figured out current tooling is more geared towards a single patch being applied.

Comment by John Szakmeister [ 25/May/12 4:36 AM ]

FWIW, both fixes look sane. The first one is a nice cleanup. The second one is a little more interesting in that uses a rename operation to put the final file into place. It removes the sync call, which does make things faster. In general, if we're concerned about on-disk consistency, we should really have a combination of the two: write the full contents to a tmp file, sync it, and atomically rename to the destination file name.

Neither the current master, nor the current patch will guarantee on-disk consistency across a machine wide crash. The current master could crash before the sync() occurs, leaving the file in an inconsistent state. With the patch, the OS may not get the file from file cache to disk before an OS level crash occurs, and leave the file in an inconsistent state as well. The benefit of the patch version is that the whole file does atomically come into view at once. It does have a nasty side effect of leaving around a temp file if the compiler crashes just before the rename though.

Perhaps a little more work to catch an exception and clean up is in order? In general, I like the patched version better.

Comment by Ivan Kozik [ 05/Oct/12 7:07 PM ]

File.renameTo returns false on (most?) errors, but the patch doesn't check for failure. Docs say "The return value should always be checked to make sure that the rename operation was successful." Failure might be especially likely on Windows, where files are opened by others without FILE_SHARE_DELETE.

Comment by Dave Della Costa [ 23/Jun/14 11:37 PM ]

We've been wondering why our compilation times on linux were so slow. It became the last straw when we walked away from one project and came back after 15 minutes and it was not done yet.

After some fruitless investigation into our linux configuration and lein java args, we stumbled upon this issue via the associated Clojure group thread. Upon commenting out the flush() and sync() lines (https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/src/jvm/clojure/lang/Compiler.java#L7171-L7172) and compiling Clojure 1.6 ourselves, our projects all started compiling in under a minute.

Point being, can we at least provide some flag to allow for "unsafe compilation" or something? As it is, this is bad enough that we've manually modified all our local versions of Clojure to work around the issue.

Comment by Tim McCormack [ 30/Sep/14 4:10 PM ]

Additional motivation: This becomes really unpleasant on an encrypted filesystem, since write and read latency become higher.

As a partial workaround, I've been using this script to mount a ramdisk over top of target, which speeds up compilation 2-4x: https://gist.github.com/timmc/6c397644668bcf41041f (but removing flush() and sync() entirely would probably speed things up even more, if safe)

Comment by Ragnar Dahlen [ 06/Oct/14 12:30 PM ]

I'd like to explore this issue further as I also don't think the flush and sync calls add any value, but do have a severe impact on performance.

To resurrect the discussion, I've attached a new patch with the following approach:

  • create a temporary file
  • write class bytecode to temporary file, no flush or sync
  • close temporary file
  • atomic rename of temporary file to class file name

It is different to previous patches in that:

  • it applies cleanly to master
  • it checks return value from File.renameTo
  • it omits proposed File.mkdirs change as the current implementation is actually converting from an "internal name", where forward slashes are assumed (splits on "/"), to a platform specific path using File.separator. I'm not convinced that the previous patch is safe on all versions of Windows, and I think it's separate from the main issue here.

I opted for the atomic rename of a temp file to avoid leaving empty class files with a correct expected class file name in case of failure.

It is my understanding that this patch will guarantee that:

  • when writeClassFile returns successfully, a class file with the expected name will exists, and subsequent reads from that file name will return the expected bytecode (possibly from kernel buffers).
  • when writeClassFile fails, a class file with the expected name will not have been created (or updated if it previously existed).

Anything preventing the operating system from flushing its buffers to disk (power failure etc) might leave a corrupt (empty, partially written) class file. It's my opinion that that is acceptable behaviour, and worth the performance improvement (I'm seeing AOT compilation reduced from 1m20s -> 22s on one of our codebases, would be happy to provide more benchmarks if requested).

Would be grateful for feedback/testing of this patch.

Comment by Ragnar Dahlen [ 08/Oct/14 6:00 AM ]

We're testing this patch on various projects/platforms at my company. So far we've seen:

  • Significantly reduced compilation times on Linux (two typical examples: 30s to 15s, 1m30s to 30s)
  • No significant change in compilation times on Mac OSX.
  • File.renameTo consistently failing on a Windows machine.

My understanding is that the performance difference between Linux and OSX is due to differences in how these platforms implement fsync. OSX by default does not actually tell the drive to flush its buffers (requires fcntl F_FULLSYNC for this, not used by JVMs) [1], whereas Linux does [2].

Our very limited test shows (as was previously pointed out) that File.renameTo is problematic on Windows. I've attached a new patch that doesn't use rename, and only has the the sync call removed (flush is a no-op for FileOutputStreams). We're currently testing this patch.

The drawback of this patch is that it may leave correctly named, but empty class files if the write fails. One option would be to try and delete the file in the catch block. Personally, I wouldn't expect a compilation that failed because of OS/IO reasons to leave my classfiles in a consistent state.

[1]: "Note that while fsync() will flush all data from the host to the drive (i.e. the "permanent storage device"), the drive itself may not physically write the data to the platters for quite some time and it may be written in an out-of-order sequence.": https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Darwin/Reference/ManPages/man2/fsync.2.html

[2]: "[...] includes writing through or flushing a disk cache if present."
http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/fsync.2.html





[CLJ-979] Clojure resolves to wrong deftype classes when AOT compiling or reloading Created: 03/May/12  Updated: 17/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.3, Release 1.4, Release 1.5, Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Release 1.7

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Edmund Jackson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 13
Labels: aot, classloader, compiler

Attachments: Text File CLJ-979.patch     Text File clj-979-symptoms.patch     Text File CLJ-979-v2.patch     Text File CLJ-979-v3.patch     Text File CLJ-979-v4.patch     Text File CLJ-979-v5.patch     Text File CLJ-979-v6.patch     Text File CLJ-979-v7.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Compiling a class via `deftype` during AOT compilation gives different results for the different constructors. These hashes should be identical.

user=> (binding [*compile-files* true] (eval '(deftype Abc [])))
user.Abc
user=> (hash Abc)
16446700
user=> (hash (class (->Abc)))
31966239 ;; should be 16446700

This also means that whenever there's a stale AOT compiled deftype class in the classpath, that class will be used rather then the JIT compiled one, breaking repl interaction.

Another demonstration of this classloader issue (from CLJ-1495) when reloading deftypes (no AOT) :

user> (defrecord Foo [bar])
user.Foo
user> (= (->Foo 42) #user.Foo{:bar 42}) ;;expect this to evaluate to true
true
user> (defrecord Foo [bar])
user.Foo
user> (= (->Foo 42) #user.Foo{:bar 42}) ;;expect this to evaluate to true also -- but it doesn't!
false
user>

This bug also affects AOT compilation of multimethods that dispatch on a class, this affected core.match for years see http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/MATCH-86, http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/MATCH-98. David had to work-around this issue by using a bunch of protocols instead of multimethods.

Cause of the bug: currently clojure uses Class.forName to resolve a class from a class name, which ignores the class cache from DynamicClassLoader thus reloading deftypes or mixing AOT compilation at the repl with deftypes breaks, resolving to the wrong class.

Approach: the current patch (CLJ-979-v7.patch) addresses this issue in multiple ways:

  • it makes RT.classForName/classForNameNonLoading look in the class cache before delegating to Class/forName if the current classloader is not a DynamicClassLoader (this incidentally addresses also CLJ-1457)
  • it makes clojure use RT.classForName/classForNameNonLoading instead of Class/forName
  • it overrides Classloader/loadClass so that it's class cache aware – this method is used by the jvm to load classes
  • it changes gen-interface to always emit an in-memory interface along the [optional] in disk interface so that the in-memory class is always updated.


 Comments   
Comment by Scott Lowe [ 12/May/12 9:05 PM ]

I can't reproduce this under Clojure 1.3 or 1.4, and Leiningen 1.7.1 on either Java 1.7.0-jdk7u4-b21 OpenJDK 64-Bit or Java 1.6.0_31 Java HotSpot 64-Bit. OS is Mac OS X 10.7.

Edmund, how are you running this AOT code? I wrapped your code in a main function and built an uberjar from it.

Comment by Edmund Jackson [ 13/May/12 2:20 AM ]

Hi Scott,

Interesting.

I have two use cases
1. AOT compile and call from repl.
My steps: git clone, lein compile, lein repl, (use 'aots.death), (in-ns 'aots.death), (= (class (Dontwork. nil)) (class (map->Dontwork {:a 1}))) => false

2. My original use case, which I've minimised here, is an AOT ns, producing a genclass that is called instantiated from other Java (no main). This produces the same error. I will produce an example of this and post it too.

Comment by Edmund Jackson [ 13/May/12 4:23 AM ]

Hi Scott,

Here is an example of it failing in the interop case: https://github.com/ejackson/aotquestion2
The steps I'm following to compile this all up are

git clone git@github.com:ejackson/aotquestion2.git
cd aotquestion2/cljside/
lein uberjar
lein install
cd ../javaside/
mvn package
java -jar ./target/aotquestion-1.0-SNAPSHOT.jar

and it dies with this:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ClassCastException: cljside.core.Dontwork cannot be cast to cljside.core.Dontwork
at cljside.MyClass.makeDontwork(Unknown Source)
at aotquestion.App.main(App.java:8)

The error message is really confusing (to me, anyway), but I think its the same root problem as for the REPL case.

What do you see when you run the above ?

Comment by Scott Lowe [ 13/May/12 8:41 AM ]

Ah, yes, looks like my initial attempt to reproduce was too simplistic. I used your second git repo, and can now confirm that it's failing for me with the same error.

Comment by Scott Lowe [ 13/May/12 10:35 PM ]

I looked into this a little further and the AOT generated code looks correct, in the sense that both code paths appear to be returning the same type.

However, I wonder if this is really a ClassLoader issue, whereby two definitions of the same class are being loaded at different times, because that would cause the x.y.Class cannot be cast to x.y.Class exception that we're seeing here.

Comment by Steve Miner [ 03/Sep/13 9:54 AM ]

This could be related to CLJ-1157 which deals with a ClassLoader issue with AOT compiled code.

Comment by Ambrose Bonnaire-Sergeant [ 29/Mar/14 1:11 PM ]

I've tried this patch attached to CLJ-1157 and it did not solve this issue.

Comment by Ambrose Bonnaire-Sergeant [ 29/Mar/14 2:27 PM ]

This bug seems to be rooted in different behaviour for do/let under compilation. Attached a patch showing these symptoms in the hope it helps people find the cause.

Comment by Peter Taoussanis [ 22/Sep/14 3:12 AM ]

Just a quick note to confirm that this still seems to be around as of Clojure 1.7.0-alpha2. Don't have any useful input on possible solutions, sorry.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Dec/14 1:12 PM ]

Duplicates - CLJ-1495, CLJ-1132

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 04/Dec/14 1:50 PM ]

The attached patch fixes the classloader issues by routing RT.classForName & variants through the DynamicClassLoader class cache before invoking Class.forName

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 04/Dec/14 1:59 PM ]

Re-adding triaged status added by Alex Miller that got accidentaly nuked by a race-condition between my edits to the ticket description and Alex's ones

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 04/Dec/14 2:30 PM ]

0001-CLJ-979-make-clojure-resolve-to-the-correct-Class-in-v2.patch is the same as 0001-CLJ-979-make-clojure-resolve-to-the-correct-Class-in.patch except it unconditionally looks for classes in the class cache of DynamicClassLoader, even if baseLoader() is not a DynamicClassLoader.
This fixes the bug of CLJ-1457 but might just be a workaround

Comment by Michael Blume [ 11/Dec/14 3:29 PM ]

Current patch blows up my Clojure build

https://gist.github.com/MichaelBlume/aa26fc715cbbdf711290

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 11/Dec/14 3:45 PM ]

Michael: the current patch builds clojure fine for me, I'll try to reproduce. Which jvm version are you using?

Comment by Michael Blume [ 11/Dec/14 4:26 PM ]

[14:24][michael.blume@tcc-michael-4:~/workspace/clojure((0fc43db...))]$ java -version
java version "1.8.0_25"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_25-b17)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.25-b02, mixed mode)
[14:24][michael.blume@tcc-michael-4:~/workspace/clojure((0fc43db...))]$ mvn -version
Apache Maven 3.2.3 (33f8c3e1027c3ddde99d3cdebad2656a31e8fdf4; 2014-08-11T13:58:10-07:00)
Maven home: /usr/local/Cellar/maven/3.2.3/libexec
Java version: 1.8.0_25, vendor: Oracle Corporation
Java home: /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk1.8.0_25.jdk/Contents/Home/jre
Default locale: en_US, platform encoding: UTF-8
OS name: "mac os x", version: "10.10.1", arch: "x86_64", family: "mac"

build was after I applied the patch to the current master branch of the clojure github repo

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 11/Dec/14 5:34 PM ]

I am seeing a similar compilation error as Michael Blume, with both JDK 1.7 and 1.8 on Mac OS X 10.9.5.

By accident I found that if I take latest Clojure master and do 'mvn package', then apply the patch CLJ-979.patch dated Dec 11 2014, then do 'mvn package' again without 'mvn clean', it compiles with no errors. If I do 'mvn clean' then 'mvn package' in a patched tree, I get the error every time I've tried.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 12/Dec/14 5:50 AM ]

The updated patch fixes the LinkageError Andy and Michael were getting.

Andy, Michael, can you confirm?

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 12/Dec/14 9:38 AM ]

Added more testcases to new patch

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 12/Dec/14 10:09 AM ]

Cleaned up the patch from whitespace changes

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 12/Dec/14 12:32 PM ]

I tried latest Clojure master plus patch CLJ-979-v4.patch, dated 12 Dec 2014, with Mac OS X 10.9.5 + JDK7, and Ubuntu Linux 14.04 with JDKs 6 through 9, and 'mvn clean' followed by 'mvn package' built and passed tests successfully with all of them.

I did notice that some files were created in the test directory that were not cleaned up by the end of the test, which you can use 'git status .' to see. Not sure if that is considered a bad thing for Clojure tests.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 12/Dec/14 1:07 PM ]

Thanks Andy, I've updated the patch and it now should remove all temporary classes created by the test.
It's probably not the best way to do it but I couldn't figure out how to do it another way.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 12/Dec/14 2:34 PM ]

Yep, looks good to me =)

Comment by Alex Miller [ 15/Dec/14 4:01 PM ]

Thanks first to Nicola for all his work so far on this!

Some feedback:
1) While the ticket itself isn't bad, I would really like to focus the title and description on a crisp statement of the real problem now that we understand it more. I'd like help on making sure we capture that correctly - how is this for a title: "Uses of Class.forName() miss classes in DynamicClassLoader cache?" ?

Similarly, the description should focus on the problem and show some examples. The defrecord one is good. The first example works for me before the patch and fails after?

2) The crux of this whole thing is the change in loading order in DCL.loadClass() - changing this is a big deal. We really need broader testing with things likely to be affected - off the top of my head: Immutant, Pomegranate, Leiningen, or anything else that monkeys with classloader stuff. Maybe something with Eclipse/OSGi if there is something testable out there.

3) DynamicClassLoader comments:
a) loadClass(String name) - I believe this is identical to the super impl, so can be removed.
b) findClass(String name) - now that we are hijacking loadClass(), I'm not sure it's even necessary to implement this or to call super.findClass() - if you get to the super.findClass(), I would expect that to always throw CNFE. Potentially, this method could even be removed (but this might do bad things if there are subclasses of DCL out there in the wild).
c) loadClass(String name, ...) - instead of calling findClass() and using the CNFE for control flow, you could just directly call findInMemoryClass(), then use a returned null as the decision factor. Again, this is possibly bad if there are DCL subclasses, so I'm on the fence about it.

4) Is the change in gen-interface something that should be a separate ticket? Seems like it could be separable.

5) I don't like the test changes with respect to set up and cleanup. The build already supports compiling a subset of test ns'es (like clojure.test-clojure.genclass.examples). I'd prefer to use that existing mechanism if at all possible. Check the build.xml for the hard-coded ns list.

6) What are the performance implications? I'm not expecting they are significant but we just made a bunch of changes for compilation performance and I'd hate to undo them all. Could findInMemoryClass be smarter about avoiding checks that can't succeed (avoiding "java.*" for example?).

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 15/Dec/14 5:43 PM ]

1) It's not really about Class.forName() specifically, it's about DynamicClassLoader not being class cache aware in the loadClass method. The JVM uses the classloader loadClass method for resolving all kind of class usages,
including but not limited to Class.forName() (i.e. when loading some bytecode containing a "new" instruction, that class reference will be resolved via a call to loadClass)
I'll try to make the documentation a bit more clear, the first example is an exhibit of the bugged behaviour, the two calls should output the same hash.

2,4) So, there are 3 approaches to how DynamicClassLoader could go at it:

  • Prefer in-disk classes over in-memory classes, roughly the current approach (sometimes it will pick the in-memory class over the in-disk one causing weird bugs like Foo. and ->Foo constructing different classes), has the
    negative effect of breaking interaction between AOT compilation and JIT loading, which has created all sorts of troubles with redefinig deftypes/defprotocols in repls while having stale classfiles in disk.
  • Always pick the most-updated class, this has the advangate of being always correct but has several disadvantages that make it inpracticable in my opinion: we'd have to keep track of the timestamp in which a dynamic class
    is defined, and make the loadClass implementation such that if there a class is both in-memory and in-disk, it compares the timestamps and select the most updated one. This would complicate the implementation a lot and we'd
    likely have to pay a substantial performance hit.
  • Prefer in-memory classes over in-disk classes, the approach proposed in the current patches. It has the advantage of being almost always correct, make repl interaction & jit/aot mixing work fine and the implementation is
    mostly straightforward. The downside is that in cases like gen-class where an AOT class can actually be the most updated version, the in-memory version will be used. In clojure all the forms that do bytecode emission either
    only do AOT compilation or do AOT compilation on demand and always load the class in memory, except gen-interface that doesn't load the class in memory if it's being AOT compiled. Changing its semantics to behave like the
    other jit/aot compiling forms (deftype/defrecord/reify) is the only way to make this approach work so I don't think this should go in another ticket.

5) I don't like the previous testing strategy either but couldn't figure out a better way. Thanks for the pointer on the already in-place infrastructure, I'll check it out and update the patch

In the meantime I've uploaded a new patch addressing 3 and 6. Specifically:
3) I removed the unnecessary loadClass(String) arity, I've made loadClass(String, boolean) use findInMemoryClass(String) directly rather than relying on findClass(String) since nowhere in the documentation it guarantess that
findClass will be used by loadClass. However I've left the findClass(String) implementation in place in case there's code out there that relies on this.
6) I haven't done any serious testing but I haven't noticed any significant difference in compile times for any of my tools.* contrib libraries with the current patch. Filtering "java.*" class names before the inMemory check
didn't seem to produce any difference so it's not included in the updated patch. However I'll probably include an alternative patch with that filtering to do more performance testings and see if it can actually help a bit.

All this said, I'm afraid that I won't have time to personally do an in-depth benchmarking & cross project testing of this patch. I've been spending almost all the free time I had in the past weeks working through a bunch of tickets (mostly this one) but now because of school and other commitments I can't promise I will be able to do anything more than maintaining the current patch & answering to any questions about the bug. Any help in moving this ticket further would be appreciated, in particular to address points 2 and 6.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 16/Dec/14 8:33 AM ]

Thanks Nicola. I'll certainly take over sheparding the bug and appeal to the greater community for help in broad testing when I think we're ready for that.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 16/Dec/14 12:50 PM ]

Updated patch with better tests, addressing Alex Miller's comments.





[CLJ-1152] PermGen leak in multimethods and protocol fns when evaled Created: 30/Jan/13  Updated: 06/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Chouser Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 8
Labels: memory, protocols

Attachments: File naive-lru-for-multimethods-and-protocols.diff     File protocol_multifn_weak_ref_cache.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Incomplete

 Description   

There is a PermGen memory leak that we have tracked down to protocol methods and multimethods called inside an eval, because of the caches these methods use. The problem only arises when the value being cached is an instance of a class (such as a function or reify) that was defined inside the eval. Thus extending IFn or dispatching a multimethod on an IFn are likely triggers.

Reproducing: The easiest way that I have found to test this is to set "-XX:MaxPermSize" to a reasonable value so you don't have to wait too long for the PermGen spaaaaace to fill up, and to use "-XX:+TraceClassLoading" and "-XX:+TraceClassUnloading" to see the classes being loaded and unloaded.

leiningen project.clj
(defproject permgen-scratch "0.1.0-SNAPSHOT"
  :dependencies [[org.clojure/clojure "1.5.0-RC1"]]
  :jvm-opts ["-XX:MaxPermSize=32M"
             "-XX:+TraceClassLoading"
             "-XX:+TraceClassUnloading"])

You can use lein swank 45678 and connect with slime in emacs via M-x slime-connect.

To monitor the PermGen usage, you can find the Java process to watch with "jps -lmvV" and then run "jstat -gcold <PROCESS_ID> 1s". According to the jstat docs, the first column (PC) is the "Current permanent space capacity (KB)" and the second column (PU) is the "Permanent space utilization (KB)". VisualVM is also a nice tool for monitoring this.

Multimethod leak

Evaluating the following code will run a loop that eval's (take* (fn foo [])).

multimethod leak
(defmulti take* (fn [a] (type a)))

(defmethod take* clojure.lang.Fn
  [a]
  '())

(def stop (atom false))
(def sleep-duration (atom 1000))

(defn run-loop []
  (when-not @stop
    (eval '(take* (fn foo [])))
    (Thread/sleep @sleep-duration)
    (recur)))

(future (run-loop))

(reset! sleep-duration 0)

In the lein swank session, you will see many lines like below listing the classes being created and loaded.

[Loaded user$eval15802$foo__15803 from __JVM_DefineClass__]
[Loaded user$eval15802 from __JVM_DefineClass__]

These lines will stop once the PermGen space fills up.

In the jstat monitoring, you'll see the amount of used PermGen space (PU) increase to the max and stay there.

-    PC       PU        OC          OU       YGC    FGC    FGCT     GCT
 31616.0  31552.7    365952.0         0.0      4     0    0.000    0.129
 32000.0  31914.0    365952.0         0.0      4     0    0.000    0.129
 32768.0  32635.5    365952.0         0.0      4     0    0.000    0.129
 32768.0  32767.6    365952.0      1872.0      5     1    0.000    0.177
 32768.0  32108.2    291008.0     23681.8      6     2    0.827    1.006
 32768.0  32470.4    291008.0     23681.8      6     2    0.827    1.006
 32768.0  32767.2    698880.0     24013.8      8     4    1.073    1.258
 32768.0  32767.2    698880.0     24013.8      8     4    1.073    1.258
 32768.0  32767.2    698880.0     24013.8      8     4    1.073    1.258

A workaround is to run prefer-method before the PermGen space is all used up, e.g.

(prefer-method take* clojure.lang.Fn java.lang.Object)

Then, when the used PermGen space is close to the max, in the lein swank session, you will see the classes created by the eval'ing being unloaded.

[Unloading class user$eval5950$foo__5951]
[Unloading class user$eval3814]
[Unloading class user$eval2902$foo__2903]
[Unloading class user$eval13414]

In the jstat monitoring, there will be a long pause when used PermGen space stays close to the max, and then it will drop down, and start increasing again when more eval'ing occurs.

-    PC       PU        OC          OU       YGC    FGC    FGCT     GCT
 32768.0  32767.9    159680.0     24573.4      6     2    0.167    0.391
 32768.0  32767.9    159680.0     24573.4      6     2    0.167    0.391
 32768.0  17891.3    283776.0     17243.9      6     2   50.589   50.813
 32768.0  18254.2    283776.0     17243.9      6     2   50.589   50.813

The defmulti defines a cache that uses the dispatch values as keys. Each eval call in the loop defines a new foo class which is then added to the cache when take* is called, preventing the class from ever being GCed.

The prefer-method workaround works because it calls clojure.lang.MultiFn.preferMethod, which calls the private MultiFn.resetCache method, which completely empties the cache.

Protocol leak

The leak with protocol methods similarly involves a cache. You see essentially the same behavior as the multimethod leak if you run the following code using protocols.

protocol leak
(defprotocol ITake (take* [a]))

(extend-type clojure.lang.Fn
  ITake
  (take* [this] '()))

(def stop (atom false))
(def sleep-duration (atom 1000))

(defn run-loop []
  (when-not @stop
    (eval '(take* (fn foo [])))
    (Thread/sleep @sleep-duration)
    (recur)))

(future (run-loop))

(reset! sleep-duration 0)

Again, the cache is in the take* method itself, using each new foo class as a key.

Workaround: A workaround is to run -reset-methods on the protocol before the PermGen space is all used up, e.g.

(-reset-methods ITake)

This works because -reset-methods replaces the cache with an empty MethodImplCache.

Patch: protocol_multifn_weak_ref_cache.diff

Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Chouser [ 30/Jan/13 9:10 AM ]

I think the most obvious solution would be to constrain the size of the cache. Adding an item to the cache is already not the fastest path, so a bit more work could be done to prevent the cache from growing indefinitely large.

That does raise the question of what criteria to use. Keep the first n entries? Keep the n most recently used (which would require bookkeeping in the fast cache-hit path)? Keep the n most recently added?

Comment by Jamie Stephens [ 18/Oct/13 9:35 AM ]

At a minimum, perhaps a switch to disable the caches – with obvious performance impact caveats.

Seems like expensive LRU logic is probably the way to go, but maybe don't have it kick in fully until some threshold is crossed.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Oct/13 4:28 PM ]

A report seeing this in production from mailing list:
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/_n3HipchjCc

Comment by Adrian Medina [ 10/Dec/13 11:43 AM ]

So this is why we've been running into PermGen space exceptions! This is a fairly critical bug for us - I'm making extensive use of multimethods in our codebase and this exception will creep in at runtime randomly.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/14 9:52 PM ]

it might be better to split this in to two issues, because at a very abstract level the two issues are the "same", but concretely they are distinct (protocols don't really share code paths with multimethods), keeping them together in one issue seems like a recipe for a large hard to read patch

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 26/Jul/14 5:49 PM ]

naive-lru-method-cache-for-multimethods.diff replaces the methodCache in multimethods with a very naive lru cache built on PersistentHashMap and PersistentQueue

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 28/Jul/14 7:09 PM ]

naive-lru-for-multimethods-and-protocols.diff creates a new class clojure.lang.LRUCache that provides an lru cache built using PHashMap and PQueue behind an IPMap interface.

changes MultiFn to use an LRUCache for its method cache.

changes expand-method-impl-cache to use an LRUCache for MethodImplCache's map case

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 30/Jul/14 3:10 PM ]

I suspect my patch naive-lru-for-multimethods-and-protocols.diff is just wrong, unless MethodImplCache really is being used as a cache we can't just toss out entries when it gets full.

looking at the deftype code again, it does look like MethidImplCache is being used as a cache, so maybe the patch is fine

if I am sure of anything it is that I am unsure so hopefully someone who is sure can chime in

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 31/Jul/14 11:02 AM ]

I haven't looked at your patch, but I can confirm that the MethodImplCache in the protocol function is just being used as a cache

Comment by dennis zhuang [ 08/Aug/14 6:21 AM ]

I developed a new patch that convert the methodCache in MultiFn to use WeakReference for dispatch value,and clear the cache if necessary.

I've test it with the code in ticket,and it looks fine.The classes will be unloaded when perm gen is almost all used up.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Aug/14 4:55 PM ]

I don't know which to evaluate here. Does multifn_weak_method_cache.diff supersede naive-lru-for-multimethods-and-protocols.diff or are these alternate approaches both under consideration?

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 22/Aug/14 8:26 PM ]

the most straight forward thing, I think, is to consider them as alternatives, I am not a huge fan of weakrefs, but of course not using weakrefs we have to pick some bounding size for the cache, and the cache has a strong reference that could prevent a gc, so there are trade offs. My reasons to stay away from weak refs in general are using them ties the behavior of whatever you are building to the behavior of the gc pretty strongly. that may be considered a matter of personal taste

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 4:31 PM ]

All patches dated Aug 8 2014 and earlier no longer applied cleanly to latest master after some commits were made to Clojure on Aug 29, 2014. They did apply cleanly before that day.

I have not checked how easy or difficult it might be to update the patches.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 29/Aug/14 7:00 PM ]

I've updated naive-lru-for-multimethods-and-protocols.diff to apply to the current master

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 7:34 PM ]

Thanks, Kevin. While JIRA allows multiple attachments to a ticket with the same filename but different contents, that can be confusing for people looking for a particular patch, and for a program I have that evaluates patches for things like whether they apply and build cleanly. Would you mind removing the older one, or in some other way making all the names unique?

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 29/Aug/14 8:43 PM ]

I deleted all of my attachments accept for my latest and greatest

Comment by dennis zhuang [ 30/Aug/14 9:51 AM ]

I updated multifn_weak_method_cache2.diff patch too.

I think using weak reference cache is better,because we have to keep one cache per multifn.When you have many multi-functions, there will be many LRU caches in memory,and they will consume too much memory and CPU for evictions. You can't choose a proper threshold for LRU cache in every environment.
But i don't have any benchmark data to support my opinion.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Sep/14 2:38 PM ]

I'm going to set the LRU cache patch aside. I don't think it's possible to find a "correct" size for it and it seems weird to me to extend APersistentMap to build such a thing anyways.

I think it makes more sense to follow the same strategy used for other caches (such as the Keyword cache) - a combination ConcurrentHashMap with WeakReferences and a ReferenceQueue for clean-up. I don't see any compelling reason not to take the same path as other internal caches.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Sep/14 3:44 PM ]

Stepping back a little to think about the problem.... our requirements are:
1) cache map of dispatch value (could be any Object) to multimethod function (IFn)
2) do we want keys to be compared based on equality or identity? identity-based opens up more reference-based caching options and is fine for most common dispatch types (Class, Keyword), but reduces (often eliminates?) cache hits for all other types where values are likely to be equiv but not identical (vector of strings for example)
3) concurrent access to cache
4) cache cannot grow without bound
5) cache cannot retain strong references to dispatch values (the cache keys) because the keys might be instances of classes that were loaded in another classloader which will prevent GC in permgen

multifn_weak_method_cache.diff uses a ConcurrentHashMap (#3) that maps RefWrapper around keys to IFn (#1). The patch uses Util.equals() (#2) for (Java) equality-based comparisons. The RefWrapper wraps them in WeakReferences to avoid #5. Cache clearing based on the ReferenceQueue is used to prevent #4.

A few things definitely need to be fixed:

  • Util.equals() should be Util.equiv()
  • methodCache and rq should be final
  • Why does RefWrapper have obj and expect rq to possibly be null?
  • RefWrapper fields should all be final
  • Whitespace errors in patch

Another idea entirely - instead of caching dispatch value, cache based on hasheq of dispatch value then equality check on value. Could then use WeakHashMap and no RefWrapper.

This patch does not cover the protocol cache. Is that just waiting for the multimethod case to look good?

Comment by dennis zhuang [ 10/Sep/14 7:18 PM ]

Hi, alex, thanks for your review.But the latest patch is multifn_weak_method_cache2.diff. I will update the patch soon by your review, but i have a few questions to be explained.

1) I will use Util.equiv() instead of Util.equals().But what's the difference of them?
2) When the RefWrapper is retained as key in ConcurrentHashMap, it wraps the obj in WeakReference.But when trying to find it in ConcurrentHashMap, it uses obj directly as strong reference, and create it with passing null ReferenceQueue.Please look at the multifn_weak_method_cache2.diff line number 112. It short, the patch stores the dispatch value as weak reference in cache,but uses strong reference for cache getting.

3) If caching dispatch value based on hasheq , can we avoid hasheq value conflicts? If two different dispatch value have a same hasheq( or why it doesn't happen?), we would be in trouble.

Sorry, the patch doesn't cover the protocol cache, i will add it ASAP.

Comment by dennis zhuang [ 11/Sep/14 2:02 AM ]

The new patch 'protocol_multifn_weak_ref_cache.diff' is uploaded.

1) Using Util.equiv() instead of Util.equals()
2) Moved the RefWrapper and it's associated methods to Util.java, and refactor the code based on alex's review.
3) Fixed whitespace errors.
4) Fixed PermGen leak in protocol fns.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 03/Oct/14 10:35 AM ]

I screened this ticket again with Brenton Ashworth and had the following comments:

1) We need to have a performance test to verify that we have not negatively impacted performance of multimethods or protocol invocation.
2) Because there are special cases around null keys in the multimethod cache, please verify that there are existing example tests using null dispatch values in the existing test coverage.
3) In Util$RefWrapper.getObj() - why does this return this.ref at the end? It was not clear to me that the comment was correct or that this was useful in any way.
4) In Util$RefWrapper.clearRefWrapCache() - can k == null in that if check? If not, can we omit that? Also, if you explicitly create the Iterator from the entry set, you can call .remove() on it more efficiently than calling .remove() on the cache itself.
5) In core_deftype / MethodImplCache, it appears that you are modifying a now-mutable field rather than the prior version that was going to great lengths to stay immutable. It's not clear to me what the implications of this change are and that concerns me. Can it use a different collection or code to stay immutable?
6) Please update the description of this ticket to include an approach section that describes the changes we are making.

Thanks!





[CLJ-1499] Replace seq-based iterators with direct iterators for all non-seq collections that use SeqIterator Created: 08/Aug/14  Updated: 02/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Release 1.7

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Rich Hickey Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: File clj-1499-all.diff     File clj-1499-v2.diff     File clj-1499-v3.diff     File clj-1499-v6.diff     Text File defrecord-iterator.patch     File defrecord-iterator-v2.diff    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Add support for direct iterators instead of seq-based iterators for non-seq collections that use SeqIterator.

Patch adds support for direct iterators on the following (removing use of SeqIterator):

  • PersistentHashMap - new internal iterator (~20% faster)
  • APersistentSet - use internal map impl iterator (~5% faster)
  • PersistentQueue
  • PersistentStructMap
  • records (in core_deftype.clj)

Patch does not change use of SeqIterator in:

  • LazyTransformer$MultiStepper (not sure if this could be changed)
  • ASeq
  • LazySeq

Patch: clj-1499-v6.diff



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Aug/14 1:57 PM ]

The list of non-seqs that uses SeqIterator are:

  • records (in core_deftype.clj)
  • APersistentSet - fallback, maybe is ok?
  • PersistentHashMap
  • PersistentQueue
  • PersistentStructMap

Seqs (that do not need to be changed) are:

  • ASeq
  • LazySeq.java

LazyTransformer$MultiStepper - not sure

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 27/Sep/14 2:16 PM ]

attached iterator impl for defrecords. ready to leverage iteration for extmap when PHM iteration lands.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Sep/14 12:52 PM ]

PHM patch

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Sep/14 10:26 PM ]

New patch that fixes bugs with PHMs with null keys (and added tests to expose those issues), added support for PHS.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 29/Sep/14 10:45 PM ]

Alex, the defrecord patch already uses the iterator for extmap. It's just made better by the PHM patch.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Sep/14 10:47 PM ]

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 30/Sep/14 4:17 PM ]

Heh. Skate to where the puck is going to be – Gretzky

Re: defrecord iterator: As is, it propagates exceptions from reaching the end of the ExtMap's iterator. As noted in CLJ-1453, PersistentArrayMap's iterator improperly returns an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException, rather than NoSuchElementException.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Sep/14 6:41 PM ]

Hey Ghadi, rather than rebuilding the case map to pass to the RecordIterator, why don't you just pass the fields in iteration order to it and leverage the case map via .valAt like everything else?

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 30/Sep/14 7:30 PM ]

defrecord-iterator-v2.diff reuses valAt and minimizes macrology.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 07/Oct/14 2:04 PM ]

Comments from Stu (found under the couch):

"1. some of the impls (e.g. queue manually concatenate two iters. Would implementing iter-cat and calling that be simpler and more robust?
2. I found this tweak to the generative testing more useful in reporting failure, non-dependent on clojure.test, and capable of expecting failures. Waddya think?

(defn seq-iter-match
  [seqable iterable]
  (let [i (.iterator iterable)]
    (loop [s (seq seqable)
           n 0]
      (if (seq s)
        (do
          (when-not (.hasNext i)
            (throw (ex-info "Iterator exhausted before seq"
                            {:pos n :seqable seqable :iterable iterable})))
          (when-not (= (.next i) (first s))
            (throw (ex-info "Iterator and seq did not match"
                            {:pos n :seqable seqable :iterable iterable})))
          (recur (rest s) (inc n)))
        (when (.hasNext i)
          (throw (ex-info "Seq exhausted before iterator"
                          {:pos n :seqable seqable :iterable iterable})))))))

		(defspec seq-and-iter-match-for-maps
  identity
  [^{:tag clojure.test-clojure.data-structures/gen-map} m]
  (seq-iter-match m m))

3. similar generative approach would be good for the other types (looks like we just do maps)"

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Dec/14 3:03 PM ]

Latest patch (clj-1499-v6.diff) makes Stu's suggested change #2 above and adds tests recommended in #3. I looked at #1 but decided in the end that it wasn't going to make anything easier.





[CLJ-1517] Unrolled small vectors Created: 01/Sep/14  Updated: 09/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Zach Tellman Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 15
Labels: collections, performance

Attachments: File unrolled-collections-2.diff     File unrolled-collections.diff     Text File unrolled-vector-2.patch     Text File unrolled-vector.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

As discussed on the mailing list [1], this patch has two unrolled variants of vectors and maps, with special inner classes for each cardinality. Currently both grow to six elements before spilling over into the general versions of the data structures, which is based on rough testing but can be easily changed. At Rich's request, I haven't included any integration into the rest of the code, and there are top-level static create() methods for each.

The sole reason for this patch is performance, both in terms of creating data structures and performing operations on them. This can be seen as a more verbose version of the trick currently played with PersistentArrayMap spilling over into PersistentHashMap. Based on the benchmarks, which can be run by cloning cambrian-collections [2] and running 'lein test :benchmark', this should supplant PersistentArrayMap. Performance is at least on par with PAM, and often much faster. Especially noteworthy is the creation time, which is 5x faster for maps of all sizes (lein test :only cambrian-collections.map-test/benchmark-construction), and on par for 3-vectors, but 20x faster for 5-vectors. There are similar benefits for hash and equality calculations, as well as calls to reduce().

This is a big patch (over 5k lines), and will be kind of a pain to review. My assumption of correctness is based on the use of collection-check, and the fact that the underlying approach is very simple. I'm happy to provide a high-level description of the approach taken, though, if that will help the review process.

I'm hoping to get this into 1.7, so please let me know if there's anything I can do to help accomplish that.

[1] https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure-dev/pDhYoELjrcs
[2] https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections



 Comments   
Comment by Zach Tellman [ 01/Sep/14 10:13 PM ]

Oh, I forgot to mention that I didn't make a PersistentUnrolledSet, since the existing wrappers can use the unrolled map implementation. However, it would be moderately faster and more memory efficient to have one, so let me know if it seems worthwhile.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 02/Sep/14 5:23 AM ]

Zach, the patch you added isn't in the correct format, they need to be created using `git format-patch`

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 02/Sep/14 5:31 AM ]

Also, I'm not sure if this is on-scope with the ticket but those patches break with *print-dup*, as it expects a static create(x) method for each inner class.

I'd suggest adding a create(Map x) static method for the inner PersistentUnrolledMap classes and a create(ISeq x) one for the inner PersistentUnrolledVector classes

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Sep/14 8:14 AM ]

Re making patches, see: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 02/Sep/14 9:16 AM ]

I wonder what is the overhead of having meta and 2 hash fields in the class. Have you considered a version where the hash is computed on the fly and where you have two sets of collections, one with meta field and one without, using former when the actual metadata is attached to the collection?

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 02/Sep/14 12:13 PM ]

I've attached a patch using the proper method. Somehow I missed the detailed explanation for how to do this, sorry. I know the guidelines say not to delete previous patches, but since the first one isn't useful I've deleted it to minimize confusion.

I did the print-dup friendly create methods, and then realized that once these are properly integrated, 'pr' will just emit these as vectors. I'm fairly sure the create methods aren't necessary, so I've commented them out, but I'm happy to add them back in if they're useful for some reason I can't see.

I haven't given a lot of thought to memory efficiency, but I think caching the hashes are worthwhile. I can see an argument for creating a "with-meta" version of each collection, but since that would double the size of an already enormous patch, I think that should probably wait.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 03/Sep/14 4:31 PM ]

I found a bug! Like PersistentArrayMap, I have a special code path for comparing keywords, but my generators for collection-check were previously using only integer keys. There was an off-by-one error in the transient map implementation [1], which was not present for non-keyword lookups.

I've taken a close look for other gaps in my test coverage, and can't find any. I don't think this substantively changes the risk of this patch (an updated version of which has been uploaded as 'unrolled-collections-2.diff'), but obviously where there's one bug, there may be others.

[1] https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections/commit/eb7dfe6d12e6774512dbab22a148202052442c6d#diff-4bf78dbf5b453f84ed59795a3bffe5fcR559

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 03/Oct/14 2:34 PM ]

As an additional data point, I swapped out the data structures in the Cheshire JSON library. On the "no keyword-fn decode" benchmark, the current implementation takes 6us, with the unrolled data structures takes 4us, and with no data structures (just lexing the JSON via Jackson) takes 2us. Other benchmarks had similar results. So at least in this scenario, it halves the overhead.

Benchmarks can be run by cloning https://github.com/dakrone/cheshire, unrolled collections can be tested by using the 'unrolled-collections' branch. The pure lexing benchmark can be reproduced by messing around with the cheshire.parse namespace a bit.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 06/Oct/14 1:31 PM ]

Is there no way to get this into 1.7? It's an awfully big win to push off for another year.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 07/Oct/14 2:08 PM ]

Hey Zach, it's definitely considered important but we have decided to drop almost everything not fully done for 1.7. Timeframe for following release is unknown, but certainly expected to be significantly less than a year.

Comment by John Szakmeister [ 30/Oct/14 2:53 PM ]

You are all free to determine the time table, but I thought I'd point out that Zach is not entirely off-base. Clojure 1.4.0 was released April 5th, 2012. Clojure 1.5.0 was released March 1st, 2013 with 1.6.0 showing up March 25th, 2014. So it appears that the current cadence is around a year.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Oct/14 3:40 PM ]

John, there is no point to comments like this. Let's please keep issue comments focused on the issue.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 13/Nov/14 12:23 PM ]

I did a small write-up on this patch which should help in the eventual code review: http://blog.factual.com/using-clojure-to-generate-java-to-reimplement-clojure

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 07/Dec/14 10:34 PM ]

Per my conversation with Alex at the Conj, here's a patch that only contains the unrolled vectors, and uses the more efficient constructor for PersistentVector when spilling over.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 08/Dec/14 1:10 PM ]

Zach, I created a new placeholder for the map work at http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1610.

Comment by Jean Niklas L'orange [ 09/Dec/14 1:52 PM ]

It should probably be noted that core.rrb-vector will break for small vectors by this patch, as it peeks into the underlying structure. This will also break other libraries which peeks into the vector implementation internals, although I'm not aware of any other – certainly not any other contrib library.

Also, two comments on unrolled-vector.patch:

private transient boolean edit = true;
in the Transient class should probably be
private volatile boolean edit = true;
as transient means something entirely different in Java.

conj in the Transient implementation could invalidate itself without any problems (edit = false;) if it is converted into a TransientVector (i.e. spills over) – unless it has a notable overhead. The invalidation can prevent some subtle bugs related to erroneous transient usage.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 09/Dec/14 1:58 PM ]

Jean - understanding the scope of the impact will certainly be part of the integration process for this patch. I appreciate the heads-up. While we try to minimize breakage for things like this, it may be unavoidable for libraries that rely on implementation internals.

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 09/Dec/14 2:03 PM ]

I'll add support for unrolled vectors to core.rrb-vector the moment they land on master. (Probably with some conditional compilation so as not to break compatibility with earlier versions of Clojure – we'll see when the time comes.)

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 09/Dec/14 2:06 PM ]

I should say that it'd be possible to add generic support for any "vector lookalikes" by pouring them into regular vectors in linear time. At first glance it seems to me that that'd be out of line with the basic promise of the library, but I'll give it some more thought before the changes actually land.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 09/Dec/14 5:43 PM ]

Somewhat predictably, the day after I cut the previous patch, someone found an issue [1]. In short, my use of the ArrayChunk wrapper applied the offset twice.

This was not caught by collection-check, which has been updated to catch this particular failure. It was, however, uncovered by Michael Blume's attempts to merge the change into Clojure, which tripped a bunch of alarms in Clojure's test suite. My own attempt to do the same to "prove" that it worked was before I added in the chunked seq functionality, hence this issue persisting until now.

As always, there may be more issues lurking. I hope we can get as many eyeballs on the code between now and 1.8 as possible.

[1] https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections/commit/2e70bbd14640b312db77590d8224e6ed0f535b43
[2] https://github.com/MichaelBlume/clojure/tree/test-vector





[CLJ-1544] AOT bug involving namespaces loaded before AOT compilation started Created: 01/Oct/14  Updated: 17/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Release 1.7

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Allen Rohner Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: aot

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1544-force-reloading-of-namespaces-during-AOT-co.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1544-force-reloading-of-namespaces-during-AOT-co-v2.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

If namespace "a" that is being AOT compiled requires a namespace "b" that has been loaded but not AOT compiled, the classfile for that namespace will never be emitted on disk, causing errors when compiling uberjars or in other cases.

A minimal reproducible case is described in the following comment: http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1544?focusedCommentId=36734&page=com.atlassian.jira.plugin.system.issuetabpanels:comment-tabpanel#comment-36734

Other examples of the bug:
https://github.com/arohner/clj-aot-repro
https://github.com/methylene/class-not-found

A real issue triggered by this bug: https://github.com/cemerick/austin/issues/23

Approach: The approach taken by the attached patch is to force reloading of namespaces during AOT compilation if no matching classfile is found in the compile-path or in the classpath



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Dec/14 12:45 PM ]

Possibly related: CLJ-1457

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 05/Dec/14 4:51 AM ]

Has anyone been able to reproduce this bug from a bare clojure repl? I have been trying to take lein out of the equation for an hour but I don't seem to be able to reproduce it – this makes me think that it's possible that this is a lein/classlojure/nrepl issue rather than a compiler/classloader bug

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Dec/14 4:20 PM ]

I was actually able to reproduce and understand this bug thanks to a minimal example reduced from a testcase for CLJ-1413.

>cat error.sh
#!/bin/sh

rm -rf target && mkdir target

java -cp src:clojure.jar clojure.main - <<EOF
(require 'myrecord)
(set! *compile-path* "target")
(compile 'core)
EOF

java -cp target:clojure.jar clojure.main -e "(use 'core)"

> cat src/core.clj
(in-ns 'core)
(clojure.core/require 'myrecord)
(clojure.core/import myrecord.somerecord)

>cat src/myrecord.clj
(in-ns 'myrecord)
(clojure.core/defrecord somerecord [])

> ./error.sh
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ExceptionInInitializerError
	at java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method)
	at java.lang.Class.forName(Class.java:344)
	at clojure.lang.RT.classForName(RT.java:2113)
	at clojure.lang.RT.classForName(RT.java:2122)
	at clojure.lang.RT.loadClassForName(RT.java:2141)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:430)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:411)
	at clojure.core$load$fn__5403.invoke(core.clj:5808)
	at clojure.core$load.doInvoke(core.clj:5807)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
	at clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj:5613)
	at clojure.core$load_lib$fn__5352.invoke(core.clj:5653)
	at clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj:5652)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj:5691)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:630)
	at clojure.core$use.doInvoke(core.clj:5785)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
	at user$eval212.invoke(NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6767)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6730)
	at clojure.core$eval.invoke(core.clj:3076)
	at clojure.main$eval_opt.invoke(main.clj:288)
	at clojure.main$initialize.invoke(main.clj:307)
	at clojure.main$null_opt.invoke(main.clj:342)
	at clojure.main$main.doInvoke(main.clj:420)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:421)
	at clojure.lang.Var.invoke(Var.java:383)
	at clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:156)
	at clojure.lang.Var.applyTo(Var.java:700)
	at clojure.main.main(main.java:37)
Caused by: java.io.FileNotFoundException: Could not locate myrecord__init.class or myrecord.clj on classpath.
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:443)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:411)
	at clojure.core$load$fn__5403.invoke(core.clj:5808)
	at clojure.core$load.doInvoke(core.clj:5807)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
	at clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj:5613)
	at clojure.core$load_lib$fn__5352.invoke(core.clj:5653)
	at clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj:5652)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj:5691)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:628)
	at clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj:5774)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
	at core__init.load(Unknown Source)
	at core__init.<clinit>(Unknown Source)
	... 33 more

This bug also has also affected Austin: https://github.com/cemerick/austin/issues/23

Essentially this bug manifests itself when a namespace defining a protocol or a type/record has been JIT loaded and a namespace that needs the protocol/type/record class is being AOT compiled later. Since the namespace defining the class has already been loaded the class is never emitted on disk.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Dec/14 6:51 PM ]

I've attached a tentative patch fixing the issue in the only way I found reasonable: forcing the reloading of namespaces during AOT compilation if the compiled classfile is not found in the compile-path or in the classpath

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Dec/14 7:30 PM ]

Updated patch forces reloading of the namespace even if a classfile exists in the compile-path but the source file is newer, mimicking the logic of clojure.lang.RT/load

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Dec/14 7:39 PM ]

Further testing demonstrated that this bug is not only scoped to deftypes/defprotocols but can manifest itself in the general case of a namespace "a" requiring a namespace "b" already loaded, and AOT compiling the namespace "a"

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 08/Dec/14 4:46 AM ]

I'm also affected by this bug. Is there some workaround I can apply in the meantime, e.g., by dictating the order in which namespaces are going to be loaded/compiled in project.clj?

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 15/Dec/14 10:58 AM ]

Tassilo, if you don't have control over whether or not a namespace that an AOT namespace depends on has already been loaded before compilation starts, requiring those namespaces with :reload-all should be enough to work around this issue

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 15/Dec/14 11:36 AM ]

Nicola, thanks! But in the meantime I've switched to using clojure.java.api and omit AOT-compilation. That works just fine, too.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 15/Dec/14 5:05 PM ]

Tassilo, that's often a good solution, another is to use a shim clojure class

(ns myproject.main-shim (:gen-class))

(defn -main [& args]
  (require 'myproject.main)
  ((resolve 'myproject.main) args))

then your shim namespace is AOT-compiled but nothing else in your project is.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 16/Dec/14 1:07 AM ]

Thanks Michael, that's a very good suggestion. In fact, I've always used AOT only as a means to export some functions to Java-land. Basically, I did as you suggest but required the to-be-exported fn's namespace in the ns-form which then causes AOT-compilation of that namespace and its own deps recursively. So your approach seems to be as convenient from the Java side (no need to clojure.java.require `require` in order to require the namespace with the fn I wanna call ) while still omitting AOT. Awesome!





[CLJ-1546] Widen vec to take Iterable/IReduce Created: 02/Oct/14  Updated: 16/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Release 1.7

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: PNG File benchmark.png     Text File clj-1546-2.patch     Text File clj-1546-3.patch     Text File clj-1546-4.patch     Text File clj-1546-5.patch     Text File clj-1546.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

These examples should work but do not:

Something Iterable but not IReduce:

user> (def i (eduction (map inc) (range 100)))
#'user/i
user> (instance? java.util.Collection i)
false
user> (instance? Iterable i)
true
user> (vec i)
RuntimeException Unable to convert: class clojure.core.Iteration to Object[]

Something IReduceInit but not Iterable:

user=> (vec
  (reify clojure.lang.IReduceInit
    (reduce [_ f start]
      (reduce f start (range 10)))))
RuntimeException Unable to convert: class user$reify__15 to Object[]

Proposal: Add PersistentVector.create(Iterable) and PersistentVector.create(IReduceInit) to efficiently create PVs from those.

For performance, vec has several cases:
1) (vec) if vector?: return new vector w/o meta - this matches prior behavior but has a constant cost of a few ns, rather than linear cost. If not a vector, spill to LazilyPersistentVector.create(Object).

2) (LPV) instanceof IReduceInit: Anything reducible can reduce itself fastest. Right now this has a big benefit for PersistentList. on 1.7.0-alpha4 with list of size 1024, into=28 seconds, vec=18 seconds. After patch, vec=7 seconds. If maps, sets, and range were IReduce later they would also use this path and see noticeable boosts. This is also the branch that will handle the Eduction and IReduceInit cases added in the patch.

3) (LPV) instanceof ISeq: If the coll is a sequence already, best to walk it rather than build an iterator or array from it. This calls into PersistentVector.create(ISeq). That implementation now contains an optimization to build into an array and construct the PersistentVector directly from the array for sequences <= 32 elements (which is most common). Once that threshold is reached, it switches to building with transients. The benchmark shows that the patch makes vec substantially faster for all seqs and even faster than into in some cases.

4) (LPV) instanceof Iterable: For all non-Clojure collections (ArrayList) and current non-IReduce Clojure collections (PHM, PHS), this is fastest path. Iterators are preferred to seqs as they do not cache or hold onto the values as they go by. The PV.create() for Iterable uses transients. Due to slightly more overhead, small maps and sets are slightly slower but this would be fixed by CLJ-1499 and/or making PHM/PHS IReduceInit.

5) (LPV) otherwise RT.toArray(): catches Map, String, Object[], primitive array, etc. The important ones here are the arrays - they are slightly slower on small arrays due to overhead of checking more cases above, but big arrays are significantly faster than they were.

In addition, there was one hard-coded path in the Compiler into PersistentVector.create() and I re-routed that through LazilyPersistentVector instead as that code is now the place to choose the fastest path logic.

Patch: clj-1546-5.patch

Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 02/Oct/14 9:44 AM ]

Is there a reason the final case for (vec something) can't just be a call to (into [] coll)? It seems a bit odd to do (to-array) on anything thats not a java collection or Iterable, when we have IReduce.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 02/Oct/14 10:02 AM ]

re: Tim - yes, this needs to support IReduce (and thereby educe) as well

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Oct/14 9:56 AM ]

Added new patch that handles Iterable and IReduceInit in vec. It also makes calling with a vector much faster due to the first check. into is still faster for chunked seqs (due to special InternalReduce handling of chunking).

It would be possible to move more of the variant checking into LazilyPersistentVector or PersistentVector so it could be used in more contexts. I'm not sure how much to do with that.

It would also be possible to instead lean on reduce more from the Java side if there was a Java version of reduce (as defined in mikera's branch for http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1192 at https://github.com/mikera/clojure/compare/clj-1192-vec-performance. Something like that is the only way I can see of leveraging that same InternalReduce logic that makes into faster than vec.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Nov/14 4:14 PM ]

Prior comments from Stu removed from description: "Open Question: Which branch should come first, Collection or IReduceInit? Collection reaches the fast path for small collections through LazilyPersistentVector, but IReduceInit should be faster for larger things. Related: Shouldn't the item count in LazilyPersistentVector be a bounded count?"

I have attached a new patch that simplifies the impl to do it in LazilyPersistentVector instead of in vec, which was easier due to "and" not being able yet when vec is implemented to do the length check.

I have also done a considerable amount of analysis on the matrix of incoming collections and best path to follow and also collected some data on what collections are commonly passed into vec. The current patch reflects those findings. Some highlights:

  • vec is called with PersistentVector in all projects I tested. The instanceof check takes that case from typically 100s of nanos to ~5 ns. So I do think it is worth doing.
  • vec is overwhelmingly called with small collections - in most cases the incoming collection is <10 elements. In cases where the collection is not a sequence, the path of creating the Vector with an owning array is the fastest option, beating even IReduce and transient building (as that path has some checks involved).
  • PersistentList is the only IReduce likely to be encountered by vec right now and adding that branch is a significant performance boost from prior impl and vs into. If maps and sets were IReduce, they would gain this as well.
  • chunked seqs will be significantly faster with into than vec as into goes through CollReduce and can leverage many optimizations on reducing through chunks that are not available to vec.
  • seqs in general though are now faster with vec than they were due to leveraging transients.
  • eduction results support IReduce and are also faster with vec than into.
  • range is currently slower with vec, but when range is IReduce, it will probably be faster with vec

In summary, some new conventional wisdom (after this patch) on (into []) vs vec:

  • vec is faster if passed a vector, an IReduce, or an array
  • into is faster when working with seqs, but even vec is better than it used to be and may even be faster for things like range in the future
Comment by Michael Blume [ 13/Nov/14 7:24 PM ]

Latest patch won't build for me when applied to master

compile-clojure:
     [java] Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ExceptionInInitializerError
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.Compile.<clinit>(Compile.java:29)
     [java] Caused by: java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: clojure.lang.LazilyPersistentVector.create(Ljava/util/Collection;)Lclojure/lang/IPersistentVector;, compiling:(clojure/core.clj:14:23)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:7206)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:370)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:361)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:440)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:411)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.RT.doInit(RT.java:448)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.RT.<clinit>(RT.java:329)
     [java] 	... 1 more
     [java] Caused by: java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: clojure.lang.LazilyPersistentVector.create(Ljava/util/Collection;)Lclojure/lang/IPersistentVector;
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.LispReader$VectorReader.invoke(LispReader.java:1073)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.LispReader.readDelimitedList(LispReader.java:1138)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.LispReader$ListReader.invoke(LispReader.java:972)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.LispReader.read(LispReader.java:183)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.LispReader$WrappingReader.invoke(LispReader.java:535)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.LispReader.readDelimitedList(LispReader.java:1138)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.LispReader$MapReader.invoke(LispReader.java:1081)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.LispReader.read(LispReader.java:183)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.LispReader$MetaReader.invoke(LispReader.java:716)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.LispReader.readDelimitedList(LispReader.java:1138)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.LispReader$ListReader.invoke(LispReader.java:972)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.LispReader.read(LispReader.java:183)
     [java] 	at clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:7190)
     [java] 	... 7 more
Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Nov/14 7:28 PM ]

Did you clean first? I replaced that static method call there with a wider version but if you are cleaning fresh it should be fine.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 13/Nov/14 7:31 PM ]

Apologies, maven just wasn't doing a good job of tracking changes, running mvn clean fixes the build.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 25/Nov/14 9:58 AM ]

Added benchmark.png showing times (in ns), tested with criterium, for into and vec on different types and sizes on 1.7.0-alpha4 and then vec again after the patch.





[CLJ-1610] Unrolled small maps Created: 08/Dec/14  Updated: 08/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Zach Tellman
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: collections

Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Placeholder for unrolled small maps enhancement (companion for vectors at CLJ-1517).






[CLJ-1620] Constants are leaked in case of a reentrant eval Created: 18/Dec/14  Updated: 19/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Christophe Grand Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: aot, compiler

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1620-avoid-constants-leak-in-static-initalizer.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1620-avoid-constants-leak-in-static-initalizer-v2.patch     Text File eval-bindings.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Compiling a function that references a non loaded (or unitialized) class triggers its init static. When the init static loads clojure code, some constants (source code I think) are leaked into the constants pool of the function under compilation.

It prevented CCW from working in some environments (Rational) because the static init of the resulting function was over 64K.

Steps to reproduce:

Load the leak.main ns and run the code in comments: the first function has 15 extra fiels despite being identical to the second one.

(ns leak.main)

(defn first-to-load []
  leak.Klass/foo)

(defn second-to-load []
  leak.Klass/foo)

(comment
=> (map (comp count #(.getFields %) class) [first-to-load second-to-load])
(16 1)
)
package leak;
 
import clojure.lang.IFn;
import clojure.lang.RT;
import clojure.lang.Symbol;
 
public class Klass {
  static {
    RT.var("clojure.core", "require").invoke(Symbol.intern("leak.leaky"));
  }
  public static IFn foo = RT.var("leak.leaky", "foo");
}
(ns leak.leaky)

(defn foo
  "Some doc"
  []
  "hello")

(def unrelated 42)

https://gist.github.com/cgrand/5dcb6fe5b269aecc6a5b#file-main-clj-L10



 Comments   
Comment by Christophe Grand [ 18/Dec/14 3:56 PM ]

Patch from Nicola Mometto

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 18/Dec/14 4:01 PM ]

Attached the same patch with a more informative better commit message

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 18/Dec/14 4:03 PM ]

I'd like to thank Christophe and Alex for their invaluable help in understanding what was happening, formulating the right hypothesis and then finding a fix.

I would also mention that even if non IBM rational environments where not affected by the bug to the point were CCW would not work, they were still affected. For instance the class for a one-liner function wrapping an interop call weighs 700bytes once the patch is applied, when it weighed 90kbytes with current 1.6 or 1.7.

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 18/Dec/14 5:07 PM ]

In CCW for the initial problematic function, the -v2 patch produces exactly the same bytecode as if the referenced class does not load any namespace in its static initializers.
That is, the patch is valid. I will test it live in the IBM Rational environment ASAP.

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 19/Dec/14 12:10 AM ]

I confirm the patch fixes the issue detected initially in the IBM Rational environment





[CLJ-2] Scopes Created: 15/Jun/09  Updated: 27/Jul/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Assembla Importer Assignee: Rich Hickey
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File scopes-spike.patch    

 Description   

Add the scope system for dealing with resource lifetime management



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 11:43 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/2

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 11:43 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #42, #113, #2, #20, #94, #96, #104, #119, #124, #127, #149, #162)

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 12/Jul/11 8:26 AM ]

Patch demonstrates idea, not ready for prime time.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 23/Dec/11 7:37 AM ]

I think the decision of having to specify either a Closeable resource or a close function for an existing non-Closeable resource in with-open is quite awkward, because they have completely different meaning.

  (let [foo (open-my-custom-resource "foo.bar")]
    (with-open [r (reader "foo.txt")
                foo #(.terminate foo)]
      (do-stuff r foo)))

I think a CloseableResource protocol that can be extended to custom types as implemented in the patch to CLJ-308 is somewhat easier to use. Extend it once, and then you can use open-my-custom-resource in with-open just like reader/writer and friends...

That said, Scopes can still be useful, but I'd vote for handling the "how should that resource be closed" question by a protocol. Then the with-open helper can simply add

(swap! *scope* conj (fn [] (clojure.core.protocols/close ~(bindings 0))))

and cleanup-scope only needs to apply each fn without having to distinguish Closeables from fns.





[CLJ-112] GC Issue 108: All Clojure interfaces should specify CharSequence instead of String when possible Created: 17/Jun/09  Updated: 26/Aug/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   
Reported by redchin, Apr 20, 2009

rhickey: unlink: then just use a map {:escaped true :val "foo"}

unlink: What I meant is, everything in between would want to see something 
String-y, not caring whether it's a String or MyString.

hiredman: unlink: if you use something that implements CharSequence and 
IMeta (I think it's IMeta) you get something that is basically a String, 
but with metadata

rhickey: what hiredman said

hiredman: ideally most things would not specify String but CharSequence in 
their interface

hiredman: but somehow I doubt that is case

unlink: ok.

unlink: Good to know.

rhickey: hiredman: unfortunately that's not true of some of Clojure - could 
you enter an issue for it please - use CharSequence when possible?


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/112

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #19, #30, #31, #126, #17, #42, #47, #50, #61, #64, #69, #71, #77, #79, #84, #87, #89, #96, #99, #103, #107, #112, #113, #114, #115, #118, #119, #121, #122, #124)





[CLJ-113] GC Issue 109: RT.load's "don't load if already loaded" mechanism breaks ":reload-all" Created: 17/Jun/09  Updated: 26/Aug/13

Status: In Progress
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Stephen C. Gilardi
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   
Reported by scgilardi, Apr 24, 2009

What (small set of) steps will reproduce the problem?

"require" and "use" support a ":reload-all" flag that is intended to  
cause the specified libs to be reloaded along with all libs on which  
they directly or indirectly depend. This is implemented by temporarily  
binding a "loaded-libs" var to the empty set and then loading the  
specified libs.

AOT compilation added another "already loaded" mechanism to  
clojure.lang.RT.load() which is currently not sensitive to a "reload-
all" being in progress and breaks its operation in the following case:

        A, B, and C are libs
        A depends on B. (via :require in its ns form)
        B depends on C. (via :require in its ns form)
        B has been compiled (B.class is on classpath)

        At the repl I "require" A which loads A, B, and C (either from
class files or clj files)
        I modify C.clj
        At the repl I "require" A with the :reload-all flag, intending to  
pick up the changes to C
        C is not reloaded because RT.load() skips loading B: B.class
exists, is already loaded, and B.clj hasn't changed since it was compiled.


What is the expected output? What do you see instead?

I expect :reload-all to be effective. It isn't.

What version are you using?

svn 1354, 1.0.0RC1

Was this discussed on the group? If so, please provide a link to the
discussion:

http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_frm/thread/9bbc290321fd895f/e6a967250021462a#e6a967250021462a

Please provide any additional information below.

I'll upload a patch soon that creates a "*reload-all*" var with a  
root binding of nil and code to bind it to true when the current  
thread has a :reload-all call pending. When *reload-all* is true,  
RT.load() will (re)load all libs from their ".clj" files even if  
they're already loaded.

The fix for this may need to be coordinated with a fix for issue #3.


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/113

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #19, #30, #31, #126, #17, #42, #47, #50, #61, #64, #69, #71, #77, #79, #84, #87, #89, #96, #99, #103, #107, #112, #113, #114, #115, #118, #119, #121, #122, #124)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #42, #113, #2, #20, #94, #96, #104, #119, #124, #127, #149, #162)

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 08/Aug/11 7:40 PM ]

seems like the code that is emitted in the static init for namespace classes could be emitted into a init_ns() static method and the static init could call init_ns(). then RT.load could call init_ns() to get the behavior of reloading an AOT compiled namespace.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 09/Aug/11 8:31 PM ]

looking at the compiler it looks like most of what I mentioned above is already implemented, just need RT to reflectively call load() on the namespace class in the right place





[CLJ-19] GC Issue 15: JavaDoc for interfaces Created: 17/Jun/09  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: documentation


 Description   
Reported by richhickey, Dec 17, 2008
Add JavaDoc to those interfaces supported for public use - IFn,
IPersistentCollection etc.


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:44 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/19

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:44 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #19, #30, #31, #126, #17, #42, #47, #50, #61, #64, #69, #71, #77, #79, #84, #87, #89, #96, #99, #103, #107, #112, #113, #114, #115, #118, #119, #121, #122, #124)

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Nov/12 8:05 PM ]

this seems like a great task for someone just starting out contributing to clojure.





[CLJ-42] GC Issue 38: When using AOT compilation, "load"ed files are not reloaded on (require :reload 'name.space) Created: 17/Jun/09  Updated: 26/Aug/13

Status: In Progress
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Stephen C. Gilardi
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   
Reported by m...@kotka.de, Jan 07, 2009
What (small set of) steps will reproduce the problem?

1. Create a file src/foo.clj

cat >src/foo.clj <<EOF
(ns foo (:load "bar"))
EOF

2. Create a file src/bar.clj

cat >src/bar.clj <<EOF
(clojure.core/in-ns 'foo)
(def x 8)
EOF

3. Start Clojure Repl: java -cp src:classes clojure.main -r

4. Compile the namespace.

user=> (compile 'foo)
foo

5. Require the namespace
user=> (require :reload-all :verbose 'foo)
(clojure.core/load "/foo")
(clojure.core/load "/bar")

What is the expected output? What do you see instead?

6. Re-Require the namespace

user=> (require :reload-all :verbose 'foo)
(clojure.core/load "/foo")

Only the "master" file is loaded, but not the bar file.
Expected would have been to also load the bar file.
Changes to bar.clj are not reflected, and depending
on the setting (eg. using multimethods in foo from
a different namespace) code may be corrupted.

What version are you using?

SVN rev. 1195


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:44 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/42

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:44 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #19, #30, #31, #126, #17, #42, #47, #50, #61, #64, #69, #71, #77, #79, #84, #87, #89, #96, #99, #103, #107, #112, #113, #114, #115, #118, #119, #121, #122, #124)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:44 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#42, #71)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:44 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #42, #113, #2, #20, #94, #96, #104, #119, #124, #127, #149, #162)





[CLJ-47] GC Issue 43: Dead code in generated bytecode Created: 17/Jun/09  Updated: 26/Aug/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Backlog

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Approval: Vetted

 Description   
Reported by Levente.Santha, Jan 11, 2009
The bug was described in detail in this thread: http://groups.google.com/
group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/81ba15d7e9130441

For clojure.core$last__2954.invoke the correct bytecode would be (notice 
the removed "goto    65" after "41:  goto    0"):

public java.lang.Object invoke(java.lang.Object)   throws 
java.lang.Exception;
  Code:
   0:   getstatic       #22; //Field const__0:Lclojure/lang/Var;
   3:   invokevirtual   #37; //Method clojure/lang/Var.get:()Ljava/lang/
Object;
   6:   checkcast       #39; //class clojure/lang/IFn
   9:   aload_1
   10:  invokeinterface #41,  2; //InterfaceMethod clojure/lang/IFn.invoke:
(Ljava/lang/Object;)Ljava/lang/Object;
   15:  dup
   16:  ifnull  44
   19:  getstatic       #47; //Field java/lang/Boolean.FALSE:Ljava/lang/
Boolean;
   22:  if_acmpeq       45
   25:  getstatic       #22; //Field const__0:Lclojure/lang/Var;
   28:  invokevirtual   #37; //Method clojure/lang/Var.get:()Ljava/lang/
Object;
   31:  checkcast       #39; //class clojure/lang/IFn
   34:  aload_1
   35:  invokeinterface #41,  2; //InterfaceMethod clojure/lang/IFn.invoke:
(Ljava/lang/Object;)Ljava/lang/Object;
   40:  astore_1
   41:  goto    0
   44:  pop
   45:  getstatic       #26; //Field const__1:Lclojure/lang/Var;
   48:  invokevirtual   #37; //Method clojure/lang/Var.get:()Ljava/lang/
Object;
   51:  checkcast       #39; //class clojure/lang/IFn
   54:  aload_1
   55:  aconst_null
   56:  astore_1
   57:  invokeinterface #41,  2; //InterfaceMethod clojure/lang/IFn.invoke:
(Ljava/lang/Object;)Ljava/lang/Object;
   62:  areturn

Our JIT reported incorrect stack size along the basic block introduced by 
the unneeded goto.
The bug was present in SVN rev 1205.


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 08/Oct/10 10:21 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/47

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 08/Oct/10 10:21 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #19, #30, #31, #126, #17, #42, #47, #50, #61, #64, #69, #71, #77, #79, #84, #87, #89, #96, #99, #103, #107, #112, #113, #114, #115, #118, #119, #121, #122, #124)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 08/Oct/10 10:21 AM ]

aredington said: This appears to still be a problem with the generated bytecode in 1.3.0. Examining the bytecode for last, the problem has moved to invokeStatic:

<pre>
public static java.lang.Object invokeStatic(java.lang.Object) throws java.lang.Exception;
Code:
0: aload_0
1: invokestatic #50; //Method clojure/core$next.invokeStatic:(Ljava/lang/Object;)Ljava/lang/Object;
4: dup
5: ifnull 25
8: getstatic #56; //Field java/lang/Boolean.FALSE:Ljava/lang/Boolean;
11: if_acmpeq 26
14: aload_0
15: invokestatic #50; //Method clojure/core$next.invokeStatic:(Ljava/lang/Object;)Ljava/lang/Object;
18: astore_0
19: goto 0
22: goto 30
25: pop
26: aload_0
27: invokestatic #59; //Method clojure/core$first.invokeStatic:(Ljava/lang/Object;)Ljava/lang/Object;
30: areturn
</pre>

Line number 22 is an unreachable goto given the prior goto on line 19.





[CLJ-115] GC Issue 111: Enable naming an array parameter for areduce Created: 17/Jun/09  Updated: 26/Aug/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   
Reported by bo...@boriska.com, Apr 28, 2009

Currently there is no way to access anonymous array parameter of areduce.

Consider:

(areduce (.. System getProperties values toArray) 
     i r 0 (some_expression))
some_expression has no way to access the array.

Per Rich:
--------------------
Yes, areduce would be nicer if it looked like a binding set:

(areduce [aname anarray, ret init] expr)
(areduce [aname anarray, ret init, start-idx  start-n] expr)
(areduce [aname anarray, ret init, start-idx  start-n, end-idx end-n]
expr) 
--------------------

This was discussed here:
http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/tree/browse_frm/thread/40597a8ac322bc37/8cf6b17328ea7e8b?rnum=1&_done=%2Fgroup%2Fclojure%2Fbrowse_frm%2Fthread%2F40597a8ac322bc37%2F8cf6b17328ea7e8b%3Ftvc%3D1%26pli%3D1%26#doc_9ea7e3c5d500ed3c


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 5:45 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/115

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 5:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #19, #30, #31, #126, #17, #42, #47, #50, #61, #64, #69, #71, #77, #79, #84, #87, #89, #96, #99, #103, #107, #112, #113, #114, #115, #118, #119, #121, #122, #124)





[CLJ-77] GC Issue 74: Clojure compiler emits too-large classfiles (results in ClassFormatError) Created: 17/Jun/09  Updated: 26/Aug/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   
Reported by cemer...@snowtide.com, Feb 10, 2009

The jvm has certain implementation limits around the maximum size of
classfiles, literal strings, method length, etc; however, in certain
circumstances, the Clojure compiler can currently emit classfiles that
violate some of those limitations, causing an error later when the
classfile is loaded.

While test coverage would necessarily detect this sort of problem on a
project-by-project basis when one's tests attempted to load a project's
classfiles, it seems like Clojure should do the following to ensure failure
as quickly as possible:

- throw an exception immediately if, while compiling a lib, it is detected
that the resulting classfile(s) would violate any classfile implementation
limits.  Ideally, the exception's message would detail what file and on
which line number the offending form is (e.g. if a method's bytecode would
be too long).  I can imagine that doing this may not be straightforward; a
reasonable stop-gap would be for the compiler to immediately attempt to
load the generated classfile in order to ensure up-front failure.

- emit a warning if any clojure form is read that would, upon being
compiled, require violating any of the classfile implementation limits; I
suspect that *most* people looking to generate classfiles would be doing so
in a "build" environment (rather than loading some code, tinkering, and
then using clojure.core/compile), but for those that aren't, I can imagine
there being a good deal of frustration around seeing that loading and using
some code successfully would eventually produce unusable classfiles.

I've appended a sample stack trace emitted by java when it attempted to
load a too-long method implementation (which was produced by embedding a
large list literal in a compiled lib).

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ClassFormatError: Invalid method  
Code length 105496 in class file com/foo/MyClass__init
         at java.lang.ClassLoader.defineClass1(Native Method)
         at java.lang.ClassLoader.defineClass(ClassLoader.java:675)
         at  
java.security.SecureClassLoader.defineClass(SecureClassLoader.java:124)
         at java.net.URLClassLoader.defineClass(URLClassLoader.java:260)
         at java.net.URLClassLoader.access$000(URLClassLoader.java:56)
         at java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run(URLClassLoader.java:195)
         at java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(Native Method)
         at java.net.URLClassLoader.findClass(URLClassLoader.java:188)
         at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(ClassLoader.java:316)
         at sun.misc.Launcher$AppClassLoader.loadClass(Launcher.java:
288)
         at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(ClassLoader.java:251)
         at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClassInternal(ClassLoader.java:
374)
         at java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method)
         at java.lang.Class.forName(Class.java:247)
         at clojure.lang.RT.loadClassForName(RT.java:1512)
         at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:394)
         at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:374)
         at clojure.core$load__4911$fn__4913.invoke(core.clj:3623)
         at clojure.core$load__4911.doInvoke(core.clj:3622)
         at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:413)
         at clojure.core$load_one__4863.invoke(core.clj:3467)
         at clojure.core$compile__4918$fn__4920.invoke(core.clj:3633)
         at clojure.core$compile__4918.invoke(core.clj:3632)
         at clojure.lang.Var.invoke(Var.java:336)
         at clojure.lang.Compile.main(Compile.java:56)


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:45 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/77

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #19, #30, #31, #126, #17, #42, #47, #50, #61, #64, #69, #71, #77, #79, #84, #87, #89, #96, #99, #103, #107, #112, #113, #114, #115, #118, #119, #121, #122, #124)





[CLJ-126] abstract superclass with non-public accessibility Created: 17/Jun/09  Updated: 05/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

The following code works in Java 6 but not in Java 5:

(def Clojure 1.1.0-alpha-SNAPSHOT
user=> (def s (new StringBuilder "aaa"))
#'user/s
user=> (. s setCharAt (int 0) (char \a))
java.lang.Exception: Unable to resolve symbol: setCharAt in this context

This was discussed on the Clojure mailing list and Stephen C. Gillardi came up with the following conclusion:

_StringBuilder extends AbstractStringBuilder (though the JavaDoc docs lie and say it extends Object). AbstractStringBuilder has default accessibility (not public, protected, or private) which makes the class inaccessible to code outside the java.lang package. In both Java SE 5 and Java SE 6, StringBuilder does not contain a .setCharAt method definition. It relies on the inherited public method in AbstractStringBuilder. (I downloaded the source code for both versions from Sun to check.)

In Java SE 5, when Clojure checks whether or not .setCharAt on StringBuilder is public, it finds that it's a public method of a non-public base class and throws the exception you saw. (It looks like you're using a version of Clojure older than 18 May 2009 (Clojure svn r1371). Versions later than that print the more detailed message I saw.)

In Java SE 6, Clojure's checks for accessibility of this method succeed and the method call works.

I'm not sure whether or not Clojure could be modified to make this method call work in Java 5. Google searches turn up discussion that this pattern of using an undocumented abstract superclass with non-public accessibility is not common in the JDK._

This ticket is being filed in the event that Clojure can handle these types of situations somehow.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 4:45 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/126

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 4:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #19, #30, #31, #126, #17, #42, #47, #50, #61, #64, #69, #71, #77, #79, #84, #87, #89, #96, #99, #103, #107, #112, #113, #114, #115, #118, #119, #121, #122, #124)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 4:45 AM ]

hiredman said: Related association with ticket #259 was added

Comment by Alex Miller [ 05/Dec/14 2:26 PM ]

possibly same as CLJ-1609





[CLJ-21] GC Issue 17: arity checking during compilation Created: 17/Jun/09  Updated: 26/Aug/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   
Reported by richhickey, Dec 17, 2008
Use available metadata to check calls when possible


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 2:44 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/21





[CLJ-127] DynamicClassLoader's call to ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader is prohibited in some environments Created: 18/Jun/09  Updated: 18/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: classloader


 Description   

Currently, clojure.lang.DynamicClassLoader's constructor has the
following call to super():

super(EMPTY_URLS,
      (Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader() == null ||
        Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader() == ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader()) ?
          Compiler.class.getClassLoader() : Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader());

That call to ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader() is forbidden by Google
AppEngine's security policies. That restricts you from being able to
load any resources from the classpath that haven't been AOT-compiled.
I've verified that just removing that removing the " ||
Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader() ==
ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader()" does in fact result in something
that works in GAE (as far as my needs go). Unfortunately, I'm not sure
whether that breaks anything, which, presumably, it does.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/127

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

jmcconnell said: I'd be happy to take this up with the GAE folks if it winds up looking like this is something they should probably allow or if we need any further information from them on their policies.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#127, #128, #129, #130)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

mikehinchey said: GAE made some changes a few weeks ago, maybe changed this because I'm able to load from .clj files now (not the servlet, of course, which must be gen-class).

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #42, #113, #2, #20, #94, #96, #104, #119, #124, #127, #149, #162)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

mattrevelle said: J. McConnell, was this issue resolved by a change in GAE policy?

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 18/Apr/14 12:05 AM ]

hard to say if this is still an issue, but I have been able to run clojure code on GAE in the past





[CLJ-129] Add documentation to sorted-set-by detailing how the provided comparator may change set membership semantics Created: 18/Jun/09  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: In Progress
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Chas Emerick
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: docstring


 Description   

To start, let's look at some simple default sorted-set behaviour (which uses PersistentHashMap via PersistentHashSet, and therefore uses equality/hashCode to determine identity):

user=> (sorted-set [1 2] [-5 10] [1 5])
#{[-5 10] [1 2] [1 5]}
</code></pre>

sorted-set-by uses PersistentTreeMap via PersistentTreeSet though, which implies that the comparator provided to sorted-set-by will be used to determine identity, and therefore member in the set.  This can lead to (IMO) non-intuitive behaviour:

<pre><code>
user=> (sorted-set-by #(> (first %) (first %2)) [1 2] [-5 10] [1 5])
#{[1 2] [-5 10]}

Notice that because the provided comparison fn determines that [1 2] and [1 5] have the same sort order, the latter value is considered identical to the former, and not included in the set. This behaviour could be very handy, but is also likely to cause confusion when what the user almost certainly wants is to maintain the membership semantics of the original set (e.g. relying upon equality/hashCode), but only modify the ordering.

(BTW, yes, I know there's far easier ways to get the order I'm indicating above over a set of vectors thanks to vectors being comparable via the compare fn. The examples are only meant to be illustrative. The same non-intuitive result would occur, with no easy fallback (like the 'compare' fn when working with vectors) when the members of the set are non-Comparable Java object, and the comparator provided to sorted-set-by is defining a sort over some values returned by method calls into those objects.)

I'd be happy to change the docs for sorted-set-by, but I suspect that there are others who could encapsulate what's going on here more correctly and more concisely than I.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 7:45 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/129

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 7:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#127, #128, #129, #130)





[CLJ-130] Namespace metadata lost in AOT compile Created: 19/Jun/09  Updated: 06/Dec/14

Status: In Progress
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Stuart Sierra Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: aot, metadata

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-130-preserve-metadata-for-AOT-compiled-namespace.patch     File aot-drops-metadata-demo.sh    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

AOT-compilation drops namespace metadata.

This also affects all of the namespaces packaged with Clojure, except clojure.core, for which metadata is explicitly added in core.clj.

Cause of the bug:

  • a namespace inherits the metadata of the symbol used to create that namespace the first time
  • the namespace is created in the load() method, that is invoked after the __init() method
  • the __init0() method creates all the Vars of the namespace
  • interning a Var in a namespace that doesn't exist forces that namespace to be created

This means that the namespace will have been already created (with nil metadata) by the time the load() method gets invoked and thus the call to in-ns will be a no-op and the metadata will be lost.

Approach: The attached patch fixes this issue by explicitely attaching the metadata to the namespace after its creation (via ns) using a .resetMeta call



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:45 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/130

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#127, #128, #129, #130)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:45 AM ]

juergenhoetzel said: This is still a issue on

Clojure 1.2.0-master-SNAPSHOT

Any progress, hints? I prefer interactive documentiation via slime/repl

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 09/Sep/14 9:44 AM ]

This is of great concern to me, as the Rook web services framework we're building depends on availability of namespace metadata at runtime.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 09/Sep/14 9:53 AM ]

BTW, I verified that this still exists in 1.6.0.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 09/Sep/14 10:11 AM ]

For me personally, I would raise the priority of this issue. And I think in general, anything that works differently with AOT vs. non-AOT should be major, if not blocker, priority.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 09/Sep/14 10:25 AM ]

Alex Miller:

@hlship I think the question is where it would go. note no one has suggested a solution in last 5 yrs.

Alas, I have not delved into the AOT compilation code (since, you know, I value my sanity). But it seems to me like the __init class for the namespace could construct the map and update the Namespace object.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 09/Sep/14 4:27 PM ]

Just playing with javap, I can see that the meta data is being assembled in some way, so it's a question of why it is not accessible ...

  public static void __init0();
    Code:
       0: ldc           #108                // String clojure.core
       2: ldc           #110                // String in-ns
       4: invokestatic  #116                // Method clojure/lang/RT.var:(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;)Lclojure/lang/Var;
       7: checkcast     #12                 // class clojure/lang/Var
      10: putstatic     #10                 // Field const__0:Lclojure/lang/Var;
      13: aconst_null
      14: ldc           #118                // String fan.auth
      16: invokestatic  #122                // Method clojure/lang/Symbol.intern:(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;)Lclojure/lang/Symbol;
      19: checkcast     #124                // class clojure/lang/IObj
      22: iconst_4
      23: anewarray     #4                  // class java/lang/Object
      26: dup
      27: iconst_0
      28: aconst_null
      29: ldc           #126                // String meta-foo
      31: invokestatic  #130                // Method clojure/lang/RT.keyword:(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;)Lclojure/lang/Keyword;
      34: aastore
      35: dup
      36: iconst_1
      37: aconst_null
      38: ldc           #132                // String meta-bar
      40: invokestatic  #130                // Method clojure/lang/RT.keyword:(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;)Lclojure/lang/Keyword;
      43: aastore
      44: dup
      45: iconst_2
      46: aconst_null
      47: ldc           #134                // String doc
      49: invokestatic  #130                // Method clojure/lang/RT.keyword:(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;)Lclojure/lang/Keyword;
      52: aastore
      53: dup
      54: iconst_3
      55: ldc           #136                // String Defines the resources for the authentication service.
      57: aastore
      58: invokestatic  #140                // Method clojure/lang/RT.map:([Ljava/lang/Object;)Lclojure/lang/IPersistentMap;
      61: checkcast     #64                 // class clojure/lang/IPersistentMap
      64: invokeinterface #144,  2          // InterfaceMethod clojure/lang/IObj.withMeta:(Lclojure/lang/IPersistentMap;)Lclojure/lang/IObj;

If I'm reading the code correctly, a Symbol named after the namespace is interned, and the meta-data for the namespace is applied to the symbol, so it's just a question of commuting that meta data to the Namespace object. I must be missing something.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 30/Sep/14 6:45 PM ]

Attached patch fixes this issue by explicitely attaching the metadata to the namespace after its creation using a .resetMeta call.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 30/Sep/14 7:46 PM ]

Here's an explaination of why this bug happens:

  • a namespace inherits the metadata of the symbol used to create that namespace the first time
  • the namespace is created in the load() method, that is invoked after the __init() method
  • the __init0() method creates all the Vars of the namespace
  • interning a Var in a namespace that doesn't exist forces that namespace to be created

This means that the namespace will have been already created (with nil metadata) by the time the load() method gets invoked and thus the call to in-ns will be a no-op and the metadata will be lost.





[CLJ-140] Single :tag for type hints conflates value's type with type of return value from an invoke Created: 01/Jul/09  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: typehints


 Description   

The value of a Var can be operated on directly, or, if it is a fn, it can be invoked and the resulting value operated on. :tag metadata on a Var is used to provide a type hint to the compiler to avoid reflection. Having a single metadata key for this two distinct uses makes it possible (even easy, if unlikely) to create a situation where type-hinting the value causes a ClassCastException on an operation on the invocation return value, or the reverse. The only obvious solution is two use different keys for the two uses.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:51 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/140





[CLJ-148] Poor reporting of symbol conflicts when using (ns) Created: 10/Jul/09  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: errormsgs


 Description   

I have a module that includes pprint and my own utils.

When com.howard.lewisship.cascade.dom/write was changed from private to public I get the following error:

java.lang.IllegalStateException: write already refers to: #'clojure.contrib.pprint/write in namespace: com.howardlewisship.cascade.test-views (test_views.clj:0)

(ns com.howardlewisship.cascade.test-views ; line 15
(:use
(clojure.contrib test-is pprint duck-streams)
(app1 views fragments)
(com.howardlewisship.cascade config dom view-manager)
com.howardlewisship.cascade.internal.utils))

That line number is wrong but better yet, identifying the true conflict (com.howard.lewisship.cascade.dom/write) would be even more important.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:54 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/148

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:54 AM ]

scgilardi said: It's saying that the symbol com.howardlewisship.cascade.test-views/write already resolves to #���clojure.contrib.pprint/write, so you can't def a new write in com.howardlewisship.cascade.test-views.

What do you propose for an alternate wording of the error message here?

Comment by Jeff Rose [ 12/May/11 9:49 AM ]

I think the issue is that only one side of the conflict is reported in the error, so if you get this kind of error in the middle of a large project it can be hard to figure out which namespace is conflicting. Take a toy example:

user=> (ns foo)
foo=> (def foobar 42)
foo=> (ns bar)
bar=> (def foobar 0)
bar=> (ns problem)
problem=> (refer 'foo)
problem=> (refer 'bar)
java.lang.IllegalStateException: foobar already refers to: #'foo/foobar in namespace: problem (NO_SOURCE_FILE:0)

In this case it would be best if the error said something like:

"Conflict referring to #'bar/foobar in #<Namespace problem> because foobar already refers to: #'foo/foobar."

This way the error message clearly identifies the location of the conflict, and the locations of the two conflicting vars.

Hopefully this helps clarify. I think I see where to fix it in warnOrFailOnReplace on line 88 of src/jvm/clojure/lang/Namespace.java, and this reminds me I need to send in a CA so I can pitch in next time...

Comment by Aaron Bedra [ 28/Jun/11 6:42 PM ]

It looks like the true conflict is in test-views, not in dom. A small example of the line number breakage showing the problem on master (1.3) would be very helpful.





[CLJ-150] Doc for array-map should mention its characteristics/caveats Created: 10/Jul/09  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: docstring


 Description   

Doc for array-map should mention its characteristics: preserves order of keys, linear O search so appropriate only for small maps, operations on array-maps return hash-maps.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 4:54 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/150





[CLJ-153] Suggest adding set-precision! API to accompany with-precision Created: 12/Jul/09  Updated: 04/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: math


 Description   

Ticket #137 makes math-context</code> settable at the REPL. However, <code>math-context is not a public name in Clojure.

The related public function is with-precision</code> which works by pushing a new binding for <code>math-context</code>. This ticket suggests adding <code>set-precision!</code> to Clojure's public API. Its effect would be the same as <code>with-precision</code>, but accomplished by using <code>set!</code> on the current <code>math-context binding rather than by pushing a new binding.

Chouser suggests that we also add a doc string for math-context</code> noting that it is private and pointing the user to <code>with-precision</code> and <code>set-precision!. I agree.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:55 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/153





[CLJ-163] Enhance = and == docs Created: 30/Jul/09  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Laurent Petit
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: docstring


 Description   

Enhance = and == docs as far as numbers handling is concerned (make them self referenced, make clear what == offers beyond = -except that it will only work for numbers)



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:04 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/163
Attachments:
fixbug163.diff - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/bH0XMCFjur3PLMeJe5aVNr/download/bH0XMCFjur3PLMeJe5aVNr

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:04 PM ]

laurentpetit said: [file:bH0XMCFjur3PLMeJe5aVNr]

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:04 PM ]

richhickey said: I don't want to recommend, in = doc, that people should prefer == for any case. People should always prefer =. If there is a perf, difference we can make that go away. Then the only difference with == is that it will fail on non-numbers, and that should be the only reason to choose it.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:04 PM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#94, #96, #104, #119, #163)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:04 PM ]

laurentpetit said: Richn, by "will fail on non-numbers", do you mean "should throw an exception" (and thus the patch must change the code), or just as it works today :

(== :a :a)
false

?

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:04 PM ]

richhickey said: I've fixed the code so == on non-numbers throws





[CLJ-190] enhance with-open to be extensible with a new close multimethod Created: 13/Sep/09  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: io


 Description   

Discussion: http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/8e4e56f6fc65cc8e/618a893a5b2a5410

Currently, with-open calls .close when it's finished. I'd like it to have a (defmulti close type) so it's behavior is extensible. A standard method could be defined for java.io.Closeable and a :default method with no type hint. I've come across a few cases where some external library defines what is essentially a close method but names it shutdown or disable, etc., and adding my own "defmethod close" would be much easier than rewriting with-open. This would also allow people to eliminate reflection for classes like sql Connection that were created before Closeable.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 4:30 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/190
Attachments:
clojure-190-with-open.patch - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/ca27R6Ojur3PQ0eJe5afGb/download/ca27R6Ojur3PQ0eJe5afGb

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 4:30 AM ]

mikehinchey said: [file:ca27R6Ojur3PQ0eJe5afGb]: fix adds close method and tests

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 4:30 AM ]

mikehinchey said: Note, I only defined methods for :default (reflection of .close) and Closeable, not sql or the numerous other classes in java that should be Closeable but are not. Maybe clojure.contrib.sql and other such libraries should define related close methods.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 4:30 AM ]

richhickey said: I want to hold off on this until scopes are in

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 23/Dec/11 6:50 AM ]

Probably better implemented using a protocol. See http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-308





[CLJ-200] Extend cond to support inline let, much like for Created: 18/Oct/09  Updated: 22/Oct/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Mark Engelberg
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None

Attachments: File clj-200-cond-let-clauses-fixed-test-v2.diff     Text File clj-200-cond-let-clauses-fixed-test-v2-patch.txt    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

I find it occasionally very useful to do a few tests in a cond, then introduce some new symbols (for both clarity and efficiency) that can be referenced in later tests (or matching expressions). This parallels similar functionality inside the for macro, where the :let keyword is matched against a vector of symbol bindings and forms an implicit let around the remainder of the comprehension.

I'll be adding a patch for this shortly.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:51 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/200

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:51 PM ]

hlship said: Trickier than I thought because cond is really wired into other fundamentals, like let.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 1:51 PM ]

cgrand said: Howard, what do you think of http://gist.github.com/432712 ?

Comment by Mark Engelberg [ 23/Nov/12 2:33 AM ]

Patch cond-let-clauses.diff on 23/Nov/12 adds inline :let clauses to cond, implementing CLJ-200. The code is based off of code by cgrand, with some tweaks so the implementation only relies on constructs defined earlier in core.clj, since when cond is defined, things aren't yet fully bootstrapped. Also added a test to control.clj.

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 23/Nov/12 3:06 AM ]

Some comments: the docstring is missing, I believe you don't have to modify the original cond (except the docstring maybe), just redefine it later on once most of the language is defined – a bit like what is done for let for example.

There is still the unlikely eventuality that some code uses :let as :else. What about shipping a cond which complains on keywords (in test position) other than :else?

Comment by Mark Engelberg [ 23/Nov/12 3:47 AM ]

cond-let-clauses-with-docstring.diff contains the same patches as cond-let-clauses, but includes the original docstring for cond along with an additional sentence about the :let bindings.

Comment by Mark Engelberg [ 23/Nov/12 3:54 AM ]

Cgrand, I did see your example of redefining cond after most of the language is defined, but since I was able to figure out how to do it in the proper place, that makes the :let bindings available for users of cond downstream and avoids any unforeseen complications that might come from rebinding.

As for your other point, I think it is highly improbable that someone would have used :let in the :else position. However I can imagine someone intentionally using something like :true or :default. I think the idea of warning for other keywords is actually more likely to cause complications than the unlikely problem it is meant to solve.

I did resubmit the patch with the docstring restored. Thanks for pointing out that problem. I'm excited about this patch – I use :let bindings within the cond in my own code all the time. Thanks again for the blog post that started me on that path.

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 23/Nov/12 4:13 AM ]

True, it's :unlikely for :let to happen.
However once :let is officially blessed, it may be better to provision for future other "special" keywords and thus to warn on "unsupported" keywords. Plus it will help out-of-order typists (like myself) to catch earlier a :elt instead of a :let
This is only my point of view. Thanks for trying to get :let in cond supported.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Nov/12 8:46 PM ]

Mark, could you remove the obsolete earlier patch now that you have added the one with the doc string? Instructions for removing patches are under the heading "Removing Patches" on this page: http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/JIRA+workflow

Comment by Mark Engelberg [ 29/Nov/12 10:50 PM ]

Done.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Nov/12 1:24 AM ]

I haven't figured out what is going wrong yet. I can apply the patch cond-let-clauses-with-docstring.diff to the latest Clojure master just fine. I can do "ant jar" and it will build a jar. When I do "ant", it fails with the new test for cond with :let, throwing a StackOverflowException. I can enter that same form into the REPL and it evaluates just as the test says it should. I can comment out that new test and all of the rest pass. But the new test doesn't pass when inside of the control.clj file. Anyone know why?

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 30/Nov/12 4:54 AM ]

It's because of the brutal replacement performed by test/are: the placeholders for this are form are x and y but in Mark's test there are used as local names and are tries to substitute them recursively...
If one changes the local names to a and b for example it works.

Comment by Mark Engelberg [ 02/Dec/12 8:20 AM ]

cond-let-clauses-fixed-test.diff on 02/Dec/12 contains the same patch, but with the x,y locals in the test case changed to a,b so that it works properly in the are clause which uses x and y.

Comment by Mark Engelberg [ 02/Dec/12 8:27 AM ]

On Windows, I can't get Clojure's test suite task to work, either via ant or maven, which has made it difficult for me to verify the part of the patch that applies to the test suite works as expected; I had tested it as best I could in the REPL, using a version of Clojure built with the patch applied, but using this process, I missed the subtle interaction between are and the locals in the test case. Sorry about that. If someone can double-check that the test suite task now works with the newest patch, that would be great, and then I'll go ahead and remove the obsoleted patch. Thanks.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 02/Dec/12 6:29 PM ]

clj-200-cond-let-clauses-fixed-test-v2-patch.txt dated Dec 2 2012 is identical to Mark Engelberg's cond-let-clauses-fixed-test.diff of the same date, except it applies cleanly to the latest Clojure master.

I've verified that it compiles and passes all tests with latest Clojure master as of this date.

Mark, I've made sure to keep your name in the patch, since you wrote it. You should be able to remove your two attachments now, so the screener won't be confused which patch should be examined.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 02/Dec/12 6:31 PM ]

Mark, besides general issues with Windows not being used much (or maybe not at all?) by Clojure developers, there is the issue right now filed as CLJ-1076 that not all tests pass when run on Windows due to CR-LF line ending differences that cause several Clojure tests to fail, regardless of whether you use ant or maven to run them.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 22/Oct/13 8:01 PM ]

clj-200-cond-let-clauses-fixed-test-v2.diff is identical to earlier patch clj-200-cond-let-clauses-fixed-test-v2-patch.txt, except it removes unnecessarily trailing whitespace that causes warnings when applying the patch, and with .diff suffix for easier diff-style viewing in some editors.





[CLJ-213] Invariants and the STM Created: 01/Dec/09  Updated: 26/Aug/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

(ticket requested here http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/119311e89fa46806/4903ce25ff6deaa6#4903ce25ff6deaa6)

The general idea is to declare invariants inside a transaction and, when at commit time an invariant doesn't hold anymore, the transaction retries.
So it can both act as a kind of soft ensure or to specify actions that "partially commute".
Thus it would enable coarser refs.

See the attached file for quick prototype.

User code would looks like:

(invariant (@world :key))
(commute world update-in [:key] val-transform-fn)

This means the commute will occur only if (@world :key) returns the same value in-transaction and at commit point.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 7:23 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/213
Attachments:
invariants.patch - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/dd4kUS3MWr3QvMeJe5aVNr/download/dd4kUS3MWr3QvMeJe5aVNr





[CLJ-233] better error reporting of nonexistent var Created: 31/Dec/09  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: errormsgs


 Description   

simple improvement to error message when referencing a var that doesn't exist.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 29/Sep/10 5:29 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/233

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 29/Sep/10 5:29 AM ]

chouser@n01se.net said: Stuart, I don't see a patch attached.





[CLJ-252] Support typed non-primitive fields in deftype Created: 29/Jan/10  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: deftype


 Description   

Right now hints are accepted but not used as field type.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:07 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/252





[CLJ-270] defn-created fns inherit old metadata from the Var they are assigned to Created: 13/Feb/10  Updated: 26/Aug/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Rich Hickey
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   
  • What (small set of) steps will reproduce the problem?

user> (def #^{:foo "bar"} x 5)
#'user/x
user> (meta #'x)
{:ns #<Namespace user>, :name x, :file "NO_SOURCE_FILE", :line 1, :foo "bar"}
user> (defn x [] 5)
#'user/x
user> (meta #'x)
{:ns #<Namespace user>, :name x, :file "NO_SOURCE_FILE", :line 1, :arglists ([])}
user> (meta x)
{:ns #<Namespace user>, :name x, :file "NO_SOURCE_FILE", :line 1, :foo "bar"}

  • What is the expected output? What do you see instead?

I expect (meta #'x) to evaluate to the value of the final (meta x) in the above.

  • What version are you using?

Current master (commit 61202d2ff6925002400a9843e8fbd080f3bef3a5).

  • Was this discussed on the group? If so, please provide a link to the discussion.

http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/4c7151aa9c4d919c/d1b033ef5a13dd89?lnk=gst&q=off-by-one#d1b033ef5a13dd89

Prompted by discussion at

http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/6553d48c981019eb/3c55b0bd43a5d8e9?lnk=gst&q=off-by-one#3c55b0bd43a5d8e9

  • Initial attempt at a diagnosis:

I think this is due to DefExpr's eval method binding the Var to init.eval() first and attaching the supplied metadata to the Var later – see Compiler.java lines 341-352. (Note the Var is always already in place when init.eval() is called, regardless of whether it existed prior to the evaluation of the def / defn.) Thus the init expression supplied by defn sees the old (and wrong) metadata on the Var.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:23 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/270
Attachments:
dont-copy-val-metadata-onto-new-var-value-in-defn.patch - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/dwK4yssayr37y_eJe5d-aX/download/dwK4yssayr37y_eJe5d-aX
0001-set-meta-on-vars-before-evaluating-their-init-see-27.patch - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/arrhbiAI4r35lQeJe5cbLr/download/arrhbiAI4r35lQeJe5cbLr

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:23 AM ]

stu said: [file:dwK4yssayr37y_eJe5d-aX]

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:23 AM ]

stu said: The problem happens with defn, but not with def+fn, so I think the original diagnosis is incorrect.

Another stab at diagnosis: The defn macro copies metadata from a var onto its new value, so if you defn a var that already exists, the old var metadata becomes metadata on the new value. I don't know why this would be the right thing to do, and if you eliminate this behavior (see patch) all the Clojure and Contrib tests still pass.

If this is correct, please assign back to me and I will write tests. If this is wrong, please tell me what's going on here so I know how to write the tests.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:23 AM ]

cgrand said: Child association with ticket #363 was added

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:23 AM ]

cgrand said: I think the original diagnosis is correct. Note that the behavior differ when def iscompiled:

user=> (def #^{:foo "bar"} x 5)
#'user/x
user=> (let [] (defn x [] 5))
#'user/x
user=> (meta x)
{:ns #<Namespace user>, :name x, :file "NO_SOURCE_PATH", :line 83, :arglists ([])}
user=> (meta #'x)
{:ns #<Namespace user>, :name x, :file "NO_SOURCE_PATH", :line 83, :arglists ([])}

See also http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/6afd81896ca368b2#

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:23 AM ]

cgrand said: [file:arrhbiAI4r35lQeJe5cbLr]

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:23 AM ]

cgrand said: My patch aligns DefExpr.eval with DefExpr.emit (first set meta then eval the init value).

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:23 AM ]

cgrand said: Forget it, my current patch is broken.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:23 AM ]

cgrand said: My current patch is broken because of #352, what is the rational for #352?





[CLJ-272] load/ns/require/use overhaul Created: 18/Feb/10  Updated: 04/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Assembla Importer Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: None


 Description   

Creating this ticket to describe various things people have wanted to change about how ns works:

Minimal needs

  1. there should be a primitive level of loading (presumably load) that just loads without question.
  2. the api should be unified across the ns and direct forms. No more keywords or quoting! So (use foo) not (use 'foo). This makes use et al macros, so there should also be new fn versions (maybe use*).

Other possibilities to discuss.

  1. Feature addressing the :like and :clone ideas from http://onclojure.com/2010/02/17/managing-namespaces/. I think I would prefer a single new option :clone which allows :only and :exclude features as subspecifiers.
  2. Convenience fn to unmap all names in a namespace?


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 9:27 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/272

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 9:27 AM ]

stu said: Suggestions from Volkan Yazici:

Hi,

I saw your "load/ns/require/use overhaul" ticket[1] and would like to
ask for a few extra overhaulings. I have a project called retop, and
here is its file hiearachy:

tr/edu/bilkent/cs/retop.clj
tr/edu/bilkent/cs/retop/km.clj
tr/edu/bilkent/cs/retop/graph.clj
tr/edu/bilkent/cs/retop/main.clj
tr/edu/bilkent/cs/retop/util.clj

In retop.clj, I have below ns definition.

(ns tr.edu.bilkent.cs.retop
(:gen-class)
(:import
(com.sun.jna
Function
Pointer)
(com.sun.jna.ptr
IntByReference)
(tr.edu.bilkent.cs.patoh
HyperGraph
HyperGraphException
Parititoning
ParititoningParameters))
(:load
"retop/util"
"retop/km"
"retop/graph"
"retop/main"))

And in every .clj file in retop/ directory I have below in-ns in the
very first line.

(in-ns 'tr.edu.bilkent.cs.retop)

The problems with the ns decleration are:

1) Most of the :import's in retop.clj only belong to a single .clj file.
For instance,

(tr.edu.bilkent.cs.patoh
HyperGraph
HyperGraphException
Parititoning
ParititoningParameters)

imports are only used by graph.clj. Yep, I can add an (import ...)
line just after the (in-ns ...), but wouldn't it be better if I can
specify that in (in-ns ...) form?

2) See (:load ...) clause in (ns ...) form. There are lots of
unnecessary directory prefixes. I'd be prefer something ala Common
Lisp's defpackage:

(:load
"packages" ; packages.clj
("retop"
"util" ; retop/util.clj
"km" ; retop/km.clj
"graph" ; retop/graph.clj
("graph"
"foo" ; retop/graph/foo.clj
"bar) ; retop/graph/bar.clj
"main")) ; retop/main.clj

Also, being able to use wildcards would be awesome.

3) There are inconsistencies between macros and functions. For instance,
consider:

(ns foo.bar.baz (:use mov))
(in-ns 'foo.bar.baz)
(use 'mov)

I'd like to get rid of quotations in both cases.

I'm not sure if I'm using the right tools and doing the right approach
for such a project. But if you agree with the above overhauling
requirements, I'd like to see them appear in the same assembla ticket as
well.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 9:27 AM ]

stuart.sierra said: My requests:

1. If writing macros that do not evaluate their arguments, provide function versions that do evaluate their arguments.

2. Do not support prefix lists for loading Clojure namespaces. It's hard to parse with external tools.

3. Do not conflate importing Java classes with loading Clojure namespaces. They are fundamentally different operations with different semantics.

I have implemented some ideas in a macro called "need" at http://github.com/stuartsierra/need

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 12/Dec/10 4:08 PM ]

Further requests:

Permit tools to read the "ns" declaration and statically determine the dependencies of a namespace, without evaluating any code.

Comment by Paudi Moriarty [ 28/Feb/12 3:56 AM ]

Permit tools to read the "ns" declaration and statically determine the dependencies of a namespace, without evaluating any code.

This would be great for building OSGi bundles where Bnd is currently not much help.





[CLJ-273] def with a function value returns meta {:macro false}, but def itself doesn't have meta Created: 23/Feb/10  Updated: 18/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Rich Hickey
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

On the master (1.2) branch, if you create a def with an initial function value, {:macro false} is added to the metadata of the return value for def. However, if you look again at the metadata on the var itself, the {:macro false} is not present! This breaks the use of contrib's defalias when aliasing macros, because the new alias is marked as {:macro false}.

The code below demonstrates the issue, which was introduced in http://github.com/richhickey/clojure/commit/430dd4fa711d0008137d7a82d4b4cd27b6e2d6d1, "metadata for fns."

;; all running on 1.2, DIFF noted in comments

(defmacro foo [])
-> #'user/foo

(meta (def bar (.getRoot #'foo)))
-> {:macro false, :ns #<Namespace user>, :name bar, :file "NO_SOURCE_PATH", :line 83}
;; DIFF: where did that :macro false come from??

(def bar (.getRoot #'foo))
-> #'user/bar

(meta #'bar)
-> {:ns #<Namespace user>, :name bar, :file "NO_SOURCE_PATH", :line 84}
;; LIKE 1.1, but really weird: now the :macro false is gone again!


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 9:32 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/273

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/14 10:27 PM ]

this belongs in the isssues for one of the new contrib projects (if defalias ever got moved)

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Apr/14 10:35 PM ]

actually, it sounds like defalias is just a place where the issue is observed but the issue is in core. The old contrib/def.clj moved to core.incubator, but defalias did not go with it.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 18/Apr/14 9:12 AM ]

https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/src/jvm/clojure/lang/Var.java#L270 this is probably relevant





[CLJ-274] cannot close over mutable fields (in deftype) Created: 23/Feb/10  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Backlog

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: deftype

Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Simplest case:

user=>
(deftype Bench [#^{:unsynchronized-mutable true} val]
Runnable
(run [_]
(fn [] (set! val 5))))

java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Cannot assign to non-mutable: val (NO_SOURCE_FILE:5)

Functions should be able to mutate mutable fields in their surrounding deftype (just like inner classes do in Java).

Filed as bug, because the loop special form expands into a fn form sometimes:

user=>
(deftype Bench [#^{:unsynchronized-mutable true} val]
Runnable
(run [_]
(let [x (loop [] (set! val 5))])))
java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Cannot assign to non-mutable: val (NO_SOURCE_FILE:9)



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 01/Oct/10 9:35 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/274

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 01/Oct/10 9:35 AM ]

donmullen said: Updated each run to [_] for new syntax.

Now gives exception listed.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 01/Oct/10 9:35 AM ]

richhickey said: We're not going to allow closing over mutable fields. Instead we'll have to generate something other than fn for loops et al used as expressions. Not going to come before cinc





[CLJ-277] Making clojure.xml/emit a little friendler to xml consumers Created: 03/Mar/10  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: xml


 Description   

Currently, clojure.xml/emit breaks the eBay api, because emit adds whitespace before and after :contents. This trivial patch fixes it for me:
http://github.com/tjg/clojure/commit/bbff079d26e627c655b847319a58d76b8b3cec7c

(Dunno whether there's a good reason emit works that way, or if I'm missing something obvious.)

I realize that emit's behavior conforms to the XML spec and it's probably eBay at fault here. But I can nevertheless see this whitespace causing problems.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 9:41 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/277

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 9:41 AM ]

bpsm said: I've attached a patch to #410, which also fixes this issue. (In fact, it turns out that it's the same patch tlj previously attached here.)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 9:41 AM ]

stu said: Duplicated association with ticket #410 was added





[CLJ-319] TransactionalHashMap bug Created: 26/Apr/10  Updated: 26/Aug/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

TransactionalHashMap computation of the bin is buggy. The implementation doesn't unset the sign bit before using it in accessing the bin array which in some cases cause an ArrayOutOfBoundException to be thrown.

As Rich Hickey has pointed out, this is an unsupported experimental Class and won't be fixed unless I provided a patch, so attached is the patch file.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 01/Oct/10 4:06 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/319
Attachments:
TransactionalHashMap.java.patch - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/cuuZnsuuWr36H0eJe5dVir/download/cuuZnsuuWr36H0eJe5dVir

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 01/Oct/10 4:06 PM ]

megabyte2021 said: [file:cuuZnsuuWr36H0eJe5dVir]: The patch file

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 01/Oct/10 4:06 PM ]

stu said: Please add a test case.





[CLJ-322] Enhance AOT compilation process to emit classfiles only for explicitly-specified namespaces Created: 29/Apr/10  Updated: 22/Oct/13

Status: In Progress
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Chas Emerick Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 15
Labels: aot

Attachments: Text File 0322-limit-aot-resolved.patch     File CLJ-322.diff     Text File compile-interop-1.patch     GZip Archive write-classes-1.diff.gz    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted
Waiting On: Chas Emerick

 Description   

Summary: still needs decision on implementation approach.

This was originally/erroneously reported by Howard Lewis Ship in the clojure-contrib assembla:

My build file specifies the namespaces to AOT compile but if I include another namespace
(even from a JAR dependency) that is not AOT compiled, the other namespace will be compiled as well.

In my case, I was using clojure-contrib's clojure.contrib.str-utils2 namespace, and I got a bunch of
clojure/contrib/str_utils2 classes in my output directory.

I think that the AOT compiler should NOT precompile any namespaces that are transitively reached,
only namespaces in the set specified by the command line are appropriate.

As currently coded, you will frequently find unwanted third-party dependencies in your output JARs;
further, if multiple parties depend on the same JARs, this could cause bloating and duplication in the
eventual runtime classpath.

Having the option of shipping either all AOT-compiled classfiles or mixed source/AOT depending upon one's distribution requirements would make that phase of work with a clojure codebase significantly easier and less error-prone. The only question in my mind is what the default should be. We're all used to the current behaviour, but I'd guess that any nontrivial project where the form of the distributable matters (i.e. the source/AOT mix), providing as much control as possible by default makes the most sense. Given the tooling that most people are using, it's trivial (and common practice, IIUC) to provide a comprehensive list of namespaces one wishes to compile, so making that the default shouldn't be a hurdle to anyone. If an escape hatch is desired, a --transitive switch to clojure.lang.Compile could be added.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/322
Attachments:
aot-transitivity-option-compat-322.diff - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/aI7Eu-HeGr35ImeJe5cbLA/download/aI7Eu-HeGr35ImeJe5cbLA
aot-transitivity-option-322.diff - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/aIWFiWHeGr35ImeJe5cbLA/download/aIWFiWHeGr35ImeJe5cbLA

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

hlship said: I'd like to reinforce this. I've been doing research on Clojure build tools for an upcoming talk and all of them (Maven, Leiningen, Gradle) have the same problem: the AOT compile extends from the desired namespaces (such as one containing a :gen-class) to every reached namespace. This is going to cause a real ugliness when application A uses libraries B and C that both depend on library D (such as clojure-contrib) and B and C are thus both bloated with duplicate, unwanted AOT compiled classes from the library D.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

cemerick said: This behaviour is an implementation detail of Clojure's AOT compilation process, and is orthogonal to any particular build tooling.

I am working on a patch that would provide a mechanism for such tooling to disable this default behaviour.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

cemerick said: A first cut of a change to address this issue is here (caution, work in progress!):

http://github.com/cemerick/clojure/commit/6f14e0790c0d283a7e44056adf1bb3f36bb16e0e

This makes available a new recognized system property, clojure.compiler.transitive, which defaults to true. When set/bound to false (i.e. -Dclojure.compiler.transitive=false when using clojure.lang.Compile), only the first loaded file (either the ns named in the call to compile or each of the namespaces named as arguments to clojure.lang.Compile) will have classfiles written to disk.

This means that this compilation invocation:

java -cp <your classpath> -Dclojure.compiler.transitive=false clojure.lang.Compile com.bar com.baz

will generate classfiles only for com.bar and com.baz, but not for any of the namespaces or other files they load, require, or use.


The only shortcoming of this WIP patch is that classfiles are still generated for proxy and gen-class classes defined outside of the explicitly-named namespaces. What I thought was a solution for this ended up breaking the loading of generated interfaces (as produced by defprotocol, etc).

I'll take a second look at this before the end of the week, but wanted to get this out there so as to get any comments people might have.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

technomancy said: Looks good, but I'm having trouble getting it to work. I tried compiling from master of Chas's fork on github, but I still got the all the .class files generated with -Dclojure.compiler.transitive=false. It could be a quirk of the way I'm using ant to fork off processes though. Is it possible to set it using System/setProperty, or must it be given as a property on the command-line?

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

cemerick said: Bah, that's just bad documentation. :-/

The system property is only provided by clojure.lang.Compile; the value of it drives the binding of clojure.core/transitive-compile, which has a root binding of true.

You should be able to configure the transitivity the same way you configure compile-path (system prop to clojure.lang.Compile or a direct binding when at the REPL, etc).

If not, ping me in irc or elsewhere.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

meikelbrandmeyer said: I think, excluding parts 'load'ed is a little strong. I have some namespaces which load several parts from different files, but which belong to the same namespace. The most prominent example of such a case is clojure.core itself. I'm find with stopping require and use, but load is a bit too much, I'd say.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

technomancy said: Chas: Thanks; will give that a go.

Meikel: Do people actually use load outside of clojure.core? I thought it was only used there because clojure.core is a "special" namespace where you want more vars to be available than can reasonably fit in a single file. Splitting up a namespace into several files is quite unadvisable otherwise.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

technomancy said: I can confirm that this works for me modulo the proxy/gen-class issue that Chas mentioned. I would love to see this in Clojure 1.2; it would really clean up a lot of build-related issues.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

meikelbrandmeyer said: I used it several times and this is the first time, I hear that it is unadvisable to do so. Even with a lower number of Vars in the namespace (c.c is here certainly exceptional) and might be of use to split several "sections" of code which belong to the same namespace but have different functionality. Whether to use a big comment in the source to indicate the section or split things into subfiles is a matter of taste. But it's a perfectly reasonable thing todo.

Another use case, where I use this (and c.c.lazy-xml, IIRC) is to conditionally load code depending on whether a dependency is available or not. Eg. vimclojure uses c.c.pprint and c.c.stacktrace/clj-stacktrace transparently depending on their availability.

There are perfectly legal uses of load. I don't see any "unadvisable" here.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

cemerick said: Thanks, Meikel; I had forgotten about that use case, as I don't use load directly myself at all. I probably wouldn't say it's inadvisable, just mostly unnecessary. In any case, that's a good catch. It complicates things a bit, but we'll see what happens. I'm going to take another whack at resolving the proxy/gen-class case and narrowing the impact of nontransitivity to use and require later tonight.

I agree wholeheartedly that this should be in 1.2, assuming the technical bits work out. This has been an irritant for quite a long time. I actually believe that nontransitivity should be the default – no one wants or expects to have classfiles show up for dependencies show up when a project is AOT-compiled. I think the only negative impact would be whoever still fiddles with compilation at the REPL, and doesn't use maven or lein – and even then, it's just a matter of binding another var.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

meikelbrandmeyer said: Then the var should be added to the default bindings in the clojure.main repl. Then it's set!-able like the other vars ��� warn-on-reflection and friends.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

cemerick said: This is looking pretty good (still WIP):

http://github.com/cemerick/clojure/commit/fedfb022ecef420a932b3d69c182ec7a8e5960a6

Thank you again for mentioning load, Meikel: it was very helpful in resolving the proxy/gen-class issue as well.

Just a single data point: the jar produced by the medium-sized project I've been using for testing the changes has shrunk from 1.8MB to less than 1MB. That's not the only reason this is a good change, but it's certainly a nice side-effect.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

cemerick said: [file:aIWFiWHeGr35ImeJe5cbLA]

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

cemerick said: [file:aI7Eu-HeGr35ImeJe5cbLA]

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

cemerick said: Patched attached. The compat one retains the current default behaviour [*transitive-compile* true], the other changes the default so that transitivity is a non-default option. At least of those I've spoken to about this, the latter is preferred.

The user impact of changing the default would be:

  1. The result of compiling from the REPL will change. Getting back current behaviour would require adding a [*transitive-compile* true] binding to the existing bindings one must set when compiling from the REPL.
  2. The same as #1 goes for those scripting AOT compilation via clojure.lang.Compile as well (whether by shell scripts, ant, etc).
  3. Those using lein, clojure-maven-plugin, gradle, and others will likely have a new option provided by those tools, and perhaps a different default than the language's. I suspect those using such tools would much prefer a change from the default behaviour in any case.
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

hlship said: Just had a brain-storm:

How about an option to support transitive compilation, but only if the Clojure source file being compiled as a file: URL (i.e., its a local file on the file system, not a file stored in a JAR). That would make it easier to use compilation on the local project without transitively compiling imported libraries, such as clojure-contrib.

So transitive-compile should be a keyword, not a boolean, with values :all (for 1.1 behavior), :none (to compile only the exact specified namespaces) or :local (to compile transitively, but only for local files, not source files from JARs).

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

cemerick said: (Crossposted to the clojure-dev list)

I thought about this some, and I don't think that's a good idea, at least for now. I'm uncomfortable with semantics changing depending upon where code is being loaded from – which, depending upon a tool's implementation, might be undefined. E.g. if the com.foo.bar ns is available in source form in one directory, but as classes from a jar, and classpaths aren't being constructed in a stable fashion, then the results of compilation will change.

If we decide that special treatment depending upon the source of code is warranted in the future, that's a fairly straightforward thing to do w.r.t. the API – we could have :all and :local as you suggest, with nil representing :none.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 28/Sep/10 12:18 AM ]

stu said: Rich is not comfortable enough with the implementation complexity of this patch (e.g. the guard clause for proxies and gen-class) to slide this in as a minor fix under the wire for 1.2.

Better to live with the pain we know a little longer than ship something we don't have enough experience with to be confident.

Comment by Chas Emerick [ 19/Nov/10 9:28 PM ]

Updated patch to cleanly apply to HEAD and address issues raised by screening done by Cosmin Stejerean. Also includes proper tests.

Note: this patch's tests require the fix for CLJ-432!

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 29/Nov/10 7:18 AM ]

the "-resolved" patch resolves a conflict in main.clj

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 29/Nov/10 7:25 AM ]

Several questions:

  1. I am getting an ant build error: "/Users/stuart/repos/clojure/build.xml:137: java.io.FileNotFoundException: Could not locate clojure/test_clojure/aot/nontransitive__init.class or clojure/test_clojure/aot/nontransitive.clj on classpath:"
  2. It feels icky to have a method named writeClassFile that, under some circumstances, does not write a class file, but instead loads it via a dynamic loader. Maybe this is just a naming issue.
  3. Are there any other ways to accomplish the goals of load-level? Or, taking the other side, if we are going to have a load-level, are there other possible consumers who might have different needs?
  4. (Minor) Why the use :only idiom instead of just require?
Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 10/Dec/10 3:34 PM ]

An alternative approach: patch write-classes-1.diff.gz

From my forked branch

What this patch does:

  • Keeps 'compile' and 'compile-files' exactly the same
  • Adds 'compile-write-classes' to write .class files for specifically named classes
  • Minor compiler changes to support this

This approach was prompted by the following observations:

  • Java interop is the dominant reason for needing .class files
  • Things other than namespaces can generate classes for Java interop:
    • deftype/defrecord
    • defprotocol
    • gen-class/gen-interface
  • For library releases, we want to control which .class files are emitted on a per-class basis, not per-namespace
  • Some legitimate uses of AOT compilation will want transitive compilation
    • Pre-compiling an entire application before release
Comment by Chas Emerick [ 10/Dec/10 4:04 PM ]

S. Halloway: My apologies, I didn't know you had commented. I thought that, having assigned this issue to myself, I'd be notified of updates.

FWIW, I aim to review your comments and SS' approach over the weekend.

Comment by Chas Emerick [ 16/Dec/10 7:36 AM ]

S. Halloway:

1. Certainly shouldn't happen. AFAIK, others have screened the patch, presumably with a successful build.
2. Agreed; given the approach, I think it's just a bad name.
3. Yes, I think S. Sierra's is one. See my next comment.
4. Because the :use form was already there. I've actually been using that form of :use more and more; I've found that easier than occasionally having to shuffle around specs between :use and :require. I think I'm aping Chris Houser in that regard.

Comment by Chas Emerick [ 16/Dec/10 9:00 AM ]

I think S. Sierra's approach is fundamentally superior what I offered. I have two suggestions: one slight perspective change (which implies no change in the actual implementation), and an idea for an even simpler approach (at least from a user perspective), in that order.

While interop is the driving requirement behind AOT, I absolutely do not want to have to keep an updated enumeration of all of the classes resulting from each and every defrecord et al. usages in my pom.xml/project.clj (and I wouldn't wish the task of ferreting those usages and their resulting classnames on any build tool author).

Right now, *compile-write-classes* is documented to be a set of classname strings, but could just as easily be any other function. *compile-write-classes* should be documented to accept any predicate function (renamed to e.g. *compile-write-class?*?). There's no reason why it shouldn't be bound to, e.g. #(re-matches #"foo\.bar\.[\w_]+$" %) if I know that all my records are defined in the foo.bar namespace.

To go along with that, I think some package/classname-globbing utilities along with corresponding options to clojure.lang.Compile would be most welcome. Classname munging rules are not exactly obvious, and it'd be good to make things a little easier for users in this regard.


Another alternative

If there's a closed set of forms that generate classes that one might reasonably be interested in having in a build result (outside of use cases for pervasive AOT), then why not have a simple option that only those forms utilize? gen-class and gen-interface already do this, but reusing the all-or-nothing *compile-files* binding; if they keyed off of a binding that implied a diminished scope (e.g. *compile-interop-forms* – which would be true if *compile-files* were true), then they'd do exactly what we wanted. Extending this approach to deftype (and therefore defrecord) should be straightforward.

An implementation of this would probably be somewhat more complicated than S. Sierra's patch, though not as complex as my original stab at the problem (i.e. no *load-level*). On the plus side:

1. No additional configuration for users or implementation work for build tool authors, aside from the addition of the boolean diminished-scope AOT option
2. Class file generation would remain opaque from a build process standpoint
3. Future/other class-generating forms (there are a few people futzing with ASM independently, etc) can make local decisions about whether or not to participate in interop-centric classfile generation. This might be particularly helpful if a given form emits multiple classes, making the determination of a classname-based filter fn less straightforward.

I can see wanting to further restrict AOT to specific classnames in certain circumstances, in which case the above and S. Sierra's patch might be complimentary.

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 16/Dec/10 11:49 AM ]

I like the idea of *compile-interop-forms*. But is it always possible to determine what an "interop form" is? I think it is, I'm just not sure.

Comment by Allen Rohner [ 09/Oct/11 12:50 PM ]

I'm also in favor of compile-interop-forms. As far as determining, how about sticking metadata on the var?

(defmacro ^{:interop-form true} deftype ...)

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 21/Oct/11 8:38 AM ]

Summary and design discussion on wiki at http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/Transitive+AOT+Compilation

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 29/Nov/11 6:54 PM ]

New attachment compile-interop-1.patch has new approach: Add a third possible value for *compile-files*. True and false keep their original meanings, but :interop causes only interop-related forms to be written out as .class files. "Interop forms" are gen-class, gen-interface, deftype, defrecord, defprotocol, and definterface.

Pros:

  • doesn't change existing behavior
  • handles common case for non-transitive AOT (interop)
  • minimal changes to the compiler

Cons:

  • not flexible
Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 02/Dec/11 8:12 AM ]

Just realized my patch doesn't solve the transitive compilation problem. If library A loads library B, then compiling interop forms in A will also emit interop .class files in B.

Comment by Paudi Moriarty [ 01/Jan/13 3:55 AM ]

It's disappointing to see an important issue like this still unresolved after 2.5 years. This is a real pain for us. We have a large closed source project where shipping source is not an option. This forces us to manage the AOT'ing of dependencies due to the hard dependency on protocol interfaces introduced by transitive AOT compilation (see https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/clojure-dev/r3A1JOIiwVU).

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Jan/13 4:27 PM ]

Paul, do you have a suggestion for which of the approaches described in comments here, or on the wiki page http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/Transitive+AOT+Compilation would be preferable solution for you? Or perhaps even a patch that implements your preferred approach?

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 04/Jan/13 4:18 PM ]

Andy,

I'm now consulting with Paudi's organization, so I think I can speak for him (I'm now the default buildmeister).

I like Stuart's :interop idea, but that is somewhat orthogonal to our needs.

I return to what I would like; compilation would compile specific namespaces; dependencies of those namespaces would not be compiled.

To be honest, I'm still a little hung up on the interop forms: especially defprotocol and friends; from a cursory glance, it appears that todays AOT compilation will compile the protocol into a Java class, then compile the namespace that references the protocol with the assumption that the protocol's Java class is available. When we use build rules to only package our namespace's class files into the output JAR, the code fails with a NoClassDefFoundError because the protocol really needs to be recompiled, at runtime compilation, into an in-memory Java class.

Obviously, supporting this correctly will be a challenge; the compiled bytecode for our namespace would ideally:
1) check to see if the Java class already exists and use it if so
2) load the necessary namespaces so as to force the creation of the Java class

I can imagine any number of ways to juggle things to make this work, so I won't suggest a specific implementation.

In the meantime, our workaround is to create a "stub" module as part of our build; it simply requires in the necessary namespaces (for example, org.clojure:core.cache); this forces an AOT compile of the dependencies and we have a special rule to package such dependencies in the stub module's output JAR. This may not be a scalable problem, and it is expensive to identify what 3rd party dependencies require this treatment.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 24/May/13 1:25 PM ]

I am marking this incomplete because there does not yet seem to be plurality, much less consensus or unanimity, on approach.

Personally I am in favor of a solution based on a predicate that gets handed the class name and compiled bits, and then can choose whether to write the class. Pretty close to Stuart Sierra's compile-write-classes. Might be possible to flow more information than classname to the predicate.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 21/Oct/13 2:35 PM ]

Removed the 1.6 release from this and added to Release.Next list to make this a priority for the next release.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 21/Oct/13 3:42 PM ]

Howard,

I don't exactly understand your write up, I am reading the compiler, the emit-protocol macro, and emit-method-builder to try and understand it.

You might check to see if you have a situation similar to the following:

(ns a.b)

(defprotocol P1
  (pm [a]))

then either

(ns a.c
  (:import (a.b P1))

(defrecord R []
  P1
  (pm [x] x))

or

(ns a.c)

(defrecord R []
  a.b.P1
  (pm [x] x))

in both examples defrecord is actually getting the class behind the protocol instead of the protocol, the correct thing to do is

(ns a.c
  (:require [a.b :refer [P1]]))

(defrecord R []
  P1
  (pm [x] x))

This is an extremely common mistake people make when using protocols, unfortunately the flexibility of using interfaces directly in defrecord forms, and protocols being backed by interfaces means it is very easy to unwittingly make such a mistake. Both of the mistake examples could result in missing classes/namespace problems.





[CLJ-366] Multiplatform command-line clojure launcher Created: 28/May/10  Updated: 17/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Backlog
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Assembla Importer Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

Clojure needs a lower barrier of entry, long java commands scare people away! We need a script that conveniently launches a clojure repl or executes clojure files, much like the ruby/python/perl/other-favorite-interpreted-language behavior.

NOTES:

From Russ Olson (regarding Dejure/Dejour):

  • I just fixed a bunch of bugs in the script, so make sure you get the latest from download from: http://github.com/russolsen/dejour
  • After looking at jruby, scala, and groovy, it seems that the only way to do this right on windows is to write a C or C++ program and have a .exe.


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 8:21 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/366

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 8:21 AM ]

stu said: Updating tickets (#370, #366, #374)

Comment by Aaron Bedra [ 10/Dec/10 10:13 AM ]

Design page is at http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/CLJ+Launcher and should be the basis for all future discussion

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/14 10:22 PM ]

is the priority on this, as the ticket says, Major?

the last commit on https://github.com/russolsen/dejour was 2 years ago.
the last edit to the wikipage was 3 years ago.





[CLJ-379] problem with classloader when run as windows service Created: 13/Jun/10  Updated: 26/Aug/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

I found following error when I run clojure application as MS Windows service (via procrun from Apache Daemon project). When I tried to do 'require' during run-time, I got NullPointerException. This happened as baseLoader function from RT class returned null in such environment (the value of Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader()). (Although my app works fine when I run my application as standalone program, not as service).
This error was fixed by explicit setting of class loader with following code:

(.setContextClassLoader (Thread/currentThread) (java.lang.ClassLoader/getSystemClassLoader))

before any call to 'require'....

May be you need to modify 'baseLoader' function, so it will check is value of Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader() is null or not, and if null, then return value of java.lang.ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader() ?



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 10:40 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/379
Attachments:
ticket-379-fix.diff - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/c5XWHcD4yr34HveJe5ccaP/download/c5XWHcD4yr34HveJe5ccaP

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 10:40 AM ]

alexott said: possible fix is attached

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 10:40 AM ]

alexott said: [file:c5XWHcD4yr34HveJe5ccaP]





[CLJ-396] Better support for multiple inheritance in hierarchies and multimethods Created: 07/Jul/10  Updated: 26/Aug/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

While the hierarchies produced with 'derive' allow multiple parents per child, there is no way to indicate precedence between those parents, other than by laboriously specifying 'prefer-method' for every type X every multimethod. When 2 multimethods are both applicable to the supplied arguments, Clojure produces a nonspecific IllegalArgumentException containing only an error string. All this means that while Clojure does have an "inheritance" mechanism in the form of the ad hoc hierarchies, it is currently not really possible to implement multiple inheritance using the ad hoc hierarchy mechanism. 'Prefer-method' will not scale up to use in large applications with complex type hierarchies and heavy use of multimethods.

Some potential ways to solve this are:

  • allowing 'defmulti' to take a 'tie-breaker' function (tie-breaker [arglist speclist1 speclist2] ...) which is called instead of throwing an IllegalArgumentException, and must return the 'winning speclist'.
  • instead of throwing IllegalArgumentException, throw a TiedMultiMethodsException – the exception instance should contain the offending speclists, the function, and the arguments that were supplied.
  • allowing specification of precedence when using 'derive' (if only via a "last in = highest precedence" rule).

Paul



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 11:06 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/396





[CLJ-401] Promote "seqable?" from contrib? Created: 13/Jul/10  Updated: 26/Jul/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: None


 Description   

This was vaguely discussed here and could potenntially help this ticket as well as be generally useful.

I don't speak for everyone but when I saw sequential? I assumed it would have the semantics that seqable? does. Just my opinion, I'd love to hear someone's who is more informed than mine.

In the proposed patch referenced in the ticket above, if seqable? could be used in place of sequential? flatten could be more powerful and work with maps/sets/java collections. Here's how it would look:

(defn flatten [coll]
  (lazy-seq
    (when-let [coll (seq coll)]
      (let [x (first coll)]
        (if (seqable? x)
          (concat (flatten x) (flatten (next coll)))
          (cons x (flatten (next coll))))))))

And an example:

user=> (flatten #{1 2 3 #{4 5 {6 {7 8 9 10 #tok1-block-tok}}}})
(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18)



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 9:19 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/401

Comment by Jeremy Heiler [ 26/Jul/14 5:37 PM ]

A reference to the implementation in contrib: https://github.com/clojure/clojure-contrib/blob/master/modules/core/src/main/clojure/clojure/contrib/core.clj#L78

It seems like that the only thing that is inconsistent with RT.seqFrom is that seqable? checks for String instead of CharSequence.





[CLJ-400] A faster flatten Created: 13/Jul/10  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: performance


 Description   

As discussed in this thread, I am submitting a more performant version of flatten for review. It has the same semantics as the current core/flatten. I have also updated the doc string to say that "(flatten nil) returns the empty list", because that's what the current version of core/flatten does as well.

I haven't mailed in a CA yet, but I will tomorrow morning.

Edit: Of course I'd mess my first ticket up . I am not immediately seeing an option to edit this to add the "patch" tag or add the "ready to test" action. Sorry folks



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:19 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/400
Attachments:
flatten-enhancement.diff - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/c5chtAJQir353NeJe5cbLr/download/c5chtAJQir353NeJe5cbLr





[CLJ-405] better error messages for bad defrecord calls Created: 20/Jul/10  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: defrecord, errormsgs


 Description   

defrecord could tell you if, e.g., you didn't specify an interface before leaping into method bodies. See http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/f52f90954edd8b09



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:28 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/405

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 12:28 AM ]

stu said: This could be fixed with an assert-valid-defrecord call in core_deftype, similar to assert-valid-fdecl in core.clj. Such a function would also be a place to hang other defrecord error messages.





[CLJ-415] smarter assert (prints locals) Created: 29/Jul/10  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Backlog

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Assembla Importer Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: errormsgs

Attachments: Text File clj-415-assert-prints-locals-v1.txt    
Approval: Vetted
Waiting On: Rich Hickey

 Description   

Here is an implementation you can paste into a repl. Feedback wanted:

(defn ^{:private true} local-bindings
  "Produces a map of the names of local bindings to their values."
  [env]
  (let [symbols (map key env)]
    (zipmap (map (fn [sym] `(quote ~sym)) symbols) symbols)))

(defmacro assert
  "Evaluates expr and throws an exception if it does not evaluate to
 logical true."
  {:added "1.0"}
  [x]
  (when *assert*
    (let [bindings (local-bindings &env)]
      `(when-not ~x
         (let [sep# (System/getProperty "line.separator")]
           (throw (AssertionError. (apply str "Assert failed: " (pr-str '~x) sep#
                                          (map (fn [[k# v#]] (str "\t" k# " : " v# sep#)) ~bindings)))))))))


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 5:41 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/415

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 5:41 PM ]

alexdmiller said: A simple example I tried for illustration:

user=> (let [a 1 b 2] (assert (= a b)))
#<CompilerException java.lang.AssertionError: Assert failed: (= a b)
 a : 1
 b : 2
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 5:41 PM ]

fogus said: Of course it's weird if you do something like:

(let [x 1 y 2 z 3 a 1 b 2 c 3] (assert (= x y)))
java.lang.AssertionError: Assert failed: (= x y)
 x : 1
 y : 2
 z : 3
 a : 1
 b : 2
 c : 3
 (NO_SOURCE_FILE:0)
</code></pre>

So maybe it could be slightly changed to:
<pre><code>(defmacro assert
  "Evaluates expr and throws an exception if it does not evaluate to logical true."
  {:added "1.0"}
  [x]
  (when *assert*
    (let [bindings (local-bindings &env)]
      `(when-not ~x
         (let [sep#  (System/getProperty "line.separator")
               form# '~x]
           (throw (AssertionError. (apply str "Assert failed: " (pr-str form#) sep#
                                          (map (fn [[k# v#]] 
                                                 (when (some #{k#} form#) 
                                                   (str "\t" k# " : " v# sep#))) 
                                               ~bindings)))))))))
</code></pre>

So that. now it's just:
<pre><code>(let [x 1 y 2 z 3 a 1 b 2 c 3] (assert (= x y)))
java.lang.AssertionError: Assert failed: (= x y)
 x : 1
 y : 2
 (NO_SOURCE_FILE:0)

:f

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 5:41 PM ]

fogus said: Hmmm, but that fails entirely for: (let [x 1 y 2 z 3 a 1 b 2 c 3] (assert (= [x y] [a c]))). So maybe it's better just to print all of the locals unless you really want to get complicated.
:f

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 5:41 PM ]

jawolfe said: See also some comments in:

http://groups.google.com/group/clojure-dev/browse_frm/thread/68d49cd7eb4a4899/9afc6be4d3f8ae27?lnk=gst&q=assert#9afc6be4d3f8ae27

Plus one more suggestion to add to the mix: in addition to / instead of printing the locals, how about saving them somewhere. For example, the var assert-bindings could be bound to the map of locals. This way you don't run afoul of infinite/very large sequences, and allow the user to do more detailed interrogation of the bad values (especially useful when some of the locals print opaquely).

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 5:41 PM ]

stuart.sierra said: Another approach, which I wil willingly donate:
http://github.com/stuartsierra/lazytest/blob/master/src/main/clojure/lazytest/expect.clj

Comment by Jeff Weiss [ 15/Dec/10 1:33 PM ]

There's one more tweak to fogus's last comment, which I'm actually using. You need to flatten the quoted form before you can use 'some' to check whether the local was used in the form:

(defmacro assert
  "Evaluates expr and throws an exception if it does not evaluate to logical true."
  {:added "1.0"}
  [x]
  (when *assert*
    (let [bindings (local-bindings &env)]
      `(when-not ~x
         (let [sep#  (System/getProperty "line.separator")
               form# '~x]
           (throw (AssertionError. (apply str "Assert failed: " (pr-str form#) sep#
                                          (map (fn [[k# v#]] 
                                                 (when (some #{k#} (flatten form#)) 
                                                   (str "\t" k# " : " v# sep#))) 
                                               ~bindings)))))))))
Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 04/Jan/11 8:31 PM ]

I am holding off on this until we have more solidity around http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/Error+Handling. (Considering, for instance, having all exceptions thrown from Clojure provide access to locals.)

When my pipe dream fades I will come back and screen this before the next release.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 28/Jan/11 1:14 PM ]

Why try to guess what someone wants to do with the locals (or any other context, for that matter) when you can specify a callback (see below). This would have been useful last week when I had an assertion that failed only on the CI box, where no debugger is available.

Rich, at the risk of beating a dead horse, I still think this is a good idea. Debuggers are not always available, and this is an example of where a Lisp is intrinsically capable of providing better information than can be had in other environments. If you want a patch for the code below please mark waiting on me, otherwise please decline this ticket so I stop looking at it.

(def ^:dynamic *assert-handler* nil)

(defn ^{:private true} local-bindings
  "Produces a map of the names of local bindings to their values."
  [env]
  (let [symbols (map key env)]
    (zipmap (map (fn [sym] `(quote ~sym)) symbols) symbols)))

(defmacro assert
  [x]
  (when *assert*
    (let [bindings (local-bindings &env)]
      `(when-not ~x
         (let [sep#  (System/getProperty "line.separator")
               form# '~x]
           (if *assert-handler*
             (*assert-handler* form# ~bindings)
             (throw (AssertionError. (apply str "Assert failed: " (pr-str form#) sep#
                                            (map (fn [[k# v#]] 
                                                   (when (some #{k#} (flatten form#)) 
                                                     (str "\t" k# " : " v# sep#))) 
                                                 ~bindings))))))))))
Comment by Jeff Weiss [ 27/May/11 8:16 AM ]

A slight improvement I made in my own version of this code: flatten does not affect set literals. So if you do (assert (some #{x} [a b c d])) the value of x will not be printed. Here's a modified flatten that does the job:

(defn symbols [sexp]
  "Returns just the symbols from the expression, including those
   inside literals (sets, maps, lists, vectors)."
  (distinct (filter symbol? (tree-seq coll? seq sexp))))
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 18/Nov/12 1:06 AM ]

Attaching git format patch clj-415-assert-prints-locals-v1.txt of Stuart Halloway's version of this idea. I'm not advocating it over the other variations, just getting a file attached to the JIRA ticket.





[CLJ-434] Additional copy methods for URLs in clojure.java.io Created: 10/Sep/10  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: io


 Description   

The copy method in clojure.java.io doesn't handle java.net.URL as input.
The necessary methods can be found in the mailing list post:
[[url:http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/24a105b12466a8e8]]



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 10/Sep/10 7:32 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/434





[CLJ-440] java method calls cannot omit varargs Created: 27/Sep/10  Updated: 04/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alexander Taggart Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 7
Labels: interop

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

From http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/7d0d6cb32656a621

E.g., trying to call java.util.Collections.addAll(Collection c, T... elements)

user=> (Collections/addAll [] (object-array 0))
false
user=> (Collections/addAll [])
IllegalArgumentException No matching method: addAll  clojure.lang.Compiler$StaticMethodExpr.<init> (Compiler.java:1401)

The Method class provides an isVarArg() method, which could be used to inform the compiler to process things differently.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 27/Sep/10 8:19 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/440

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 01/Apr/11 11:16 PM ]

Patch adds support for varargs. Builds on top of patch in CLJ-445.

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 05/Apr/11 5:45 PM ]

Patch updated to current CLJ-445 patch.

Comment by Nick Klauer [ 29/Oct/12 8:12 AM ]

Is this ticket on hold? I find myself typing (.someCall arg1 arg2 (into-array SomeType nil)) alot just to get the right method to be called. This ticket sounds like it would address that extraneous into-array arg that I use alot.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Oct/12 10:45 AM ]

fixbug445.diff uploaded on Oct 29 2012 was written Oct 23 2010 by Alexander Taggart. I am simply copying it from the old Assembla ticket tracking system to here to make it more easily accessible. Not surprisingy, it doesn't apply cleanly to latest master. I don't know how much effort it would be to update it, but only a few hunks do not apply cleanly according to 'patch'. See the "Updating stale patches" section on the JIRA workflow page here: http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/JIRA+workflow

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Oct/12 10:56 AM ]

Ugh. Deleted the attachment because it was for CLJ-445, or at least it was named that way. CLJ-445 definitely has a long comment history, so if one or more of its patches address this issue, then you can read the discussion there to see the history.

I don't know of any "on hold" status for tickets, except for one or two where Rich Hickey has explicitly said in a comment that he wants to wait a while before making the change. There are just tickets that contributors choose to work on and ones that screeners choose to screen.





[CLJ-445] Method/Constructor resolution does not factor in widening conversion of primitive args Created: 29/Sep/10  Updated: 27/Jul/13

Status: In Progress
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Backlog

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alexander Taggart Assignee: Alexander Taggart
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File clj-445-prim-conversion-update-2-patch.txt     Text File prim-conversion.patch     Text File prim-conversion-update-1.patch     Text File reorg-reflector.patch    
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Problem:
When making java calls (or inlined functions), if both args and param are primitive, no widening conversion is used to locate the proper overloaded method/constructor.

Examples:

user=> (Integer. (byte 0))
java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: No matching ctor found for class java.lang.Integer (NO_SOURCE_FILE:0)
</code></pre>
The above occurs because there is no Integer(byte) constructor, though it should match on Integer(int).
<pre><code>user=> (bit-shift-left (byte 1) 1)
Reflection warning, NO_SOURCE_PATH:3 - call to shiftLeft can't be resolved.
2

In the above, a call is made via reflection to Numbers.shiftLeft(Object, Object) and its associated auto-boxing, instead of directly to the perfectly adequate Numbers.shiftLeft(long, int).

Workarounds:
Explicitly casting to the formal type.

Ancillary benefits of fixing:
It would also reduce the amount of method overloading, e.g., RT.intCast(char), intCast(byte), intCast(short), could all be removed, since such calls would pass to RT.intCast(int).



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 23/Oct/10 6:43 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/445
Attachments:
fixbug445.diff - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/b6gDSUZOur36b9eJe5cbCb/download/b6gDSUZOur36b9eJe5cbCb

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 23/Oct/10 6:43 PM ]

ataggart said: [file:b6gDSUZOur36b9eJe5cbCb]

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 23/Oct/10 6:43 PM ]

ataggart said: Also fixes #446.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 03/Dec/10 12:50 PM ]

The patch is causing a test failure

[java] Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: 
     More than one matching method found: equiv, compiling:(clojure/pprint/cl_format.clj:428)

Can you take a look?

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 28/Jan/11 12:30 PM ]

The failing test happens when trying to find the correct equiv for signature (Number, long). Is the compiler wrong to propose this signature, or is the resolution method wrong in not having an answer? (It thinks two signatures are tied: (Object, long) and (Number, Number).)

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: More than one matching method found: equiv, compiling:(clojure/pprint/cl_format.clj:428)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6062)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5827)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6050)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.access$100(Compiler.java:35)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$LetExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:5492)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6055)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6043)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6043)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5827)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$IfExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:2372)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6055)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6043)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5827)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$InvokeExpr.parse(Compiler.java:3277)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6057)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5827)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$BodyExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:5231)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$LetExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:5527)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6055)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6043)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5827)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$BodyExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:5231)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6055)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5827)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$IfExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:2385)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6055)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5827)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$BodyExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:5231)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$LetExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:5527)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6055)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6043)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5827)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$IfExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:2385)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6055)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5827)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$BodyExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:5231)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$LetExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:5527)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6055)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6043)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5827)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$BodyExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:5231)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$FnMethod.parse(Compiler.java:4667)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$FnExpr.parse(Compiler.java:3397)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6053)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6043)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.access$100(Compiler.java:35)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$DefExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:480)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6055)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5866)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:5827)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6114)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:6545)
	at clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:340)
	at clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:331)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:409)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:381)
	at clojure.core$load$fn__1427.invoke(core.clj:5308)
	at clojure.core$load.doInvoke(core.clj:5307)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:409)
	at clojure.pprint$eval3969.invoke(pprint.clj:46)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6110)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:6545)
	at clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:340)
	at clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:331)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:409)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:381)
	at clojure.core$load$fn__1427.invoke(core.clj:5308)
	at clojure.core$load.doInvoke(core.clj:5307)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:409)
	at clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj:5132)
	at clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj:5169)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:143)
	at sun.reflect.GeneratedMethodAccessor11.invoke(Unknown Source)
	at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:25)
	at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:597)
	at clojure.lang.Reflector.invokeMatchingMethod(Reflector.java:77)
	at clojure.lang.Reflector.invokeInstanceMethod(Reflector.java:28)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:602)
	at clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj:5203)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:138)
	at sun.reflect.GeneratedMethodAccessor11.invoke(Unknown Source)
	at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:25)
	at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:597)
	at clojure.lang.Reflector.invokeMatchingMethod(Reflector.java:77)
	at clojure.lang.Reflector.invokeInstanceMethod(Reflector.java:28)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:604)
	at clojure.core$use.doInvoke(core.clj:5283)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:409)
	at clojure.main$repl.doInvoke(main.clj:196)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:422)
	at clojure.main$repl_opt.invoke(main.clj:267)
	at clojure.main$main.doInvoke(main.clj:362)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:409)
	at clojure.lang.Var.invoke(Var.java:401)
	at clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:163)
	at clojure.lang.Var.applyTo(Var.java:518)
	at clojure.main.main(main.java:37)
Caused by: java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: More than one matching method found: equiv
	at clojure.lang.Reflector.getMatchingParams(Reflector.java:639)
	at clojure.lang.Reflector.getMatchingParams(Reflector.java:578)
	at clojure.lang.Reflector.getMatchingMethod(Reflector.java:569)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$StaticMethodExpr.<init>(Compiler.java:1439)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler$HostExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:896)
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6055)
	... 115 more
Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 08/Feb/11 6:27 PM ]

In working on implementing support for vararg methods, I found a number of flaws with the previous solutions. Please disregard them.

I've attached a single patch (reflector-compiler-numbers.diff) which is a rather substantial overhaul of the Reflector code, with some enhancements to the Compiler and Numbers code.

The patch notes:

  • Moved reflection functionality from Compiler to Reflector.
  • Reflector supports finding overloaded methods by widening conversion, boxing conversion, and casting.
  • During compilation Reflector attempts to find best wildcard match.
  • Reflector refers to *unchecked-math* when reflectively invoking methods and constructors.
  • Both Reflector and Compiler support variable arity java methods and constructor; backwards compatible with passing an array or nil in the vararg slot.
  • Added more informative error messages to Reflector.
  • Added tests to clojure.test-clojure.reflector.
  • Altered overloaded functions of clojure.lang.Numbers to service Object/double/long params; fixes some ambiguity issues and avoids unnecessary boxing in some cases.
  • Patch closes issues 380, 440, 445, 666, and possibly 259 (not enough detail provided).
Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 10/Feb/11 7:35 PM ]

Updated patch to fix a bug where a concrete class with multiple identical Methods (e.g., one from an interface, another from an abstract class) would result in ambiguity. Now resolved by arbitrary selection (this is what the original code did as well albeit not explicitly).

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 25/Feb/11 9:29 PM ]

Updated patch to work with latest master branch.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 06/Mar/11 1:54 PM ]

patch appears to be missing test file clojure/test_clojure/reflector.clj.

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 06/Mar/11 2:39 PM ]

Bit by git.

Patch corrected to contain clojure.test-clojure.reflector.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 11/Mar/11 10:30 AM ]

Rich: I verified that the patch applied but reviewed only briefly, knowing you will want to go over this one closely.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 11/Mar/11 10:55 AM ]

After applying this patch, I am getting method missing errors:

java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: clojure.lang.Numbers.lt(JLjava/lang/Object;)

but only when using compiled code, e.g. the same code works in the REPL and then fails after compilation. Haven't been able to isolate an example that I can share here yet, but hoping this will cause someone to have an "a, hah" moment...

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 02/Apr/11 12:55 PM ]

The patch now contains only the minimal changes needed to support widening conversion. Cleanup of Numbers overloads, etc., can wait until this patch gets applied. The vararg support is in a separate patch on CLJ-440.

Comment by Christopher Redinger [ 15/Apr/11 12:50 PM ]

Please test patch

Comment by Christopher Redinger [ 21/Apr/11 11:02 AM ]

FYI: Patch applies cleanly on master and all tests pass as of 4/21 (2011)

Comment by Christopher Redinger [ 22/Apr/11 9:57 AM ]

This work is too big to take into the 1.3 beta right now. We'll revisit for a future release.

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 28/Apr/11 1:19 PM ]

To better facilitate understanding of the changes, I've broken them up into two patches, each with a number of isolable, incremental commits:

reorg-reflector.patch: Moves the reflection/invocation code from Compiler to Reflector, and eliminates redundant code. The result is a single code base for resolving methods/constructors, which will allow for altering that mechanism without excess external coordination. This contains no behaviour changes.

prim-conversion.patch: Depends on the above. Alters the method/constructor resolution process:

  • more consistent with java resolution, especially when calling pre-1.5 APIs
  • adds support for widening conversion of primitive numerics of the same category (this is more strict than java, and more clojuresque)
  • adds support for wildcard matches at compile-time (i.e., you don't need to type-hint every arg to avoid reflection).

This also provides a base to add further features, e.g., CLJ-666.

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 29/Apr/11 3:01 PM ]

It's documented in situ, but here are the conversion rules that the reflector uses to find methods:

  1. By Type:
    • object to ancestor type
    • primitive to a wider primitive of the same numeric category (new)
  2. Boxing:
    • boxed number to its primitive
    • boxed number to a wider primitive of the same numeric category (new for Short and Byte args)
    • primitive to its boxed value
    • primitive to Number or Object (new)
  3. Casting:
    • long to int
    • double to float
Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 10/May/11 3:13 PM ]

prim-conversion-update-1.patch applies to current master.

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 11/May/11 2:15 PM ]

Created CLJ-792 for the reflector reorg.

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 17/Feb/12 2:29 PM ]

prim-conversion-update-1.patch does not apply as of f5bcf64.

Is CLJ-792 now a prerequisite of this ticket?

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 17/Feb/12 3:15 PM ]

Yes, after the original patch was deemed "too big".

After this much time with no action from TPTB, feel free to kill both tickets.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 20/Feb/12 2:04 PM ]

Again, not sure if this is any help, but I've tested starting from Clojure head as of Feb 20, 2012, applying clj-792-reorg-reflector-patch2.txt attached to CLJ-792, and then applying clj-445-prim-conversion-update-2-patch.txt attached to this ticket, and the result compiles and passes all but 2 tests. I don't know whether those failures are easy to fix or not, or whether issues may have been introduced with these patches.





[CLJ-450] Add default predicate argument to filter, every?, take-while Created: 01/Oct/10  Updated: 17/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File clj-450-add-default-pred-arg-to-core-fns-patch.txt     Text File clojure-default-every-argument-v1.patch    

 Description   

Some seq processing functions that take predicates could be improved by the addition of a default value of identity for the predicate argument.

This has been discussed on the mailing list, and people seem favorable:
http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/600559b7ee261908/3bc5d144ac54854e?lnk=gst&q=filter+identity#3bc5d144ac54854e
http://groups.google.com/group/clojure-dev/browse_thread/thread/0a9b5750dd7ec4ca

I can put together a patch.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 01/Oct/10 4:39 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/450

Comment by Jason Orendorff [ 13/Mar/12 2:51 PM ]

I independently wanted this. Here's a patch for: some, not-any?, every?, not-every?. If this is roughly what's wanted I'll be happy to add filter, remove, take-while, drop-while.

Comment by Jason Orendorff [ 13/Mar/12 4:57 PM ]

Note that there are a few cases of (every? identity ...) and (some identity ...) in core.clj itself; the patch removes "identity" from those.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 26/Apr/12 7:51 PM ]

clj-450-add-default-pred-arg-to-core-fns-patch.txt dated Apr 26 2012 is identical to Jason Orendorff's, except it is in git format. Jason is not on the list of Clojure contributors as of today. I have sent him an email asking if he has done so, or is planning to.

Comment by Jason Orendorff [ 27/Apr/12 10:35 AM ]

Of course I'd be happy to send in a contributor agreement. ...Is there actually any interest in taking this patch or something like it?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 27/Apr/12 11:38 AM ]

I don't know if there is any interest in taking this patch. Perhaps a Clojure screener will take a look at it and comment, but I am not a screener and can't promise anything.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/14 10:33 PM ]

it doesn't seem productive to dance around: "I'll send in a ca, if you agree to take my patch" "We might take your patch but first send in a ca"

if there is no signed ca I think the patch should be removed from jira

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Apr/14 10:39 PM ]

Generally, I do not look at patches from people that have not signed a CA in case I need to write a patch later that is "clean".





[CLJ-451] fn literals lack name/arglists/namespace metadata Created: 05/Oct/10  Updated: 26/Aug/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None


 Description   

I would expect (meta (fn not-so-anonymous [a b c])) to include {:name not-so-anonymous :arglists ([a b c])} alongside line number information and possibly namespace/file as well, but currently it only includes :line.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 05/Oct/10 12:29 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/451





[CLJ-457] lazy recursive definition giving incorrect results Created: 13/Oct/10  Updated: 23/Nov/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Assembla Importer Assignee: Christophe Grand
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: File CLJ-457-2.diff     File clj-457-3.diff    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

If you define a global data var in terms of a lazy sequence referring to that same var, you can get different results depending on the chunkiness of laziness of the functions being used to build the collection.

Clojure's lazy sequences don't promise to support this, but they shouldn't return wrong answers. In the example given in http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/1c342fad8461602d (and repeated below), Clojure should not return bad data. An error message would be good, and even an infinite loop would be more reasonable than the current behavior.

(Similar issue reported here: https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure/yD941fIxhyE/discussion)

(def nums (drop 2 (range)))
(def primes (cons (first nums)
             (lazy-seq (->>
               (rest nums)
               (remove
                 (fn [x]
                   (let [dividors (take-while #(<= (* % %) x)
primes)]
                     (println (str "primes = " primes))
                     (some #(= 0 (rem x %)) dividors))))))))
(take 5 primes)

It prints out:
(primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
2 3 5 7 9)


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 13/Oct/10 3:00 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/457

Comment by Aaron Bedra [ 10/Dec/10 9:08 AM ]

Stu and Rich talked about making this an error, but it would break some existing code to do so.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 17/Dec/10 8:03 AM ]

Is there a specific question on this?

Comment by Aaron Bedra [ 05/Jan/11 9:05 PM ]

Stu, you and I went over this but I can't remember exactly what the question was here.

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 28/Nov/12 12:24 PM ]

Tentative patch attached.
Have you an example of existing code which is broken by such a patch (as mention by Aaron Bedra)?

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 30/Nov/12 9:43 AM ]

The patch intends to do what? We have only a problem description and code. Please enumerate the plan rather than make us decipher the patch.

As a first principle, I don't want Clojure to promise that such recursively defined values are possible.

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 30/Nov/12 10:23 AM ]

The proposal here is to catch recursive seq realization (ie when computing the body of a lazy-seq attempts to access the same seq) and throw an exception.

Currently when such a case happens, the recursive access to the seq returns nil. This results in incorrect code seemingly working but producing incorrect results or even incorrect code producing correct results out of luck (see https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure/yD941fIxhyE/discussion for such an example).

So this patch moves around the modification to the LazySeq state (f, sv and s fields) before all potentially recursive method call (.sval in the while of .seq and .invoke in .sval) so that, upon reentrance, the state of the LazySeq is coherent and able to convey the fact the seq is already being computed.

Currently a recursive call may find f and sv cleared and concludes the computation is done and the result is in s despite s being unaffected yet.

Currently:

State f sv s
Unrealized not null null null
Realized null null anything
Being realized/recursive call from fn.invoke not null null null
Being realized/recursive call from ls.sval null null null

Note that "Being realized" states overlap with Unrealized or Realized.
(NB: "anything" includes null)

With the patch:

State f sv s
Unrealized not null null null
Realized null null anything but this
Being realized null null this
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Nov/12 2:06 PM ]

That last comment, Christophe, goes a long way to explaining the idea to me, at least. Any chance comments with similar content could be added as part of the patch?

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 03/Dec/12 11:18 AM ]

New patch with a comment explaining the expected states.
Note: I tidied the states table up.

// Before calling user code (f.invoke() in sval and, indirectly,
// ((LazySeq)ls).sval() in seq -- and even RT.seq() in seq), ensure that 
// the LazySeq state is in one of these states:
//
// State            f          sv
// ================================
// Unrealized       not null   null
// Realized         null       null
// Being realized   null       this

CLJ-1119 is also fixed by this patch.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Nov/13 12:35 AM ]

Patch clj-457-3.diff is identical to Christophe's CLJ-457-2.diff, except it has been updated to no longer conflict with the commit made for CLJ-949 on Nov 22, 2013, which basically removed the try/catch in method sval(). It passes tests, and I don't see anything wrong with it, but it would be good if Christophe could give it a look, too.





[CLJ-666] Add support for Big* numeric types to Reflector Created: 29/Oct/10  Updated: 27/Jul/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Chas Emerick Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-Add-Big-support-to-Reflector.patch     Text File 0001-Add-Big-support-to-Reflector-Updated.patch    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

This should work as expected, for example:

(Integer. 1N)

Probably for BigInt, BigInteger, and BigDecimal.

Method to look at is c.l.Reflector.paramArgTypeMatch, per Rich in irc.



 Comments   
Comment by Colin Jones [ 30/Mar/11 11:52 PM ]

Questions posed on the clojure-dev list around how this impacts bit-shift-left: http://groups.google.com/group/clojure-dev/browse_thread/thread/2191cbf0048d8ca6

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 31/Mar/11 12:42 AM ]

Patch on CLJ-445 fixes this as well.

Comment by Colin Jones [ 27/Apr/11 4:41 PM ]

This patch fails a test around bit-shifting a BigInt: `(bit-shift-left 1N 10000)`. The reason is that the patch changes the dispatch of (BigInt, Long) from (Object, Object) to (long, int).

Clearly this can't be applied (unless another change makes it possible), but I'm putting it up as a start of the conversation.

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 27/Apr/11 5:26 PM ]

My comment from the mailing list:

If the test breaks it likely means Numbers.shiftLeft(long,int) was
selected over Numbers.shiftLeft(Object,Object). Given that 1N is an
Object (one that can exceed the size of a long), the method selection
is incorrect, thus the patch is broken.


The suggestion of "simply" modifying paramArgTypeMatch is not sufficient since the mechanism for preferring one method over another lives in Compiler, and isn't smart enough to make these sorts of decisions.

Comment by Christopher Redinger [ 28/Apr/11 9:21 AM ]

Considering moving this out of Release.next - soliciting comments from Chas.

Comment by Chas Emerick [ 28/Apr/11 9:41 AM ]

I'm afraid I don't have any particular insight into the issues involved at this point. I ran into the problem originally noted a while back, and opened the ticket at Rich's suggestion. I'm sorry if the text of the ticket led anyone down unfruitful paths…

Comment by Luke VanderHart [ 29/Apr/11 10:01 AM ]

The issues relating to bitshift are moot since the decision was made that bit-shifts are only for 32/64 bit values.

Still a valid issue, but de-prioritized as per Rich.

Comment by Alex Ott [ 25/Jun/12 7:19 AM ]

Modified version of original patch

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 26/Jun/12 1:38 PM ]

Alex, would you mind attaching it with a unique file name? I know that JIRA lets us create multiple attachments with the same file name, and I know we can tell them apart by date and the account of the person who uploaded the attachment, but giving them the same name only seems to invite confusion.

Comment by Alex Ott [ 28/Jun/12 1:00 PM ]

Renamed updated patch to unique name





[CLJ-668] Improve slurp performance by using native Java StringWriter and jio/copy Created: 01/Nov/10  Updated: 03/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.3
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Jürgen Hötzel Assignee: Timothy Baldridge
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: ft, io, performance

Attachments: File slurp-perf-patch.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Instead of copying each character from InputReader to StringBuffer.

Performance improvement:

Generate a 10meg file:
user> (spit "foo.txt" (apply str (repeat (* 1024 1024 10) "X")))

Test code:
user> (dotimes [x 100] (time (do (slurp "foo.txt") 0)))

From:
...
Elapsed time: 136.387 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 143.782 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 153.174 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 211.51 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 155.429 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 145.619 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 142.641 msecs"
...


To:
...
"Elapsed time: 23.408 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 25.876 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 41.449 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 28.292 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 25.765 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 24.339 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 32.047 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 23.372 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 24.365 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 26.265 msecs"
...

Approach: Use StringWriter and jio/copy vs character by character copy. Results from the current patch see a 4-5x perf boost after the jit warms up, with purely in-memory streams (ByteArrayInputStream over a 6MB string).

Patch: slurp-perf-patch.diff
Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 21/Apr/14 3:28 PM ]

This is double-better with the changes in Clojure 1.6 to improve jio/copy performance by using the NIO impl. Rough timing difference on a 25M file: old= 2316.021 msecs, new= 93.319 msecs.

Filer did not supply a patch and is not a contributor. If someone wants to make a patch (and better timing info demonstrating performance improvements), that would be great.

Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 10/Sep/14 10:29 PM ]

Fixed the ticket formatting a bit, and added a patch I coded up tonight. Should be pretty close to the old patch, as we both use StringWriter, but I didn't really look at the old patch beyond noticing that it was using StringWriter.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Sep/14 7:01 AM ]

Can you update the perf comparison on latest code and do both a small and big file?





[CLJ-701] Compiler loses 'loop's return type in some cases Created: 03/Jan/11  Updated: 06/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Backlog
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Chouser Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None
Environment:

Clojure commit 9052ca1854b7b6202dba21fe2a45183a4534c501, version 1.3.0-master-SNAPSHOT


Attachments: File hoistedmethod-pass-1.diff     File hoistedmethod-pass-2.diff     File hoistedmethod-pass-3.diff     File hoistedmethod-pass-4.diff     File hoistedmethod-pass-5.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Vetted

 Description   
(set! *warn-on-reflection* true)
(fn [] (loop [b 0] (recur (loop [a 1] a))))

Generates the following warnings:

recur arg for primitive local: b is not matching primitive, had: Object, needed: long
Auto-boxing loop arg: b

This is interesting for several reasons. For one, if the arg to recur is a let form, there is no warning:

(fn [] (loop [b 0] (recur (let [a 1] a))))

Also, the compiler appears to understand the return type of loop forms just fine:

(use '[clojure.contrib.repl-utils :only [expression-info]])
(expression-info '(loop [a 1] a))
;=> {:class long, :primitive? true}

The problem can of course be worked around using an explicit cast on the loop form:

(fn [] (loop [b 0] (recur (long (loop [a 1] a)))))

Reported by leafw in IRC: http://clojure-log.n01se.net/date/2011-01-03.html#10:31



 Comments   
Comment by a_strange_guy [ 03/Jan/11 4:36 PM ]

The problem is that a 'loop form gets converted into an anonymous fn that gets called immediately, when the loop is in a expression context (eg. its return value is needed, but not as the return value of a method/fn).

so

(fn [] (loop [b 0] (recur (loop [a 1] a))))

gets converted into

(fn [] (loop [b 0] (recur ((fn [] (loop [a 1] a))))))

see the code in the compiler:
http://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/src/jvm/clojure/lang/Compiler.java#L5572

this conversion already bites you if you have mutable fields in a deftype and want to 'set! them in a loop

http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-274

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 23/Nov/12 2:28 AM ]

loops in expression context are lifted into fns because else Hotspot doesn't optimize them.
This causes several problems:

  • type inference doesn't propagate outside of the loop[1]
  • the return value is never a primitive
  • mutable fields are inaccessible
  • surprise allocation of one closure objects each time the loop is entered.

Adressing all those problems isn't easy.
One can compute the type of the loop and emit a type hint but it works only with reference types. To make it works with primitive, primitie fns aren't enough since they return only long/double: you have to add explicit casts.
So solving the first two points can be done in a rather lccal way.
The two other points require more impacting changes, the goal would be to emit a method rather than a fn. So it means at the very least changing ObjExpr and adding a new subclassof ObjMethod.

[1] beware of CLJ-1111 when testing.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 21/Oct/13 10:28 PM ]

I don't think this is going to make it into 1.6, so removing the 1.6 tag.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 21/Jul/14 7:14 PM ]

an immediate solution to this might be to hoist loops out in to distinct non-ifn types generated by the compiler with an invoke method that is typed to return the getJavaClass() type of the expression, that would give us the simplifying benefits of hoisting the code out and free use from the Object semantics of ifn

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 22/Jul/14 8:39 PM ]

I have attached a 3 part patch as hoistedmethod-pass-1.diff

3ed6fed8 adds a new ObjMethod type to represent expressions hoisted out in to their own methods on the enclosing class

9c39cac1 uses HoistedMethod to compile loops not in the return context

901e4505 hoists out try expressions and makes it possible for try to return a primitive expression (this might belong on http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1422)

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 22/Jul/14 8:54 PM ]

with hoistedmethod-pass-1.diff the example code generates bytecode like this

user=> (println (no.disassemble/disassemble (fn [] (loop [b 0] (recur (loop [a 1] a))))))
// Compiled from form-init1272682692522767658.clj (version 1.5 : 49.0, super bit)
public final class user$eval1675$fn__1676 extends clojure.lang.AFunction {
  
  // Field descriptor #7 Ljava/lang/Object;
  public static final java.lang.Object const__0;
  
  // Field descriptor #7 Ljava/lang/Object;
  public static final java.lang.Object const__1;
  
  // Method descriptor #10 ()V
  // Stack: 2, Locals: 0
  public static {};
     0  lconst_0
     1  invokestatic java.lang.Long.valueOf(long) : java.lang.Long [16]
     4  putstatic user$eval1675$fn__1676.const__0 : java.lang.Object [18]
     7  lconst_1
     8  invokestatic java.lang.Long.valueOf(long) : java.lang.Long [16]
    11  putstatic user$eval1675$fn__1676.const__1 : java.lang.Object [20]
    14  return
      Line numbers:
        [pc: 0, line: 1]

 // Method descriptor #10 ()V
  // Stack: 1, Locals: 1
  public user$eval1675$fn__1676();
    0  aload_0 [this]
    1  invokespecial clojure.lang.AFunction() [23]
    4  return
      Line numbers:
        [pc: 0, line: 1]
  
  // Method descriptor #25 ()Ljava/lang/Object;
  // Stack: 3, Locals: 3
  public java.lang.Object invoke();
     0  lconst_0
     1  lstore_1 [b]
     2  aload_0 [this]
     3  lload_1 [b]
     4  invokevirtual user$eval1675$fn__1676.__hoisted1677(long) : long [29]
     7  lstore_1 [b]
     8  goto 2
    11  areturn
      Line numbers:
        [pc: 0, line: 1]
      Local variable table:
        [pc: 2, pc: 11] local: b index: 1 type: long
        [pc: 0, pc: 11] local: this index: 0 type: java.lang.Object

 // Method descriptor #27 (J)J
  // Stack: 2, Locals: 5
  public long __hoisted1677(long b);
    0  lconst_1
    1  lstore_3 [a]
    2  lload_3
    3  lreturn
      Line numbers:
        [pc: 0, line: 1]
      Local variable table:
        [pc: 2, pc: 3] local: a index: 3 type: long
        [pc: 0, pc: 3] local: this index: 0 type: java.lang.Object
        [pc: 0, pc: 3] local: b index: 1 type: java.lang.Object

}
nil
user=> 
  

the body of the method __hoisted1677 is the inner loop

for reference the part of the bytecode from the same function compiled with 1.6.0 is pasted here https://gist.github.com/hiredman/f178a690718bde773ba0 the inner loop body is missing because it is implemented as its own IFn class that is instantiated and immediately executed. it closes over a boxed version of the numbers and returns an boxed version

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 23/Jul/14 12:43 AM ]

hoistedmethod-pass-2.diff replaces 901e4505 with f0a405e3 which fixes the implementation of MaybePrimitiveExpr for TryExpr

with hoistedmethod-pass-2.diff the largest clojure project I have quick access to (53kloc) compiles and all the tests pass

Comment by Alex Miller [ 23/Jul/14 12:03 PM ]

Thanks for the work on this!

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 23/Jul/14 2:05 PM ]

I have been working through running the tests for all the contribs projects with hoistedmethod-pass-2.diff, there are some bytecode verification errors compiling data.json and other errors elsewhere, so there is still work to do

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 25/Jul/14 7:08 PM ]

hoistedmethod-pass-3.diff

49782161 * add HoistedMethod to the compiler for hoisting expresssions out well typed methods
e60e6907 * hoist out loops if required
547ba069 * make TryExpr MaybePrimitive and hoist tries out as required

all contribs whose tests pass with master pass with this patch.

the change from hoistedmethod-pass-2.diff in this patch is the addition of some bookkeeping for arguments that take up more than one slot

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 26/Jul/14 1:37 AM ]

Kevin there's still a bug regarding long/doubles handling:
On commit 49782161, line 101 of the diff, you're emitting gen.pop() if the expression is in STATEMENT position, you need to emit gen.pop2() instead if e.getReturnType is long.class or double.class

Test case:

user=> (fn [] (try 1 (finally)) 2)
VerifyError (class: user$eval1$fn__2, method: invoke signature: ()Ljava/lang/Object;) Attempt to split long or double on the stack  user/eval1 (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 26/Jul/14 1:46 AM ]

bah, all that work to figure out the thing I couldn't get right and of course I overlooked the thing I knew at the beginning. I want to get rid of some of the code duplication between emit and emitUnboxed for TryExpr, so when I get that done I'll fix the pop too

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 26/Jul/14 12:52 PM ]

hoistedmethod-pass-4.diff logically has the same three commits, but fixes the pop vs pop2 issue and rewrites emit and emitUnboxed for TryExpr to share most of their code

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 26/Jul/14 12:58 PM ]

hoistedmethod-pass-5.diff fixes a stupid mistake in the tests in hoistedmethod-pass-4.diff





[CLJ-705] Make sorted maps and sets implement j.u.SortedMap and SortedSet interfaces Created: 05/Jan/11  Updated: 02/Jun/12

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Rich Hickey Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 02/Jun/12 2:29 PM ]

This might be a duplicate of CLJ-248. See that one before working on this one, at least.





[CLJ-735] Improve error message when a protocol method is not found Created: 04/Feb/11  Updated: 28/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.2
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: errormsgs

Attachments: File protocolerr.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

If you call a protocol function but pass the wrong arity (forget an argument for example), you currently a message that says "No single method ... of interface ... found for function ... of protocol ...". The code in question is getting matching methods from the Reflector and creates this message if the number of matches != 1.

There are really two cases there:

  • matches == 0 - this happens frequently due to typos
  • matches > 1 - this presumably happens infrequently

I propose that the == 0 case instead should have slightly different text at the beginning and a hint as to the intended arity within it:

"No method: ... of interface ... with arity ... found for function ... of protocol ...".

The >1 case should have similar changes: "Multiple methods: ... of interface ... with arity ... found for function ... of protocol ...".

Patch is attached. I used case which presumably should have better performance than a nested if/else. I was not sure whether the reported arity should match the actual Java method arity or Clojure protocol function arity (including the target). I did the former.

I did not add a test as I wasn't sure whether checking error messages in tests was appropriate or not. Happy to add that if requested.



 Comments   
Comment by Chas Emerick [ 14/Jul/11 6:39 AM ]

I was not sure whether the reported arity should match the actual Java method arity or Clojure protocol function arity (including the target). I did the former.

I think it should be the latter. The message is emitted when the protocol methods are being invoked through the corresponding function, so it should be consistent with the errors emitted by regular functions.

+1 for some tests, too. There certainly are tests for reflection warnings and such.

FWIW, I'm happy to take this on if Alex is otherwise occupied.





[CLJ-787] transient blows up when passed a vector created by subvec Created: 03/May/11  Updated: 06/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Alexander Redington Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File CLJ-787-p1.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Incomplete

 Description   

Subvectors created with subvec from a PersistentVector cannot be made transient:

user=> (transient (subvec [1 2 3 4] 2))
ClassCastException clojure.lang.APersistentVector$SubVector cannot be cast to clojure.lang.IEditableCollection  clojure.core/transient (core.clj:2864)

Cause: APersistentVector$SubVector does not implement IEditableCollection

Patch: CLJ-787-p1.patch

Approach: Create a TransientSubVector based on an underlying TransientVector.

Two assumptions:

  • It's okay for TransientSubVector to delegate the ensureEditable functionality to the underlying TransientVector (sometimes explicitly, sometimes implicitly) - calling ensureEditable explicitly also requires that the field for the underlying vector be the concrete TransientVector type rather than the ITransientVector interface.
  • When an operation that would throw an exception on a PersistentVector happens from the wrong thread (or after persistent!), we throw that exception rather than the IllegalAccessError that transients throw when accessed inappropriately.


 Comments   
Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 31/May/11 9:28 AM ]

Confirmed. APersistentVector$SubVector does not implement IEditableCollection.

The current implementation of TransientVector depends on implementation details of PersistentVector, so it is not a trivial fix. The simplest fix might be to implement IEditableCollection.asTransient in SubVector by creating a new PersistentVector, but I do not know the performance implications.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 25/May/13 8:11 PM ]

We could get the same performance characteristics as SubVector by creating a TransientSubVector based on an underlying TransientVector, right?

Preparing a patch to that effect.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 25/May/13 10:58 PM ]

Text from the commit msg:

Made two assumptions:

  • It's okay for TransientSubVector to delegate the ensureEditable
    functionality to the underlying TransientVector (sometimes
    explicitely, sometimes implicitely) – calling ensureEditable
    explicitely also requires that the field for the underlying vector
    be the concrete TransientVector type rather than the
    ITransientVector interface.
  • When an operation that would throw an exception on a
    PersistentVector happens from the wrong thread (or after
    persistent!), we throw that exception rather than the
    IllegalAccessError that transients throw when accessed
    inappropriately.
Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Oct/13 4:17 PM ]

I think there are some assumptions being made in this patch about the class structure here that do not hold. The structure is, admittedly, quite twisty.

A counter-example that highlights one of a few subtypes of APersistentVector that are not PersistentVector (like MapEntry):

user=> (transient (subvec (first {:a 1}) 0 1))
ClassCastException clojure.lang.MapEntry cannot be cast to clojure.lang.IEditableCollection  clojure.lang.APersistentVector$TransientSubVector.<init> (APersistentVector.java:592)

PersistentVector.SubVector expects to work on anything that implements IPersistentVector. Note that this includes concrete types such as MapEntry and LazilyPersistentVector, but could also be any user-implemented type IPersistentVector type too. TransientSubVector is making the assumption that the IPersistentVector in a SubVector question is also an IEditableCollection (that can be converted to be transient). Note that while PersistentVector implements TransientVector (and IEditableCollection), APersistentVector does not. To really implement this in tandem with SubVector, I think you would need to guarantee that IPersistentVector extended IEditableCollection and I don't think that's something we want to do.

I don't see an easy solution. Any time I see all these modifiers (Transient, Sub, etc) being created in different combinations, it is a clear sign that independent kinds of functionality are being remixed into single inheritance OO trees. You can see the same thing in most collection libraries (even Java's - need a ConcurrentIdentitySortedMap? too bad!).

Needs more thought.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Nov/13 10:17 AM ]

Patch CLJ-787-p1.patch no longer applies cleanly to latest master, but it is only because of some new tests added to the transients.clj file since the patch was created, so it is trivial to update in that sense. Not updating it now due to other more significant issues with the patch described above.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Jan/14 10:19 AM ]

No good solution to consider right now, removing from 1.6.





[CLJ-790] Primitive type hints on function names should print error message Created: 10/May/11  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alan Dipert Assignee: Alan Dipert
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: errormsgs


 Description   

Functions returning primitives are hinted with metadata on the argument list, not on the function name. Using a primitive type hint on a function name should print an error message.

Currently, misplaced primitive hints are read without error.






[CLJ-792] Refactor method resolution code out of Compiler and into Reflector Created: 11/May/11  Updated: 05/Feb/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alexander Taggart Assignee: Alexander Taggart
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File clj-792-reorg-reflector-patch2.txt     Text File reorg-reflector.patch    

 Description   

Issues:

  1. Code for obtaining method/constructor instances is duplicated across the Compiler
  2. Code for resolving a preferred overloaded method lives in the Compiler

By consolidating the duplicated code, moving the reflection-related parts into Reflector, and providing a straightforward API, it should be easier to read and understand the method resolution process. Further, improvements to (e.g., CLJ-445) the mechanism for reflecting on class members can largely be isolated from the Compiler. And the few points of coordination (e.g., Compiler emitting same arg and return types as Reflector does when invoking) can be clearly identified and documented.



 Comments   
Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 17/Feb/12 2:28 PM ]

Patch does not apply as of commit f5bcf64.

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 17/Feb/12 3:14 PM ]

Yeah, year-old patches tend to do that.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 20/Feb/12 1:11 PM ]

I don't know if this is helpful or not, but this updated version of Alexander's patch applies cleanly to latest Clojure head as of Feb 20, 2012. It compiles, but does not pass ant test.





[CLJ-825] Protocol implementation inconsistencies when overloading arity Created: 08/Aug/11  Updated: 10/Jun/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.2, Release 1.3, Release 1.4, Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Carl Lerche Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: protocols
Environment:

All


Attachments: Text File clj-825-1.patch     File scribbles.clj    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The forms required for implementing arity-overloaded protocol methods are inconsistent between the "extend-*" macros and "defrecord".

The "extend" family of macros requires overloaded method definitions to follow the form used by defn:

(method ([arg1] ...) ([arg1 arg2] ...))

However, "defrecord" requires implementations to be defined separately:

(method [arg1] ...)
(method [arg1 arg2] ...)

Furthermore, the error modes if you get it wrong are unhelpful.

If you use the "defrecord" form with "extend-*", it evals successfully, but later definitions silently overwrite lexically previous definitions.

If you use the "extend-*" form with "defrecord", it gives a cryptic error about "unsupported binding form" on the body of the method.

This is not the same issue as CLJ-1056: That pertains to the syntax for declaring a protocol, this problem is with the syntax for implementing a protocol.

(defprotocol MyProtocol
  (mymethod
    [this arg]
    [this arg optional-arg]))

(extend-protocol MyProtocol
  Object
  (mymethod
    ([this arg] :one-arg)
    ([this arg optional-arg] :two-args)))

;; BAD! Blows up with "Unsupported binding form: :one-arg"
(defrecord MyRecord []
  MyProtocol
  (mymethod
    ([this arg] :one-arg)
    ([this arg optional-arg] :two-args)))

;; Works...
(defrecord MyRecord []
  MyProtocol
  (mymethod [this arg] :one-arg)
  (mymethod [this arg optional-arg] :two-args))

;; Evals...
(extend-protocol MyProtocol
  Object
  (mymethod [this arg] :one-arg)
  (mymethod [this arg optional-arg] :two-args))

;; But then... Error! "Wrong number of args"
(mymethod :obj :arg)

;; 2-arg version is invokable...
(mymethod :obj :arg1 :arg2)


 Comments   
Comment by Paavo Parkkinen [ 17/Nov/13 6:02 AM ]

Attached a patch for this.

For defrecord, I check which style is used for defining methods, and transform into the original style if the new style is used. For the check I do what I believe defn does, which is (vector? (first fdecl)).

For extend-*, I skip the checking, and just transform everything into the same format.

Tests included for both.

All tests pass.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 10/Jun/14 11:00 AM ]

What the proposal?





[CLJ-840] Add a way to access the current test var in :each fixtures for clojure.test Created: 21/Sep/11  Updated: 23/Nov/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Hugo Duncan Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: File add-test-var.diff     File clj840-2.diff    
Patch: Code

 Description   

When looking at (log) output from tests written with clojure.test, I would like to be able to identify the output associated with each test. A mechanism to expose the current test var within an :each fixture would enable this.

One mechanism might be to bind a test-var var with the current test var before calling the each-fixture-fn in clojure.test/test-all-vars.



 Comments   
Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 07/Oct/11 4:33 PM ]

Or just pass the Var directly into the fixture. Vars are invokable.

Comment by Hugo Duncan [ 07/Oct/11 4:45 PM ]

I don't think that works, since the the function passed to the fixture is not the test var, but a function calling test-var on the test var.

Comment by Hugo Duncan [ 21/Oct/11 10:34 PM ]

Patch to add test-var

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 25/Oct/11 6:04 PM ]

*testing-vars* already has this information, but it's not visible to the fixture functions because it gets bound inside test-var.

Perhaps the :each fixture functions should be called in test-var rather than in test-all-vars. (The namespace of a Var is available in its metadata.) But then we have to call join-fixtures inside test-var every time.

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 25/Oct/11 6:26 PM ]

Try this patch: clj840-2.diff.

This makes *testing-vars* visible to :each fixture functions, which seems intuitively more correct.

BUT it slightly changes the behavior of test-var, which I'm less happy about.

Comment by Hugo Duncan [ 25/Oct/11 8:07 PM ]

Might it make sense to provide a function on top of testing-vars to return the current test-var?

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 28/Oct/11 9:14 AM ]

No, that function is first

Comment by Hugo Duncan [ 28/Oct/11 11:31 AM ]

I agree with having the dynamic vars as part of the extension interface, but would have thought that having a function for use when writing tests would have been cleaner. Just my 2c.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Nov/13 12:42 AM ]

With a commit made on Nov 22, 2013, patch clj840-2.diff no longer applies cleanly to latest master. Updating it appears like it might be straightforward, but best for someone who knows this part of the code well to do so.





[CLJ-859] Built in dynamic vars don't have :dynamic metadata Created: 19/Oct/11  Updated: 24/Feb/12

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.3
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Anthony Simpson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

I'm sure 'built in' is probably not the right term here, but I'm not sure what these are called.

I ran into this issue earlier today while fixing a bug in clojail. Built in vars, particularly ones listed here without a source link: http://clojure.github.com/clojure/clojure.core-api.html, do not have :dynamic metadata despite being dynamic. This includes *in*, *out*, and *err* among others. Here are some examples:

user=> (meta #'*err*)
{:ns #<Namespace clojure.core>, :name *err*, :added "1.0", :doc "A java.io.Writer object representing standard error for print operations.\n\n  Defaults to System/err, wrapped in a PrintWriter"}
user=> (meta #'*in*)
{:ns #<Namespace clojure.core>, :name *in*, :added "1.0", :doc "A java.io.Reader object representing standard input for read operations.\n\n  Defaults to System/in, wrapped in a LineNumberingPushbackReader"}
user=> (meta #'*out*)
{:ns #<Namespace clojure.core>, :name *out*, :added "1.0", :doc "A java.io.Writer object representing standard output for print operations.\n\n  Defaults to System/out, wrapped in an OutputStreamWriter", :tag java.io.Writer}
user=> (meta #'*ns*)
{:ns #<Namespace clojure.core>, :name *ns*, :added "1.0", :doc "A clojure.lang.Namespace object representing the current namespace.", :tag clojure.lang.Namespace}


 Comments   
Comment by Ben Smith-Mannschott [ 19/Oct/11 12:03 PM ]

This recent discussion on the users list seems relevant: Should intern obey :dynamic?.

It seems to boil down to this the information that a Var is dynamic (or not) is duplicated. Once as metadata with the key :dynamic, and once as a boolean field on the Var class which implements Clojure's variables. This boolean can be obtained by calling the method isDynamic() on the Var.

The confusion arises because apparently :dynamic and .isDynamic can get out of sync with each other. .isDynamic is the source of truth in this case.

Comment by Ben Smith-Mannschott [ 19/Oct/11 12:18 PM ]

Compiler$Parser.parse(...) finds the :dynamic entry left in the metadata of the symbol by LispReader and passes this on when creating a new DefExpr, which in turn, generates the code that will call setDynamic(...) on the var when it is created at runtime.

As far as I can tell, the :dynamic entry is irrelevant once that has occurred. It seems to be implemented only as a way to communicate (by way of the reader) with the compiler. Once the compiler's gotten the message, it isn't needed anymore. Keeping it around seems to just cause confusion.

Dynamic vars created by the Java layer of Clojure core don't use the :dynamic mechanism, they just setDynamic() directly. That's why they don't have :dynamic in their meta-data map.

  • Perhaps the compiler should elide :dynamic from the metadata map available at runtime, since it has served its purpose.
  • Perhaps Clojure should supply the function dynamic?.
    (defn dynamic? [^clojure.lang.Var v] (.isDynamic v))

Or, perhaps one might consider, for 1.4, replacing :dynamic altogether and just enforcing the established naming convention: *earmuffs* are dynamic, everything-else isn't. (The compile warns about violations of this convention in 1.3.)

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 24/Feb/12 11:39 AM ]

I recently noticed several lines like this one in core.clj. Depending upon how many symbols are like this, perhaps this method could be used to add :dynamic metadata to symbols in core, along with a unit test to verify that all symbols in core have :dynamic if and only if .isDynamic returns true?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 24/Feb/12 12:41 PM ]

Ugh. In my previous comment, by "several lines like this one" I meant to paste the following as an example:

(alter-meta! #'agent assoc :added "1.0")





[CLJ-864] defrecord positional arity factory fn should have an inline version that calls the record constructor Created: 26/Oct/11  Updated: 04/Dec/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Kevin Downey Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: defrecord


 Description   

defrecord positional arity factory fn should have an inline version that calls the record constructor



 Comments   
Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 26/May/13 3:39 PM ]

I had the idea recently that the factory fn was useful partly for being a redefinable var, e.g. that you could wrap with contracts or anything else. This idea would preclude that.

It makes sense though if the only purpose of ->Foo is to avoid having to :import something.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 13/Aug/13 4:04 PM ]

interesting, that is a good point

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 04/Dec/13 7:21 AM ]

Another thought – using the factory fns rather than constructors directly gives you a little bit of protection against code-reloading issues, does it not? I don't think I understand the code reloading issues in great detail, so I'm not confident about this. My assumption is that the compiled code refers to vars rather than classes.





[CLJ-888] defprotocol should throw error when signatures include variable number of parameters Created: 29/Nov/11  Updated: 05/Feb/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.3
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Greg Chapman Assignee: Stuart Halloway
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: errormsgs, protocols

Attachments: Text File 0001-Forbid-vararg-declaration-in-defprotocol-definterfac.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

I tried to use & in the signature for a method in defprotocol. Apparently (see below), this is compiled so that & becomes a simple parameter name, and there is no special handling for variable number of parameters. I think the use of & in a protocol signature ought to be detected and immediately cause an exception (I also think this restriction on the signatures ought to be documented; I couldn't find it specified in the current documentation, though of course it is implied (as I later realized) by the fact that defprotocol creates a Java interface).

user=> (defprotocol Applier (app [this f & args]))
Applier
user=> (deftype A [] Applier (app [_ f & args] (prn f & args) (apply f args)))
user.A
user=> (app (A.) + 1 2)
#<core$PLUS clojure.core$PLUS@5d9d0d20> 1 2
IllegalArgumentException Don't know how to create ISeq from: java.lang.Long
clojure.lang.RT.seqFrom (RT.java:487)



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Coventry [ 21/Oct/13 4:21 PM ]

Patch with test code attached. I have it throwing a CompilerException so that it shows source code location. Not sure whether this is kosher in clojure code, but I wish more macros provided this in their error handling.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 22/Oct/13 6:26 AM ]

This issue has already been discussed in CLJ-1024. There I provided a patch that forbids varargs and destructuring forms at various places including defprotocol/definterface. My patch had been applied shortly before clojure 1.5 was released, but it had a bug (forbid too many uses), so it got reverted and the bug closed and declined.

I was told to bring up the issue again after 1.5 has been released.

So here is my patch again. This time it's much more relaxed and only forbids varargs in defprotocol/definterface method declarations, and in deftype/defrecord and reify method implementations.

Comment by Alex Coventry [ 22/Oct/13 7:30 AM ]

Thanks, Tassilo. If there's anywhere in the JIRA system where I could check for prior work like that for other similar issues, I'd be grateful for a pointer.

Best regards,
Alex

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 22/Oct/13 7:39 AM ]

New version of my patch.

Now I use a CompilerException with proper file/line/column information like Alex did. I also added his test case (which passes).

Concerning your question, Alex: a search for "varargs" would have listed CLJ-1024, but probably you wouldn't have looked into it anyway, because it's a closed issue...

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 22/Oct/13 7:44 AM ]

Alex, if you don't object could we remove your patch in favor of mine which covers a bit more cases?

Comment by Alex Coventry [ 22/Oct/13 10:57 AM ]

Yep. Just read through 1024 and the associated mailing list discussion. You should totally get the credit: Your patch is more comprehensive and you have been on this a long time. Thanks for folding in the good parts of my patch.

Best regards,
Alex

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 22/Oct/13 12:15 PM ]

Ok, great.

It seems I don't have the permissions to delete other peoples' attachments, so could you please delete your patch yourself?

Comment by Alex Coventry [ 23/Oct/13 2:44 PM ]

Sure, Tassilo. It's done.

I think this also needs a regression test for the case hugod originally pointed out. I initially made the same mistake as you there, but amalloy pointed it out[1] before I submitted the patch, so it is a natural mistake to make and should probably be documented in the source code.

Best regards,
Alex

[1] http://logs.lazybot.org/irc.freenode.net/%23clojure/2013-10-21.txt search for 14:48:34.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 24/Oct/13 2:00 AM ]

Alex, I've added the regression test you suggested. Thanks for pointing that out.

Also, I added tests checking definterface method declarations, and tests checking inline method implementations made with defrecord, deftype, and reify.

However, there's a problem with the tests for deftype and reify I don't know how to fix. When I eval the macroexpand forms used in the tests in a REPL, I can see that the CompilerException is successfully thrown and printed. But it also seems to be caught somewhere in the middle, so that the macroexpand returns a form and the exception doesn't make it to the (is (thrown? ...)). Therefore, I've commented the these tests and added a big FIXME.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 24/Oct/13 2:28 AM ]

New version of the patch with now all tests uncommented and passing. Andy Fingerhut made me aware that for the 4 deftype and reify tests, I need eval instead of just macroexpand.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 25/Oct/13 6:25 PM ]

I have not investigated the reason yet, but patch 0001-Forbid-vararg-declaration-in-defprotocol-definterfac.patch no longer applies cleanly after the latest commits to Clojure master on Oct 25 2013.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 28/Oct/13 2:21 AM ]

I've rebased the patch onto the current master so that it applies cleanly again.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 28/Oct/13 2:25 AM ]

Stu, I've assigned this issue to you because you've been assigned to CLJ-1165 which I have closed as duplicate of this issue.

One minor difference between my patch to this issue and CLJ-1165 is that here I use a CompilerException with file/line/column info whereas in CLJ-1165 I've used `ex-info`. I think the CE is more appropriate/informative, as the error is already triggered during macro expansion.





[CLJ-899] Accept and ignore colon between key and value in map literals Created: 18/Dec/11  Updated: 19/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Stuart Halloway Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: reader


 Description   

Original title was 'treat colons as whitespace' which isn't a problem description but a (flawed) implementation approach

For JSON compatibility
known problems when no spaces - x:true and y:false



 Comments   
Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 23/Dec/11 3:22 AM ]

Discussed here: https://groups.google.com/d/msg/clojure/XvJUzaY1jec/l8xEwlFl8EUJ

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 11/Jan/12 2:23 PM ]

please no

Comment by Tavis Rudd [ 16/Jan/12 12:17 PM ]

Alan Malloy raises a good point in the google group discussion (https://groups.google.com/d/msg/clojure/XvJUzaY1jec/aVpWBicwGhsJ) about accidental confusion between trailing (or floating) and leading colons:
"It isn't even as simple as "letting them
be whitespace", because presumably you want (read-string "{a: b}") to
result in (hash-map 'a 'b), but (read-string "{a :b}") to result in
(hash-map 'a :b)."

This issue could be avoided by only treating a colon as whitespace when followed by a comma. As easy cut-paste of json seems the be the key motivation here, the commas are going to be there anyway: valid {"v":, 1234} vs syntax error {a-key: should-be-a-keyword}.

Comment by Alex Baranosky [ 16/Jan/12 5:23 PM ]

This would be visually confusing imo.

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 17/Jan/12 5:01 PM ]

Please, oh please, no.

Comment by Tavis Rudd [ 18/Jan/12 2:40 PM ]

Er, brain fart. I was typing faster than I was thinking and put the comma in the wrong place. In my head I meant the form following the colon would have to have a comma after it. Thus, {"a-json-key": 1234, ...} would be valid while {"a-json-key": was-supposed-to-be-a-keyword "another-json-key" foo} would complain about the colon being an Invalid Token. I don't see the need for it, however.

Comment by Joseph Smith [ 27/Feb/12 10:55 AM ]

Clojure already has reader syntax for a map. If we support JSON, do we also support ruby map literals? Seems like this addition would only add confusion, imo, given colons are used in keywords and keywords are frequently used in maps - e.g., when de-serializing from XML, or even JSON.

Comment by David Nolen [ 27/Feb/12 11:19 AM ]

Clojure is no longer a language hosted only on the JVM. Clojure is also hosted on the CLR, and JavaScript. In particular ClojureScript can't currently easily deal with JSON literals - an extremely common (though problematic) data format. By allowing colon whitespace in map literals - Clojure data structures can effectively become an extensible JSON superset - giving the succinctness of JSON and the expressiveness of XML.

+1 from me.

Comment by Tim McCormack [ 13/Nov/12 7:27 PM ]

Clojure is only hosted on the JVM; ClojureScript is hosted on JS VMs. If this is useful for CLJS, it should just be a CLJS feature.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 10/Dec/12 11:51 PM ]

-1 for this whole idea: that way madness lies....

If we keep adding syntactical oddities like this then the language will become unmaintainably complex. It's the exact opposite of simple to have lots of special cases and ambiguities that you have to remember.

If people want to use JSON that is fine, but then the best approach use a specific JSON parser/writer, not just paste it into Clojure source and expect it to work.

Comment by Laszlo Török [ 11/Dec/12 4:54 AM ]

-1 for reasons mentioned by Allan Malloy and Mike Anderson

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 19/Oct/14 3:06 AM ]

-1 Don't repeat the mistake made in Ruby...





[CLJ-903] extend-protocol does not allow classnames as a String Created: 30/Dec/11  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.2, Release 1.3, Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Meikel Brandmeyer Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: interop


 Description   

In various places Clojure accepts classnames as String, eg. in gen-class or type hints. However it does not in extend-protocol. This does not allow simple specification of array types.

See also here: http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/722a0c09d02bb0ac






[CLJ-911] 'proxy' prevents overriding Object.finalize (and doesn't document it) Created: 16/Jan/12  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.3
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Norman Gray Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: interop
Environment:

OS X, Java 1.6.0?



 Description   

It appears to be impossible to override Object.finalize() using proxy. If the method is defined using proxy, then it cannot be called straightforwardly (see below), and it is not called as a finalizer during normal program execution (not demonstrated below).

See extensive discussion at: https://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/a1e2fca45af6c1af

user=> (def m (proxy [java.util.HashMap] []
(finalize []
;(proxy-super finalize)
(prn "finalizing..."))
(hashCode []
99)))
#'user/m
user=> (.hashCode m)
99
user=> (.finalize m)
IllegalArgumentException No matching field found: finalize for class user.proxy$java.util.HashMap$0 clojure.lang.Reflector.getInstanceField (Reflector.java:289)

There is at least one of two bugs here (thanks to Cedric Greevey for summarising this way):

  • If the inability to override finalize() is unintentional, that's a bug.
  • If it's intentional for some reason, then (a) that's not documented, and (b) the failure is silent, in the sense that an explicit call produces an apparently completely unrelated error (above), and the failure to call the method during object finalization is completely silent.





[CLJ-919] cannot create anonymous primitive functions Created: 27/Jan/12  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.3
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Ben Mabey Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: typehints


 Description   

Primitive functions only work (e.g. return primitive types) when defined with `defn`. An equivalent function created with `fn` does not behave the same way as when created with `defn`. For example:

(definterface IPrimitiveTester
(getType [^int x])
(getType [^long x])
(getType [^float x])
(getType [^double x])
(getType [^Object x]))

(deftype PrimitiveTester []
IPrimitiveTester
(getType [this ^int x] :int)
(getType [this ^long x] :long)
(getType [this ^float x] :float)
(getType [this ^double x] :double)
(getType [this ^Object x] :object))

(defmacro pt [x]
`(.getType (PrimitiveTester.) ~x))

(defn with-defn ^double [^double x]
(+ x 0.5))

(pt (with-defn 1.0)) ; => :double

(let [a (fn ^double [^double x] (+ x 0.5))]
(pt (a 0.1))) ; => :object

Please see the discussion on the mailing list for more details and thoughts on what is happening:
http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/d83c8643a7c7d595?hl=en






[CLJ-968] ns emitting gen-class before imports results in imported annotations being discarded. Created: 09/Apr/12  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.3, Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Charles Duffy Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: interop


 Description   

The following discards the imported annotations:

(ns com.example.BaseXModuleTest
  (:import (org.basex.query QueryModule QueryModule$Deterministic))
  (:gen-class
     :extends org.basex.query.QueryModule
     :methods [
       [^{QueryModule$Deterministic {}}
        addOne [int] int]]))

However, when moving the gen-class call out of the ns declaration, the annotation is correctly applied:

(ns com.example.BaseXModuleTest
  (:import (org.basex.query QueryModule QueryModule$Deterministic)))

(gen-class
  :extends org.basex.query.QueryModule
  :name com.example.BaseXModuleTest
  :methods [
    [^{QueryModule$Deterministic {}}
     addOne [int] int]])

It appears that imported names are not yet in-scope when gen-class is run from a ns declaration.






[CLJ-969] Symbol/keyword implements IFn for lookup but a non-collection argument produces non-intuitive results Created: 09/Apr/12  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Sean Corfield Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: errormsgs


 Description   

('+ 1 2) ;; return 2 because it is treated as (get 1 '+ 2)

Whilst this is "consistent" once you know the lookup behavior, it's confusing for Clojure newbies and it seems to be a non-useful behavior.

Proposal: modify Keyword.invoke() and Symbol.invoke() to restrict first Object argument to instanceof ILookup, Map or IPersistentSet (or null) so that the "not found" behavior doesn't produce non-intuitive behavior.






[CLJ-978] bean unable to handle non-public classes Created: 30/Apr/12  Updated: 05/Feb/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Charles Duffy Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None

Attachments: File clojure--bean-support-for-private-implementation-classes-v3.diff    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

Take the following Java as an example:

public interface IFoo {
  String getBar();
}

class FooImpl {
  String getBar() { return "bar"; }
}

As presently implemented, (bean my-foo) tries to invoke the following:

(. #<Method public java.lang.String FooImpl.getBar> (invoke my-foo nil))

However, as FooImpl is not public, this fails:

java.lang.IllegalAccessException: Class clojure.core$bean$fn__1827$fn__1828 can not access a member of class FooImpl with modifiers "public"
 at sun.reflect.Reflection.ensureMemberAccess (Reflection.java:65)
    java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke (Method.java:588)
    clojure.core$bean$fn__1827$fn__1828.invoke (core_proxy.clj:382)
    clojure.core$bean$v__1832.invoke (core_proxy.clj:388)
    clojure.core$bean$fn__1838$thisfn__1839$fn__1840.invoke (core_proxy.clj:406)
    clojure.lang.LazySeq.sval (LazySeq.java:42)
    clojure.lang.LazySeq.seq (LazySeq.java:60)
    clojure.lang.RT.seq (RT.java:473)

However, the same thing succeeds if we call #<Method public java.lang.String Foo.getBar> rather than #<Method public java.lang.String FooImpl.getBar>.



 Comments   
Comment by Charles Duffy [ 30/Apr/12 10:40 PM ]

Fix inaccurate documentation string

Comment by Charles Duffy [ 01/May/12 9:41 AM ]

Apache Commons Beanutils has their own implementation of this, at http://www.docjar.com/html/api/org/apache/commons/beanutils/MethodUtils.java.html#771 – notably, it tries to reflect a method with the given signature and catches the exception on failure, rather than iterating through the whole list. This may be a better approach – I'm unfamiliar with how the cost of exception handling compares with that of reflecting on the full method list of a class.

Comment by Charles Duffy [ 01/May/12 10:11 AM ]

Prior version of patch were missing new test suite files. Corrected.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 04/May/12 2:48 AM ]

Thanks for the patches, Charles. Could you please create a patch in the desired format and attach that, and then remove the obsolete patches? Instructions for creating a patch are under the heading "Development" at this page: http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/JIRA+workflow

Instructions for removing patches are under the heading "Removing patches" on that same page.

Comment by Charles Duffy [ 06/May/12 2:59 PM ]

Added a patch created per documented process.

Comment by Gary Trakhman [ 04/Oct/12 6:44 PM ]

I found in my code that it's possible to get a NPE if there is no read-method, for instance on the http://docs.cascading.org/cascading/2.0/javadoc/cascading/flow/hadoop/HadoopFlow.html object which has a setCascade method but no getter. I fixed this in our code by inlining the is-zero-args check into the public-method definition and and-ing the whole thing with 'method' like the original 'bean' code, like so:

public-method (and method (zero? (alength (. method (getParameterTypes))))
(or (and (java.lang.reflect.Modifier/isPublic (. c (getModifiers)))
method)
(public-version-of-method method)))

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 29/Nov/12 10:01 AM ]

Charles, I think we should follow Apache BeanUtils on this. Exceptions not thrown are cheap. Ordinarily, exception for control flow are bad, but this is forced by bad design of reflection API.





[CLJ-986] Adds an exit function to exit clojure process Created: 06/May/12  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: dennis zhuang Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

There is no standard function to exit the clojure process.
In java implementation,we use (System/exit 0),but in other implementations(CLR), i have to use another function.

Why not add a standard function in clojure.core?
For example:

(defn exit
([] (exit 0)
([status] (System/exit status)))

I think it's useful for us.






[CLJ-992] `iterate` reducer Created: 10/May/12  Updated: 09/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alan Malloy Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: reducers

Attachments: Text File 0001-Add-reducers-iterate.patch     Text File iterate-reducer.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Added a reducer implementation mirroring clojure.core/iterate.

Patch: 0001-Add-reducers-iterate.patch

Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Alan Malloy [ 10/May/12 9:50 PM ]

Should I have made this implement Seqable as well? It wasn't clear to me, because as far as I could see this was the only function in clojure.core.reducers that's generating a brand-new sequence rather than transforming an existing one.

Comment by Alan Malloy [ 10/May/12 10:24 PM ]

Previous version neglected to include the seed value of the iteration in the reduce.

Comment by Jason Jackson [ 11/May/12 11:23 AM ]

Currying iterate seems useless, albeit not harmful.

While implementing repeat, I couldn't use currying. Because 1-arity is already reserved for infinite repeat ([n x] and [x], not [n x] and [n] if currying)

How about we just support currying for functions where last param is reducible?

Comment by Alan Malloy [ 18/Aug/12 7:16 PM ]

This new patch replaces the previous patch. As requested, I am splitting up the large issue CLJ-993 into smaller tickets.

Does not depend on any of my other reducer patches, but there will probably be some minor merge conflicts unless it is merged after CLJ-1045 and CLJ-1046, and before CLJ-993.





[CLJ-993] `range` reducer Created: 10/May/12  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alan Malloy Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: reducers

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-993-implement-range-and-iterate-as-reducers.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-993-implement-range-and-iterate-as-reducers.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-993-implement-range-as-a-reducer.patch     Text File 0002-Make-iterate-and-range-Seqable.patch     Text File 0003-Implement-fold-for-Range-objects.patch     Text File just-iseq.patch     Text File range-reducer.patch    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

Rich mentioned in IRC today he'd welcome a reducer implementation of clojure.core/range. Now that I've figured out how to do iterate, I figure I'll knock out range as well by the end of the night. Just opening the issue early to announce my intentions to anyone else interested in doing it.



 Comments   
Comment by Alan Malloy [ 10/May/12 10:45 PM ]

Implemented range. A separate commit is attached, making iterate and range also Seqable, since I'm not sure if that's desired. Apply it or not, as you prefer.

Comment by Jason Jackson [ 11/May/12 11:20 AM ]

Range should be foldable

Comment by Alan Malloy [ 11/May/12 12:53 PM ]

Yep, so it should. Time for me to dig into the folding implementations!

Comment by Alan Malloy [ 11/May/12 2:42 PM ]

Should I fold (har har) all of these commits into one? I don't know what is preferred on JIRA, and I also don't know whether range/iterate should be seqable or if I should just drop the second commit.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 11/May/12 3:21 PM ]

Yes, please merge these together, it's hard to see otherwise (I can barely read diffs as is . range and iterate shouldn't be novel in reducers, but just enhanced return values of core fns. The enhancement (e.g. protocol extensions) can come by requiring reducers since it can't be leveraged without it. Also, I'm not sure how I feel about an allocating protocol for 'splittable' - I've avoided it thus far.

Comment by Alan Malloy [ 11/May/12 3:30 PM ]

So you want clojure.core/range to return some object (a Range), which implements Counted and Seqable (but isn't just a lazy-seq), and then inside of clojure.core.reducers I extend CollReduce and CollFold to that type? Okay, I can do that.

I don't quite follow what you mean by an allocating protocol. I see your point that my fold-by-halves which takes a function in is analogous to a protocol with a single function, but it doesn't allocate anything more than foldvec already does - I just pulled that logic out so that the fork/join fiddly work doesn't need to be repeated in everything foldable. Do you have an alternative recommendation, or is it just something that makes you uneasy and you're still thinking about?

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 11/May/12 3:52 PM ]

While vector-fold allocs subvecs, the halving-fn must return a new vector, for all implementations. It's ok, I don't think it's likely to dominate (since fj needs new closures anyway). Please proceed, but keep range and iterate in core. They are sources, not transformers, and only transformers (which must be different from their seq-based counterparts) must reside in reducers. Thanks!

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 11/May/12 5:01 PM ]

One big patch file is preferred, although that file may contain multiple commits if that makes the intent clearer.

When adding a patch, update the description of the ticket to indicate which file is the most recent. Leave old patch files around for historical reference.

Comment by Alan Malloy [ 11/May/12 9:00 PM ]

It's looking harder than I expected to move iterate and range into core.clj. My plan was to just have them implement Seqable, which is easy enough, but currently they are actually instances of ISeq, because they inherit from LazySeq. A bunch of code all over the place (eg, to print them in the repl) depends on them being ISeq, so I can't just ignore it. To implement all of these methods (around thirty) would take a large amount of code, which can't easily be shared between Iteration, Range, and any future reducible sources that are added to core.clj.

I could write a macro like (defseq Range [start end step] Counted (count [this] ...) ...) which takes normal deftype args and also adds in implementations for ISeq, Collection, and so forth in terms of (.seq this), which will be a LazySeq. However, this seems like a somewhat awkward approach that I would be a little embarrassed to clutter up core.clj with. If anyone has a better alternative I will be pleased to hear it. In the mean time, I will go ahead with this macro implementation, in case it turns out to be the best choice.

Comment by Alan Malloy [ 11/May/12 11:52 PM ]

– This patch subsumes all previous patches to this issue and to CLJ-992

In order to create an object which is both a lazy sequence and a
reducible source, I needed to add a macro named defseq to core_deftype.
It is basically a reimplementation of clojure.lang.LazySeq as a clojure
macro, so that I can "mix in" lazy-sequence functions into a new class
with whatever methods are needed for reducing and folding.

If we wanted, we could use this macro to implement lazy-seq in clojure instead of in java, but that's unrelated so I didn't do that in this patch.

As noted in a previous comment, defseq may not be the right approach, but this works until something better is suggested.

Comment by Alan Malloy [ 11/May/12 11:58 PM ]

I accidentally included an implementation of drop-while in this patch, which I was playing around with to make sure I understood how this all works. I guess I'll leave it in for the moment, since it works and is useful, but I can remove it, or move it to a new JIRA ticket, if it's not wanted at this time.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 12/May/12 10:52 AM ]

Ok, I think this patch is officially off the rails. There must be a better way. Let's start with: touching core/deftype and reimplementing lazy-seq as a macro are off the table. The return value of range doesn't have to be a LazySeq, it has to be a lazy seq, .e.g. implement ISeq (7 methods, not 30) which it can do by farming out to its existing impl. It can also implement some new interface for use by the reducer logic. There is also still clojure.lang.Range still there, which is another approach. Please take an extremely conservative approach in these things.

Comment by Alan Malloy [ 12/May/12 5:53 PM ]

Okay, thanks for the feedback - I'm glad I went into that last patch knowing it was probably wrong . I thought I would need to implement the java collection interfaces that LazySeq does, eg java.util.List, in order to avoid breaking interop functions like (defn range-list [n] (ArrayList. (range n))). If it's sufficient to implement ISeq (and thus IPersistentCollection), then that's pretty manageable.

It's still an unpleasant chunk of boilerplate for each new source, though; would you welcome a macro like defseq if I didn't put it in core_deftype? If so, it seems like it might as well implement the interop interfaces; if not, I can skip them and implement the 7 (isn't it more like 9?) methods in ISeq, IPersistentCollection, and Seqable for each new source type.

Thanks for pointing out clojure.lang.Range to me - I didn't realize we had it there. Of course with implementation inheritance it would be easy to make Range, Iteration, etc inherit from LazySeq and just extend protocols from them. But that means moving functionality out of clojure and into java, which I didn't think we'd want to do.

I'll put together a patch that just implements ISeq by hand for both of these new types, and attach it probably later today.

Comment by Alan Malloy [ 12/May/12 7:49 PM ]

So I've written a patch that implements ISeq, but not the java Collections interfaces, and it mostly works but there are definitely assumptions in some parts of clojure.core and clojure.lang that assume seqs are Collections. The most obvious to me (ie, it shows up when running mvn test) is RT/toArray - it tests for Collection, but never for ISeq, implying that it's not willing to handle an ISeq that is not also a collection. Functions which rely on toArray (eg to-array and vec) now fail.

This patch subsumes all previous patches on this issue, but is not suitable for application because it leaves some failing tests behind - it is intended only for intermediate feedback.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 13/May/12 8:50 AM ]

It would be a great help if, time permitting, you could please write up the issues, challenges and options you've discovered somewhere on the dev wiki (even a simple table would be fantastic). I realize this has been a challenging task, and at this point perhaps we should opt for the more modest reducers/range and reducers/iterate and leave the two worlds separate. I'd like at some point to unify range, as there are many extant ranges it would be nice to be able to fold, as we can extant vectors.

Comment by Jason Jackson [ 13/May/12 9:24 AM ]

Should r/range return something Seqable and Counted?

If so, I'll do the same for r/repeat.

Comment by Alan Malloy [ 13/May/12 1:59 PM ]

I've sketched out a description of the issues and options. I'm not very familiar with the dev wiki and couldn't figure out where was the right place to put this. "release.next" seems to still be about 1.4 issues, and I don't know if it's "appropriate" to create a whole new category for this. It's available as a gist until a better home can be found for it.

Comment by Alan Malloy [ 23/May/12 7:54 PM ]

Here's a single patch summing up the state Rich suggested "rolling back" to: separate r/range and r/iterate functions. I haven't heard any feedback since doing the writeup Rich asked for, so am not making any further progress at the moment; if something other than this patch is desired just let me know.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 14/Aug/12 2:07 PM ]

I prefer not to see the use of extend like this for new types. Perhaps this code is too DRY? Also, it does a lot in one patch which makes it hard to parse and accept. This adds Range, switches impl of vector folds etc. Can it be broken up into separate tickets that do each step that builds on the previous, e.g. one ticket could be: capture vector fold impl for reuse by similar things.

Comment by Alan Malloy [ 18/Aug/12 6:19 PM ]

Okay, I should be able to split it up over the weekend. I'll also see about converting fold-by-halves into a function that is used by Range/Vector, rather than a function that gets extended onto them.

Comment by Alan Malloy [ 18/Aug/12 7:18 PM ]

As requested, I have split up the large patch on this issue into four smaller tickets. The other three are: CLJ-1045, CLJ-1046, and CLJ-992.

CLJ-1045 contains the implementation of fold-by-halves, and as such this patch cannot be applied until CLJ-1045 is accepted. This ticket does not depend on the other two, but there will be minor merge conflicts if this is merged before them.





[CLJ-994] repeat reducer Created: 11/May/12  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Jason Jackson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: reducers

Attachments: Text File 0001-repeat-for-clojure.core.reducers.patch    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

i'm working on clojure.core/repeat reducer.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 17/May/12 6:18 PM ]

Jason, have you tried to build this using JDK 1.6.0? I've tried on Mac OS X 10.6.8 + Oracle/Apple JDK 1.6.0 and Ubuntu 11.10 + IBM JDK 1.6.0, and on both it compiles, but during the tests fails with a ClassNotFoundException for class jsr166y.ForkJoinTask.

It builds and tests cleanly on Ubuntu 11.10 + Oracle JDK 1.7.0 for me.

Comment by Jason Jackson [ 17/May/12 6:41 PM ]

That's an issue that applies to all of core.reducers. Alan Malloy experienced it as well. I tried fixing it, but eventually just upgraded to JDK 1.7. I don't understand why it's happening.

Comment by Jason Jackson [ 19/May/12 2:55 PM ]

This issue is isolated to mvn test afaik.

When I include clojure inside a leiningen project, and add jsr166y.jar to lib directory, core.reducers works fine with java 1.6.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 20/May/12 3:00 AM ]

Jason, you say it applies to all of core.reducers in your May 17, 2012 comment. I don't understand. Without your patch applied, I can run "./antsetup.sh ; ant" in a freshly-pulled Clojure git repo on either of the JDK 1.6.0 versions mentioned in my earlier comment, and do not get any errors during the tests. Are you saying perhaps that core.reducers currently has no tests that exercise the problem now, but your patch adds such tests that fail, even with no other changes to the code?

Comment by Jason Jackson [ 20/May/12 11:55 AM ]

Yah that's right. Now that you mention it, my patch is the first unit test to call r/fold (the existing tests do non-parallel reductions).

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Jun/12 7:11 PM ]

With Stuart Halloway's commit to Clojure master on June 8, 2012 titled "let reducers tests work under ant", patch 0001-repeat-for-clojure.core.reducers.patch dated May 11, 2012 now runs correctly even the new unit tests requiring class jsr166y.ForkJoinTask with Oracle/Apple JDK 1.6 and Linux IBM JDK 1.6.

Comment by Jason Jackson [ 14/Aug/12 1:17 AM ]

I'm on the contributors list. Is this patch still needed?
sorry for long long delay.

Comment by Jason Jackson [ 14/Sep/12 2:37 PM ]

This patch should wait until http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-993 is committed. I think there's a some shared code.





[CLJ-995] sorted-set doesn't support IEditableCollection Created: 13/May/12  Updated: 05/Feb/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Moritz Ulrich Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: collections


 Description   

I think sorted-set (PersistentTreeSet) should implement the transient interface. It's a special-purpose set and should be usable just like every normal set.



 Comments   
Comment by Michel Alexandre Salim [ 04/Jun/12 2:32 AM ]

Note that this would require PersistentTreeMap to implement IEditableCollection as well.





[CLJ-1001] Proxy cannot call proper super-class method Created: 23/May/12  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.2, Release 1.3
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Guanpeng Xu Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: interop
Environment:

Linux herberteuler 3.2.0-2-amd64 #1 SMP Sat May 12 23:08:28 UTC 2012 x86_64 GNU/Linux


Attachments: File proxy-bug.clj    

 Description   

Attached is a program that reproduces this issue. We have a proxy, `p', which sub-classes java.io.InputStream. There are three methods named `read' in java.io.InputStream: abstract int read(); int read(byte[] b); and int read(byte[] b, int off, int len); see http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/io/InputStream.html. In the definition of proxy `p', we implement the abstract variant of method `read', making `p' a concrete instance of java.io.InputStream.

The first invocation, (. p read), returns -1, which is expected.

The second invocation, (. p (read b 0 n)), should call int read(byte[] b, int off, int len); in java.io.InputStream. But these are actual behavior:

$ clojure1.2 ~/tmp/proxy-bug.clj
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Wrong number of args (4) passed to: user$eval1$fn (proxy-bug.clj:0)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:5441)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:5858)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.loadFile(Compiler.java:5821)
at clojure.main$load_script.invoke(main.clj:221)
at clojure.main$script_opt.invoke(main.clj:273)
at clojure.main$main.doInvoke(main.clj:354)
at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
at clojure.lang.Var.invoke(Var.java:365)
at clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:161)
at clojure.lang.Var.applyTo(Var.java:482)
at clojure.main.main(main.java:37)
Caused by: java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Wrong number of args (4) passed to: user$eval1$fn
at clojure.lang.AFn.throwArity(AFn.java:437)
at clojure.lang.AFn.invoke(AFn.java:51)
at user.proxy$java.io.InputStream$0.read(Unknown Source)
at user$eval1.invoke(proxy-bug.clj:9)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:5425)
... 10 more

$ clojure1.2 ~/tmp/proxy-bug.clj
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Wrong number of args (4) passed to: user$eval1$fn (proxy-bug.clj:0)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:5441)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:5858)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.loadFile(Compiler.java:5821)
at clojure.main$load_script.invoke(main.clj:221)
at clojure.main$script_opt.invoke(main.clj:273)
at clojure.main$main.doInvoke(main.clj:354)
at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
at clojure.lang.Var.invoke(Var.java:365)
at clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:161)
at clojure.lang.Var.applyTo(Var.java:482)
at clojure.main.main(main.java:37)
Caused by: java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Wrong number of args (4) passed to: user$eval1$fn
at clojure.lang.AFn.throwArity(AFn.java:437)
at clojure.lang.AFn.invoke(AFn.java:51)
at user.proxy$java.io.InputStream$0.read(Unknown Source)
at user$eval1.invoke(proxy-bug.clj:9)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:5425)
... 10 more



 Comments   
Comment by Guanpeng Xu [ 23/May/12 10:24 PM ]

The second behavior should be in Clojure 1.3:

$ clojure1.3 ~/tmp/proxy-bug.clj
Exception in thread "main" clojure.lang.ArityException: Wrong number of args (4) passed to: user$eval1$fn
at clojure.lang.AFn.throwArity(AFn.java:437)
at clojure.lang.AFn.invoke(AFn.java:51)
at user.proxy$java.io.InputStream$0.read(Unknown Source)
at user$eval1.invoke(proxy-bug.clj:9)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6468)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:6905)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.loadFile(Compiler.java:6866)
at clojure.main$load_script.invoke(main.clj:282)
at clojure.main$script_opt.invoke(main.clj:342)
at clojure.main$main.doInvoke(main.clj:426)
at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
at clojure.lang.Var.invoke(Var.java:401)
at clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:161)
at clojure.lang.Var.applyTo(Var.java:518)
at clojure.main.main(main.java:37)

Sorry for the inconvenience.

Comment by Russell Mull [ 01/Sep/13 3:12 AM ]

Verified with Clojure 1.5.1:

Stack Trace
clojure.lang.ArityException: Wrong number of args (4) passed to: user$eval147$fn
                                      AFn.java:437 clojure.lang.AFn.throwArity
                                       AFn.java:51 clojure.lang.AFn.invoke
                                  (Unknown Source) user.proxy/java.io.InputStream[fn]
                                  NO_SOURCE_FILE:9 user/eval147
                                Compiler.java:6619 clojure.lang.Compiler.eval
                                Compiler.java:6582 clojure.lang.Compiler.eval
                                     core.clj:2852 clojure.core/eval
                                      main.clj:259 clojure.main/repl[fn]
                                      main.clj:259 clojure.main/repl[fn]
                                      main.clj:277 clojure.main/repl[fn]
                                      main.clj:277 clojure.main/repl
                                  RestFn.java:1096 clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke
                         interruptible_eval.clj:56 clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible-eval/evaluate[fn]
                                      AFn.java:159 clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper
                                      AFn.java:151 clojure.lang.AFn.applyTo
                                      core.clj:617 clojure.core/apply
                                     core.clj:1788 clojure.core/with-bindings*
                                   RestFn.java:425 clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke
                         interruptible_eval.clj:41 clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible-eval/evaluate
                        interruptible_eval.clj:171 clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible-eval/interruptible-eval[fn]
                                     core.clj:2330 clojure.core/comp[fn]
                        interruptible_eval.clj:138 clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible-eval/run-next[fn]
                                       AFn.java:24 clojure.lang.AFn.run
                      ThreadPoolExecutor.java:1110 java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor.runWorker
                       ThreadPoolExecutor.java:603 java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor$Worker.run
                                   Thread.java:722 java.lang.Thread.run




[CLJ-1005] Use transient map in zipmap Created: 30/May/12  Updated: 26/Sep/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Michał Marczyk Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 11
Labels: performance

Attachments: Text File 0001-Use-transient-map-in-zipmap.2.patch     Text File 0001-Use-transient-map-in-zipmap.patch     Text File 0002-CLJ-1005-use-transient-map-in-zipmap.patch     Text File CLJ-1005-zipmap-iterators.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

The attached patch changes zipmap to use a transient map internally. The definition is also moved so that it resides below that of #'transient. The original definition is commented out (like that of #'into).



 Comments   
Comment by Aaron Bedra [ 14/Aug/12 9:24 PM ]

Why is the old implementation left and commented out? If we are going to move to a new implementation, the old one should be removed.

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 15/Aug/12 4:17 AM ]

As mentioned in the ticket description, the previously attached patch follows the pattern of into whose non-transient-enabled definition is left in core.clj with a #_ in front – I wasn't sure if that's something desirable in all cases.

Here's a new patch with the old impl removed.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 15/Aug/12 10:37 AM ]

Thanks for the updated patch, Michal. Sorry to raise such a minor issue, but would you mind using a different name for the updated patch? I know JIRA can handle multiple attached files with the same name, but my prescreening code isn't quite that talented yet, and it can lead to confusion when discussing patches.

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 15/Aug/12 10:42 AM ]

Thanks for the heads-up, Andy! I've reattached the new patch under a new name.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 16/Aug/12 8:24 PM ]

Presumptuously changing Approval from Incomplete back to None after the Michal's updated patch was added, addressing the reason the ticket was marked incomplete.

Comment by Aaron Bedra [ 11/Apr/13 5:32 PM ]

The patch looks good and applies cleanly. Are there additional tests that we should run to verify that this is providing the improvement we think it is. Also, is there a discussion somewhere that started this ticket? There isn't a lot of context here.

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 11/Apr/13 6:19 PM ]

Hi Aaron,

Thanks for looking into this!

From what I've been able to observe, this change hugely improves zipmap times for large maps. For small maps, there is a small improvement. Here are two basic Criterium benchmarks (transient-zipmap defined at the REPL as in the patch):

;;; large map
user=> (def xs (range 16384))
#'user/xs
user=> (last xs)
16383
user=> (c/bench (zipmap xs xs))
Evaluation count : 13920 in 60 samples of 232 calls.
             Execution time mean : 4.329635 ms
    Execution time std-deviation : 77.791989 us
   Execution time lower quantile : 4.215050 ms ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 4.494120 ms (97.5%)
nil
user=> (c/bench (transient-zipmap xs xs))
Evaluation count : 21180 in 60 samples of 353 calls.
             Execution time mean : 2.818339 ms
    Execution time std-deviation : 110.751493 us
   Execution time lower quantile : 2.618971 ms ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 3.025812 ms (97.5%)

Found 2 outliers in 60 samples (3.3333 %)
	low-severe	 2 (3.3333 %)
 Variance from outliers : 25.4675 % Variance is moderately inflated by outliers
nil

;;; small map
user=> (def ys (range 16))
#'user/ys
user=> (last ys)
15
user=> (c/bench (zipmap ys ys))
Evaluation count : 16639020 in 60 samples of 277317 calls.
             Execution time mean : 3.803683 us
    Execution time std-deviation : 88.431220 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 3.638146 us ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 3.935160 us (97.5%)
nil
user=> (c/bench (transient-zipmap ys ys))
Evaluation count : 18536880 in 60 samples of 308948 calls.
             Execution time mean : 3.412992 us
    Execution time std-deviation : 81.338284 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 3.303888 us ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 3.545549 us (97.5%)
nil

Clearly the semantics are preserved provided transients satisfy their contract.

I think I might not have started a ggroup thread for this, sorry.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 03/Sep/14 8:10 PM ]

Patch 0001-Use-transient-map-in-zipmap.2.patch dated Aug 15 2012 does not apply cleanly to latest master after some commits were made to Clojure on Sep 3 2014.

I have not checked whether this patch is straightforward to update. See the section "Updating stale patches" at http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches for suggestions on how to update patches.

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 14/Sep/14 12:48 PM ]

Thanks, Andy. It was straightforward to update – an automatic rebase. Here's the updated patch.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 22/Sep/14 9:58 AM ]

New patch using clojure.lang.RT/iter, criterium shows >30% more perf in the best case. Less alloc probably but I didn't measure. CLJ-1499 (better iterators) is related





[CLJ-1013] Clojure's classloader cannot handle out-of-order loading Created: 13/Jun/12  Updated: 18/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Edward Z. Yang Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None


 Description   

Here is a minimal test-case:

import java.io.IOException;

import clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap;
import clojure.lang.RT;

public class TestClass {

static Class y = RT.class;
//static PersistentTreeMap x = PersistentTreeMap.EMPTY;

/**

  • @param args
  • @throws ClassNotFoundException
  • @throws IOException
    */
    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException { PersistentTreeMap x = PersistentTreeMap.EMPTY; }

}

This results in the exception:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ExceptionInInitializerError
at java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method)
at java.lang.Class.forName(Class.java:247)
at clojure.lang.RT.loadClassForName(RT.java:2056)
at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:419)
at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:400)
at clojure.lang.RT.doInit(RT.java:436)
at clojure.lang.RT.<clinit>(RT.java:318)
at clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap.<init>(PersistentTreeMap.java:45)
at clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap.<clinit>(PersistentTreeMap.java:32)
at TestClass.main(TestClass.java:19)
Caused by: java.lang.NullPointerException
at clojure.lang.APersistentSet.contains(APersistentSet.java:33)
at clojure.lang.RT.contains(RT.java:700)
at clojure.core$contains_QMARK_.invoke(core.clj:1386)
at clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj:5255)
at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:603)
at clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj:5298)
at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:603)
at clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj:5381)
at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
at clojure.core__init.load(Unknown Source)
at clojure.core__init.<clinit>(Unknown Source)
... 10 more

The crux of the issue appears Clojure's classloader doesn't understand how to handle out-of-order classloading.



 Comments   
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 18/Apr/14 12:31 AM ]

exception still happens with clojure 1.6





[CLJ-1016] Global scope overrides lexical scope for classes (Clojure assumes no classes in default package / Clojure cannot handle yFiles JARs in classpath) Created: 21/Jun/12  Updated: 24/May/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Edward Z. Yang Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File collision-workaround.patch    

 Description   

The most visible symptom of this bug is having a class named 'w' (default package) in your classpath (such classes are produced by Java obfuscation tools such as yFiles) and then attempting to load Clojure's core class. For example:

java -cp hotspotapi.jar:clojure-1.4.0-slim.jar clojure.main

(where hotspotapi.jar is a stereotypical example of an obfuscated JAR) results in:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ExceptionInInitializerError
at clojure.main.<clinit>(main.java:20)
Caused by: java.lang.NoSuchFieldException: close, compiling:(clojure/core.clj:6139)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6462)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6262)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6223)
at clojure.lang.Compiler$BodyExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:5618)
at clojure.lang.Compiler$TryExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:2178)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6455)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6262)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6223)
at clojure.lang.Compiler$BodyExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:5618)
at clojure.lang.Compiler$LetExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:5919)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6455)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6262)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6443)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6262)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6443)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6262)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6223)
at clojure.lang.Compiler$BodyExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:5618)
at clojure.lang.Compiler$FnMethod.parse(Compiler.java:5054)
at clojure.lang.Compiler$FnExpr.parse(Compiler.java:3674)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6453)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6262)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6443)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6262)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.access$100(Compiler.java:37)
at clojure.lang.Compiler$DefExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:518)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6455)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6262)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze(Compiler.java:6223)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6515)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:6952)
at clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:359)
at clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:350)
at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:429)
at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:400)
at clojure.lang.RT.doInit(RT.java:436)
at clojure.lang.RT.<clinit>(RT.java:318)
... 1 more
Caused by: java.lang.NoSuchFieldException: close
at java.lang.Class.getField(Class.java:1537)
at clojure.lang.Compiler$StaticFieldExpr.<init>(Compiler.java:1180)
at clojure.lang.Compiler$HostExpr$Parser.parse(Compiler.java:923)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq(Compiler.java:6455)
... 37 more
Could not find the main class: clojure.main. Program will exit.

To understand what is going on, consider this simple test:

import java.io.StringReader;

import clojure.lang.Compiler;
import clojure.lang.RT;

public class Test {
public static void main(String[] args) { RT.var("clojure.core", "require"); String s = "(let [mumble (new java.io.StringReader \"\")] (. mumble close))"; Compiler.load(new StringReader(s)); }
}

It should be clear that 'mumble' in the dot operator is referencing the locally defined mumble. However, if we define a class named 'mumble' in the default package, Clojure picks that one up instead.

To forestall any objections: yes, we know that placing classes in the default package is extremely poor form. Point of the matter is, the Java ecosystem is extremely diverse and there are a lot of JARs people may not have control over. While one might argue, "Don't put classes in the default namespace", point of the matter is, Clojure is wrong here, and these situations arise in practice, through no fault of the implementer.



 Comments   
Comment by Edward Z. Yang [ 21/Jun/12 11:01 AM ]

Here is a workaround patch which makes this error less likely to occur.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 27/Aug/12 7:37 PM ]

Edward, it is Rich Hickey's policy only to consider for inclusion in Clojure patches written by people who have signed a Contributor Agreement: http://clojure.org/contributing

Were you interested in becoming a contributor?

Comment by Edward Z. Yang [ 27/Aug/12 9:24 PM ]

Sure, although the patch attached is emphatically not the one you want to actually applying, since it only band-aids the problem.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 24/May/13 1:21 PM ]

I am not sure, but this ticket may be related to CLJ-1171. At least, there the issue was a global name not being shadowed by a local name bound with let. That seems similar to this issue.





[CLJ-1022] gen-class destroys method annotations Created: 03/Jul/12  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Maris Orbidans Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: interop


 Description   

When extending a class gen-class doesn't preserve method annotations.

If class com.bar.Foo has annotated methods then in MyClass all annotations are gone.

(gen-class
:name com.my.MyClass
:extends com.bar.Foo
:implements [com.google.common.base.Supplier]
:prefix demo-
:post-init post-init)

(defn demo-post-init [this]
(info "initialized")
(swank.swank/start-server :port 68478))

(defn demo-get [_]
(get-msg))

Class<?> aClass = Class.forName("com.my.MyClass");
Method[] methods = aClass.getMethods();

for (Method m : methods) {
Annotation[] annotations = m.getAnnotations();
System.out.println(m.getName()+" "+annotations.length);
for (Annotation a : annotations) { System.out.println(a.annotationType().getClass().getName()); }
}






[CLJ-1037] Allow doc strings for both interfaces and concrete implementations Created: 04/Aug/12  Updated: 17/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: None

Type: