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[CLJ-1172] Cross-linking between clojure.lang.Compiler and clojure.lang.RT Created: 28/Feb/13  Updated: 21/Jun/13

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Yegor Bugayenko Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None
Environment:

version 1.5.0-RC17



 Description   

This is my code (an example):

import clojure.lang.Compiler;
import clojure.lang.RT;
import clojure.lang.Var;

Compiler.load("(+ 5 %)");
Var foo = RT.var("bar", "foo");
Object result = foo.invoke(10);
assert result.toString().equals("15");

This is what I'm getting:

ava.lang.ExceptionInInitializerError
	at clojure.lang.Compiler.<clinit>(Compiler.java:47)
	at foo.main(Main.java:75)
Caused by: java.lang.NullPointerException
	at clojure.lang.RT.baseLoader(RT.java:2043)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:417)
	at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:411)
	at clojure.lang.RT.doInit(RT.java:447)
	at clojure.lang.RT.<clinit>(RT.java:329)
	... 36 more

The same code worked just fine with version 1.4. Looks like Compiler is using RT and RT is using Compiler, both statically.



 Comments   
Comment by Yegor Bugayenko [ 04/Mar/13 11:40 AM ]

I cross-posted this question to SO: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/15207596

Comment by Yegor Bugayenko [ 05/Mar/13 12:04 AM ]

calling RT.init() before Compiler.load() solves the problem

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 05/Mar/13 4:17 AM ]

Yegor, do you consider it OK to close this ticket as not being a problem, or at least one with a reasonable workaround?

Comment by Yegor Bugayenko [ 05/Mar/13 1:11 PM ]

Yes, of course. Let's close it.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 05/Mar/13 6:14 PM ]

Ticket submitter agrees that this is not an issue, or that there is a reasonable workaround.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 13/Mar/13 12:58 AM ]

This issue came up again on the Clojure group. https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=en_US&fromgroups=#!topic/clojure/2xdLNMb9yyQ

I did some testing, and the issue did not exist in Clojure 1.5.0-RC3 and before, and it has existed since 1.5.0-RC4. There was only one commit between those two points:

https://github.com/clojure/clojure/commit/9b80a552fdabeabdd93951a625b55ae49c2f8d83

Maybe this new behavior is an intended consequence of that change. I don't know. In any case, it seems like perhaps the "No need to call RT.init() anymore" message might be outdated?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 13/Mar/13 12:59 AM ]

Reopening since it came up again, and there is some more info known about the issue. I'll let someone who knows more about the issue decide whether to close it.

Comment by Edward [ 23/Mar/13 10:31 AM ]

Doing this RT.load("clojure/core"); at the top works avoids the message from RT.init()

Comment by Jean Niklas L'orange [ 21/Jun/13 10:36 AM ]

It seems like RT.load("clojure/core") does not hide the message anymore - at least not from 1.5.1.





[CLJ-1368] Document usage for case with non-readable constants Created: 02/Mar/14  Updated: 02/Mar/14

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Herwig Hochleitner Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: docs, interop


 Description   

Problem

It is pretty obscure how to get constant-time dispatch for e.g. Enums, even if user knows about case.

Proposal

The possibility to dispatch to arbitrary constants with case, by wrapper macro, should be documented.

Wording

  • Should it warn against doing that with unstable values?
  • Should it mention anything else than java Enums?

Case Techniques

Case is documented for accepting all readable forms as test-constants. However, it can also be made to use any compile-time-known constants as test-constants, by wrapping it in another macro.

Sometimes this is appropriate, e.g. when dispatching on a java Enum.
Other times, less so, e.g. when dispatching on objects whose hash changes when the vm is restarted (breaks AOT).

Implications

This technique is an application of a more general technique: Passing non-literals to a macro from another macro.
Are there other macros that have use cases like this?

References

https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure/3yGjDO2YnjQ/discussion



 Comments   
Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 02/Mar/14 11:25 AM ]

This is a duplicate of http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1367

Actually, it's an alternate solution





[CLJ-1093] Empty PersistentCollections get incorrectly evaluated as their generic clojure counterpart Created: 24/Oct/12  Updated: 09/Apr/14

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4, Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Timothy Baldridge
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1093-fix-empty-records-literal-v2.patch     Text File clj-1093-fix-empty-record-literal-patch-v2.txt    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted

 Description   
user> (defrecord x [])
user.x
user> #user.x[]
{}
user> #user.x{}
{}
user> #clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap[]
{}
user> (class *1)
clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap

Cause: Compiler's ConstantExpr parser returns an EmptyExpr for all empty persistent collections, even if they are of types other than the core collections (for example: records, sorted collections, custom collections). EmptyExpr reports its java class as one the classes - IPersistentList/IPersistentVector/IPersistentMap/IPersistentSet rather than the original type.

Proposed: If one of the Persistent* classes, then create EmptyExpr as before, otherwise retain the ConstantExpression of the original collection.

Patch: 0001-CLJ-1093-fix-empty-records-literal-v2.patch

Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 27/Nov/12 11:41 AM ]

Unable to reproduce this bug on latest version of master. Most likely fixed by some of the recent changes to data literal readers.

Marking Not-Approved.

Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 27/Nov/12 11:41 AM ]

Could not reproduce in master.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 01/Mar/13 1:23 PM ]

I just checked, and the problem still exists for records with no arguments:

Clojure 1.6.0-master-SNAPSHOT
user=> (defrecord a [])
user.a
user=> #user.a[]
{}

Admittedly it's an edge case and I see little usage for no-arguments records, but I think it should be addressed aswell since the current behaviour is not what one would expect

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 02/Mar/13 8:14 AM ]

Got the following REPL interaction:

% java -jar ~/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.5.0/clojure-1.5.0.jar
user=> (defrecord a [])
user.a
user=> (a.)
#user.a{}
user=> #user.a{}
{}
#user.a[]
{}

This should be reopened or declined for another reason than reproducability.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 10/Mar/13 2:18 PM ]

I'm reopening this since the bug is still there.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 13/Mar/13 2:04 PM ]

Patch clj-1093-fix-empty-record-literal-patch-v2.txt dated Mar 13, 2013 is identical to Bronsa's patch 001-fix-empty-record-literal.patch dated Oct 24, 2012, except that it applies cleanly to latest master. I'm not sure why the older patch doesn't but git doesn't like something about it.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 26/Jun/13 8:06 PM ]

Patch 0001-CLJ-1093-fix-empty-records-literal-v2.patch solves more issues than the previous patch that was not evident to me at the time.

Only collections that are either PersistentList or PersistentVector or PersistentHash[Map|Set] or PersistentArrayMap can now be EmptyExpr.
This is because we don't want every IPersistentCollection to be emitted as a generic one eg.

user=> (class #clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap[])
clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap

Incidentally, this patch also solves CLJ-1187
This patch should be preferred over the one on CLJ-1187 since it's more general

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 09/Aug/13 2:08 AM ]

Maybe this is related:

user=> (def x `(quote ~(list 1 (clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap/create (seq [1 2 3 4])))))
#'user/x
user=> x
(quote (1 {1 2, 3 4}))
user=> (class (second (second x)))
clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap
user=> (eval x)
(1 {1 2, 3 4})
user=> (class (second (eval x)))
clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap

Even if the collection is not evaluated, it is still converted to the generic clojure counterpart.





[CLJ-1099] better error message when passing non-seq to seq Created: 01/Nov/12  Updated: 09/Apr/14

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Stuart Halloway Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File better-error-message-for-seq.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Design discussion here.

This patch improves Clojure's error message for a single common error: passing a non-seq where a seq is neede. More importantly, it is intended as a prototype for other similar improvements in the future.

Error message before:

(cons 1 2)
=> IllegalArgumentException Don't know how to create ISeq from: java.lang.Long

Error message after:

user=> (cons 1 2)
ExceptionInfo Don't know how to create ISeq from: java.lang.Long
user=> (ex-data *e)
{:instance 2}

Patch: better-error-message-for-seq.patch
NOTE: This patch was reverted as it affected the inlining of RT.seqFrom().



 Comments   
Comment by Michael Klishin [ 12/Nov/12 10:34 AM ]

Wouldn't it be better to make it read "Don't know how to create ISeq from: 2 (java.lang.Long)"? How many beginners will figure
out ex-data exists and how to use it?

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 12/Apr/13 11:36 AM ]

Hi Michael,

ex-info messages should not, in general, pr-str things into their bodies. This raises the question of print-length and print-level in a place where the user doesn't have good control, while the whole point of ex-info is to be in the data business, not the string business. Users can control printing from ex-data any way they like.

There are two possible ways to make beginners aware of ex-data: Tell them about it in one (or a few places) in docs, or in an infinite number of places saying "This would have been useful here, but we didn't use it because you might not know about it." I prefer the former.

That said, I think it would be great to increase the visibility of ex-info and ex-data early on in documentation for beginners, and to make sure that things like exception printing in logs are flexible enough not to lose the benefits of ex-info.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 25/Mar/14 5:14 PM ]

Just a comment that this fix was committed before release 1.6.0, and then reverted very shortly before release 1.6.0. I believe the reason for reverting was due to concerns that this change made performance about 5% slower in some relatively common cases, with a suspicion that it could have affected inlining of the seqFrom method.

Not sure whether the ticket should be reopened or not.





[CLJ-1401] CompilerException / IllegalStateException when reloading namespaces Created: 10/Apr/14  Updated: 12/Apr/14

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Mike Anderson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler, errormsgs


 Description   
user> (ns op)
nil
op> (defn * [a b] (clojure.core/* a b))
WARNING: * already refers to: #'clojure.core/* in namespace: op, being replaced by: #'op/*
#'op/*
op> (ns use-op (:require [op :refer :all]))
WARNING: * already refers to: #'clojure.core/* in namespace: use-op, being replaced by: #'op/*
nil
use-op> (ns use-op (:require [op :refer :all]))
IllegalStateException * already refers to: #'op/* in namespace: use-op  clojure.lang.Namespace.warnOrFailOnReplace (Namespace.java:88)
use-op> (clojure.repl/pst *e)
IllegalStateException * already refers to: #'op/* in namespace: use-op
	clojure.lang.Namespace.warnOrFailOnReplace (Namespace.java:88)
	clojure.lang.Namespace.reference (Namespace.java:110)
	clojure.lang.Namespace.refer (Namespace.java:168)
	clojure.core/refer (core.clj:3920)
	use-op/eval2402/loading--4958--auto----2403 (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)
	use-op/eval2402 (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6703)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6692)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6666)
	clojure.core/eval (core.clj:2927)
	clojure.main/repl/read-eval-print--6625/fn--6628 (main.clj:239)
	clojure.main/repl/read-eval-print--6625 (main.clj:239)

I would expect (at worst) a similar warning to the initial namespace loading, rather than an exception here.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Apr/14 8:26 AM ]

Could you put together a better reproducible test case for this that does not depend on core.matrix? Also, please include the (pst *e) when it occurs.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 11/Apr/14 10:19 AM ]

I have tried the smallest possible Leiningen project I could think of that would cause the warnings about redefinitions, to see if I could get the exception to occur. 'lein new try1' to create the skeleton project, then edit src/try1/core.clj to contain only the following function definitions:

(defn merge
  "This definition of merge replaces clojure.core/merge"
  [x y]
  (- x y))

(defn *
  [x y]
  (* x y))

Then start a REPL with 'lein repl', and I see this behavior:

user=> (require '[try1.core :as c])
WARNING: merge already refers to: #'clojure.core/merge in namespace: try1.core, being replaced by: #'try1.core/merge
WARNING: * already refers to: #'clojure.core/* in namespace: try1.core, being replaced by: #'try1.core/*
nil
user=> (require '[try1.core :as c] )
nil
user=> (require '[try1.core :as c] :reload)
WARNING: merge already refers to: #'clojure.core/merge in namespace: try1.core, being replaced by: #'try1.core/merge
WARNING: * already refers to: #'clojure.core/* in namespace: try1.core, being replaced by: #'try1.core/*
nil

Ths all looks like behavior as I would expect, and I did not see the exception that Mike reports.

It seems that either Ctrl+Alt+L in Counterclockwise does something different than (require ... :reload), or there is something different about Mike's namespace in addition to redefining names in clojure.core that is causing the problem.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Apr/14 11:17 AM ]

Marking this as NR for now - would be happy to see it reopened with an easily reproducible test case.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 12/Apr/14 12:41 AM ]

To reproduce:

(ns op)
(defn * [a b] (clojure.core/* a b)) ;; gives warning
(ns use-op (:require [op :refer :all])) ;; gives warning
(ns use-op (:require [op :refer :all])) ;; gives error!

I believe Counterclockwise is simply loading the namespace again with CTRL-Alt+L, which is causing the ns form to be re-executed.

The docstring implies that ns can be used multiple times ("Sets ns to the namespace named by name (unevaluated), creating it if needed") so I would certainly expect multiple invocations of ns to be a no-op





[CLJ-1371] divide(Object, Object) with (NaN, 0) does not return NaN Created: 07/Mar/14  Updated: 07/Mar/14

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Trivial
Reporter: Yongqian Li Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: math


 Description   

user=> (def x Double/NaN)
#'user/x
user=> (/ x 0)

ArithmeticException Divide by zero clojure.lang.Numbers.divide (Numbers.java:156)
user=> (/ Double/NaN 0)
Double/NaN



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 07/Mar/14 7:50 AM ]

As per the Java Language Specification (http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-4.html#jls-4.2.4),

"All numeric operations with NaN as an operand produce NaN as a result."

Comment by Yongqian Li [ 07/Mar/14 7:54 AM ]

But in the first example it produces an ArithmeticException.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 07/Mar/14 9:27 AM ]

Ah, I see the question now.

Here we are dividing a double by a long. In the first case, this is parsed as divide(Object, long) which then calls divide(Object, Object), which throws ArithmeticException if the second arg is 0 (regardless of the first arg).

In the second case it's parsed as divide(double, long) which just relies on Java to properly upcast the primitive long to a double to do the divide.

Note that making this call with 2 doubles does return NaN:

user=> (def x Double/NaN)
#'user/x
user=> (/ x 0.0)
NaN

or type hinting x to a double works as well:

user=> (def x Double/NaN)
#'user/x
user=> (/ ^double x 0.0)
NaN

I think one option to "fix" this behavior would be to add checks in divide(Object, Object) to check whether x is NaN and instead return NaN.





[CLJ-738] <= is incorrect when args include Double/NaN Created: 14/Feb/11  Updated: 10/Apr/14

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Trivial
Reporter: Jason Wolfe Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: math
Environment:

Mac OS X, Java 6


Attachments: File 738.diff     File 738-tests.diff    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted

 Description   
user=> (<= (long Double/NaN) 1)
true     
user=> (<= Double/NaN 1)
false  ;; should match primitive version

Cause: The problem was that the logic for lte/gte depended on the fact that lte is equivalent to !gt.
However, in Java, this assumption is invalid - any comparison involving NaN always yields false.

Solution: The fix was to adding lte and gte methods to Numbers.Ops directly, rather than implementing everything in terms of lt. This was the only fix I could see that didn't incur the cost of runtime checks for NaN.

Patch: 738.diff, 738-tests.diff

Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Jason Wolfe [ 14/Feb/11 7:18 PM ]

The source of the issue seems to be incorrect treatment of boxed NaN:

user> (<= 1000 (Double. Double/NaN))
true
user> (<= 1000 (double Double/NaN))
false

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 28/Feb/11 11:14 PM ]

Primitive comparisons use java's primitive operators directly, which always return false for NaN, even when testing equality between two NaNs.

In clojure, Number comparisons are all logical variations around calls to Numbers.Ops.lt(Number, Number). So a call to (<= x y) is actually a call to (not (< y x)), which eventually uses the primitive < operator. Alas that logical premise doesn't hold when dealing with NaN:

user=> (<= 1 Double/NaN)
false
user=> (not (< Double/NaN 1))
true

So the bug is not that boxed NaN is treated incorrectly, but rather:

user> (<= 1000 (Double. Double/NaN)) ; becomes !(NaN < 1000) 
true
user> (<= 1000 (double Double/NaN))  ; becomes (1000 <= NaN)
false

In the original example, since there are more than two args, the primitive looking args were boxed:

user=> (<= 10 Double/NaN 1) ; equivalent to logical-and of the following
true
user=> (<= 10 (Double. Double/NaN))  ; becomes !(NaN < 10)
true
user=> (<= (Double. Double/NaN) 1)   ; becomes !(1 < NaN)
true

Note however that java object comparisons for NaNs behave differently: NaN is the largest Double, and NaNs equal each other (see the javadoc).

If we make object NaN comparisons always return false, we would need to add the rest of the comparison methods to Numbers.Ops. Yet doing so could also make collection sorting algorithms behave oddly, deviating from sorting written in java. Besides, (= NaN NaN) => false is annoying.

Clojure already throws out the notion of error-free dividing by zero (which for doubles would otherwise result in NaN or Infinity, depending on the dividend). Perhaps we could similarly error on NaNs passed to clojure numeric ops. They seem to be more trouble than they're worth. That said, people smarter than me thought they were useful.

Then there's that -0.0 nonsense...

Comment by Jouni K. Seppänen [ 19/Mar/11 3:02 PM ]

On current master, (<= x y) seems to be special-cased by the compiler, but when <= is called dynamically, the bug is still there:

user=> (<= 1 Float/NaN)
false
user=> (let [op <=] (op 1 Float/NaN))
true

Since CLJ-354 got marked "Completed", perhaps there was an attempt to fix this.

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 19/Mar/11 6:45 PM ]

Using let forces calling <= as a function rather than inlining Numbers/lte, which means the args are treated as objects not primitives, thus the different behaviour as I discussed earlier.

Comment by Aaron Bedra [ 28/Jun/11 6:28 PM ]

Rich, what should the behavior be?

Comment by Jouni K. Seppänen [ 29/Jun/11 1:22 AM ]

My suggestion for the behavior is to follow Java (Java Language Specification §15.20.1) and IEEE 754. The java.sun.com site seems to be down right now, but here's a Google cache link:

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:http://java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/third_edition/html/expressions.html#15.20.1

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 29/Jul/11 7:48 AM ]

It should work the same as primitive double in all cases

Comment by Luke VanderHart [ 26/Aug/11 11:33 AM ]

Added patches. The problem was that our logic for lte/gte depended on the fact that lte is equivalent to !gt.

However, in Java, this assumption is invalid - any comparison involving NaN always yields false.

The fix was to adding lte and gte methods to Numbers.Ops directly, rather than implementing everything in terms of lt. This was the only fix I could see that didn't incur the cost of runtime checks for NaN.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Mar/14 3:18 PM ]

David Welte noted: "CLJ-738 is marked Closed but the attached patch is has not been applied and both Clojure 1.5.1 and 1.6.0-beta2 exhibit the bad behavior listed in CLJ-738. The issue that CLJ-738 is that (<= (Double. Double/NaN) 1) evaluates to true while (<= Double/NaN 1) evaluates to false."

I concur that this patch was not applied. It looks likely that Luke marked this as Resolved when the patch was ready instead of whatever state change would have been appropriate at the time of the ticket (the process has varied over the years). AFAICT, this ticket should be open and Vetted (accepted as a problem) but probably needs release targeting and an updated patch based on current code.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 05/Mar/14 12:32 PM ]

Might want to make the "Fix Version" on this ticket empty so it is back on the JIRA state chart as Vetted.





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