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[CLJ-1620] Constants are leaked in case of a reentrant eval Created: 18/Dec/14  Updated: 19/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Christophe Grand Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: aot, compiler

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1620-avoid-constants-leak-in-static-initalizer.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1620-avoid-constants-leak-in-static-initalizer-v2.patch     Text File eval-bindings.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Compiling a function that references a non loaded (or unitialized) class triggers its init static. When the init static loads clojure code, some constants (source code I think) are leaked into the constants pool of the function under compilation.

It prevented CCW from working in some environments (Rational) because the static init of the resulting function was over 64K.

Steps to reproduce:

Load the leak.main ns and run the code in comments: the first function has 15 extra fiels despite being identical to the second one.

(ns leak.main)

(defn first-to-load []
  leak.Klass/foo)

(defn second-to-load []
  leak.Klass/foo)

(comment
=> (map (comp count #(.getFields %) class) [first-to-load second-to-load])
(16 1)
)
package leak;
 
import clojure.lang.IFn;
import clojure.lang.RT;
import clojure.lang.Symbol;
 
public class Klass {
  static {
    RT.var("clojure.core", "require").invoke(Symbol.intern("leak.leaky"));
  }
  public static IFn foo = RT.var("leak.leaky", "foo");
}
(ns leak.leaky)

(defn foo
  "Some doc"
  []
  "hello")

(def unrelated 42)

https://gist.github.com/cgrand/5dcb6fe5b269aecc6a5b#file-main-clj-L10



 Comments   
Comment by Christophe Grand [ 18/Dec/14 3:56 PM ]

Patch from Nicola Mometto

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 18/Dec/14 4:01 PM ]

Attached the same patch with a more informative better commit message

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 18/Dec/14 4:03 PM ]

I'd like to thank Christophe and Alex for their invaluable help in understanding what was happening, formulating the right hypothesis and then finding a fix.

I would also mention that even if non IBM rational environments where not affected by the bug to the point were CCW would not work, they were still affected. For instance the class for a one-liner function wrapping an interop call weighs 700bytes once the patch is applied, when it weighed 90kbytes with current 1.6 or 1.7.

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 18/Dec/14 5:07 PM ]

In CCW for the initial problematic function, the -v2 patch produces exactly the same bytecode as if the referenced class does not load any namespace in its static initializers.
That is, the patch is valid. I will test it live in the IBM Rational environment ASAP.

Comment by Laurent Petit [ 19/Dec/14 12:10 AM ]

I confirm the patch fixes the issue detected initially in the IBM Rational environment





[CLJ-1591] Symbol not being bound in namespace when name clashes with clojure.core Created: 14/Nov/14  Updated: 27/Nov/14

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Mike Anderson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The following code fails (both in 1.6 and latest 1.7-alpha4):

user=> (ns foo)
nil
foo=>  (def inc inc)
WARNING: inc already refers to: #'clojure.core/inc in namespace: foo, being replaced by: #'foo/inc
#'foo/inc

;; Note inc is unbound at this point, which causes the exception below
foo=> inc
#<Unbound Unbound: #'foo/inc>
foo=> (ns bar)
nil
bar=> (require ['foo :refer ['inc]])
WARNING: inc already refers to: #'clojure.core/inc in namespace: bar, being replaced by: #'foo/inc
nil
bar=> (inc 8)

IllegalStateException Attempting to call unbound fn: #'foo/inc  clojure.lang.Var$Unbound.throwArity (Var.java:43)

Further investigation shows that foo/inc is unbound:

foo/inc
=> #<Unbound Unbound: #'foo/inc>

Further investigation also shows that replacing the (def inc inc) with almost anything else, e.g. (def inc dec), (def inc clojure.core/inc), or (def inc (fn [n] (+ n 1))), causes no exception (but the warnings remain).

I would expect:
a) foo/inc should be bound and have the same value as clojure.core/inc
b) No error when requiring foo/inc
c) bar/inc should be bound to foo/inc



 Comments   
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 14/Nov/14 10:04 PM ]

The second error should be expected, the right syntax should be (require ['foo :refer ['inc]]) (note the leading quote before inc)

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 14/Nov/14 10:20 PM ]

Thanks for the catch Nicola - I've edited the description. Still get the same error however (just with a slightly different message)

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Nov/14 10:22 PM ]

See comment...

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 14/Nov/14 10:24 PM ]

@Alex what comment? Note that the error still occurs even with the right syntax....

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 14/Nov/14 10:26 PM ]

Appears to have been closed prematurely

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Nov/14 10:39 PM ]

I can't reproduce with the correct syntax:

Clojure 1.7.0-master-SNAPSHOT
user=> (ns foo)
nil
foo=> (def inc inc)
WARNING: inc already refers to: #'clojure.core/inc in namespace: foo, being replaced by: #'foo/inc
#'foo/inc
foo=> (ns bar)
nil
bar=> (require ['foo :refer ['inc]])
WARNING: inc already refers to: #'clojure.core/inc in namespace: bar, being replaced by: #'foo/inc
nil
Comment by Mike Anderson [ 14/Nov/14 10:55 PM ]

The problem is that the var is still unbound and causes e.g. the following error:

=> (foo/inc 8)
IllegalStateException Attempting to call unbound fn: #'foo/inc clojure.lang.Var$Unbound.throwArity (Var.java:43)

I don't think that should be expected - or am I missing something?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Nov/14 10:57 PM ]

Ah, will take a look. But not right now.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 15/Nov/14 1:09 PM ]

Updated the description with a few more details. The exception goes away if you do (def inc (fn [n] (+ n 1))) instead of (def inc inc), for example. The warnings remain.

Comment by Tom Crayford [ 20/Nov/14 11:07 AM ]

Unsure if this is the same issue (I think it might be?), but I reproduced the exact same error message with AOT compilation involved:

reproduced in this git repository: https://github.com/yeller/compiler_update_not_referenced_bug

clone it, run `lein do clean, uberjar, test`, and that error message will show up every time for me

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 20/Nov/14 5:43 PM ]

Mike, I think replacing (def inc inc) in your example with (def inc clojure.core/inc) should be considered as a reasonable workaround for this issue, unless you have some use case where you need to def inc to something that is not in clojure.core (and if so, why?)

The reason (def inc inc) behaves this way is, if not absolutely necessary, at least commonly used in Clojure programs to define recursive functions, e.g. (defn fib [n] (if (<= n 1) 1 (+ (fib (dec n)) (fib (- n 2))))), so that the occurrences of fib in the body are resolved to the fib being defined.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Nov/14 9:05 AM ]

Moving to 1.7 until I can look at this more deeply.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 23/Nov/14 6:08 PM ]

Andy - yes the workaround is fine for me right now.

I don't think this is an urgent issue but it may be exposing a subtle complexity regarding assumptions about the state of the namespace at different times. Perhaps the semantics should be something like:

  • The def statement itself should be run before the var is interned. e.g. (def inc (inc 5)) should result in (def inc 6)
  • Anything complied / deferred to run after completion of the def statement should use the new var (i.e. the new var should be referenced by fns, lazy sequences etc.)
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Nov/14 6:36 PM ]

I'm not sure what your proposal means in a case like this:

(def inc (fn [x] (inc x)))

Is the second inc to be interpreted/resolved before or after the new inc is created? Because it is (fn ...) it should be the after-behavior? What else besides fn should cause the after-behavior, rather than the before-behavior?

Even more fun (not saying that people often write code like this, but the compiler can handle it today):

(def inc (if (> (inc y) 5)
           (fn [x] (inc x))
           (fn [x] (dec x))))

I think the current compiler behavior of 'in the body of a def, the def'd symbol always refers to the new var, not any earlier def'd vars' is fairly straightforward to explain.

Comment by Tom Crayford [ 23/Nov/14 9:15 PM ]

Should I file the AOT issue reproduced in that thing as a new issue?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 24/Nov/14 5:16 PM ]

Tom: Alex Miller or another screener would be best to say whether the AOT issue should be a separate ticket, but my best guess would be "go for it". I tried to look at the link you gave but it seems not to point to anything. Could you double-check that link?

Comment by Tom Crayford [ 24/Nov/14 6:48 PM ]

Andy,

Great. I'll write one up tomorrow sometime. I accidentally left that repo as private, should be visible now.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 24/Nov/14 8:11 PM ]

This comment is really most relevant for ticket CLJ-1604, where it has been copied:

Tom, looked at your project. Thanks for that. It appears not to have anything like (def inc inc) in it. It throws exception during test step of 'lein do clean, uberjar, test' consistently for me, too, but compiles with only warnings and passes tests with 'lein do clean, test'. I have more test results showing in which Clojure versions these results change. To summarize, the changes to Clojure that appear to make the biggest difference in the results are below (these should be added to the new ticket you create – you are welcome to do so):

Clojure 1.6.0, 1.7.0-alpha1, and later changes up through the commit with description "CLJ-1378: Allows FnExpr to override its reported class with a type hint": No errors or warnings for either lein command above.

Next commit with description "Add clojure.core/update, like update-in but takes a single key" that adds clojure.core/update: 'lein do clean, test' is fine, but 'lein do clean, uberjar' throws exception during compilation, probably due to CLJ-1241.

Next commit with description "fix CLJ-1241": 'lein do clean, test' and 'lein do clean, uberjar' give warnings about clojure.core/update, but no errors or exceptions. 'lein do clean, uberjar, test' throws exception during test step that is same as the one I see with Clojure 1.7.0-alpha4. Debug prints of values of clojure.core/update and int-map/update (in data.int-map and in Tom's namespace compiler-update-not-referenced-bug.core) show things look fine when printed inside data.int-map, and in Tom's namespace when not doing the uberjar, but when doing the uberjar, test, int-map/update is unbound in Tom's namespace.

In case it makes a difference, my testing was done with Mac OS X 10.9.5, Leiningen 2.5.0 on Java 1.7.0_45 Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 25/Nov/14 3:44 PM ]

Tom, I've opened a ticket with a patch fixing the AOT issue: http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1604





[CLJ-1586] Compiler doesn't preserve metadata for LazySeq literals Created: 12/Nov/14  Updated: 12/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler, metadata, typehints

Attachments: Text File 0001-Compiler-doesn-t-preserve-metadata-for-lazyseq-liter.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The analyzer in Compiler.java forces evaluation of lazyseq literals, but loses the compile time original metadata of that form, meaning that a type hint will be lost.

Example demonstrating this issue:

user=> (set! *warn-on-reflection* true)
true
user=> (list '.hashCode (with-meta (concat '(identity) '("foo")) {:tag 'String}))
(.hashCode (identity "foo"))
user=> (eval (list '.hashCode (with-meta (concat '(identity) '("foo")) {:tag 'String})))
Reflection warning, NO_SOURCE_PATH:1:1 - reference to field hashCode can't be resolved.
101574

Forcing the concat call to an ASeq rather than a LazySeq fixes this issue:

user=> (eval (list '.hashCode (with-meta (seq (concat '(identity) '("foo"))) {:tag 'String})))
101574

This ticket blocks http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1444 since clojure.core/sequence might return a lazyseq.

This bug affected both tools.analyzer and tools.reader and forced me to commit a fix in tools.reader to work around this issue, see: http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/TANAL-99

The proposed patch trivially preserves the form metadata after realizing the lazyseq






[CLJ-1568] Incorrect error locations reported in the stacktrace Created: 19/Oct/14  Updated: 22/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Bozhidar Batsov Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 18
Labels: errormsgs, ft

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1568-fix-incorrect-error-locations.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The following code produces an incorrect stacktrace:

(ns clojure-demo.core)

(defn foo
  "I don't do a whole lot."
  [x]
  (println x "Hello, World!"))

(/ 1 0)
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ArithmeticException: Divide by zero, compiling:(clojure_demo/core.clj:6:31)

The problem is actually on the 8th line. As a matter of fact - there's nothing at location 6:31.
This is a pretty serious problem as many tools parse stacktraces for error locations.
Here's a related discussion in cider's issue tracker.

Patch: 0001-CLJ-1568-fix-incorrect-error-locations.patch
Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Oct/14 1:39 PM ]

Maybe a dupe of CLJ-1561 ?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 19/Oct/14 4:16 PM ]

I tried out the example given in the description, with the latest Clojure master as of today plus the patch for CLJ-1561 called 0002-Mark-line-number-after-emitting-children.patch, dated Oct 10 2014.

The line:column number 6:31 is the same for that patched version as it is in the ticket description, which is for Clojure 1.6.0.

The issue of misleading line:column numbers is common between the two tickets, but at least the proposed improvement in CLJ-1561's patch is not effective for improving this issue.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 20/Oct/14 1:36 AM ]

I know that the issue list for 1.7 is pretty much finalised, but I think that this issue and and CLJ-1561 should be fixed as soon as possible.
Correct error reporting is extremely important IMO.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 20/Oct/14 8:28 AM ]

Attached a patch that fixes the issue by consuming all the whitespaces before retrieving line/column info for the next form.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Oct/14 8:39 AM ]

Are there possible downsides to more eagerly consuming whitespace as done in the patch?

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 20/Oct/14 8:44 AM ]

I can't think of any

Comment by Paul Stadig [ 22/Oct/14 2:59 PM ]

The defect on master does not have effect when using compile:

user=> (require 'clojure-demo.core)

CompilerException java.lang.ArithmeticException: Divide by zero, compiling:(clojure_demo/core.clj:6:31) 
user=> (load "/clojure_demo/core")

CompilerException java.lang.ArithmeticException: Divide by zero, compiling:(clojure_demo/core.clj:6:31) 
user=> (compile "clojure_demo/core")

CompilerException java.lang.ArithmeticException: Divide by zero, compiling:(core.clj:8:1) 

With the patch applied all the line numbers are the same in all cases:

user=> (require 'clojure-demo.core)

CompilerException java.lang.ArithmeticException: Divide by zero, compiling:(clojure_demo/core.clj:8:1) 
user=> (load "/clojure_demo/core")

CompilerException java.lang.ArithmeticException: Divide by zero, compiling:(clojure_demo/core.clj:8:1) 
user=> (compile "clojure_demo/core")

CompilerException java.lang.ArithmeticException: Divide by zero, compiling:(core.clj:8:1) 

Agreed that this seems to be orthogonal to CLJ-1561.





[CLJ-1561] Incorrect line numbers are emitted Created: 10/Oct/14  Updated: 22/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Paul Stadig Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 22
Labels: errormsgs

Attachments: Text File 0001-Mark-line-number-after-emitting-children.patch     Text File 0002-Mark-line-number-after-emitting-children.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The Clojure JVM compiler marks the line number for a form before emitting the children for that form. Marking the line number before emitting children leads to incorrect line numbers when a runtime error occurs. For example, when

 (foo bar
      baz)

is emitted the compiler will visit the line number for the expression, then emit the children expressions ('bar' and 'baz') which will mark their own line numbers, then come back and emit the invoke bytecode for 'foo', but since the last line number to be marked was that of 'baz', if 'foo' throws an exception the line number of 'baz' will be reported instead of the line number for the expression as a whole.

This same issue was being manifested with special forms and inlined functions, and was especially bad in the case of the threading macro '->', because it is usually spread across several lines, and the line number reported could end up being very different than the line actually causing an exception.

A demonstration of the incorrect line numbers (and how the fix affects line numbers) can be seen here https://github.com/pjstadig/clojure-line-numbers



 Comments   
Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 10/Oct/14 1:57 PM ]

additions in your patch mixes tabs and spaces. Could you please update the patch so that your added lines indent only with tab characters? Not everyone has tab set at 4 spaces...

Comment by Paul Stadig [ 10/Oct/14 2:42 PM ]

There's already a mixture of just tabs, just spaces, and tabs & spaces in Compiler.java. I'm not sure what the "standard" is, but I've changed the patch to match the surrounding lines.

Comment by Paul Stadig [ 10/Oct/14 2:42 PM ]

Patch with whitespace changes.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Oct/14 8:38 AM ]

These changes will affect the line number tables for a variety of Clojure constructs when compiled. It would be very helpful to me to have a set of examples that covered each case touched in the patch so that I could compile them and look at the bytecode vs the source. This would greatly accelerate the screening process.

Comment by Paul Stadig [ 20/Oct/14 2:29 PM ]

Alex,
I have created a repo on github that has a sample file demonstrating the line number changes.

https://github.com/pjstadig/clojure-line-numbers

Hope that helps!

BTW, I'd be glad to do a skype call or hangout, if you have questions.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Oct/14 2:34 PM ]

This is very helpful, thanks!!

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Oct/14 11:35 AM ]

In the hunk at 3191 in KeywordInvokeExpr, a call to visitLineNumber was added, but the prior call 4 lines earlier was not removed. Should it be?

Comment by Paul Stadig [ 22/Oct/14 12:05 PM ]

I left that in thinking that if something goes wrong with the getstatic instruction (null pointer exception? class cast exception?) it should report the line number of the KeywordInvokeExpr. It may be that there isn't a realistic possibility that anything could actually happen with that getstatic instruction, but that was the thought process.

My general rule of thumb was if an emit method emits any instructions before it calls the emit method on another expr, then it should mark its line number before and after the recursive emit call (assuming that the recursive emit call would mark its own line number). In cases where an emit method immediately calls another emit method, then I don't bother to mark a line number until afterwards.





[CLJ-1472] The locking macro fails bytecode verification on ART runtime Created: 23/Jul/14  Updated: 11/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Adam Clements Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: None
Environment:

Android ART runtime


Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1472-Locking-macro-without-explicit-monitor-ente.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Android ART runs compile time verification on bytecode and was failing on any usage of the locking macro. Examination of the bytecode as compared to a java synchronized block shows up a number of differences:
https://gist.github.com/AdamClements/2ae6c4919964b71eb470

Having the monitor-enter inside the try block seems wrong to me, as surely if the lock fails to be acquired, it shouldn't be released with monitor-exit. Moving the monitor enter outside the try block seems to have resolved the issue and android no longer complains about usages of locking and all clojure tests still pass.

Java's generated code goes further and catches any exceptions generated by the monitor-exit itself and retries indefinitely (I believe the logic is that then at least your deadlock is in the right place, and not next time something else attempts to acquire a lock on the same object). I don't think that this can be replicated in clojure without getting down to the bytecode emitting level though and it doesn't seem to be an issue for the ART verifier.



 Comments   
Comment by Adam Clements [ 24/Jul/14 11:17 AM ]

After using this a little more, I've found that moving this outside the try block breaks nREPL.

Looking at the bytecode, the monitorenter for the locking in clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.session/session-out and in a few other places ends up in an entirely different method definition and we now get a JVM IllegalMonitorStateException as well as an ART verification error for this function.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Aug/14 9:08 PM ]

Adam, I cannot comment on whether your patch is of interest or not, but it is true that no patch will be committed to Clojure if the author has not signed a Contributor Agreement, which can now be done on-line at http://clojure.org/contributing

Comment by Adam Clements [ 04/Aug/14 4:24 PM ]

Uploaded a new patch (and signed the contributor agreement). This passes both the JVM and ART bytecode verification, The extra try/catch around the monitor exit is optional (verification passes with or without it) but where the java version retries monitor-exit indefinitely and shows the deadlock at the right time, without catching errors in the monitor-exit an undetermined monitor-enter in the future might fail, not showing up the actual bug.

It's not very pretty, but without finer grained control of the generated bytecode, this is the best I could do.

Comment by Adam Clements [ 25/Nov/14 8:31 AM ]

Have just tested with Lollipop, and this patch might no longer be sufficient.

Getting in touch with the ART guys to see if they can shed a little more light and verify whether it will work on the current master branch of AOSP

Comment by Adam Clements [ 25/Nov/14 9:49 AM ]

Bug filed with AOSP project, hopefully they can shed some light on whether it is our problem and if so how we can fix it.

https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=80823

Comment by Adam Clements [ 28/Nov/14 11:03 AM ]

I have uploaded an alternative implementation of the locking macro (0001-CLJ-1472-Locking-macro-without-explicit-monitor-ente.patch) which cheats a little - the synchronized block is actually implemented in Java and so guarantees compatibility. This is at the cost of a little extra indirection and the naming/location could probably be better.

But it does fix the bug and work on all versions of android, android + art and the jvm. Would this approach be acceptable?

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 08/Dec/14 1:12 PM ]

I have yet to see any evidence that the bytecode clojure is generating in some way violates the jvm spec, so I suspect the issue is clojure requires a jvm to run, and android doesn't provide a jvm, just something that looks like one if you don't tread outside the beaten path.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 08/Dec/14 1:27 PM ]

given the structured locking verbiage in https://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jvms/se7/html/jvms-2.html#jvms-2.11.10, `(locking nil)` may generate bytecode whose runtime behavior violates structured locking. the first patch on this issue can cause the compiler to emit monitorenter/exit instructions in different methods, which definitely violates structured locking

Comment by Adam Clements [ 09/Dec/14 10:45 AM ]

Yes, the first patch was definitely wrong, I left it for some context to the conversation, but it's probably best to just remove it for clarity.

For anyone following this conversation who doesn't want to decompile and observe the bytecode, here's a gist with the difference between a java synchronized block and clojure locking https://gist.github.com/AdamClements/2ae6c4919964b71eb470

I'm finding it hard to work out where the deviation from the spec occurs too, though I can see the difference with the Java version, if anything, the Clojure version looks closer to what's described in the spec than the Java one!

If someone with more knowledge than me on the subject could engage on the AOSP bug https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=80823 then perhaps we could settle this as an android bug which is too focussed on the java implementation rather than the JVM spec, or perhaps they'll find something that's wrong with the Clojure implementation. I have uploaded the original clojure behaviour and asked them for some more explanation on why it is failing.

Comment by Adam Clements [ 09/Dec/14 11:09 AM ]

The response from the ART guys about what they think we're violating is:

The section on "Structured locking" contains the following:

"[...] implementations [...] are permitted but not required to enforce
both of the following two rules guaranteeing structured locking. [...]"

ART currently enforces both rules at verification time, including

"At no point during a method invocation may the number of monitor exits
performed by T on M since the method invocation exceed the number of
monitor entries performed by T on M since the method invocation."

Comment by Adam Clements [ 09/Dec/14 11:32 AM ]

If for example instruction https://gist.github.com/AdamClements/2ae6c4919964b71eb470#file-test_locks-class-L24 or the monitor-enter itself on the next line were to fail, couldn't it could end up in the finally clause and attempt to release the lock even though it has never been captured?

I think this violates the structured locking rules in the jvm spec you linked to.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 09/Dec/14 1:15 PM ]

an interesting question about structured locking, is does the specification refer to the static bytecode or the runtime behavior of the bytecode. given the bytecode linked(https://gist.github.com/AdamClements/2ae6c4919964b71eb470#file-test_locks-class-L24), the static bytecode has the same number of entries and exits, but the dynamic behavior may be different. I wonder which one the art guys claim to be enforcing at verification time (it seems like it would have to be the static bytecode, not the dynamic properties, but then they shouldn't be failing to verify this). looking at the google code issue, the comment https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=80823#c6 was made by the same dev as https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=80823#c3, so I sort of suspect there is some miscommunication going on. It is not clear in what context the dev is replying in, since in the previous comment you mention splitting monitor-enter and exit across methods. I think things would be much clearer if all patches, specialized clojure android builds, etc, were gotten rid of, then with a vanilla clojure jar you get a javap dump of what fails to verify, then just take that over to the android issue tracker and ask "hey, this fails to verify, why?"

Comment by Adam Clements [ 11/Dec/14 9:15 AM ]

Yeah, I shouldn't have confused it with the patched versions. The gist and the currently uploaded version use the vanilla clojure version of the locking macro now though.

I think the issue comes from the exception table and the instructions that covers. If line 24 can throw for example, you would end up at runtime with a monitor-exit, having never encountered a monitor-enter.





[CLJ-1453] Most Iterator implementations do not correctly implement next failing to throw the required NoSuchElementException Created: 24/Jun/14  Updated: 07/Aug/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Meikel Brandmeyer Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: interop

Attachments: Text File 0001-Fix-iterator-implementations-to-throw-NSEE-when-exha.patch     Text File 0001-Throw-NSEE-in-gvec-iterator.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Most implementations of Iterators for Clojure's collections do not implement the next method correctly. In case the iterator is exhausted the methods fail with some case dependent error, but not with the NoSuchElementException as required by the official Java contract for that method. This causes problems when working with Java libraries relying on that behaviour.

Issue encountered in real world code using http://pipes.tinkerpop.com.

To reproduce:

(-> [] .iterator .next)

This throws a NPE instead of NSEE.

(doto (.iterator [1 2]) .next .next .next)

This throws an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException instead of NSEE.

The attached patch fixes the methods by adding a check for hasNext before actually trying to provide the next element. If there is no next element the correct exception is thrown.

Up-to-date patch file: 0001-Fix-iterator-implementations-to-throw-NSEE-when-exha.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Tim McCormack [ 15/Jul/14 9:56 PM ]

To establish a baseline, this piece of code checks all the iterators I could find within Clojure 1.6.0 and makes sure they throw an appropriate exception:

iterator-checker.clj
(defn next-failure
  []
  (let [ok (atom [])]
    (doseq [[tp v]
            (sorted-map
             :vec-0 []
             :vec-n [1 2 3]
             :vec-start (subvec [1 2 3 4] 0 1)
             :vec-end (subvec [1 2 3 4] 3 4)
             :vec-ls-0 (.listIterator [])
             :vec-ls-n (.listIterator [1 2 3])
             :vec-start-ls (.listIterator (subvec [1 2 3 4] 0 1))
             :vec-end-ls (.listIterator (subvec [1 2 3 4] 3 4))
             :seq ()
             :list-n '(1 2 3)
             :set-hash-0 (hash-set)
             :set-hash-n (hash-set 1 2 3)
             :set-sor-0 (sorted-set)
             :set-sor-n (sorted-set 1 2 3)
             :map-arr-0 (array-map)
             :map-arr-n (array-map 1 2, 3 4)
             :map-hash-0 (hash-map)
             :map-hash-n (hash-map 1 2, 3 4)
             :map-sor-n (sorted-map)
             :map-sor-n (sorted-map 1 2, 3 4)
             :map-sor-ks-0 (.keys (sorted-map))
             :map-sor-ks-n (.keys (sorted-map 1 2, 3 4))
             :map-sor-vs-0 (.vals (sorted-map))
             :map-sor-vs-n (.vals (sorted-map 1 2, 3 4))
             :map-sor-rev-0 (.reverseIterator (sorted-map))
             :map-sor-rev-n (.reverseIterator (sorted-map 1 2, 3 4))
             :map-ks-0 (.keySet {})
             :map-ks-n (.keySet {1 2, 3 4})
             :map-vs-0 (.values {})
             :map-vs-n (.values {1 2, 3 4})
             :gvec-int-0 (vector-of :long)
             :gvec-int-n (vector-of :long 1 2 3))]
      (let [it (if (instance? java.util.Iterator v)
                 v
                 (.iterator v))]
        (when-not it
          (println "Null iterator:" tp))
        (try (dotimes [_ 50]
               (.next it))
             (catch java.util.NoSuchElementException nsee
               (swap! ok conj tp))
             (catch Throwable t
               (println tp "threw" (class t))))))
    (println "OK:" @ok)))

The output as of current Clojure master (201a0dd970) is:

:gvec-int-0 threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:gvec-int-n threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-arr-0 threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-arr-n threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-hash-0 threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-ks-0 threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-ks-n threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-sor-ks-0 threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-ks-n threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-n threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-rev-0 threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-rev-n threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-vs-0 threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-vs-n threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-vs-0 threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-vs-n threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-0 threw java.lang.NullPointerException
:vec-end threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-end-ls threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-ls-0 threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-ls-n threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-n threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-start threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-start-ls threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
OK: [:list-n :map-hash-n :seq :set-hash-0 :set-hash-n :set-sor-0 :set-sor-n]
Comment by Tim McCormack [ 15/Jul/14 9:57 PM ]

0001-Fix-iterator-implementations-to-throw-NSEE-when-exha.patch missed one thing: clojure.gvec. With the patch in place, my checker outputs the following:

:gvec-int-0 threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:gvec-int-n threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
OK: [:list-n :map-arr-0 :map-arr-n :map-hash-0 :map-hash-n :map-ks-0 :map-ks-n :map-sor-ks-0 :map-sor-ks-n :map-sor-n :map-sor-rev-0 :map-sor-rev-n :map-sor-vs-0 :map-sor-vs-n :map-vs-0 :map-vs-n :seq :set-hash-0 :set-hash-n :set-sor-0 :set-sor-n :vec-0 :vec-end :vec-end-ls :vec-ls-0 :vec-ls-n :vec-n :vec-start :vec-start-ls]

That should be a quick fix.

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 15/Jul/14 10:01 PM ]

CLJ-1416 includes a fix for gvec's iterator impls (and some other improvements to interop).

Comment by Tim McCormack [ 15/Jul/14 10:17 PM ]

Attaching a fix for the gvec iterator. Combined with the existing patch, this fixes all broken iterators that I could find.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 07/Aug/14 10:25 AM ]

I believe this Clojure commit: https://github.com/clojure/clojure/commit/e7215ce82215bda33f4f0887cb88570776d558a0

introduces more implementations of the java.util.Iterator interface where next() returns null instead of throwing a NoSuchElementException





[CLJ-1372] Inconsistent hash with java collections Created: 09/Mar/14  Updated: 12/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Jozef Wagner Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 7
Labels: collections, interop
Environment:

1.6.0 master


Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1372-consistent-hasheq-for-java.util.-List-Map-M-alternative.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1372-consistent-hasheq-for-java.util.-List-Map-M.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1372-consistent-hasheq-for-java.util.-List-Map-M-substring.patch     Text File 0005-CLJ-1372-consistent-hasheq-for-java.util.-List-Map-M.patch     Text File 0006-CLJ-1372-consistent-hasheq-for-java.util.-List-Map-M.patch     Text File 0007-CLJ-1372-consistent-hasheq-for-java.util.-List-Map-M.patch     File clj-1372-2.diff     File clj-1372.diff    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

c.c/hash always use hashCode for java collections, which is incompatible when comparing with Clojure collections, which use Murmur3.

user=> (== (hash (java.util.ArrayList. [1 2 3])) (hash [1 2 3]))
false
user=> (= (java.util.ArrayList. [1 2 3]) [1 2 3])
true

One way to fix it is to add a special case in Util/hasheq for java.util.Collections, as it is now for Strings.

Link to a discussion of this topic in the Clojure group: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/dQhdwZsyIEw



 Comments   
Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 09/Mar/14 8:02 AM ]

Same problem for maps, so hasheq should have a special case for java.util.Map too.

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 09/Mar/14 9:21 AM ]

Added patch with fix for j.u. Map, Set and List.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 09/Mar/14 6:02 PM ]

Add patch clj-1372-2.diff that is identical to Jozef Wagner's clj-1372.diff, except it also adds some new tests that fail without his changes, and pass with them.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Mar/14 9:31 AM ]

I think the contract on equiv/hasheq is more narrowly scoped than this and only applies if both collections are IPersistentCollection. In other words, I don't think this is wanted or required.

Note that the Java .equals/.hashCode contract is maintained here - these collections will compare as .equals() and do have the same .hashCode().

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 10/Mar/14 9:38 AM ]

Without the patch the following statement is not valid: "If two objects are equal with c.c/=, than their hash returned by c.c/hash is the same number". We can say that this is valid only iff both objects are 'clojure' objects, but this goes against clojures interop principles (interop is easy, fast, no surprises).

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 10/Mar/14 9:54 AM ]

Manifestation of this bug

user=> (assoc (hash-map [1 2 3] :foo) (java.util.ArrayList. [1 2 3]) :bar)
{[1 2 3] :bar, [1 2 3] :foo}
user=> (get (hash-map [1 2 3] :foo) (java.util.ArrayList. [1 2 3]))
nil
Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Mar/14 10:58 AM ]

I agree that would be a nice thing to say without qualification.

There is a real cost to adding more branches in hasheq - adding those collection checks affects every hasheq. Running a full Clojure build, I see the following set of classes with >100 occurences where this happens (note that exactly 0 of these are the Java collections - this case doesn't exist in the Clojure build itself):

clojure.lang.Var 107001502
java.lang.Class 2651389
java.lang.Character 2076322 
java.util.UUID 435235 
java.util.Date 430956
clojure.lang.Compiler$LocalBinding 116830
java.lang.Boolean 112361
java.util.regex.Pattern 325

We'd be adding 4 more instanceof checks in the path of every one of those hasheqs. This would also likely blow any JVM inlining.

Rich says "all bets should be off for hasheq/equiv of non-values" where Java collections obviously fall into the class of "non-values".

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 10/Mar/14 11:04 AM ]

Would a doc patch be considered? Say one that modified the doc of clojure.core/hash to include a phrase indicating that it is only promised to be consistent with clojure.core/= for immutable values? It could even perhaps mention that Floats are out, too: see CLJ-1036

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Mar/14 12:00 PM ]

I think it would be preferred to do any detailed docs about hash at http://clojure.org/data_structures rather than in the docstring. Although the docstring on hash probably could use an update and a pointer to the web site after the latest changes.

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 10/Mar/14 12:14 PM ]

Neverthless it is a breaking change from 1.5, and it should be mentioned in changelog. What still bugs me is that c.c/= is supported in such cases but the c.c/hash is not. If supporting c.c/hash is expensive, isn't it better to drop support for c.c/= in such cases? It will eliminate surprises such as:

user=> (apply distinct? (hash-set [1 2 3] (java.util.Collections/unmodifiableList [1 2 3])))
false
Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Mar/14 2:05 PM ]

I'm not sure it's a "breaking" change if something not considered to be guaranteed changes. But I take your point.

I don't think it's feasible to drop = support for Clojure and Java collections - that seems important and useful. And if it were free to do so, I would like to be able to say without qualification that if equiv=true, then hasheq is the same.

It's unclear to me that the examples listed on this ticket are actually real problems people are likely to encounter. The main users of hasheq are hash map and hash set. So to manifest, you would need to be putting a mixture of Clojure and Java collections into one of those, in particular a mixture of collections that compare as equal.

Still thinking about it.

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 10/Mar/14 3:27 PM ]

Sorry for spamming but there may be another option, to not fallback into hashCode in hasheq, but to instead throw in cases where hasheq is requested for non-values. This will lead to a cleaner separation of hash types. Of course it will prevent putting non-values into hash-set.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Mar/14 3:34 PM ]

There is no simple check for "valueness" though?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 10/Mar/14 3:37 PM ]

An idea, for what it might be worth: Add one test for instance of java.util.Collection in Util.hasheq method instead of 3 separate tests for Set, List, and Map. It doesn't cover Map.Entry.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Mar/14 3:38 PM ]

Map doesn't extend Collection either.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 11/Mar/14 10:44 AM ]

I think this needs more consideration and should not hold up 1.6.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 20/Mar/14 2:01 PM ]

Both patches clj-1372.diff and clj-1372-2.diff fail to apply cleanly as of latest Clojure master on Mar 20 2014. They did apply cleanly before the Mar 19 2014 commit, I believe, and the only issue appears to be a changed line of diff context. Given the discussion about whether such a change is desired, it sounds like more thought is needed before deciding what change should be made, if any.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 11/May/14 2:31 PM ]

This is a pretty bad defect. It absolutely needs to be fixed. It's not really about whether using a mix of Clojure and Java collections is a likely use case or not (it probably isn't...), it's about providing consistent guarantees that people can rely upon.

For example, now I'm really unsure about whether some of the library functions I have that use sets or maps are broken or not. I'd be particularly worried about anything that implements object caches / memoisation / interning based on hashed values. Such code may now have some really nasty subtle defects.

Since they are library functions, I can't guarantee what kind of objects are passed in so the code has to work with all possible inputs (either that or I need to write a clear docstring and throw an exception if the input is not supported).

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 12/May/14 11:29 PM ]

This patch (0001-CLJ-1372-consistent-hasheq-for-java.util.-List-Map-M.patch) makes hasheq consistent with = for java.util.{List,Map,Map.Entry,Set}. Additionally it extends the special treatment of String (return hasheq of hashCode) to all types not otherwise handled (see below for a comment on this).

It is also available here:

https://github.com/michalmarczyk/clojure/tree/alien-hasheq-2

An earlier version is available here:

https://github.com/michalmarczyk/clojure/tree/alien-hasheq

If I understand correctly, what needs to be benchmarked is primarily the "dispatch time" for clojure.lang.Util/hasheq given a Clojure type. So, I ran a Criterium benchmark repeatedly hashing the same persistent hash map, on the theory that this will measure just the dispatch time on IHashEq instances. I then ran a separate benchmark hashing a PHM, a string and a long and adding up the results with unchecked-add. Hopefully this is a good start; I've no doubt additional benchmarks would be useful.

The results are somewhat surprising to me: hasheq on PHM is actually slightly faster in this benchmark on my build than on 1.6.0; the "add three hasheqs" benchmark is slightly faster on 1.6.0.

;;; 1.6.0

;;; NB. j.u.HM benchmark irrelevant
user=> (let [phm (apply hash-map (interleave (range 128) (range 128))) juhm (java.util.HashMap. phm)] #_(assert (= (hash phm) (hash juhm))) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq phm)) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq juhm)))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.24405836928592 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 5549560980 in 60 samples of 92492683 calls.
             Execution time mean : 9.229881 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.156716 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 8.985994 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 9.574039 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.741068 ns

Found 2 outliers in 60 samples (3.3333 %)
	low-severe	 2 (3.3333 %)
 Variance from outliers : 6.2652 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
Evaluation count : 35647680 in 60 samples of 594128 calls.
             Execution time mean : 1.695145 µs
    Execution time std-deviation : 20.186554 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 1.670049 µs ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 1.740329 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.741068 ns

Found 2 outliers in 60 samples (3.3333 %)
	low-severe	 2 (3.3333 %)
 Variance from outliers : 1.6389 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
nil

user=> (let [phm (apply hash-map (interleave (range 128) (range 128))) juhm (java.util.HashMap. phm)] #_(assert (= (hash phm) (hash juhm))) (c/bench (unchecked-add (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq phm) (unchecked-add (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq "foo") (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq 123)))))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.028614538339401 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 1029948300 in 60 samples of 17165805 calls.
             Execution time mean : 56.797488 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.732221 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 55.856731 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 58.469940 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.836671 ns

Found 1 outliers in 60 samples (1.6667 %)
	low-severe	 1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 1.6389 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
nil

;;; patch applied

user=> (let [phm (apply hash-map (interleave (range 128) (range 128))) juhm (java.util.HashMap. phm)] (assert (= (hash phm) (hash juhm))) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq phm)) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq juhm)))
Evaluation count : 5537698680 in 60 samples of 92294978 calls.
             Execution time mean : 8.973200 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.157079 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 8.733544 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 9.289350 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.744772 ns
Evaluation count : 2481600 in 60 samples of 41360 calls.
             Execution time mean : 24.287800 µs
    Execution time std-deviation : 288.124326 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 23.856445 µs ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 24.774097 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.744772 ns
nil

user=> (let [phm (apply hash-map (interleave (range 128) (range 128))) juhm (java.util.HashMap. phm)] #_(assert (= (hash phm) (hash juhm))) (c/bench (unchecked-add (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq phm) (unchecked-add (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq "foo") (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq 123)))))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.298136122909759 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 954751500 in 60 samples of 15912525 calls.
             Execution time mean : 61.681794 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.712110 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 60.622003 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 62.904801 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.744772 ns

Found 1 outliers in 60 samples (1.6667 %)
	low-severe	 1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 1.6389 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
nil

As a side note, the earlier version of the patch available on the other branch doesn't have a separate branch for String. This made hasheq faster for objects implementing IHashEq, but slowed down the "three hashes" benchmark roughly by a factor of 2.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 12/May/14 11:39 PM ]

Just for clarity, please refer to patches attached here by name so as time goes on we don't have to correlate attachment time with comment time.

I'm not particularly worried about the cost of things that implement IHashEq as they should be unaffected other than potential inlining issues. I am curious about the cost of hasheq for objects that fall through to the end of the cases and pay the cost for all of the checks. The list farther up in the comments is a good place to start - things like Class, Character, and Var (which could possibly be addressed in Var).

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 12/May/14 11:47 PM ]

Good point, I've edited the above comment to include the patch name.

Thanks for the benchmarking suggestions – I'll post some new results in ~6 minutes.

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 13/May/14 12:18 AM ]

First, for completeness, here's a new patch (0001-CLJ-1372-consistent-hasheq-for-java.util.-List-Map-M-alternative.patch) which doesn't do the extra murmuring for types not otherwise handled. It's slower for the single PHM case; see below for details. Also, here's the branch on GitHub:

https://github.com/michalmarczyk/clojure/tree/alien-hasheq-3

As for the new results, the perf hit is quite large, I'm afraid:

;;; with patch (murmur hashCode for default version)
user=> (let [class-instance java.lang.String character-instance \a var-instance #'hash] (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq class-instance)) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq character-instance)) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq var-instance)))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.409118084170768 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 655363680 in 60 samples of 10922728 calls.
             Execution time mean : 96.459888 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 1.019817 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 95.079086 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 98.684168 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.708347 ns
Evaluation count : 675919140 in 60 samples of 11265319 calls.
             Execution time mean : 88.965959 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.825226 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 87.817159 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 90.755688 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.708347 ns
Evaluation count : 574987680 in 60 samples of 9583128 calls.
             Execution time mean : 103.881498 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 1.103615 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 102.257474 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 106.071144 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.708347 ns

Found 1 outliers in 60 samples (1.6667 %)
	low-severe	 1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 1.6389 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
nil

;;; 1.6.0
user=> (let [class-instance java.lang.String character-instance \a var-instance #'hash] (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq class-instance)) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq character-instance)) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq var-instance)))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.3353133083866688 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 1829305260 in 60 samples of 30488421 calls.
             Execution time mean : 34.205701 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.379106 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 33.680636 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 34.990138 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.718257 ns

Found 2 outliers in 60 samples (3.3333 %)
	low-severe	 1 (1.6667 %)
	low-mild	 1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 1.6389 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
Evaluation count : 1858100340 in 60 samples of 30968339 calls.
             Execution time mean : 30.401309 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.213878 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 30.095976 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 30.871497 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.718257 ns
Evaluation count : 1592932200 in 60 samples of 26548870 calls.
             Execution time mean : 36.292934 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.333512 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 35.795063 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 36.918183 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.718257 ns

Found 1 outliers in 60 samples (1.6667 %)
	low-severe	 1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 1.6389 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
nil

One PHM and Class/Character/Var results with the new patch (no extra murmur step in the default case):

user=> (let [phm (apply hash-map (interleave (range 128) (range 128))) juhm (java.util.HashMap. phm)] #_(assert (= (hash phm) (hash juhm))) (c/bench (unchecked-add (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq phm) (unchecked-add (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq "foo") (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq 123)))))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.258952964663877 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 1007768460 in 60 samples of 16796141 calls.
             Execution time mean : 58.195608 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.482804 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 57.655857 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 59.154655 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.567532 ns

Found 1 outliers in 60 samples (1.6667 %)
	low-severe	 1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 1.6389 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
nil
user=> (let [class-instance java.lang.String character-instance \a var-instance #'hash] (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq class-instance)) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq character-instance)) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq var-instance)))
Evaluation count : 647944080 in 60 samples of 10799068 calls.
             Execution time mean : 91.275863 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.659943 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 90.330980 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 92.711120 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.567532 ns
Evaluation count : 699506160 in 60 samples of 11658436 calls.
             Execution time mean : 84.564131 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.517071 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 83.765607 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 85.569206 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.567532 ns

Found 1 outliers in 60 samples (1.6667 %)
	low-severe	 1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 1.6389 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
Evaluation count : 594919980 in 60 samples of 9915333 calls.
             Execution time mean : 100.336792 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.811312 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 99.313490 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 102.167675 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.567532 ns

Found 3 outliers in 60 samples (5.0000 %)
	low-severe	 3 (5.0000 %)
 Variance from outliers : 1.6389 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
nil
Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 13/May/14 1:05 AM ]

Here's a new patch (0001-CLJ-1372-consistent-hasheq-for-java.util.-List-Map-M-substring.patch) that takes the outrageous approach of replacing the Iterable/Map/Entry test with a .startsWith("java.util.") on the class name. (I experimented with .getClass().getPackage(), but the performance of that was terrible.) The branch is here:

https://github.com/michalmarczyk/clojure/tree/alien-hasheq-4

Hash perf on the "fall-through" cases with this patch seems to be very good:

user=> (let [class-instance java.lang.String character-instance \a var-instance #'hash] (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq class-instance)) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq character-instance)) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq var-instance)))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.31690036780011 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 1661453640 in 60 samples of 27690894 calls.
             Execution time mean : 35.099750 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.422800 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 34.454839 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 35.953584 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.556642 ns
Evaluation count : 1630167600 in 60 samples of 27169460 calls.
             Execution time mean : 35.487409 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.309872 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 35.083030 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 36.190015 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.556642 ns

Found 4 outliers in 60 samples (6.6667 %)
	low-severe	 3 (5.0000 %)
	low-mild	 1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 1.6389 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
Evaluation count : 1440434700 in 60 samples of 24007245 calls.
             Execution time mean : 40.894457 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.529510 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 40.055991 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 41.990985 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.556642 ns
nil
Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 13/May/14 1:28 AM ]

The new patch (...-substring.patch) returns hashCode for java.util.** classes other than List, Map, Map.Entry and Set, of course, so no behaviour change there.

Here are the benchmarks for repeated PHM lookups (slightly slower than 1.6.0 apparently, though within 1 ns) and the "add three hasheqs" benchmark (66 ns with patch vs. 57 ns without):

user=> (let [phm (apply hash-map (interleave (range 128) (range 128))) juhm (java.util.HashMap. phm)] (assert (= (hash phm) (hash juhm))) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq phm)) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq juhm)))
Evaluation count : 5183841240 in 60 samples of 86397354 calls.
             Execution time mean : 10.076893 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.182592 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 9.838456 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 10.481086 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.565749 ns
Evaluation count : 3090420 in 60 samples of 51507 calls.
             Execution time mean : 19.596627 µs
    Execution time std-deviation : 224.380257 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 19.288347 µs ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 20.085620 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.565749 ns
nil

user=> (let [phm (apply hash-map (interleave (range 128) (range 128))) juhm (java.util.HashMap. phm)] #_(assert (= (hash phm) (hash juhm))) (c/bench (unchecked-add (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq phm) (unchecked-add (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq "foo") (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq 123)))))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.418253438197936 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 879210900 in 60 samples of 14653515 calls.
             Execution time mean : 66.939309 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.747984 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 65.667310 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 68.155046 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.724002 ns
nil

It is important to note that I have obtained the no-patch result for the "three hasheqs" benchmarks on a fresh JVM when benchmarking 1.6.0, so that's also how I repeated the benchmark with the patch applied. Hashing many different types changes the results noticeably – presumably HotSpot backs off from some optimizations after seeing several different types passed in to hasheq?

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 13/May/14 8:04 AM ]

Here's a new patch (0005-CLJ-1372-consistent-hasheq-for-java.util.-List-Map-M.patch) that introduces a new isAlien static method that checks for instanceof Map/Map.Entry/Iterable and uses this method to test for "alien collection".

Initial benchmarking results are promising:

;;; "fall-through" benchmark
user=> (let [class-instance java.lang.String character-instance \a var-instance #'hash] (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq class-instance)) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq character-instance)) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq var-instance)))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.258979068087473 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 1598432100 in 60 samples of 26640535 calls.
             Execution time mean : 36.358882 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.566925 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 35.718889 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 37.414722 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.823120 ns

Found 1 outliers in 60 samples (1.6667 %)
	low-severe	 1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 1.6389 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
Evaluation count : 1626362460 in 60 samples of 27106041 calls.
             Execution time mean : 35.426993 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.294517 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 35.047064 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 36.058667 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.823120 ns

Found 1 outliers in 60 samples (1.6667 %)
	low-severe	 1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 1.6389 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
Evaluation count : 1461423180 in 60 samples of 24357053 calls.
             Execution time mean : 39.541873 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.423707 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 38.943560 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 40.499433 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.823120 ns

Found 2 outliers in 60 samples (3.3333 %)
	low-severe	 2 (3.3333 %)
 Variance from outliers : 1.6389 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
nil

;;; "three hasheqs" benchmark
user=> (let [phm (apply hash-map (interleave (range 128) (range 128))) juhm (java.util.HashMap. phm)] #_(assert (= (hash phm) (hash juhm))) (c/bench (unchecked-add (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq phm) (unchecked-add (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq "foo") (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq 123)))))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.5536755331464491 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 820376460 in 60 samples of 13672941 calls.
             Execution time mean : 71.999365 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.746588 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 70.869739 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 73.565908 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.738155 ns

Found 2 outliers in 60 samples (3.3333 %)
	low-severe	 2 (3.3333 %)
 Variance from outliers : 1.6389 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
nil
Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 13/May/14 8:28 AM ]

Ah, I left out the repeated phm hasheq lookup + hasheq of a java.util.HashMap instance pair of benchmarks from the above – here it is for completeness (no surprises though):

user=> (let [phm (apply hash-map (interleave (range 128) (range 128))) juhm (java.util.HashMap. phm)] (assert (= (hash phm) (hash juhm))) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq phm)) (c/bench (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq juhm)))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.260853406580491 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 5369135760 in 60 samples of 89485596 calls.
             Execution time mean : 10.380464 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 3.407284 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 9.510624 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 11.461485 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.566301 ns

Found 5 outliers in 60 samples (8.3333 %)
	low-severe	 3 (5.0000 %)
	low-mild	 2 (3.3333 %)
 Variance from outliers : 96.4408 % Variance is severely inflated by outliers
Evaluation count : 3078180 in 60 samples of 51303 calls.
             Execution time mean : 19.717981 µs
    Execution time std-deviation : 209.896848 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 19.401811 µs ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 20.180163 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.566301 ns

Found 2 outliers in 60 samples (3.3333 %)
	low-severe	 2 (3.3333 %)
 Variance from outliers : 1.6389 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers
nil
Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/May/14 9:17 AM ]

Please don't submit any patches that change hashcode for anything other than making Java collections match Clojure collections - any other change is out of scope of this ticket.

In general, I would prefer just the execution time mean report for the moment rather than everything - the full criterium output makes these comments much harder to read and compare.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/May/14 9:33 AM ]

Could I get a summary of approaches, and a timing of 1.6.0 vs each patch for a consistent set of tests - say time of hash for Long, PHM, juHM, Class, and the "three hasheqs" test?

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 13/May/14 9:47 AM ]

"Hashing many different types changes the results noticeably – presumably HotSpot backs off from some optimizations after seeing several different types passed in to hasheq?"

Right - if your benchmarks do not treat this site as megamorphic you will get all sorts of distorted results.

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 14/May/14 3:15 AM ]

Ok, I have what I think is an improved microbenchmark for this: xor of hasheqs for a long, a double, a string, a class, a character and a PHM (single instance, so it'll be a hash lookup). The results are not very encouraging.

Single form including the require to make it convenient to run; also bundled is a j.u.HashMap (128 entries) hasheq benchmark:

(do
  (require '[criterium.core :as c])
  (let [l    41235125123
        d    123.456
        s    "asdf;lkjh"
        k    BigInteger
        c    \S
        phm  (apply hash-map (interleave (range 128) (range 128)))
        juhm (java.util.HashMap. phm)
        f    (fn f []
               (-> (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq l)
                   (bit-xor (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq d))
                   (bit-xor (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq s))
                   (bit-xor (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq k))
                   (bit-xor (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq c))
                   (bit-xor (clojure.lang.Util/hasheq phm))))]
    (c/bench (f))
    (c/bench (hash juhm))))

Mean execution time as reported by Criterium:

version xor (ns) j.u.HM (µs)
unpatched 1.6.0 148.128748 1.701640
0005 patch 272.039667 21.201178
original patch 268.670316 21.169436
-alternative patch 271.747043 20.755397

The substring patch is broken (see below), so I skipped it. The patch I'm describing as the "original" one is attached as 0001-CLJ-1372-consistent-hasheq-for-java.util.-List-Map-M.patch.

Decisions common to all the patches:

1. One extra if statement in hasheq just above the default return with a three-way instanceof check.

2. The types tested for are j.u.Iterable, j.u.Map.Entry and j.u.Map.

3. Murmur3.hashOrdered takes Iterable, so that's why it's on the list. Map does not extend Iterable, so it's listed separately. Map.Entry is on the list, because ultimately the way to hash maps is to iterate over and hash their entries.

4. The actual hashing of the "alien" / host types is done by a separate static method – clojure.lang.Util.doalienhasheq – on the theory that this will permit hasheq to be inlined more aggressively and limit the worst of the perf hit to alien collections.

5. doalienhasheq checks for Map, Map.Entry, Set and List; entries are converted to lists for hashing, maps are hashed through entry sets and lists and sets are passed directly to Murmur3.

6. There is also a default case for other Iterable types – we must return hashCode or the result of composing some other function with hashCode for these, since we use equals to test them for equivalence.

The 0005 patch has hasheq call a separate private static method to perform the three-way type check, whereas the others put the check directly in the actual if test. The -alternative patch and the 0005 patch return hashCode in the default case, whereas the original patch composes Murmur3.hashInt with hashCode.

The substring patch only works for java.util.** classes and so doesn't solve the problem (it wouldn't correctly hash Guava collections, for example).

All of the patches change c.l.Util.hasheq and add one or two new static methods to clojure.lang.Util that act as helpers for hasheq. None of them changes anything else. Murmuring hashCode was a performance experiment that appeared to have a slight positive impact on some of the "fast cases" (in fact it's still the best performer among the current three patches in the microbenchmark presented above, although the margin of victory is of course extremely tiny). Thus I think all the current patches are in fact limited in scope to changes directly relevant to the ticket; the -alternative patch and the 0005 patch certainly are.

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 14/May/14 3:29 AM ]

For completeness, branching on Map, Set etc. directly in hasheq, as with Jozef's original patch, results in the following timings in the microbenchmark introduced in my previous comment:

xor 315.866626 ns
juhm 18.520133 µs
Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 14/May/14 4:01 AM ]

New patch (0006) that leaves out the Map.Entry check; instead, two methods are introduced in the Murmur3 class to handle j.u.maps.

Java map entries aren't really integrated into Clojure – you can't use them like vectors, can't call seq on them etc. – so I don't think they need to match Clojure map entries in hasheq as long as j.u.maps do.

Timings:

xor 233.341689 ns
juhm 9.104637 µs
Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 14/May/14 4:17 AM ]

Checking for Map/Iterable in-line doesn't seem to affect xor benchmark results very much, but makes juhm hashing quicker. This is rather surprising to me. In any case, here's a new patch (0007) and the timings:

xor 233.062337 ns
juhm 8.629149 µs
Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/May/14 7:17 AM ]

What are equivalent timings without the patch?

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 14/May/14 7:43 AM ]

They're listed in the table in the comment introducing the benchmark – 148.128748 ns for xor, 1.701640 µs for juhm.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/May/14 8:02 AM ]

What if we override hasheq for different types instead of using instanceof?

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 14/May/14 12:50 PM ]

Overloaded methods are resolved statically, so there's no avoiding testing for type in the Object overload.

A more specific overload could be used to speed up hashing for its parameter type given a type hint or for literals, since the compiler would emit calls to that overload given appropriate compile-time information. There wouldn't be any speed-up in "implicit" hashing during hash map / set ops, however.

Comment by Daniel Compton [ 12/Nov/14 9:19 PM ]

This hit me when upgrading Factual/skuld from 1.5.1 to 1.6. clojure.data.fressian serialises c.l.PersistentHashSet sets into java.util.HashSet. This breaks equality checking in https://github.com/Factual/skuld/blob/b720feb142e6d274e85be208dc1d6d8634801719/test/skuld/net_test.clj#L8-L29 as we are comparing a set of maps where the original set contains a PersistentSet and the serialised and deserialised one contains a HashSet.

Comment by Daniel Compton [ 12/Nov/14 11:54 PM ]

This has come up again for me, details are in http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/DFRS-7





[CLJ-1232] Functions with non-qualified return type hints force import of hinted classes when called from other namespace Created: 18/Jul/13  Updated: 02/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Tassilo Horn Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 6
Labels: compiler, typehints

Attachments: Text File 0001-auto-qualify-arglists-class-names.patch     Text File 0001-throw-on-non-qualified-class-names-that-are-not-auto.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

You can add a type hint to function arglists to indicate the return type of a function like so.

user> (import '(java.util List))
java.util.List
user> (defn linkedlist ^List [] (java.util.LinkedList.))
#'user/linkedlist
user> (.size (linkedlist))
0

The problem is that now when I call `linkedlist` exactly as above from another namespace, I'll get an exception because java.util.List is not imported in there.

user> (in-ns 'user2)
#<Namespace user2>
user2> (refer 'user)
nil
user2> (.size (linkedlist))
CompilerException java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Unable to resolve classname: List, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:1:1)
user2> (import '(java.util List)) ;; Too bad, need to import List here, too.
java.util.List
user2> (.size (linkedlist))
0

There are two workarounds: You can import the hinted type also in the calling namespace, or you always use fully qualified class names for return type hints. Clearly, the latter is preferable.

But clearly, that's a bug that should be fixed. It's not in analogy to type hints on function parameters which may be simple-named without having any consequences for callers from other namespaces.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 16/Apr/14 3:47 PM ]

To make sure I understand, Nicola, in this ticket you are asking that the Clojure compiler change behavior so that the sample code works correctly with no exceptions, the same way as it would work correctly without exceptions if one of the workarounds were used?

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 17/Apr/14 12:18 AM ]

Hi Andy. Tassilo here, not Nicola. But yes, the example should work as-is. When I'm allowed to use type hints with simple imported class names for arguments, then doing so for return values should work, too.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 10/Jun/14 10:41 AM ]

Type hints on function params are only consumed by the function definition, i.e. in the same module as the import/alias. Type hints on returns are just metadata, they don't get 'compiled' and if the metadata is not useful to consumers in other namespaces, it's not a useful hint. So, if it's not a type in the auto-imported set (java.lang), it should be fully qualified.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Jun/14 11:55 AM ]

Based on Rich's comment, this ticket should probably morph into an enhancement request on documentation, probably on http://clojure.org/java_interop#Java Interop-Type Hints.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 10/Jun/14 3:13 PM ]

I would suggest something like the following for a documentation change, after this part of the text on the page Alex links in the previous comment:

For function return values, the type hint can be placed before the arguments vector:

(defn hinted
(^String [])
(^Integer [a])
(^java.util.List [a & args]))

-> #user/hinted

If the return value type hint is for a class that is outside of java.lang, which is the part auto-imported by Clojure, then it must be a fully qualified class name, e.g. java.util.List, not List.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 10/Jun/14 4:02 PM ]

I don't understand why we should enforce this complexity to the user.
Why can't we just make the Compiler (or even defn itself) update all the arglists tags with properly resolved ones? (that's what I'm doing in tools.analyzer.jvm)

Comment by Alexander Kiel [ 19/Jul/14 10:02 AM ]

I'm with Nicola here. I also think that defn should resolve the type hint according the imports of the namespace defn is used in.

Comment by Max Penet [ 22/Jul/14 7:06 AM ]

Same here, I was bit by this in the past. The current behavior is clearly counterintuitive.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 28/Aug/14 12:58 PM ]

Attached two patches implementing two different solutions:

  • 0001-auto-qualify-arglists-class-names.patch makes the compiler automatically qualify all the tags in the :arglists
  • 0001-throw-on-non-qualified-class-names-that-are-not-auto.patch makes the compiler throw an exception for all public defs whose return tag is a symbol representing a non-qualified class that is not in the auto-import list (approach proposed in IRC by Alex Miller)
Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 29/Aug/14 1:49 AM ]

For what it's worth, I'd prefer the first patch because the second doesn't help in situations where the caller lives in a namespace where the called function's return type hinted class is `ns-unmap`-ed. And there a good reasons for doing that. For example, Process is a java.lang class and Process is a pretty generic name. So in some namespace, I want to define my own Process deftype or defrecord. Without unmapping 'Process first to get rid of the java.lang.Process auto-import, I'd get an exception:

user> (deftype Process [])
IllegalStateException Process already refers to: class java.lang.Process in namespace: user  clojure.lang.Namespace.referenceClass (Namespace.java:140)

Now when I call some function from some library that has a `^Process` return type hint (meaning java.lang.Process there), I get the same exception as in my original report.

I can even get into troubles when only using standard Clojure functions because those have `^String` and `^Class` type hints. IMO, Class is also a pretty generic name I should be able to name my custom deftype/defrecord. And I might also want to have a custom String type/record in my astrophysics system.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Sep/14 4:39 PM ]

Not sure whether the root cause of this behavior is the same as the example in the description or not, but seems a little weird that even for fully qualified Java class names hinting the arg vector, it makes a difference whether it is done with defn or def:

Clojure 1.6.0
user=> (set! *warn-on-reflection* true)
true
user=> (defn f1 ^java.util.LinkedList [coll] (java.util.LinkedList. coll))
#'user/f1
user=> (def f2 (fn ^java.util.LinkedList [coll] (java.util.LinkedList. coll)))
#'user/f2
user=> (.size (f1 [2 3 4]))
3
user=> (.size (f2 [2 3 4]))
Reflection warning, NO_SOURCE_PATH:5:1 - reference to field size can't be resolved.
3
Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Sep/14 6:21 PM ]

Andy, can you file that as a separate ticket?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Sep/14 9:08 PM ]

Created ticket CLJ-1543 for the issue raised in my comment earlier on 30 Sep 2014.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Oct/14 12:38 PM ]

Tassilo (or anyone), is there a reason to prefer putting the tag on the argument vector in your example? It seems that putting it on the Var name instead avoids this issue:

user=> (clojure-version)
"1.6.0"
user=> (set! *warn-on-reflection* true)
true
user=> (import '(java.util List))
java.util.List
user=> (defn ^List linkedlist [] (java.util.LinkedList.))
#'user/linkedlist
user=> (.size (linkedlist))
0
user=> (ns user2)
nil
user2=> (refer 'user)
nil
user2=> (.size (linkedlist))
0

I suppose that only allows a single type tag, rather than an independent one for each arity.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 02/Oct/14 3:16 AM ]

I wasn't aware of the fact that you can put it on the var's name. That's not documented at http://clojure.org/java_interop#Java Interop-Type Hints. But IMHO the documented version with putting the tag on the argument vector is more general since it supports different return type hints for the different arity version. In any case, if both forms are permitted then they should be equivalent in the case the function has only one arity.





[CLJ-1195] emit-hinted-impl expands to non-ns-qualified invocation of 'fn' Created: 09/Apr/13  Updated: 22/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Jason Wolfe Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None
Environment:

Mac os X Clojure 1.5.1 onwards.


Attachments: File extend-emits-qualified-fn.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   
(ns plumbing.tmp
  (:refer-clojure :exclude [fn]))

(defprotocol Foo
  (foo [this]))

(extend-protocol Foo
  Object
  (foo [this]))

yields

CompilerException java.lang.RuntimeException: Unable to resolve symbol: fn in this context, compiling/Users/w01fe/prismatic/prismatic/plumbing/src/plumbing/tmp.clj:7:1)

This makes it difficult to construct a namespace that provides a replacement def for fn.



 Comments   
Comment by Jason Wolfe [ 21/Dec/14 9:36 PM ]

changes 'fn to `fn in two places in core_deftype.clj.

Comment by Jason Wolfe [ 21/Dec/14 9:40 PM ]

Attached patch extend-emits-qualified-fn.diff from 21 Dec 2014 replaces
'fn with `fn in two places in core_deftype.clj. Tests pass with this patch.
Also verified that there are no other places in Clojure where 'fn
is emitted.





[CLJ-130] Namespace metadata lost in AOT compile Created: 19/Jun/09  Updated: 06/Dec/14

Status: In Progress
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Stuart Sierra Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: aot, metadata

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-130-preserve-metadata-for-AOT-compiled-namespace.patch     File aot-drops-metadata-demo.sh    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

AOT-compilation drops namespace metadata.

This also affects all of the namespaces packaged with Clojure, except clojure.core, for which metadata is explicitly added in core.clj.

Cause of the bug:

  • a namespace inherits the metadata of the symbol used to create that namespace the first time
  • the namespace is created in the load() method, that is invoked after the __init() method
  • the __init0() method creates all the Vars of the namespace
  • interning a Var in a namespace that doesn't exist forces that namespace to be created

This means that the namespace will have been already created (with nil metadata) by the time the load() method gets invoked and thus the call to in-ns will be a no-op and the metadata will be lost.

Approach: The attached patch fixes this issue by explicitely attaching the metadata to the namespace after its creation (via ns) using a .resetMeta call



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:45 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/130

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#127, #128, #129, #130)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:45 AM ]

juergenhoetzel said: This is still a issue on

Clojure 1.2.0-master-SNAPSHOT

Any progress, hints? I prefer interactive documentiation via slime/repl

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 09/Sep/14 9:44 AM ]

This is of great concern to me, as the Rook web services framework we're building depends on availability of namespace metadata at runtime.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 09/Sep/14 9:53 AM ]

BTW, I verified that this still exists in 1.6.0.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 09/Sep/14 10:11 AM ]

For me personally, I would raise the priority of this issue. And I think in general, anything that works differently with AOT vs. non-AOT should be major, if not blocker, priority.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 09/Sep/14 10:25 AM ]

Alex Miller:

@hlship I think the question is where it would go. note no one has suggested a solution in last 5 yrs.

Alas, I have not delved into the AOT compilation code (since, you know, I value my sanity). But it seems to me like the __init class for the namespace could construct the map and update the Namespace object.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 09/Sep/14 4:27 PM ]

Just playing with javap, I can see that the meta data is being assembled in some way, so it's a question of why it is not accessible ...

  public static void __init0();
    Code:
       0: ldc           #108                // String clojure.core
       2: ldc           #110                // String in-ns
       4: invokestatic  #116                // Method clojure/lang/RT.var:(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;)Lclojure/lang/Var;
       7: checkcast     #12                 // class clojure/lang/Var
      10: putstatic     #10                 // Field const__0:Lclojure/lang/Var;
      13: aconst_null
      14: ldc           #118                // String fan.auth
      16: invokestatic  #122                // Method clojure/lang/Symbol.intern:(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;)Lclojure/lang/Symbol;
      19: checkcast     #124                // class clojure/lang/IObj
      22: iconst_4
      23: anewarray     #4                  // class java/lang/Object
      26: dup
      27: iconst_0
      28: aconst_null
      29: ldc           #126                // String meta-foo
      31: invokestatic  #130                // Method clojure/lang/RT.keyword:(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;)Lclojure/lang/Keyword;
      34: aastore
      35: dup
      36: iconst_1
      37: aconst_null
      38: ldc           #132                // String meta-bar
      40: invokestatic  #130                // Method clojure/lang/RT.keyword:(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;)Lclojure/lang/Keyword;
      43: aastore
      44: dup
      45: iconst_2
      46: aconst_null
      47: ldc           #134                // String doc
      49: invokestatic  #130                // Method clojure/lang/RT.keyword:(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;)Lclojure/lang/Keyword;
      52: aastore
      53: dup
      54: iconst_3
      55: ldc           #136                // String Defines the resources for the authentication service.
      57: aastore
      58: invokestatic  #140                // Method clojure/lang/RT.map:([Ljava/lang/Object;)Lclojure/lang/IPersistentMap;
      61: checkcast     #64                 // class clojure/lang/IPersistentMap
      64: invokeinterface #144,  2          // InterfaceMethod clojure/lang/IObj.withMeta:(Lclojure/lang/IPersistentMap;)Lclojure/lang/IObj;

If I'm reading the code correctly, a Symbol named after the namespace is interned, and the meta-data for the namespace is applied to the symbol, so it's just a question of commuting that meta data to the Namespace object. I must be missing something.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 30/Sep/14 6:45 PM ]

Attached patch fixes this issue by explicitely attaching the metadata to the namespace after its creation using a .resetMeta call.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 30/Sep/14 7:46 PM ]

Here's an explaination of why this bug happens:

  • a namespace inherits the metadata of the symbol used to create that namespace the first time
  • the namespace is created in the load() method, that is invoked after the __init() method
  • the __init0() method creates all the Vars of the namespace
  • interning a Var in a namespace that doesn't exist forces that namespace to be created

This means that the namespace will have been already created (with nil metadata) by the time the load() method gets invoked and thus the call to in-ns will be a no-op and the metadata will be lost.





[CLJ-1609] Fix an edge case in the Reflector's search for a public method declaration Created: 05/Dec/14  Updated: 06/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Jeremy Heiler Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: interop

Attachments: Text File reflector_method_bug.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The Reflector was not taking into account that a non-public class can implement an interface, and have a non-public parent class contain an implementation of a method on that interface.

The solution I took is to pass in the target object's class instead of the declaring class of the method object.

I've outlined a small example here: https://github.com/jeremyheiler/clj-reflector-bug

The repo contains a Java example that works, and the same example in Clojure that doesn't work. It also includes a patched version of Clojure 1.6.0, and shows that the patch solves the issue. Also, in `src/foo/m.clj`, there is a real example of this bug occurring by using the Java Debug Interface API in the tools.jar library.

I would have added tests to the patch, but I don't think the test runner compiles test Java code, which is required.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 05/Dec/14 8:48 AM ]

Probably a dupe of CLJ-259. I'll probably dupe that one to this though.

Comment by Jeremy Heiler [ 05/Dec/14 1:33 PM ]

Thanks. Sorry for not finding that myself. CLJ-259 refers to CLJ-126, which I think is covered with this patch.

Comment by Jeremy Heiler [ 06/Dec/14 12:37 PM ]

I was looking into whether or not the target could be null, and it can be when invoking a static method. However, I don't think that code path would make it to the target.getClass() because non-public static methods aren't returned by getMethods().





[CLJ-1596] Using keywords in place of symbols for defrecord fields causes a compiler exception with incorrect line number Created: 20/Nov/14  Updated: 20/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Kyle Kingsbury Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler, defrecord

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Possibly related to http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1261: a defrecord like

(defn foo [x])

(defrecord Bar [:b])

Throws an exception, like you'd expect:

java.lang.ClassCastException: clojure.lang.Keyword cannot be cast to clojure.lang.IObj, compiling:(tesser/quantiles_test.clj:45:15)

However, this exception's line and character indicates the error is in the previous form: the defn, not the defrecord. This can be really tricky to figure out when the expressions are more complicated.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Nov/14 4:17 PM ]

Related: CLJ-1261

Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Nov/14 4:18 PM ]

Possibly fixed by CLJ-1561, not sure.





[CLJ-1588] StackOverflow in clojure.test macroexpand with `are` and anonymous `fn` Created: 13/Nov/14  Updated: 14/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Nikita Prokopov Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File clojure-test.recursion.patch    
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

I noticed that this happens when an argument in anonymous `fn` is named the same as one of the binding in `are` form

(use 'clojure.test)
(deftest x
  (are [x y] (= x y)
    ((fn [x] (inc x)) 1) 2))
=>
clojure.lang.Compiler$CompilerException: java.lang.StackOverflowError, compiling:(/Users/nprokopov/Dropbox/ws/clojure.unicode/test/clojure/test_unicode.clj:54:3)

This path contains fix & test:

clojure-test.recursion.patch

src/clj/clojure/template.clj => line 43
test/clojure/test_clojure/test.clj => lines 83-85



 Comments   
Comment by Michael Blume [ 13/Nov/14 11:45 PM ]

yep, I bet it's trying to replace the x with (fn [x] (inc x)) and then replacing the x in that and...

this doesn't seem like that much of a defect? Like why write the code with the same variable names in the first place?

Comment by Nikita Prokopov [ 13/Nov/14 11:49 PM ]

Well, logically these are two completely separate, isolated Xes. It can be avoided, sure, but this behavior is not expected and I’m sure can be easily fixed.

Comment by Nikita Prokopov [ 13/Nov/14 11:53 PM ]

I mean, there shouldn’t be any recursion at all in the first place, right?

Comment by Nikita Prokopov [ 14/Nov/14 2:12 AM ]

Patch

Comment by Nikita Prokopov [ 14/Nov/14 2:13 AM ]

I fixed the issue by replacing prewalk with postwalk. It was caused by prewalk-replace that first replaced the form and then goes inside it looking for more replacements. Postwalk-replace avoids that.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Nov/14 9:27 AM ]

1) Needs tests.
2) As a change in template, this affects many possible users. Can you assess other possible users either in core or in other external projects and whether they are affected? I have found http://crossclj.info to be helpful for questions like this.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Nov/14 11:42 AM ]

Please include tests in a single combined patch and update the description to include a line specifying the current active patch for consideration.

Comment by Nikita Prokopov [ 14/Nov/14 11:46 AM ]

Alex, I attached a test case.

I also took a look at all use-cases of apply-template and do-template in both clojure.core and third-party projects. It’s not used very often, and in all cases use of do-template is pretty straightforward (take [x y z] and just replace it with some completely different forms), it does not depend on recursion and change from prewalk to postwalk will not cause any change in behavior. I think this patch is safe.

Comment by Nikita Prokopov [ 14/Nov/14 12:00 PM ]

I’m afraid I cannot edit description...

src/clj/clojure/template.clj => line 43
test/clojure/test_clojure/test.clj => lines 83-85

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Nov/14 10:14 PM ]

You should have edit rights now on jira issues.





[CLJ-1579] source-fn can fail due to reading namespace-aliased keywords while in another namespace context Created: 05/Nov/14  Updated: 21/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Reid McKenzie Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-Read-src-in-appropriate-ns-context.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

clojure.repl/source-fn functions by using a custom reader to read a source form at the location specified by line & file metadata on a given symbol. While this works well for most things, I encountered an issue when applying source-fn to code containing keyword namespace aliases ala ::T/foo. ::T/foo is a legitimate namespace keyword in the context where it occurs, because a namespace alias to T is created in the ns header. When the keyword ::T/foo is read then, it resolves to :my-other.ns/foo as one would expect because ns has the appropriate alias. However when attempting to read source via clojure.repl/source-fn, ns may no longer be the original read context of the indicated form thus leading to the erroneous exception java.lang.RuntimeException: Invalid token: ::T/foo.

The solution is that the reading operation of clojure.repl/source-fn must be wrapped in (binding [*ns* (.ns v)] ...) so that source reading will take place in the original load reading context thus preventing this error.

A patched equivalent function exists here, https://github.com/clojure-grimoire/lein-grim/blob/master/src/grimoire/doc.clj#L50-L74, and I will submit a patch against 1.6.0 in the morning.






[CLJ-1565] pprint issues infinite output for a protocol Created: 15/Oct/14  Updated: 13/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Michael Nygard Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: print, protocols

Attachments: File fix-pprint-var.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Using pprint with a protocol name generates an unending stream of output. pprint appears to recurse through the Var reference as the value of the :var key in the protocol definition itself.

To reproduce:

user=> (defprotocol Foo (foo-you [this]))
Foo
user=> (pprint Foo)
{:on user.Foo,
:on-interface user.Foo,
:sigs {:foo-you {:doc nil, :arglists ([this]), :name foo-you}},
:var
#<Var@6a3b02d8:
{:on user.Foo,
:on-interface user.Foo,
:sigs {:foo-you {:doc nil, :arglists ([this]), :name foo-you}},
:var
#<Var@6a3b02d8:
{:on user.Foo,
:on-interface user.Foo,
:sigs {:foo-you {:doc nil, :arglists ([this]), :name foo-you}},
:var
#<Var@6a3b02d8:
{:on user.Foo,
:on-interface user.Foo,
:sigs
{:foo-you {:doc nil, :arglists ([this]), :name foo-you}},
:var
#<Var@6a3b02d8:
{:on user.Foo,
:on-interface user.Foo,
:sigs
{:foo-you {:doc nil, :arglists ([this]), :name foo-you}},
:var
#<Var@6a3b02d8:
{:on user.Foo,
:on-interface user.Foo,
:sigs
{:foo-you
{:doc nil, :arglists ([this]), :name foo-you}},



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 12/Nov/14 1:26 PM ]

I've run across this issue while debugging Eastwood. It probably does more than what you want in terms of modifying pprint behavior, but check out eastwood.util/pprint-meta here: https://github.com/jonase/eastwood/blob/master/src/eastwood/util.clj#L206

Comment by Daniel Marjenburgh [ 12/Nov/14 2:29 PM ]

The issue is that the simple-dispatch multifn dispatched a clojure.lang.Var to clojure.lang.IDeref, which dereferenced the Var before printing it. We have created a patch which dispatches a Var to the default print fn.

– With regards from the Amsterdam Clojure meetup group

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 12/Nov/14 7:13 PM ]

The patch for this ticket also addressed http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1576





[CLJ-1562] some->,some->>,cond->,cond->> and as-> doesn't work with (recur) Created: 11/Oct/14  Updated: 11/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Nahuel Greco Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

some-> and his friends doesn't work with recur, because they never place the last expression in tail position. For example:

(loop [l [1 2 3]] 
  (some-> l 
          next 
          recur))

raises UnsupportedOperationException: Can only recur from tail position

This is similar to the bug reported for as-> at http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1418 (see the comment at http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1418?focusedCommentId=35702&page=com.atlassian.jira.plugin.system.issuetabpanels:comment-tabpanel#comment-35702)

It can be fixed by changing the some-> definition to:

(defmacro some->
  "When expr is not nil, threads it into the first form (via ->),
  and when that result is not nil, through the next etc"
  {:added "1.5"}
  [expr & forms]
  (let [g (gensym)
        pstep (fn [step] `(if (nil? ~g) nil (-> ~g ~step)))]
    `(let [~g ~expr
           ~@(interleave (repeat g) (map pstep (butlast forms)))]
       ~(if forms
          (pstep (last forms))
          g))))

Similar fixes can be done for some->>, cond->, cond->> and as->.

Note -> supports recur without problems, fixing this will homogenize *-> macros behaviour.






[CLJ-1533] Oddity in type tag usage for primInvoke Created: 24/Sep/14  Updated: 03/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: ft, typehints

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1533-inject-original-var-form-meta-in-constructe.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Some odd behavior demonstrated in Clojure 1.6.0 REPL below. Why does the (Math/abs (f2 -3)) call issue a reflection warning? It seems like perhaps it should not, given the other examples.

user=> (clojure-version)
"1.6.0"
user=> (set! *warn-on-reflection* true)
true
user=> (defn ^{:tag 'long} f1 [x] (inc x))
#'user/f1
user=> (Math/abs (f1 -3))
2
user=> (defn ^{:tag 'long} f2 [^long x] (inc x))
#'user/f2
user=> (Math/abs (f2 -3))
Reflection warning, NO_SOURCE_PATH:6:1 - call to static method abs on java.lang.Math can't be resolved (argument types: java.lang.Object).
2
user=> (defn ^{:tag 'long} f3 ^long [^long x] (inc x))
#'user/f3
user=> (Math/abs (f3 -3))
2

Cause: invokePrim path does not take into account var or form meta

Approach: apply var and form meta to invokePrim expression

Patch: 0001-CLJ-1533-inject-original-var-form-meta-in-constructe.patch

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 25/Sep/14 9:47 AM ]

The issue is similar to http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1491

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 25/Sep/14 9:58 AM ]

The root cause was also almost the same, the proposed patch is a superset of the one proposed for CLJ-1491

Comment by Alex Miller [ 25/Sep/14 10:09 AM ]

Can we include 1491 cases in this ticket and mark 1491 a duplicate?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 25/Sep/14 10:09 AM ]

Also needs tests in the patch.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 25/Sep/14 10:23 AM ]

Updated the patch with testcases for both issues, I agree that CLJ-1491 should be closed as duplicate





[CLJ-1528] clojure.test/inc-report-counter is not thread safe Created: 19/Sep/14  Updated: 22/Sep/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Alexander Redington Assignee: Alexander Redington
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: test
Environment:

OS X, Clojure 1.7, Macbook pro


Attachments: File fix-CLJ-1528.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

clojute.test/inc-report-counter, as implemented at https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/919a7100ddf327d73bc2d50d9ee1411d4a0e8921/src/clj/clojure/test.clj#L313, is not thread safe.

The commute operation described combines dereferencing the report-counters ref and operating on the previous state of the ref, leading to race conditions during concurrent access.

Specifically, the report-counters ref is dereferenced on 320, instead of the commute function operating entirely as a function of its inputs.



 Comments   
Comment by Alexander Redington [ 19/Sep/14 10:58 AM ]

Fixes 1528





[CLJ-1527] Harmonize accepted / documented symbol and keyword syntax over various readers Created: 18/Sep/14  Updated: 21/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Herwig Hochleitner Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 9
Labels: reader

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Documentation Issues

http://clojure.org/reader#The%20Reader--Reader%20forms is ambigous on whether foo/bar/baz is allowed. Also, it doesn't mention the tick ' as a valid constituent character.
The EDN spec also currently omits ', ticket here: https://github.com/edn-format/edn/issues/67

Implementation Issues

clojure.core/read, as well as clojure.edn/read accept symbols like foo/bar/baz, even though they should be rejected.

References

https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure-dev/b09WvRR90Zc/discussion
Related ticket: CLJ-1286



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 17/Oct/14 2:13 AM ]

The Clojure reader documentation also does not mention the following symbols as valid constituent characters. They are all mentioned as valid symbol constituent characters in the EDN readme here: https://github.com/edn-format/edn#symbols

dollar sign - used in Clojure/JVM to separate Java subclass names from class names, e.g. java.util.Map$Entry
percent sign - not sure why this is part of edn spec. In Clojure it seems only to be used inside #() for args like % %1 %&
ampersand - like in &form and &env in macro definitions
equals - clojure.core/= and many others
less-than - clojure.core/< clojure.core/<=
greater-than - clojure.core/> clojure.core/>=

I don't know whether Clojure and edn specs should be the same in this regard, but it seemed worth mentioning for this ticket.





[CLJ-1509] Some clojure namespaces not AOT-compiled and included in the clojure jar Created: 20/Aug/14  Updated: 20/Aug/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: build

Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

There is a list of namespaces to AOT in build.xml and several namespaces are missing from that list, thus no .class files for those namespaces are created or included in the standard clojure jar file as part of the build.

Missing namespaces include:

  • clojure.core.reducers
  • clojure.instant
  • clojure.parallel
  • clojure.uuid

Proposal: Attached patch sorts the ns list alphabetically (for easier maintenance) and adds clojure.instant and clojure.uuid to the compiled namespaces. clojure.parallel is deprecated and requires the JSR-166 jar so was not included (perhaps it's a separate ticket to remove this). clojure.core.reducers uses a compile-time check to choose the fork/join packages to use so cannot be compiled early.

Patch: clj-1509.diff

Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Aug/14 1:06 PM ]

Looking at this a bit further, clojure.core.reducers uses the compile-if macro to determine what version of fork/join is available so AOT-compiling this namespace would fix that decision at build time rather than runtime, so it cannot be included.





[CLJ-1492] PersistentQueue objects are improperly eval'd and compiled Created: 06/Aug/14  Updated: 07/Aug/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Jon Distad Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler
Environment:

OS X 10.9.4
java version "1.7.0_60"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.7.0_60-b19)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 24.60-b09, mixed mode)


Attachments: Text File 0001-Exclude-PersistentQueue-from-IPersistentList-eval-co.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

PersistentQueue objects do not follow the correct evaluation path in the Compiler.

The simplest case:

user=> (def q (conj clojure.lang.PersistentQueue/EMPTY 1 2 3))
#'user/q
user=> q
#<PersistentQueue clojure.lang.PersistentQueue@7861>
user=> (eval q)
CompilerException java.lang.ClassCastException: clojure.lang.PersistentQueue cannot be cast to java.util.List, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:4:1)

And you get the same exception when embedding a PersistentQueue:

user=> (eval `(fn [] ~q))
CompilerException java.lang.ClassCastException: clojure.lang.PersistentQueue cannot be cast to java.util.List, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:2:1)

Instead of the expected:

CompilerException java.lang.RuntimeException: Can't embed unreadable object in code: #<PersistentQueue clojure.lang.PersistentQueue@7861>, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:3:1)

Since PersistentQueue implements IPersistentCollection and IPersistentList, and is not called out explicitly in the compiler, it is falling into the same compile path as a list. The exception comes from the call to emitValue inside the emitConstants portion of the FnExpr emit path. PersistentQueue does not implement java.util.List and thus the cast in emitListAsObjectArray (Compiler.java:4479) throws. Implementing List would NOT, however, resolve this issue, but would mask it by causing all eval'd PersistedQueues to be compiled as PersistentLists.

The first case is resolved by adding `&& !(form instanceof PersistentQueue)` to the IPersistentCollection branch of Compiler.eval() (Compiler.java:6695-8), allowing the PersistentQueue to fall through to the ConstantExpr case in analyze (Compiler.java:6459). The embedding case is resolved by adding `&& !(value instanceof PersistentQueue)` to the IPersistentList branch in ObjExpr's emitValue (Compiler.java:4639).

This bug also precludes definition of data-readers for PersistentQueue as the read object throws an exception when it is passed to the Compiler.

The attached patch includes the two changes mentioned above, and tests for each case that illustrates the bug.

Clojure-dev thread: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure-dev/LDUQfqjFg9w






[CLJ-1485] clojure.test.junit/with-junit-output doesn't handle multiple expressions Created: 29/Jul/14  Updated: 03/Aug/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Howard Lewis Ship Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: clojure.test

Attachments: Text File clj-1485.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   
(defmacro with-junit-output
  "Execute body with modified test-is reporting functions that write
  JUnit-compatible XML output."
  {:added "1.1"}
  [& body]
  `(binding [t/report junit-report
             *var-context* (list)
             *depth* 1]
     (t/with-test-out
       (println "<?xml version=\"1.0\" encoding=\"UTF-8\"?>")
       (println "<testsuites>"))
     (let [result# ~@body]
       (t/with-test-out (println "</testsuites>"))
       result#)))

From this description, and the use of ~@body, it's clear that the intent was to support a body containing multiple forms (for side-effects). However, the use inside the let, and with no supplied do, means that you must supply a single form, or be confrunted with an inscrutable compilation error about "clojure.core/let requires an even number of forms in binding vector" that's not obviously your fault, or easy to track down.



 Comments   
Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 29/Jul/14 4:59 PM ]

Patch for issue





[CLJ-1475] :post condition causes compiler error with recur Created: 25/Jul/14  Updated: 29/Jul/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Steve Miner Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler

Attachments: File clj-1475.diff    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Michael O'Keefe <michael.p.okeefe@gmail.com> posted on the mailing list an example of code that causes a compiler error only if a :post condition is added. Here's my slightly modified version:

(defn g
  [xs acc]
  {:pre [(or (nil? xs) (sequential? xs))]
   :post [(number? %)]}
  (if (seq xs)
     (recur (next xs) (+ (first xs) acc))
     acc))

CompilerException java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException: Can only recur from tail position

The work-around is to wrap the body in a loop that simply rebinds the original args.



 Comments   
Comment by Steve Miner [ 25/Jul/14 9:53 AM ]

A macro expansion shows that body is placed in a let form to capture the result for later testing with the post condition, but the recur no longer has a proper target. The work-around of using a loop form is easy once you understand what's happening but it's a surprising limitation.

Comment by Steve Miner [ 25/Jul/14 9:55 AM ]

Use a local fn* around the body and call it with the original args so that the recur has a proper target. Update: not good enough for handling destructuring. Patch withdrawn.

Comment by Michael Patrick O'Keefe [ 25/Jul/14 10:37 AM ]

Link to the original topic discussion: https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure/Wb1Nub6wVUw/discussion

Comment by Steve Miner [ 25/Jul/14 1:42 PM ]

Patch withdrawn because it breaks on destructured args.

Comment by Steve Miner [ 25/Jul/14 5:27 PM ]

While working on a patch, I came up against a related issue: Should the :pre conditions apply to every recur "call". Originally, I thought the :pre conditions should be checked just once on the initial function call and never during a recur. People on the mailing list pointed out that the recur is semantically like calling the function again so the :pre checks are part of the contract. But no one seemed to want the :post check on every recursion, so the :post would happen only at the end.

That means automatically wrapping a loop (or nested fn* call) around the body is not going to work for the :pre conditions. A fix would have to bring the :pre conditions inside the loop.

Comment by Steve Miner [ 26/Jul/14 8:54 AM ]

I'm giving up on this bug. My approach was adding too much complexity to handle an edge case. I recommend the "loop" work-around to anyone who runs into this problem.

(defn g2
  [xs acc]
  {:pre [(or (nil? xs) (sequential? xs))]
   :post [(number? %)]}
  (loop [xs xs acc acc]
    (if (seq xs)
       (recur (next xs) (+ (first xs) acc))
       acc)))
Comment by Ambrose Bonnaire-Sergeant [ 26/Jul/14 10:29 AM ]

Add patch that handles rest arguments and destructuring.

Comment by Michael Patrick O'Keefe [ 26/Jul/14 10:57 AM ]

With regard to Steve's question on interpreting :pre, to me I would expect g to act like the case g3 below which uses explicit recursion (which does work and does appear to check the :pre conditions each time and :post condition once):

(defn g3
  [xs acc]
  {:pre [(or (sequential? xs) (nil? xs)) (number? acc)]
   :post [(number? %)]}
  (if (seq xs)
    (g3 (next xs) (+ (first xs) acc))
    acc))
Comment by Ambrose Bonnaire-Sergeant [ 26/Jul/14 11:42 AM ]

Patch clj-1475.diff handles destructuring, preconditions and rest arguments

Comment by Steve Miner [ 26/Jul/14 4:04 PM ]

The clj-1475.diff patch looks good to me.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 27/Jul/14 7:18 AM ]

Please don't use "patch" as a label - that is the purpose of the Patch field. There is a list of good and bad labels at http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Creating+Tickets

Comment by Steve Miner [ 27/Jul/14 11:32 AM ]

More knowledgeable commenters might take a look at CLJ-701 just in case that's applicable to the proposed patch.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 29/Jul/14 1:35 AM ]

re clj-701

it is tricky to express loop expression semantics in jvm byte code, so the compiler sort of punts, hoisting expression loops in to anonymous functions that are immediately invoked, closing over whatever is in scope that is required by the loop, this has some problems like those seen in CLJ-701, losing type data which the clojure compiler doesn't track across functions, the additional allocation of function objects (the jit may deal with that pretty well, I am not sure) etc.

where the world of clj-701 and this ticket collide is the patch on this ticket lifts the function body out as a loop expression, which without the patch in clj-701 will have the issues I listed above, but we already have those issues anywhere something that is difficult to express in bytecode as an expression (try and loop) is used as an expression, maybe it doesn't matter, or maybe clj-701 will get fixed in some way to alleviate those issues.

general musings

it seems like one feature people like from asserts is the ability to disable them in production (I have never actually seen someone do that with clojure), assert and :pre/:post have some ability to do that (it may only work at macroexpansion time, I don't recall) since the hoisting of the loop could impact performance it might be nice to have some mechanism to disable it (maybe using the same flag assert does?).





[CLJ-1461] print-dup is broken for some clojure collections Created: 06/Jul/14  Updated: 06/Jul/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: collections

Approval: Triaged

 Description   
user=> (print-dup (sorted-set 1) *out*)
#=(clojure.lang.PersistentTreeSet/create [1])nil
user=> (read-string (with-out-str (print-dup (sorted-set 1) *out*)))
ClassCastException Cannot cast clojure.lang.PersistentVector to clojure.lang.ISeq  java.lang.Class.cast (Class.java:3258)
user=> (print-dup (subvec [1] 0) *out*)
#=(clojure.lang.APersistentVector$SubVector/create [1])nil
user=> (read-string (with-out-str (print-dup (subvec [1] 0) *out*)))
IllegalArgumentException No matching method found: create  clojure.lang.Reflector.invokeMatchingMethod (Reflector.java:53)

print-dup assumes all IPersistentCollections not defined via defrecord have a static /create method that take an IPersistentCollection, but this is not true for many clojure collections






[CLJ-1460] Clojure transforms literals of custom IPersistentCollections not created via deftype/defrecord to their generic clojure counterpart Created: 06/Jul/14  Updated: 06/Jul/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Approval: Triaged

 Description   
user=> (class (eval (sorted-map 1 1)))
clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap ;; expected: clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap


 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 06/Jul/14 5:35 PM ]

Seems related to CLJ-1093.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Jul/14 5:51 PM ]

The symptoms are indeed similar but there are differences: CLJ-1093 affects all empty IPersistentCollections, this one affects all {ISeq,IPersistentList,IPersistentMap,IPersistentVector,IPersistentSet} collections that are not IRecord/IType.





[CLJ-1457] once the compiler pops the dynamic classloader from the stack, attempts to read record reader literals will fail Created: 30/Jun/14  Updated: 06/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Kevin Downey Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 6
Labels: classloader

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1457-ensure-Compiler.LOADER-is-bound-while-readi.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

reproduction case

java -jar target/clojure-1.7.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar -e "(do (ns foo.bar) (defrecord Foo []) (defn -main [] (prn (->Foo)) (read-string \"#foo.bar.Foo[]\")))" -m foo.bar

result

#'foo.bar/-main
#foo.bar.Foo{}
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ClassNotFoundException: foo.bar.Foo
	at java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run(URLClassLoader.java:372)
	at java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run(URLClassLoader.java:361)
	at java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(Native Method)
	at java.net.URLClassLoader.findClass(URLClassLoader.java:360)
	at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(ClassLoader.java:424)
	at sun.misc.Launcher$AppClassLoader.loadClass(Launcher.java:308)
	at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(ClassLoader.java:357)
	at java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method)
	at java.lang.Class.forName(Class.java:340)
	at clojure.lang.RT.classForNameNonLoading(RT.java:2076)
	at clojure.lang.LispReader$CtorReader.readRecord(LispReader.java:1195)
	at clojure.lang.LispReader$CtorReader.invoke(LispReader.java:1164)
	at clojure.lang.LispReader$DispatchReader.invoke(LispReader.java:609)
	at clojure.lang.LispReader.read(LispReader.java:183)
	at clojure.lang.RT.readString(RT.java:1737)
	at clojure.core$read_string.invoke(core.clj:3497)
	at foo.bar$_main.invoke(NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)
	at clojure.lang.Var.invoke(Var.java:375)
	at clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:152)
	at clojure.lang.Var.applyTo(Var.java:700)
	at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:624)
	at clojure.main$main_opt.invoke(main.clj:315)
	at clojure.main$main.doInvoke(main.clj:420)
	at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:457)
	at clojure.lang.Var.invoke(Var.java:394)
	at clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:165)
	at clojure.lang.Var.applyTo(Var.java:700)
	at clojure.main.main(main.java:37)

what happens is the evaluator pushes a dynamicclassloader, evaluates some code, then -m foo.bar causes foo.bar/-main to be called, which tries to read in a literal for the just defined record, but it fails because when foo.bar/-main is called clojure.lang.Compiler/LOADER is unbound so RT uses the sun.misc classloader to try and find the class, which it knows nothing about

Approaches: If the patch 0001-CLJ-979-make-clojure-resolve-to-the-correct-Class-in-v2.patch for CLJ-979 were to be committed, this issue would be automatically fixed aswell and the patch attached to this ticket would be unnecessary.
Alternatively, the attached patch (0001-CLJ-1457-ensure-Compiler.LOADER-is-bound-while-readi.patch) simply forces a DynamicClassLoader to be bound to clojure.lang.Compiler/LOADER during reading.



 Comments   
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 01/Jul/14 11:42 AM ]

this means that you cannot depend on ever being able to deserialize a record with read unless you are at the repl (the only place clojure.lang.Compiler/LOADER is guaranteed to be bound).

1. print/read support for records is broken
2. behavior is inconsistent between the repl and other environments
which will drive people crazy when the try to figure out why their code isn't working

Comment by Alex Miller [ 01/Jul/14 4:43 PM ]

I would appreciate more understanding about how this affects code run in a more normal scenario (than calling clojure.main with -e and -m).

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 22/Aug/14 4:24 PM ]

https://gist.githubusercontent.com/anonymous/bafde69c99e0be63988d/raw/736d14d98030f48b6a65ca0bfdc3c81fb44e1789/gistfile1.txt is an hour long irc log where someone was having a problem after they switched their app from aot compilation to launch via -m, which I tracked down to this issue.

Comment by David Pidcock [ 27/Oct/14 8:24 PM ]

This also affects me running
lein ring server

I threw this test code in my handler.clj

(defrecord Test [id])

(def example-test (pr-str (->Test 1)))

(defroutes app-routes
(GET "/test" [] (read-string example-test)))

When I run this in the REPL, it works.
But I get ClassNotFound when I browse to "/test".

I thought I'd done something stupid, until I found this bug. (Well - I could still be doing something stupid, of course).

Comment by Michael Fogleman [ 03/Nov/14 11:04 AM ]

Nicola Mometto helpfully pointed out that CLJ-1413 seems to be the same issue as this.

http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1413

Comment by Michael Fogleman [ 13/Nov/14 8:29 AM ]

In the other issue, Lars Bohl has a reproducible example of a very simple or even simplest possible case.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Dec/14 12:46 PM ]

Possibly related: CLJ-1544

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 04/Dec/14 2:31 PM ]

The patch 0001-CLJ-979-make-clojure-resolve-to-the-correct-Class-in-v2.patch from CLJ-979 contains a workaround that fixes this bug.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Dec/14 6:26 PM ]

For completeness here's an alternative patch to the one proposed for CLJ-979 that fixes this issue by ensuring Compiler/LOADER is bound to a DynamicClassLoader while reading





[CLJ-1390] pprint a GregorianCalendar results in Arity exception Created: 25/Mar/14  Updated: 30/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Steve Suehs Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: print

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1390.patch     Text File 0002-CLJ-1390-test2.patch     Text File 0002-CLJ-1390-test.patch     Text File CLJ-1390-pprint-GregorianCalendar.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

What I was doing: attempting to pretty-print nested structures from Things mac app, which include instances of java.util.GregorianCalendar.
What I expected to happen: output should have an #inst very much like printing java.util.Date.
What happened instead: ArityException Wrong number of args (4) passed to: pprint$pretty-writer$fn

thingsplay.core=> (def nowish (java.util.GregorianCalendar.))
#'thingsplay.core/nowish
thingsplay.core=> nowish
#inst "2014-03-25T22:43:29.240-05:00"
thingsplay.core=> (require 'clojure.pprint)
nil
thingsplay.core=> (pprint nowish)
ArityException Wrong number of args (4) passed to: pprint$pretty-writer$fn  clojure.lang.AFn.throwArity (AFn.java:437)
#inst "
thingsplay.core=> (simple-dispatch nowish)
#inst "2014-03-25T22:43:29.240-05:00"nil
thingsplay.core=> nowish
#inst "2014-03-25T22:43:29.240-05:00"
thingsplay.core=> (write nowish)
ArityException Wrong number of args (4) passed to: pprint$pretty-writer$fn  clojure.lang.AFn.throwArity (AFn.java:437)
#inst "


 Comments   
Comment by Norman Richards [ 29/Mar/14 4:15 PM ]

The print-calendar function introduced in CLJ-928 doesn't work with clojure.pprint/pretty-writer since pretty-writer does not correctly implement the java.io.Writer interface. It only implements write(String) but print-calendar wants write(String,int,int) among others. Although pretty-writer should probably correctly implement java.io.Writer, it's pretty easy to rewrite print-calendar to use the supported subset of java.io.Writer that is implemented.

Comment by Steve Suehs [ 29/Mar/14 4:20 PM ]

Thank you, "random person at the Austin Clojure Hack Day" "that I don't know" that has a CA in place. You are awesome!

See you at the next Austin Clojure Meetup.

-s

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 04/Apr/14 2:51 PM ]

Norman, it would be good if the patch included a few test cases, especially ones that fail without the patch, and succeed with the patch.

Comment by Norman Richards [ 04/Apr/14 3:09 PM ]

Absolutely. I have no idea how test cases work on Clojure core, but I assume it should be easy enough to do.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 04/Apr/14 3:15 PM ]

I would recommend looking at the following file in the Clojure repo, which already contains other pprint tests. It shouldn't be too difficult to get an idea from one or more of the tests there. Actually those might be slightly unusual in that many of them use a simple-tests macro defined in file test_helper.clj that most of the Clojure tests do not use, but ask questions if you have trouble, e.g. on the Clojure Google group or IRC channel.

test/clojure/test_clojure/pprint/test_pretty.clj

Comment by Steve Suehs [ 04/Apr/14 7:50 PM ]

Alright...you two are inspiring me to go work on getting my CA in.

Comment by Norman Richards [ 04/Apr/14 8:31 PM ]

Test case attached. Apply the test patch, "mvn test" fails. Apply the fix, test passes.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Apr/14 3:32 PM ]

It would be better if the "is" were of the form:

(is (= calculated-value "constant string to compare against") "string to show if test fails")

rather than just (is calculated-value "string to show if test fails"). The second form will fail if calculating the value throws an exception, but only the first form will calculate it, and then verify that the value is the expected one (and fail if it is not the expected one).

Comment by Norman Richards [ 07/Apr/14 10:49 AM ]

Ok - here's an alternative test case. I'm less happy with this test case, since I have to add the TimeZone and make assumptions about how the specifics of how the pretty printer formats. But, it does test the fix adequately, so if you like the test2 patch better, that's perfectly fine with me.

Comment by Steve Miner [ 10/Apr/14 4:23 PM ]

I would rather fix the actual bug in pretty_writer.clj. The proxy needs to support more of the java.io.Writer interface. I think adding another arity to the write method would work. Something like:

(write 
   ...
  ([x off len]
      (.write this (subs (str x) off (+ off len)))))
Comment by Steve Miner [ 10/Apr/14 4:38 PM ]

CLJ-1390-pprint-GregorianCalendar.patch fixes the pretty_writer.clj proxy to support the missing version of the write method. Includes the same test as the previous patch.





[CLJ-1361] Pretty printing code using pprint with code-dispatch incorrectly prints a simple ns macro call. Created: 18/Feb/14  Updated: 18/Feb/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Russ Olsen Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: print
Environment:

java version "1.6.0_65"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_65-b14-462-11M4609)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.65-b04-462, mixed mode)

Mac OS X 10.9.1


Attachments: Text File simple-ns-pprint-fix.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Pretty printing code using pprint with code-dispatch incorrectly prints a simple ns macro call.
The problem is that "nil" is added to the output after the namespace name.

user> (use 'clojure.pprint)
nil
user> (def code '(ns foo.bar))
#'user/code
user> (with-out-str (with-pprint-dispatch code-dispatch (pprint code)))
"(ns foo.barnil)\n"   ;; Expected: {{"(ns foo.bar)\n"}}

Cause: In clojure.pprint/pprint-ns-reference, reference is printed regardless, but may be nil.
Solution: Omit printing reference if nil.
Patch: simple-ns-pprint-fix.patch
Screened by:






[CLJ-1313] Correct a few unit tests Created: 23/Dec/13  Updated: 03/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: ft

Attachments: File clj-1313-v1.diff     File clj-1313-v2.diff    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Several unit tests do not test what they appear to have been intended to test, because of missing is statements around (= expr1 expr2) expressions, or because of use of (is (thrown? ...)) instead of (is (thrown-with-msg? ...))

Patch: clj-1313-v2.diff

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Dec/13 3:11 AM ]

Patch clj-1313-v1.diff wraps (is ...) around several = expressions in unit tests that appeared to have been missing them, and changes several thrown? to thrown-with-msg? when there were regexes that were unused.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 31/Jan/14 12:36 PM ]

please update to apply cleanly on master

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 31/Jan/14 3:29 PM ]

clj-1313-v2.diff is identical to clj-1313-v1.diff except that it removes the portion that conflicts with the latest Clojure master. That portion needs updating for a different reason anyway (ticket CLJ-1328), and is probably best put into a patch for that ticket.





[CLJ-1254] Incorrect long quot result involving Long/MIN_VALUE Created: 06/Sep/13  Updated: 04/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: math

Attachments: File clj-1254-2.diff    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   
user=> (quot Long/MIN_VALUE -1)
-9223372036854775808

Similar issue to CLJ-1222 and CLJ-1253, with the same root cause as described for CLJ-1225. Ticket filed separately from CLJ-1253 for long division / because the desired fix may be quite different in this case.

Rich Hickey stated in a comment on CLJ-1225 that this case should throw an exception.

Question: For inc (which throws when given input Long/MAX_VALUE) there is an auto-promoting inc' and an unchecked-inc. quot now throws an exception in this case. Should there be an auto-promoting quot' and an unchecked-quot?



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Sep/13 10:55 AM ]

Patch clj-1254-v1.txt causes (quot Long/MIN_VALUE -1) to throw an exception due to overflow of the result, if the arguments are both long.

Unlike inc, which has auto-promoting version inc' and unchecked version unchecked-inc, there is no auto-promoting quot' and unchecked unchecked-quot. This patch does not add one.

Should quot' and unchecked-quot be added? If so, this ticket or a separate one?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Nov/13 12:59 AM ]

Patch clj-1254-2.diff is identical to clj-1254-v1.txt except it applies cleanly to latest master. The only changes were in the context of the lines that were changed, due to a recent commit made.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Oct/14 10:23 PM ]

quot should throw an an exception on overflow
quot' (I assume not divide' ?) should be added to autopromote on overflow
unchecked-divide should be added to do what quot does now - see CLJ-1545





[CLJ-1253] Incorrect long division involving Long/MIN_VALUE Created: 06/Sep/13  Updated: 04/Oct/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: math

Attachments: Text File clj-1253-1.txt    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   
user=> (/ Long/MIN_VALUE -1)
-9223372036854775808

Similar issue to CLJ-1222, with the same root cause as described for CLJ-1225.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Sep/13 8:56 AM ]

Patch clj-1253-1.txt corrects LongOps method divide for the case of args Long/MIN_VALUE and -1. It returns a BigInt in this case, not a Long, but most other pairs of values passed to this function return a Ratio exact answer, so it seems reasonable in this one case to return a BigInt exact answer when it will not fit in a Long.





[CLJ-1225] quot overflow issues around Long/MIN_VALUE for BigInt Created: 25/Jun/13  Updated: 04/Oct/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: math

Attachments: Text File clj-1225-2.txt     Text File clj-1225-fix-division-overflow-patch-v1.txt    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

In Clojure 1.5.1, see the following undesirable behavior regarding incorrect quot results for BigInts:

user=> (quot Long/MIN_VALUE -1N)
-9223372036854775808N
user=> (quot (bigint Long/MIN_VALUE) -1)
-9223372036854775808N

Similar issue to CLJ-1222. The root cause is that Java division of longs gives a numerically incorrect answer of Long.MIN_VALUE for (Long.MIN_VALUE / -1), because the numerically correct answer does not fit in a long. I believe this is the only pair of arguments for long division that gives a numerically incorrect answer, because division with a denominator having an absolute value of 2 or more gives a result closer to 0 than the numerator, and everything works fine for a denominator of 1 or -1, except this one case.

Related issues: CLJ-1222 for multiply, CLJ-1253 for / on longs, CLJ-1254 for quot on longs



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 25/Jun/13 11:03 AM ]

Patch clj-1225-fix-division-overflow-patch-v1.txt dated Jun 25 2013 may be one good way to address this issue. It modifies quot and / to return the numerically correct (BigInt) answer when given args Long/MIN_VALUE and -1.

It also removes the quotient intrinsic that does a JVM LDIV operation on longs for quot, since that operation is one of those that gives the incorrect result. I have not done any performance testing with this patch yet, but I have verified that it does not introduce any new reflection warnings when compiling Clojure itself.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 25/Jun/13 11:13 AM ]

Another possible approach would be to create unchecked-quotient and quot', which together with quot would correspond to the existing unchecked-multiply, *' and *. That is a more significant change. One potential concern it addresses that patch clj-1225-fix-division-overflow-patch-v1.txt does not is that patch leaves a Clojure developer with no way to do a primitive Java long division except by writing Java code.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 05/Sep/13 8:39 AM ]

this is two separate issues, one with longs and one with bigints. long problem should throw

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Sep/13 12:37 AM ]

Updating description for BigInt issue only. Will create separate ticket for incorrect behavior of / and quot on long type args Long/MIN_VALUE and -1.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Sep/13 12:41 AM ]

Patch clj-1225-2.txt fixes this issue with quot on BigInts, with tests for quot and / on these values. / on BigInt worked fine before, but added the tests in case someone decides to change the implementation and forgets this corner case.





[CLJ-1137] Metadata on a def gets evaluated twice Created: 21/Dec/12  Updated: 04/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Ghadi Shayban Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None

Attachments: File CLJ-1137-eval-metadata-once.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Metadata on the symbol of a def special form is evaluated twice.

(def ^{:foo (println "HA")} a [])

prints out HA HA. Offending line is in Compiler$DefExpr, fixed.






[CLJ-1134] star-directive in clojure.pprint/cl-format with an at-prefix ("~n@*") do not obey its specifications Created: 18/Dec/12  Updated: 14/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4, Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Jean Niklas L'orange Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: print

Attachments: Text File clj-1134-star-directive-in-cl-format.txt    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The star-directive in clojure.pprint/cl-format with an at-prefix (~n@*) does not obey its specifications according to Common Lisp the Language, 2nd Edition. There are two bugs within ~n@* as of right now:

  1. When ~n@* is supposed to jump forward over more than one argument, it jumps one step backward as if it had seen ~:*. For instance, (cl-format nil "~D ~3@*~D" 0 1 2 3) will return "0 0" and not "0 3" as expected.
  2. When ~@* is seen, the formatter is supposed to jump to the first argument (as n defaults to 0, see specification linked above). However, whenever a ~@*-directive is seen, the formatter jumps to the second argument instead.

What (small set of) steps will reproduce the problem?

Inside a clean Clojure repl, perform these steps:

user=> (require '[clojure.pprint :refer [cl-format]])
nil
user=> (cl-format nil "~D ~3@*~D" 0 1 2 3)
"0 0"                                           ;; Expected: "0 3"
user=> (cl-format nil "~D~D~D~D ~@*~D" 0 1 2 3)
"0123 1"                                        ;; Expected: "0123 0"

What is the expected output? What do you see instead?

The expected output is "0 3" and "0123 0", but is "0 0" and "0123 1" as shown above.

What version are you using?

Tested on both 1.4.0 and 1.5.0-beta2, both have the defect described.

Please provide any additional information below.

The format strings which reproduces the problem has been compared with the format function from the Common Lisp implementations SBCL, CLisp and Clozure. All of them print the expected output.



 Comments   
Comment by Jean Niklas L'orange [ 18/Dec/12 9:28 PM ]

Patch attached.

It may be easier to read the changes the patch does from within JIRA instead from the commit message, so I've added it here:

This solves two issues as specified by #CLJ-1134. Issue #1 is solved by doing a
relative jump forward within absolute-reposition in cl_format.clj, line 114 by
switching (- (:pos navigator) position) with (- position (:pos navigator)).

Issue #2 is handled by changing the default n-parameter to * depending on
whether the @-prefix is placed or not. If it is placed, then n defaults to
0, otherwise it defaults to 1.

In addition, new tests have been appended to test_cl_format.clj to ensure the
correctness of this patch. The tests have been tested on the Common Lisp
implementation GNU CLISP 2.49, which presumably handle the ~n@*
correctly. This patch and GNU CLISP returns the same output for each format
call, sans case for printed symbols; Common Lisp has case-insensitive symbols,
whereas Clojure has not.

Comment by Tom Faulhaber [ 14/Apr/14 11:12 AM ]

I walked through this patch and it looks just right. Thanks!

Let's get it applied for 1.7.





[CLJ-1074] Read/print round-trip for +/-Infinity and NaN Created: 21/Sep/12  Updated: 19/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Colin Jones Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: print, reader

Attachments: Text File 0001-Read-Infinity-and-NaN.patch     Text File clj-1074-read-infinity-and-nan-patch-v2-plus-edn-reader.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

A few float-related forms (namely, Double/POSITIVE_INFINITY, Double/NEGATIVE_INFINITY, Double/NaN) are not eval-able after a round-trip via

(read-string (binding [*print-dup* true] (pr-str f))

The two options I see are to provide print-method implementations for these and their Float cousins, or to make Infinity, -Infinity, +Infinity, and NaN readable values. Since it sounds like edn may want to provide a spec for these values (see https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure-dev/LeJpOhHxESs/discussion and https://github.com/edn-format/edn/issues/2), I think making these values directly readable as already printed is preferable. Something like Double/POSITIVE_INFINITY seems too low-level from edn's perspective, as it would refer to a Java class and constant.

I'm attaching a patch implementing reader support for Infinity, -Infinity, +Infinity, and NaN.



 Comments   
Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 03/Dec/12 11:34 AM ]

Please bring this up on clojure-dev. We'll be able to vet this ticket after that.

Comment by Colin Jones [ 03/Dec/12 1:18 PM ]

Should I respond to my original clojure-dev post about this (linked in the issue description above), or start a new one?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 24/May/13 1:11 PM ]

Patch clj-1074-read-infinity-and-nan-patch-v2.txt dated May 24 2013 is identical to 0001-Read-Infinity-and-NaN.patch dated Sep 21 2012, except it applies cleanly to latest master. The older patch conflicts with a recent commit made for CLJ-873.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 25/May/13 11:55 AM ]

clj-1074-read-infinity-and-nan-patch-v2-plus-edn-reader.patch is the same as clj-1074-read-infinity-and-nan-patch-v2.txt except it patches EdnReader too, but it must be applied after #CLJ-873 0001-Fix-CLJ-873-for-EdnReader-too.patch get merged





[CLJ-703] Improve writeClassFile performance Created: 04/Jan/11  Updated: 08/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.3
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Jürgen Hötzel Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 19
Labels: Compiler, performance

Attachments: Text File 0001-use-File.mkdirs-instead-of-mkdir-every-single-direct.patch     Text File 0002-Ensure-atomic-creation-of-class-files-by-renaming-a-.patch     Text File improve-writeclassfile-perf.patch     Text File remove-flush-and-sync-only.patch     Text File remove-sync-only.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

This Discussion about timing issues when writing class files led to the the current implementation of synchronous writes to disk. This leads to bad performance/system-load when compiling Clojure code.

This Discussion questioned the current implentation.

Synchronous writes are not necessary and also do not ensure (crash while calling write) valid classfiles.

These Patches (0001 is just a code cleanup for creating the directory structure) ensures atomic creation of classfiles by using File.renameTo()



 Comments   
Comment by David Powell [ 17/Jan/11 2:16 PM ]

Removing sync makes clojure build much faster. I wonder why it was added in the first place? I guess only Rich knows? I assume that it is not necessary.

If we are removing sync though, I wouldn't bother with the atomic rename stuff. Doing that sort of thing can cause problems on some platforms, eg with search indexers and virus checkers momentarily locking files after they are created.

The patch seems to be assuming that sync is there for some reason, but my initial assumption would be that sync isn't necessary - perhaps it was working around some issue that no longer exists?

Comment by Jürgen Hötzel [ 19/Jan/11 2:05 PM ]

Although its unlikely: there is a possible race condition "loading a paritally written classfile"?:

https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/src/jvm/clojure/lang/RT.java#L393

Comment by John Szakmeister [ 25/May/12 4:22 AM ]

The new improve-writeclassfile-perf version of the patch combines the two previous patches into a single patch file and brings them up-to-date with master. I can split the two changes back out into separate patch files if desired, but I figured out current tooling is more geared towards a single patch being applied.

Comment by John Szakmeister [ 25/May/12 4:36 AM ]

FWIW, both fixes look sane. The first one is a nice cleanup. The second one is a little more interesting in that uses a rename operation to put the final file into place. It removes the sync call, which does make things faster. In general, if we're concerned about on-disk consistency, we should really have a combination of the two: write the full contents to a tmp file, sync it, and atomically rename to the destination file name.

Neither the current master, nor the current patch will guarantee on-disk consistency across a machine wide crash. The current master could crash before the sync() occurs, leaving the file in an inconsistent state. With the patch, the OS may not get the file from file cache to disk before an OS level crash occurs, and leave the file in an inconsistent state as well. The benefit of the patch version is that the whole file does atomically come into view at once. It does have a nasty side effect of leaving around a temp file if the compiler crashes just before the rename though.

Perhaps a little more work to catch an exception and clean up is in order? In general, I like the patched version better.

Comment by Ivan Kozik [ 05/Oct/12 7:07 PM ]

File.renameTo returns false on (most?) errors, but the patch doesn't check for failure. Docs say "The return value should always be checked to make sure that the rename operation was successful." Failure might be especially likely on Windows, where files are opened by others without FILE_SHARE_DELETE.

Comment by Dave Della Costa [ 23/Jun/14 11:37 PM ]

We've been wondering why our compilation times on linux were so slow. It became the last straw when we walked away from one project and came back after 15 minutes and it was not done yet.

After some fruitless investigation into our linux configuration and lein java args, we stumbled upon this issue via the associated Clojure group thread. Upon commenting out the flush() and sync() lines (https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/src/jvm/clojure/lang/Compiler.java#L7171-L7172) and compiling Clojure 1.6 ourselves, our projects all started compiling in under a minute.

Point being, can we at least provide some flag to allow for "unsafe compilation" or something? As it is, this is bad enough that we've manually modified all our local versions of Clojure to work around the issue.

Comment by Tim McCormack [ 30/Sep/14 4:10 PM ]

Additional motivation: This becomes really unpleasant on an encrypted filesystem, since write and read latency become higher.

As a partial workaround, I've been using this script to mount a ramdisk over top of target, which speeds up compilation 2-4x: https://gist.github.com/timmc/6c397644668bcf41041f (but removing flush() and sync() entirely would probably speed things up even more, if safe)

Comment by Ragnar Dahlen [ 06/Oct/14 12:30 PM ]

I'd like to explore this issue further as I also don't think the flush and sync calls add any value, but do have a severe impact on performance.

To resurrect the discussion, I've attached a new patch with the following approach:

  • create a temporary file
  • write class bytecode to temporary file, no flush or sync
  • close temporary file
  • atomic rename of temporary file to class file name

It is different to previous patches in that:

  • it applies cleanly to master
  • it checks return value from File.renameTo
  • it omits proposed File.mkdirs change as the current implementation is actually converting from an "internal name", where forward slashes are assumed (splits on "/"), to a platform specific path using File.separator. I'm not convinced that the previous patch is safe on all versions of Windows, and I think it's separate from the main issue here.

I opted for the atomic rename of a temp file to avoid leaving empty class files with a correct expected class file name in case of failure.

It is my understanding that this patch will guarantee that:

  • when writeClassFile returns successfully, a class file with the expected name will exists, and subsequent reads from that file name will return the expected bytecode (possibly from kernel buffers).
  • when writeClassFile fails, a class file with the expected name will not have been created (or updated if it previously existed).

Anything preventing the operating system from flushing its buffers to disk (power failure etc) might leave a corrupt (empty, partially written) class file. It's my opinion that that is acceptable behaviour, and worth the performance improvement (I'm seeing AOT compilation reduced from 1m20s -> 22s on one of our codebases, would be happy to provide more benchmarks if requested).

Would be grateful for feedback/testing of this patch.

Comment by Ragnar Dahlen [ 08/Oct/14 6:00 AM ]

We're testing this patch on various projects/platforms at my company. So far we've seen:

  • Significantly reduced compilation times on Linux (two typical examples: 30s to 15s, 1m30s to 30s)
  • No significant change in compilation times on Mac OSX.
  • File.renameTo consistently failing on a Windows machine.

My understanding is that the performance difference between Linux and OSX is due to differences in how these platforms implement fsync. OSX by default does not actually tell the drive to flush its buffers (requires fcntl F_FULLSYNC for this, not used by JVMs) [1], whereas Linux does [2].

Our very limited test shows (as was previously pointed out) that File.renameTo is problematic on Windows. I've attached a new patch that doesn't use rename, and only has the the sync call removed (flush is a no-op for FileOutputStreams). We're currently testing this patch.

The drawback of this patch is that it may leave correctly named, but empty class files if the write fails. One option would be to try and delete the file in the catch block. Personally, I wouldn't expect a compilation that failed because of OS/IO reasons to leave my classfiles in a consistent state.

[1]: "Note that while fsync() will flush all data from the host to the drive (i.e. the "permanent storage device"), the drive itself may not physically write the data to the platters for quite some time and it may be written in an out-of-order sequence.": https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Darwin/Reference/ManPages/man2/fsync.2.html

[2]: "[...] includes writing through or flushing a disk cache if present."
http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/fsync.2.html





[CLJ-1585] Report boxed math warning on function that boxes primitive return value Created: 11/Nov/14  Updated: 12/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: errormsgs, math

Attachments: Text File clj-1585.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

With the new :warn-on-boxed (CLJ-1325), these examples do not report a boxed math warning although they each do boxing:

user=> (defn f1 [^long x] (inc x))
f1
user=> (defn f2 [x] (aget (long-array [1 2]) 0))
f2
user=> (defn f3 [x] (aget (int-array [1 2]) 0))
f3
user=> (defn f4 [^String s] (.indexOf s "a"))

Cause: emitBoxReturn has a hard-coded call to box a prim return value.

Solution: If *unchecked-math* is set to :warn-on-boxed, emit a warning on boxing of primitive numeric return types.

Patch:



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 12/Nov/14 12:39 AM ]

Attached patch does the job, but from trying it out on some real code, it finds both problematic cases and lots of cases that could safely be ignored and/or where there is no obvious way to fix the warning. I think it may need some more tuning to reduce the rate of unfixable things a bit.





[CLJ-1576] clojure.pprint should print vars as pr does Created: 29/Oct/14  Updated: 13/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Kevin Downey Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: print

Attachments: Text File pprint-vars-as-prn-does-0.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

clojure.pprint/pprint currently by default lets vars fall through to its IDeref printing which prints them as something like:

#<Var@107e78: #<core$inc clojure.core$inc@f278dd>>

which is not a super representation of a var. vars have names.

generally when I pprint a data structure containing vars it is because at some point in writing the code that constructed that data structure I decided I wanted a history of the functions called, and since vars are invokable as functions and have a name, I can just use those as the history. the history then turns in to a big structure so I pretty print it, which then doesn't print the vars.

it is possible to work/around change the behaviour of the pretty printer by using its customizing options, but it is not a simple change to make, and means that for a small program a large percentage of it is spent making the pretty printer print something useful for vars.



 Comments   
Comment by Chris Blom [ 13/Nov/14 4:25 AM ]

I've added a patch which adds a method for clojure.lang.Var to
simple-dispatch in src/clojure/pprint/dispatch.clj:

(use-method simple-dispatch clojure.lang.Var pr)

The patch includes a simple test.

Comment by Aspasia Beneti [ 13/Nov/14 4:37 AM ]

Related bug http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1565





[CLJ-1545] Add unchecked-divide, unchecked-remainder Created: 02/Oct/14  Updated: 06/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Colin Taylor
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: math, newbie

Attachments: File CLJ-1545-2.diff     File CLJ-1545.diff    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

This appears like it might be an oversight that these are missing. There are unchecked-divide-int and unchecked-remainder-int functions, but not equivalents for longs, even though there are equivalents for longs for every other unchecked operation. The JVM has bytecodes for long division and remainder.

The Clojure documentation in the section "Support for Java Primitives" on page http://clojure.org/java_interop has links for unchecked-divide and unchecked-remainder, but since they don't exist in Clojure, the API link targets don't exist.

It seems like a good idea to either add these to Clojure, or remove them from the documentation.



 Comments   
Comment by Colin Taylor [ 03/Oct/14 6:17 PM ]

Having a go at this.

Comment by Colin Taylor [ 04/Oct/14 6:02 AM ]
  • Added tests for unchecked-divide-int and unchecked-remainder-int too.
  • Unchecked fns only support binary arity and will throw CompilerException(ArityException)s where checked will not.
  • Is there any value to (int,long) (long,int) overrides for java interop cases e.g. using java collections from Clojure in high perf code?
Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Oct/14 9:13 AM ]

Thanks for taking this on Colin!

1) When I apply the patch (git apply CLJ-1545.diff), I get a bunch of whitespace errors which will need to be cleaned up but also the patch seems to fail to apply at all on the changes in test/clojure/test_clojure/numbers.clj. It looks like perhaps the diff is just not the right diff format. You might want to check out the instructions at http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches about using git format-patch.

2) If you could put a more useful git commit message, that would be helpful. Something like "CLJ-1545 Adds missing unchecked-divide and unchecked-remainder for primitive longs."

Thanks!

Comment by Colin Taylor [ 04/Oct/14 4:47 PM ]

Uggh, sorry Alex.

New patch with better commit message.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Oct/14 7:24 PM ]

The patch format looks better. Pulling out farther to the ticket itself, afaict Clojure will already use the right byteocode for checked or unchecked so this may not even be needed?

If I compile (without the patch):

(defn foo-div ^long [^long a ^long b]
  (quot a b))

then the bytecode for that fn is:

public final long invokePrim(long, long);
    Code:
       0: lload_1
       1: lload_3
       2: ldiv
       3: lreturn

similarly, quot of two longs yields the same code but with lrem. I think patch has no net effect on the resulting bytecode?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 04/Oct/14 7:42 PM ]

Alex, did you do the testing in your previous comment with *unchecked-math* true or false? If false, then I would think that if CLJ-1254 is judged a bug, then the behavior you saw is a bug, too, that misses the same corner case.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Oct/14 10:19 PM ]

The current results are the same with either unchecked-math setting, but I see your point.

Refreshing my memory of the (/ Long/MIN_VALUE -1) case, I think you're right. The (new) unchecked-divide / remainder should do what the current (checked) forms do and the regular division and remainder cases should be making the overflow check. I think CLJ-1254 should cover the quot changes.

Comment by Colin Taylor [ 04/Oct/14 10:19 PM ]

user=> (dotimes [_ 6] (time (dotimes [_ 50000000] (unchecked-divide 4 (System/currentTimeMillis)))))
"Elapsed time: 1806.942 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 1808.747 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 1865.074 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 1802.777 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 1839.468 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 1830.61 msecs"
nil
user=> (dotimes [_ 6] (time (dotimes [_ 50000000] (/ 4 (System/currentTimeMillis)))))
"Elapsed time: 5003.598 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 4998.182 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 4941.237 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 5036.517 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 4965.867 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 4982.693 msecs"





[CLJ-1493] Fast keyword intern Created: 06/Aug/14  Updated: 11/Sep/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: dennis zhuang Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: keywords, performance
Environment:

Mac OS X 10.9.4 / 2.6 GHz Intel Core i5 / 8 GB 1600 MHz DDR3
java version "1.7.0_17"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.7.0_17-b02)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 23.7-b01, mixed mode)


Attachments: File fast_keyword_intern.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Keyword's intern(Symbol) method uses recursive invocation to get a valid keyword instance.I think it can be rewrite into a 'for loop'
to reduce method invocation cost.
So i developed this patch, and make some simple benchmark.Run the following command line three times after 'ant jar':

java -Xms64m -Xmx64m -cp test:clojure.jar clojure.main -e "(time (dotimes [n 10000000] (keyword (str n))))"

Before patched:

"Elapsed time: 27343.827 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 26172.653 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 25673.764 msecs"

After patched:

"Elapsed time: 24884.142 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 23933.423 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 25382.783 msecs"

It looks the patch make keyword's intern a little more fast.

The patch is attached and test.

Thanks.

P.S. I've signed the contributor agreement, and my email is killme2008@gmail.com .



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 07/Aug/14 9:01 AM ]

Looks intriguing (and would be a nice change imo). I ran this on a json parsing benchmark I used for the keyword changes and saw ~3% improvement.

Comment by dennis zhuang [ 07/Aug/14 9:54 PM ]

Updated the patch, remove the 'k == null' clause in for loop,it's not necessary.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 11/Aug/14 1:29 AM ]

Dennis, while JIRA can handle multiple patches with the same name, it can be confusing for people discussing the patches, and for some scripts I have to evaluate them. Please consider giving the patches different names (e.g. with version numbers in them), or removing older ones if they are obsolete.

Comment by dennis zhuang [ 11/Aug/14 9:19 AM ]

Hi,andy

Thank you for reminding me.I deleted the old patch.

Comment by dennis zhuang [ 11/Sep/14 10:34 AM ]

I am glad to see it is helpful.I benchmark the patch with current master branch,it's fine too.





[CLJ-1473] Bad pre/post conditions silently passed Created: 24/Jul/14  Updated: 11/Sep/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Brandon Bloom Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: errormsgs

Attachments: Text File 0001-Validate-that-pre-and-post-conditions-are-vectors.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Before:

user=> ((fn [x] {:pre (pos? x)} x) -5) ; ouch!
-5
user=> ((fn [x] {:pre [(pos? x)]} x) -5) ; meant this
AssertionError Assert failed: (pos? x)  user/eval4075/fn--4076 (form-init5464179453862723045.clj:1)

After:

user=> ((fn [x] {:pre (pos? x)} x) -5)
CompilerException java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Pre and post conditions should be vectors, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:1:2) 
user=> ((fn [x] {:pre [(pos? x)]} x) -5)                                  
AssertionError Assert failed: (pos? x)  user/eval2/fn--3 (NO_SOURCE_FILE:2)
user=> ((fn [x] {:post (pos? x)} x) -5)
CompilerException java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Pre and post conditions should be vectors, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:3:2) 
user=> ((fn [x] {:post [(pos? x)]} x) -5)              
AssertionError Assert failed: (pos? x)  user/eval7/fn--8 (NO_SOURCE_FILE:4)





[CLJ-1456] The compiler ignores too few or too many arguments to throw Created: 30/Jun/14  Updated: 03/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alf Kristian Støyle Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler, ft

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1456-counting-forms-to-catch-malformed-throw-for.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1456-counting-forms-to-catch-malformed-throw-for.patch     Text File v3_0001-CLJ-1456-counting-forms-to-catch-malformed-throw-for.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The compiler does not fail on "malformed" throw forms:

user=> (defn foo [] (throw))
#'user/foo

user=> (foo)
NullPointerException   user/foo (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)

user=> (defn bar [] (throw Exception baz))
#'user/bar

user=> (bar)
ClassCastException java.lang.Class cannot be cast to java.lang.Throwable  user/bar (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)

; This one works, but ignored-symbol, should probably not be ignored
user=> (defn quux [] (throw (Exception. "Works!") ignored-symbol))
#'user/quux

user=> (quux)
Exception Works!  user/quux (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)

The compiler can easily avoid these by counting forms.

Patch: v3_0001-CLJ-1456-counting-forms-to-catch-malformed-throw-for.patch

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Alf Kristian Støyle [ 30/Jun/14 11:56 AM ]

Not sure how to create a test for the attached patch. Will happily do so if anyone has a suggestion.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Jun/14 12:23 PM ]

Re testing, I think the examples you give are good - you should add tests to test/clojure/test_clojure/compilation.clj that eval the form and expect compilation errors. I'm sure you can find similar examples.

Comment by Alf Kristian Støyle [ 30/Jun/14 2:01 PM ]

Newest patch also contains a few tests.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 4:54 PM ]

All patches dated Jun 30 2014 and earlier no longer applied cleanly to latest master after some commits were made to Clojure on Aug 29, 2014. They did apply cleanly before that day.

I have not checked how easy or difficult it might be to update this patch. See section "Updating Stale Patches" on this wiki page for some tips on updating patches: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Alf, it can help avoid confusion if different patches have different file names. JIRA lets you create multiple attachments with the same name, but I wouldn't recommend it.

Comment by Alf Kristian Støyle [ 30/Aug/14 2:18 AM ]

It was easy to fix the patch. Uploaded the new patch v3_0001-CLJ-1456-counting-forms-to-catch-malformed-throw-for.patch, which applies cleanly to the current master.





[CLJ-1454] Companion to swap! which returns the old value Created: 28/Jun/14  Updated: 10/Sep/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Philip Potter Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 6
Labels: atom

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Sometimes, when mutating an atom, it's desirable to know what the value before the swap happened. The existing swap! function returns the new value, so is unsuitable for this use case. Currently, the only option is to roll your own using a loop and compare-and-set!

An example of this would be where the atom contains a PersistentQueue and you want to atomically remove the head of the queue and process it: if you run (swap! a pop), you have lost the reference to the old head of the list so you can't process it.

It would be good to have a new function swap-returning-old! which returned the old value instead of the new.



 Comments   
Comment by Philip Potter [ 28/Jun/14 4:00 PM ]

Overtone already defines functions like this in overtone.helpers.ref, which get used by overtone.libs.event. These return both the old and the new value, although in all existing use cases only the old value gets used.

flatland/useful defines a trade! fn which returns the old value, although the implementation is less clean than a compare-and-set! based solution would be.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 29/Jun/14 6:23 AM ]

Chris Ford suggested "swap-out!" as a name for this function. I definitely think "swap-returning-old!" isn't the ideal name.

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 30/Jun/14 1:33 AM ]

I propose a switch! name. The verb switch is defined as "substitute (two items) for each other; exchange.", and as you get the old value back, it evokes slightly the exchange of items.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 30/Jun/14 3:03 AM ]

Medley also has a deref-swap! which does the same thing.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Jun/14 8:20 AM ]

I think deref-swap! seems like a morally equivalent name to Java's AtomicReference.getAndSet() which is the same idea.

Comment by Philip Potter [ 30/Jun/14 1:19 PM ]

Funny you say that Alex, because prismatic/plumbing defines a get-and-set! (also defined by other projects), equivalent to deref-reset! in medley. Plumbing also defines swap-pair! which returns both old and new values, like the overtone fn, although once again the only usage I can find only uses the old value.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Jun/14 3:37 PM ]

I think it's important to retain the notion that you are not switching/exchanging values but applying the update model of applying a function to the old value to produce the new value. I don't even particularly like "swap!" as I think that aspect is lost in the name (alter and alter-var-root are better). I like that "deref-swap!" combines two words with existing connotations and orders them appropriately.

Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 30/Jun/14 3:43 PM ]

except that that naming doesn't fit well compared to functions like nfirst which are defined as (comp next first). This function is not (comp deref swap!).





[CLJ-1373] LazySeq should utilize cached hash from its underlying seq. Created: 09/Mar/14  Updated: 20/Mar/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Jozef Wagner Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: collections, performance
Environment:

1.6.0 master SNAPSHOT


Attachments: File clj-1373.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Even if underlying seq contains a cached hash, LazySeq computes it every time.

user=> (def a (range 100000))
#'user/a
user=> (time (hash a))
"Elapsed time: 46.904273 msecs"
375952610
user=> (time (hash a)) ;; RECOMPUTE
"Elapsed time: 10.879098 msecs"
375952610
user=> (def b (seq a))
#'user/b
user=> (time (hash b))
"Elapsed time: 10.572522 msecs"
375952610
user=> (time (hash b)) ;; CACHED HASH
"Elapsed time: 0.024927 msecs"
375952610
user=> (def c (lazy-seq b))
#'user/c
user=> (time (hash c))
"Elapsed time: 12.207651 msecs"
375952610
user=> (time (hash c))
"Elapsed time: 10.995798 msecs"
375952610


 Comments   
Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 09/Mar/14 9:20 AM ]

Added patch which checks if underlying seq implements IHashEq and if yes, uses that hash instead of recomputing.





[CLJ-1295] Speed up dissoc on array-maps Created: 15/Nov/13  Updated: 08/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: performance

Attachments: File clj-1295-1.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

In latest Clojure master as of Nov 15 2013, the method without() in PersistentArrayMap.java first searches for a matching key using indexOf(key) and saves the result in i.

If a matching key was found, the code then copies the old array to the new smaller one, but unnecessarily repeats the comparison of every key in the map to the key being removed, even though its location is already stored in i.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 15/Nov/13 7:05 PM ]

The patch clj-1295-1.diff changes PersistentArrayMap's without() to use System.arraycopy to copy only the necessary parts from the current array to newArray, similar to PersistentHashMap's method removePair().

Benchmark 1 has strings for keys, which are relatively slow to compare to each other.

(def m1 (array-map "abcdef" 1 "abcdeg" 2 "abcdeh" 3 "abcdei" 4))
(time (dotimes [i 100000000] (dissoc m1 "abcdei")))

1.6.0-alpha2 with no changes:
"Elapsed time: 29663.443 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 29490.225 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 29600.138 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 29627.948 msecs"

1.6.0-alpha2 with patch clj-1295-1.diff:
"Elapsed time: 6362.006 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 6121.006 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 6163.377 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 6155.299 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 6395.224 msecs"

Averages about 21% of the run time before the change.

Benchmark 2 has keywords for keys, which are compared via Java ==, so as fast as comparison can get.

(def m2 (array-map :abcdef 1 :abcdeg 2 :abcdeh 3 :abcdei 4))
(time (dotimes [i 100000000] (dissoc m2 :abcdei)))

1.6.0-alpha2 with no changes:
"Elapsed time: 5033.863 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 5028.327 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 5045.019 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 5004.751 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 5039.143 msecs"

1.6.0-alpha2 with patch clj-1295-1.diff:
"Elapsed time: 2874.748 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2862.878 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2887.778 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2874.196 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 2861.807 msecs"

Averages about 57% of the run time before the change.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 08/Dec/14 9:47 AM ]

A nice boost, but probably obsoleted by CLJ-1517

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Dec/14 11:10 AM ]

Always happy to be obsoleted by something even better

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 08/Dec/14 11:43 AM ]

I dunno, seems like CLJ-1517 phase 1 is just vectors not maps, so this is still easy low-hanging fruit.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 08/Dec/14 1:07 PM ]

There will be a second ticket for maps, both will be targeted for 1.8.





[CLJ-1289] aset-* and aget perform poorly on multi-dimensional arrays even with type hints. Created: 01/Nov/13  Updated: 14/Feb/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Michael O. Church Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: arrays, performance
Environment:

Clojure 1.5.1.

Dependencies: criterium


Attachments: Text File CLJ-1289-p1.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Here's a transcript of the behavior. I don't know for sure that reflection is being done, but the performance penalty (about 1300x) suggests it.

user=> (use 'criterium.core)
nil
user=> (def b (make-array Double/TYPE 1000 1000))
#'user/b
user=> (quick-bench (aget ^"[[D" b 304 175))
WARNING: Final GC required 3.5198021166354323 % of runtime
WARNING: Final GC required 29.172288684474303 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 63558 in 6 samples of 10593 calls.
             Execution time mean : 9.457308 µs
    Execution time std-deviation : 126.220954 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 9.344450 µs ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 9.629202 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 2.477107 ns

One workaround is to use multiple agets.

user=> (quick-bench (aget ^"[D" (aget ^"[[D" b 304) 175))
WARNING: Final GC required 40.59820310542545 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 62135436 in 6 samples of 10355906 calls.
             Execution time mean : 6.999273 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.112703 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 6.817782 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 7.113845 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 2.477107 ns

Cause: The inlined version only applies to arity 2, and otherwise it reflects.



 Comments   
Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 08/Dec/13 9:28 PM ]

A glance at the source makes it obvious that the hypothesis is correct – the inlined version only applies to arity 2, and otherwise it reflects.

I thought this would be as simple as converting the inline function to be variadic (using reduce), but after trying it I realized this is tricky as you have to generate the correct type hints for each step. E.g., given ^"[[D" the inline function needs to type-hint the intermediate result with ^"[D". This isn't difficult if we're just dealing with strings that begin with square brackets, but I don't know for sure that those are the only possibilities.

Comment by Yaron Peleg [ 13/Feb/14 4:44 AM ]

Bump. I just got bitten bad by this.

There are two seperate issues here:
1) (aget 2d-array-doubles 0 0 ) doesn't emit a reflection warning.
2) It seems like the compiler has enough information to avoid the reflective call here.

Note this gets exp. worse as number of dimensions grows, i.e (get doubles3d 0 0 0)
will be 1M slower, etc' Not true, unless you iterate over all elements. it's
simply n_dims*1000x per lookup.

Nasty surprise, especially considering you often go to primitive arrays for speed,
and a common use case is an inner loop(s) that iterate over arrays.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 13/Feb/14 7:08 AM ]

I can probably take a stab at this.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 13/Feb/14 8:34 PM ]

I think the reflection warning problem is pretty much impossible to solve without changing code elsewhere in the compiler, because the reflection done in aget is a different kind than normal clojure reflection – it's explicitly in the function body rather than emitted by the compiler. Since the compiler isn't emitting it, it doesn't reasonably know it's even there. So even if aget is fixed for other arities, you still won't get the warning when it's not inlined.

I can imagine some sort of metadata that you could put on a function telling the compiler that it will reflect if not inlined. Or maybe a more generic not-inlined warning?

The global scope of adding another compiler flag seems about balanced by the seriousness of array functions not being able to warn on reflection.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 13/Feb/14 8:52 PM ]

Attached CLJ-1289-p1.patch which simply inlines variadic calls to aget. It assumes that if it sees a :tag on the array arg that is a string beginning with [, it can assume that the return value from one call to aget can be tagged with the same string with the leading [ stripped off.

I'm not a jvm expert, but having read through the spec a little bit I think this is a reasonable assumption.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Feb/14 3:34 PM ]

I think this probably is actually true, but a more official way to ask that question would be to get the array class and ask for Class.getComponentType() (and less janky than string munging).

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 14/Feb/14 3:40 PM ]

How would you get the array class based on the :tag type hint?

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 14/Feb/14 7:05 PM ]

I see (-> s (Class/forName) (.getComponentType) (.getName)) does the same thing – is that route preferred, or is there another one?





[CLJ-1282] The quote special form should throw an exception if passed more than one form to quote Created: 23/Oct/13  Updated: 10/Sep/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Howard Lewis Ship Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: errormsgs, reader

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1282-p1.patch     Text File CLJ-1282-p2.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Quote currently ignores all but the first argument. In the case of being called accidentally with multiple values, it should throw an exception specifying the error.

user> (quote 1 2 3)
1

------- Original: --------

Every once in a while, you can just go down the rabbit hole.

I had an errant expression in my code:

(-> message get-message-values 'DESTINATION_MERCHANT_ID)

One would think this would work; it certainly would if the key was a keyword and not a symbol.

One would expect this to expand to:

('DESTINATION_MERCHANT_ID (get-message-values message))

however, the reader is involved, so it is as if the source were:

(-> message get-message-values (quote DESTINATION_MERCHANT_ID))

which expands to:

(quote (-> message get-message-values) DESTINATION_MERCHANT_ID))

... hilarity ensues! Because quote currently ignores extra parameters, my code gets the quoted value '(clojure.core/-> message get-message-values) rather than the expected string from the map; this shifts us from the "there's a bug in my code" to "the nature of reality is broken".

The correct expression is:

(-> message get-message-values (get 'DESTINATION_MERCHANT_ID))

This took quite a while to track down; if the

special form checked that it was passed exactly one form to quote and threw an exception otherwise, I think I would have caught this much earlier. It could even identify the expression it is quoting, which would provide a lot better understanding of where I went wrong.



 Comments   
Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 23/Oct/13 2:02 PM ]

Sorry, can't edit the description now to correct the formatting errors.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 24/Oct/13 6:09 PM ]

I just wanted to point out that your description is shorter, but makes it appear that such a use is unlikely and therefore unimportant; the detail of my description is to point out a reasonable situation where something explicable, but completely counterintuitive and confusing, does occur.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 24/Oct/13 8:28 PM ]

That's why I left the original in there too.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 09/Dec/13 7:07 AM ]

(quote) currently returns nil. Do we have an opinion about that?

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 09/Dec/13 9:32 AM ]

Attached p1, which throws an IllegalArgumentException (wrapped in a CompilerException of course) for anything but 1 arg, and includes the number of args that were passed.

I can't think of any reason why (quote) would be useful, so I decided to throw on that too. Very easy to change of course.

Also added a test that (eval '(quote 1 2 3)) throws.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 31/Jan/14 12:46 PM ]

I recommend the following changes:

  • throw an ex-info that includes the offending form in its map {:form ...}
  • check only for the map data, not exception type or message, in the tests
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 31/Jan/14 6:31 PM ]

Patch CLJ-1282-p1.patch no longer applies cleanly after commits made to Clojure master on Jan 31 2014, probably due to the patch committed for CLJ-1318, and probably only because some lines of context changed in the test file. That would be trivial to update, but Stu's comments above suggest that more significant changes need to be made.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 01/Feb/14 9:19 AM ]

Throwing an ex-info is easy enough. I don't know how to avoid at least incidentally checking for the exception type, since the ExceptionInfo is wrapped in a CompilerException. I'll make a patch that keeps the class name in the test but doesn't do any checks on the cause aside from the ex-data. Let me know if I should do anything different.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 01/Feb/14 9:58 AM ]

Attached CLJ-1282-p2.patch which is off of the current master and addresses Stu's points.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Feb/14 11:23 PM ]

Moving back to Triaged for more looks.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 16/Feb/14 12:12 PM ]

Currently (quote) returns nil, is it intended that this patch makes that an error or was this by accident?

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 16/Feb/14 12:23 PM ]

I consciously chose to make (quote) an error – I made a comment about that earlier and didn't get any feedback, so I unilaterally decided to make it an error due to the fact that I couldn't think of any possible use for (quote).

It's an easy switch if somebody thinks differently.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 16/Feb/14 1:13 PM ]

I'm sorry I did not notice your previois comment.
I'm asking because I need to know whether I should throw on (quote) for tools.analyzer, currently it is allowed but I too think that (quote) should be an error.





[CLJ-1277] Speed up printing of time instants by adding type hints Created: 10/Oct/13  Updated: 03/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: ft, performance

Attachments: Text File clj-1277-1.txt    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

There are several occurrences of reflection in instant.clj that slow down the printing of time instants.

Clojure Google group conversation link: https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?shva=1#label/clojure/1419e1e6f6cc5b3d

The addition of a few type hints is enough to speed the printing of time instants by a factor of about 3 to 4.5, in a few small benchmarks.

Patch: clj-1277-1.txt
Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 10/Oct/13 12:07 AM ]

Patch clj-1277-1.txt adds 4 type hints that eliminate all reflection occurrences in source file instant.clj. Benchmarks show that it speeds up printing of java.util.Date and java.sql.Timestamp objects by a factor of about 3 to 4.5.

Latest Clojure master as of Oct 9 2013:

user=> (time (let [d (java.util.Date.)] (dotimes [i 3000000] (pr-str d))))
"Elapsed time: 24094.282 msecs"
user=> (import 'java.sql.Timestamp)
user=> (time (let [d (java.sql.Timestamp. 1300000000000)] (dotimes [i 2000000] (pr-str d))))
"Elapsed time: 20856.957 msecs"

That version of Clojure plus the patch clj-1277-1.txt:

user=> (time (let [d (java.util.Date.)] (dotimes [i 3000000] (pr-str d))))
"Elapsed time: 5085.847 msecs"
user=> (time (let [d (java.sql.Timestamp. 1300000000000)] (dotimes [i 2000000] (pr-str d))))
"Elapsed time: 7582.233 msecs"

Comment by Alexander Kiel [ 10/Oct/13 4:54 AM ]

Thanks for the patch Andy. But I don't like the (set! warn-on-reflection true). I think its better to use it only in the dev profile in leiningen. Not in real production code.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 10/Oct/13 4:06 PM ]

Alexander, Leiningen is not used for building Clojure itself. The two supported choices are Maven and ant. Several Clojure source files, e.g. core/protocols.clj and core/reducers.clj, set warn-on-reflection to true, I believe so that if code is changed in such a way as to introduce a warning, it will be caught more quickly.

If the screeners or Rich think it is inappropriate, it is easy enough to remove.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Oct/13 4:48 PM ]

Setting that is not uncommon in core clojure code and seems fine to me here.





[CLJ-1259] Speed up pprint Created: 09/Sep/13  Updated: 03/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: ft, performance, print

Attachments: Text File clj-1259-1.txt    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

There are many occurrences of reflection in the pprint implementation.

By eliminating all of them, I ran one benchmark of pprint'ing a Clojure map that resulted in a 300 Kbyte output. After eliminating reflection, the elapsed time to pprint was reduced by 18% (about 14.0 sec down to about 11.5 sec) on a recent model MacBook Pro.

Patch: clj-1277-1.txt
Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 09/Sep/13 11:36 PM ]

Patch clj-1259-1.txt eliminates all occurrences of reflection in pprint, and all files loaded from pprint.clj. It also sets warn-on-reflection to true for those files, in hopes of making it more obvious if a new use of reflection is added there.





[CLJ-1255] Support Abstract Base Classes with Java-only variant of "reify" Created: 06/Sep/13  Updated: 01/Jul/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Mike Anderson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: interop

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Problem:

  • Various Java APIs depend on extension of abstract base classes rather than interfaces
  • "proxy" has limitations (no access to protected fields or super)
  • "proxy" has performance overhead because of an extra layer of functions / parameter boxing etc.
  • "gen-class" is complex and is complected with compilation / bytecode generation

In summary: Clojure does not currently have a good / convenient way to extend a Java abstract base class dynamically.

The proposal is to create a variant of "reify" that allows the extension of a single abstract base class (optionally also with interfaces/protocols). Code generation would occur as if the abstract base class had been directly extended in Java (i.e. with full access to protected members and with fully type-hinted fields).

Since this is a JVM-only construct, it should not affect the portable extension methods in Clojure (deftype etc.). We propose that it is placed in an separate namespace that could become the home for other JVM-specific interop functionality, e.g. "clojure.java.interop"



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Jun/14 8:18 AM ]

From Rich: we do not want to support abstract classes in a portable construct (reify, deftype). However, this would be considered as a new Java-only construct (extend-class or reify-class). If you could modify the ticket appropriately, will move back to Triaged.





[CLJ-1209] clojure.test does not print ex-info in error reports Created: 11/May/13  Updated: 05/Sep/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Thomas Heller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0002-CLJ-1209-show-ex-data-in-clojure-test.patch     File clj-test-print-ex-data.diff     Text File output-with-0002-patch.txt    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

clojure.test does not print the data attached to ExceptionInfo in error reports.

Approach: In clojure.stacktrace, which clojure.test uses for printing exceptions, add a check for ex-data and pr it.

Patch: 0002-CLJ-1209-show-ex-data-in-clojure-test.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Dec/13 9:53 AM ]

Great idea, thx for the patch!

Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Dec/13 9:54 AM ]

Would be great to see a before and after example of the output.

Comment by Ivan Kozik [ 12/Jul/14 10:35 PM ]

Attaching sample output

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 05/Sep/14 3:24 PM ]

As pointed out on IRC, there's a possible risk of trying to print an infinite lazy sequence that happened to be included in ex-data.

To mitigate, consider binding *print-length* and *print-level* to small numbers around the call to pr.





[CLJ-1149] Unhelpful error message from :use (and use function) when arguments are malformed Created: 17/Jan/13  Updated: 28/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4, Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Sean Corfield Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: errormsgs

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

the following exception happens when you have something like this(bad):

(ns runtime.util-test
(:use [midje.sweet :reload-all]))

as opposed to any of these(correct):

(ns runtime.util-test
(:use midje.sweet :reload-all))

(ns runtime.util-test
(:use [midje.sweet] :reload-all))

and the exception is:
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: No value supplied for key: true
at clojure.lang.PersistentHashMap.create(PersistentHashMap.java:77)
at clojure.core$hash_map.doInvoke(core.clj:365)
at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:617)
at clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj:5352)
at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:619)
at clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj:5403)
at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:621)
at clojure.core$use.doInvoke(core.clj:5497)

Note that this is similar to the equally unhelpful message shown in http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1140 although that is a different root cause.

Probably best to enhance the `use` function to validate its arguments before trying to apply hash-map?



 Comments   
Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 26/May/13 3:17 PM ]

I believe this applies to require as well.





[CLJ-1107] 'get' should throw exception on non-Associative argument Created: 13/Nov/12  Updated: 07/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Stuart Sierra Assignee: Stuart Sierra
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 12
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1107-Throw-exception-for-get-called-on-unsupport.patch     Text File 0003-CLJ-1107-Throw-exception-for-get-on-unsupported-type.patch     Text File clj-1107-throw-on-unsupported-get-v4.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The implementation of clojure.core/get returns nil if its argument is not an associative collection.

This behavior can obscure common programmer errors such as:

(def a (atom {:a 1 :b 2})

(:foo a)   ; forgot to deref a
;;=> nil

Calling get on something which is neither nil nor an Associative collection is almost certainly a bug, and should be indicated by an exception.

CLJ-932 was accepted as a similar enhancement to clojure.core/contains?

Patch: 0003-CLJ-1107-Throw-exception-for-get-on-unsupported-type.patch

Approach: Throw IllegalArgumentException as final fall-through case in RT.getFrom instead of returning nil.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 24/May/13 12:31 PM ]

Patch clj-1107-throw-on-get-for-unsupported-types-patch-v2.txt dated May 24 2013 is identical to 0001-CLJ-1107-Throw-exception-for-get-called-on-unsupport.patch dated Nov 13 2012, except it applies cleanly to latest master. A recent commit for CLJ-1099 changed many IllegalArgumentException occurrences to Throwable in the tests, which is the only thing changed in this updated patch.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Jan/14 5:01 PM ]

Patch clj-1107-throw-on-get-for-unsupported-types-patch-v2.txt applied cleanly to latest Clojure master as of Jan 23 2014, but no longer does with commits made to Clojure between then and Jan 30 2014. I have not checked to see how difficult or easy it may be to update this patch.

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 11/Feb/14 7:23 AM ]

New patch 0003-CLJ-1107-Throw-exception-for-get-on-unsupported-type.patch created from master at 5cc167a.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 26/Mar/14 11:55 AM ]

Patch clj-1107-throw-on-unsupported-get-v4.patch dated Mar 26 2014 is identical to Stuart Sierra's patch 0003-CLJ-1107-Throw-exception-for-get-on-unsupported-type.patch, and retains his authorship. The only difference is in one line of diff context required in order to make it apply cleanly to latest master.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 10/Jun/14 10:54 AM ]

This would be a breaking change

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 17/Jun/14 6:59 PM ]

Arguably so was CLJ-932 (contains?), which did "break" some things that were already broken.

This is a more invasive change than CLJ-932, but I believe it is more likely to expose hidden bugs than to break intentional behavior.

Comment by Andy Sheldon [ 07/Oct/14 5:40 AM ]

Is it more idiomatic to use "({:a 1}, :a)" and a safe replacement to boot? E.g. could you mass replace "(get " with "(" in a code base, in order to find bugs? I am still learning the language, and not young anymore, and couldn't reliably remember the argument order. So, I found it easier to avoid (get) with maps anyways. Without it I can put the map first or second.





[CLJ-1096] Make destructuring emit direct keyword lookups Created: 29/Oct/12  Updated: 06/Jun/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4, Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Christophe Grand Assignee: Christophe Grand
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: performance

Attachments: File desctructure-keyword-lookup.diff     File inline-get-keyword.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Currently associative destructuring emits calls to get. The attached patch modify desctruture to emit direct keyword lookups when possible.

Approved here https://groups.google.com/d/msg/clojure-dev/MaYcHQck8VA/nauMus4mzPgJ



 Comments   
Comment by Christophe Grand [ 04/Sep/13 3:40 AM ]

Rethinking about this patch now, it may be too specific: get's inline expansion should be modified when the key is a literal keyword.

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 04/Sep/13 3:41 AM ]

More generic patch (inline-get-keyword.diff): all get calls with literal keywords as keys are inlined to direct keyword lookup.

Comment by John Hume [ 19/May/14 1:14 PM ]

Is this only stalled out of lack of interest?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 19/May/14 6:13 PM ]

There are currently about 50 tickets "triaged", i.e. marked for Rich to look at and decide whether they are things he is interested in seeing a patch for, and another 25 or so that were triaged and he has "vetted" them, and they are in various stages of having patches written for them, screened, etc. That doesn't mean anything for this ticket in particular – just wanted to make it clear that there are a bunch of other tickets that are getting some attention, and a bunch of others that are not.

What gets triaged depends somewhat upon how severe the issue appears. You can vote on the ticket, and try to persuade others to do so as well, if they think this would enhance the performance of some commonly-written types of Clojure code. You could also consider doing some benchmarking with & without these patches to see how much performance they can gain.





[CLJ-888] defprotocol should throw error when signatures include variable number of parameters Created: 29/Nov/11  Updated: 05/Feb/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.3
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Greg Chapman Assignee: Stuart Halloway
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: errormsgs, protocols

Attachments: Text File 0001-Forbid-vararg-declaration-in-defprotocol-definterfac.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

I tried to use & in the signature for a method in defprotocol. Apparently (see below), this is compiled so that & becomes a simple parameter name, and there is no special handling for variable number of parameters. I think the use of & in a protocol signature ought to be detected and immediately cause an exception (I also think this restriction on the signatures ought to be documented; I couldn't find it specified in the current documentation, though of course it is implied (as I later realized) by the fact that defprotocol creates a Java interface).

user=> (defprotocol Applier (app [this f & args]))
Applier
user=> (deftype A [] Applier (app [_ f & args] (prn f & args) (apply f args)))
user.A
user=> (app (A.) + 1 2)
#<core$PLUS clojure.core$PLUS@5d9d0d20> 1 2
IllegalArgumentException Don't know how to create ISeq from: java.lang.Long
clojure.lang.RT.seqFrom (RT.java:487)



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Coventry [ 21/Oct/13 4:21 PM ]

Patch with test code attached. I have it throwing a CompilerException so that it shows source code location. Not sure whether this is kosher in clojure code, but I wish more macros provided this in their error handling.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 22/Oct/13 6:26 AM ]

This issue has already been discussed in CLJ-1024. There I provided a patch that forbids varargs and destructuring forms at various places including defprotocol/definterface. My patch had been applied shortly before clojure 1.5 was released, but it had a bug (forbid too many uses), so it got reverted and the bug closed and declined.

I was told to bring up the issue again after 1.5 has been released.

So here is my patch again. This time it's much more relaxed and only forbids varargs in defprotocol/definterface method declarations, and in deftype/defrecord and reify method implementations.

Comment by Alex Coventry [ 22/Oct/13 7:30 AM ]

Thanks, Tassilo. If there's anywhere in the JIRA system where I could check for prior work like that for other similar issues, I'd be grateful for a pointer.

Best regards,
Alex

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 22/Oct/13 7:39 AM ]

New version of my patch.

Now I use a CompilerException with proper file/line/column information like Alex did. I also added his test case (which passes).

Concerning your question, Alex: a search for "varargs" would have listed CLJ-1024, but probably you wouldn't have looked into it anyway, because it's a closed issue...

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 22/Oct/13 7:44 AM ]

Alex, if you don't object could we remove your patch in favor of mine which covers a bit more cases?

Comment by Alex Coventry [ 22/Oct/13 10:57 AM ]

Yep. Just read through 1024 and the associated mailing list discussion. You should totally get the credit: Your patch is more comprehensive and you have been on this a long time. Thanks for folding in the good parts of my patch.

Best regards,
Alex

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 22/Oct/13 12:15 PM ]

Ok, great.

It seems I don't have the permissions to delete other peoples' attachments, so could you please delete your patch yourself?

Comment by Alex Coventry [ 23/Oct/13 2:44 PM ]

Sure, Tassilo. It's done.

I think this also needs a regression test for the case hugod originally pointed out. I initially made the same mistake as you there, but amalloy pointed it out[1] before I submitted the patch, so it is a natural mistake to make and should probably be documented in the source code.

Best regards,
Alex

[1] http://logs.lazybot.org/irc.freenode.net/%23clojure/2013-10-21.txt search for 14:48:34.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 24/Oct/13 2:00 AM ]

Alex, I've added the regression test you suggested. Thanks for pointing that out.

Also, I added tests checking definterface method declarations, and tests checking inline method implementations made with defrecord, deftype, and reify.

However, there's a problem with the tests for deftype and reify I don't know how to fix. When I eval the macroexpand forms used in the tests in a REPL, I can see that the CompilerException is successfully thrown and printed. But it also seems to be caught somewhere in the middle, so that the macroexpand returns a form and the exception doesn't make it to the (is (thrown? ...)). Therefore, I've commented the these tests and added a big FIXME.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 24/Oct/13 2:28 AM ]

New version of the patch with now all tests uncommented and passing. Andy Fingerhut made me aware that for the 4 deftype and reify tests, I need eval instead of just macroexpand.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 25/Oct/13 6:25 PM ]

I have not investigated the reason yet, but patch 0001-Forbid-vararg-declaration-in-defprotocol-definterfac.patch no longer applies cleanly after the latest commits to Clojure master on Oct 25 2013.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 28/Oct/13 2:21 AM ]

I've rebased the patch onto the current master so that it applies cleanly again.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 28/Oct/13 2:25 AM ]

Stu, I've assigned this issue to you because you've been assigned to CLJ-1165 which I have closed as duplicate of this issue.

One minor difference between my patch to this issue and CLJ-1165 is that here I use a CompilerException with file/line/column info whereas in CLJ-1165 I've used `ex-info`. I think the CE is more appropriate/informative, as the error is already triggered during macro expansion.





[CLJ-825] Protocol implementation inconsistencies when overloading arity Created: 08/Aug/11  Updated: 10/Jun/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.2, Release 1.3, Release 1.4, Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Carl Lerche Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: protocols
Environment:

All


Attachments: Text File clj-825-1.patch     File scribbles.clj    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The forms required for implementing arity-overloaded protocol methods are inconsistent between the "extend-*" macros and "defrecord".

The "extend" family of macros requires overloaded method definitions to follow the form used by defn:

(method ([arg1] ...) ([arg1 arg2] ...))

However, "defrecord" requires implementations to be defined separately:

(method [arg1] ...)
(method [arg1 arg2] ...)

Furthermore, the error modes if you get it wrong are unhelpful.

If you use the "defrecord" form with "extend-*", it evals successfully, but later definitions silently overwrite lexically previous definitions.

If you use the "extend-*" form with "defrecord", it gives a cryptic error about "unsupported binding form" on the body of the method.

This is not the same issue as CLJ-1056: That pertains to the syntax for declaring a protocol, this problem is with the syntax for implementing a protocol.

(defprotocol MyProtocol
  (mymethod
    [this arg]
    [this arg optional-arg]))

(extend-protocol MyProtocol
  Object
  (mymethod
    ([this arg] :one-arg)
    ([this arg optional-arg] :two-args)))

;; BAD! Blows up with "Unsupported binding form: :one-arg"
(defrecord MyRecord []
  MyProtocol
  (mymethod
    ([this arg] :one-arg)
    ([this arg optional-arg] :two-args)))

;; Works...
(defrecord MyRecord []
  MyProtocol
  (mymethod [this arg] :one-arg)
  (mymethod [this arg optional-arg] :two-args))

;; Evals...
(extend-protocol MyProtocol
  Object
  (mymethod [this arg] :one-arg)
  (mymethod [this arg optional-arg] :two-args))

;; But then... Error! "Wrong number of args"
(mymethod :obj :arg)

;; 2-arg version is invokable...
(mymethod :obj :arg1 :arg2)


 Comments   
Comment by Paavo Parkkinen [ 17/Nov/13 6:02 AM ]

Attached a patch for this.

For defrecord, I check which style is used for defining methods, and transform into the original style if the new style is used. For the check I do what I believe defn does, which is (vector? (first fdecl)).

For extend-*, I skip the checking, and just transform everything into the same format.

Tests included for both.

All tests pass.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 10/Jun/14 11:00 AM ]

What the proposal?





[CLJ-735] Improve error message when a protocol method is not found Created: 04/Feb/11  Updated: 28/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.2
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: errormsgs

Attachments: File protocolerr.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

If you call a protocol function but pass the wrong arity (forget an argument for example), you currently a message that says "No single method ... of interface ... found for function ... of protocol ...". The code in question is getting matching methods from the Reflector and creates this message if the number of matches != 1.

There are really two cases there:

  • matches == 0 - this happens frequently due to typos
  • matches > 1 - this presumably happens infrequently

I propose that the == 0 case instead should have slightly different text at the beginning and a hint as to the intended arity within it:

"No method: ... of interface ... with arity ... found for function ... of protocol ...".

The >1 case should have similar changes: "Multiple methods: ... of interface ... with arity ... found for function ... of protocol ...".

Patch is attached. I used case which presumably should have better performance than a nested if/else. I was not sure whether the reported arity should match the actual Java method arity or Clojure protocol function arity (including the target). I did the former.

I did not add a test as I wasn't sure whether checking error messages in tests was appropriate or not. Happy to add that if requested.



 Comments   
Comment by Chas Emerick [ 14/Jul/11 6:39 AM ]

I was not sure whether the reported arity should match the actual Java method arity or Clojure protocol function arity (including the target). I did the former.

I think it should be the latter. The message is emitted when the protocol methods are being invoked through the corresponding function, so it should be consistent with the errors emitted by regular functions.

+1 for some tests, too. There certainly are tests for reflection warnings and such.

FWIW, I'm happy to take this on if Alex is otherwise occupied.





[CLJ-668] Improve slurp performance by using native Java StringWriter and jio/copy Created: 01/Nov/10  Updated: 03/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.3
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Jürgen Hötzel Assignee: Timothy Baldridge
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: ft, io, performance

Attachments: File slurp-perf-patch.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Instead of copying each character from InputReader to StringBuffer.

Performance improvement:

Generate a 10meg file:
user> (spit "foo.txt" (apply str (repeat (* 1024 1024 10) "X")))

Test code:
user> (dotimes [x 100] (time (do (slurp "foo.txt") 0)))

From:
...
Elapsed time: 136.387 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 143.782 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 153.174 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 211.51 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 155.429 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 145.619 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 142.641 msecs"
...


To:
...
"Elapsed time: 23.408 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 25.876 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 41.449 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 28.292 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 25.765 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 24.339 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 32.047 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 23.372 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 24.365 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 26.265 msecs"
...

Approach: Use StringWriter and jio/copy vs character by character copy. Results from the current patch see a 4-5x perf boost after the jit warms up, with purely in-memory streams (ByteArrayInputStream over a 6MB string).

Patch: slurp-perf-patch.diff
Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 21/Apr/14 3:28 PM ]

This is double-better with the changes in Clojure 1.6 to improve jio/copy performance by using the NIO impl. Rough timing difference on a 25M file: old= 2316.021 msecs, new= 93.319 msecs.

Filer did not supply a patch and is not a contributor. If someone wants to make a patch (and better timing info demonstrating performance improvements), that would be great.

Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 10/Sep/14 10:29 PM ]

Fixed the ticket formatting a bit, and added a patch I coded up tonight. Should be pretty close to the old patch, as we both use StringWriter, but I didn't really look at the old patch beyond noticing that it was using StringWriter.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Sep/14 7:01 AM ]

Can you update the perf comparison on latest code and do both a small and big file?





[CLJ-440] java method calls cannot omit varargs Created: 27/Sep/10  Updated: 04/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alexander Taggart Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 7
Labels: interop

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

From http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/7d0d6cb32656a621

E.g., trying to call java.util.Collections.addAll(Collection c, T... elements)

user=> (Collections/addAll [] (object-array 0))
false
user=> (Collections/addAll [])
IllegalArgumentException No matching method: addAll  clojure.lang.Compiler$StaticMethodExpr.<init> (Compiler.java:1401)

The Method class provides an isVarArg() method, which could be used to inform the compiler to process things differently.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 27/Sep/10 8:19 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/440

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 01/Apr/11 11:16 PM ]

Patch adds support for varargs. Builds on top of patch in CLJ-445.

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 05/Apr/11 5:45 PM ]

Patch updated to current CLJ-445 patch.

Comment by Nick Klauer [ 29/Oct/12 8:12 AM ]

Is this ticket on hold? I find myself typing (.someCall arg1 arg2 (into-array SomeType nil)) alot just to get the right method to be called. This ticket sounds like it would address that extraneous into-array arg that I use alot.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Oct/12 10:45 AM ]

fixbug445.diff uploaded on Oct 29 2012 was written Oct 23 2010 by Alexander Taggart. I am simply copying it from the old Assembla ticket tracking system to here to make it more easily accessible. Not surprisingy, it doesn't apply cleanly to latest master. I don't know how much effort it would be to update it, but only a few hunks do not apply cleanly according to 'patch'. See the "Updating stale patches" section on the JIRA workflow page here: http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/JIRA+workflow

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Oct/12 10:56 AM ]

Ugh. Deleted the attachment because it was for CLJ-445, or at least it was named that way. CLJ-445 definitely has a long comment history, so if one or more of its patches address this issue, then you can read the discussion there to see the history.

I don't know of any "on hold" status for tickets, except for one or two where Rich Hickey has explicitly said in a comment that he wants to wait a while before making the change. There are just tickets that contributors choose to work on and ones that screeners choose to screen.





[CLJ-1624] Support get from arbitrary java.util.List data types Created: 23/Dec/14  Updated: 23/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Mike Anderson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: interop

Attachments: File clj-1624.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Currently "get", "get-in" and related functions in clojure.core work on Clojure vectors, maps and Java arrays, but do not work on instances of java.util.List

(def al (java.util.Arrays/asList (object-array [1 2 3 4])))
(get al 2)
=> nil

This makes it inconvenient to work with nested structures of Java objects that could otherwise be viewed as similar to nested Clojure data structures.

This is also inconsistent with other clojure.core functions that do support arbitrary java.util.List instances (e.g. "nth" and "count")

With a small change to RT.java, it is possible to allow core functions to operate on arbitrary instances of java.util.List. There does not appear to be any significant downside to this change (it is not on the fast path so will not affect regular ILookup or Map checks).



 Comments   
Comment by Mike Anderson [ 23/Dec/14 12:31 AM ]

Patch for CLJ-1624





[CLJ-1607] docstring for clojure.core/counted? should be more specific Created: 29/Nov/14  Updated: 01/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Gary Fredericks Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: docstring

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1607-p1.patch    
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The docstring for counted? currently says:

Returns true if coll implements count in constant time

This tempts the user into thinking they can use this function to determine whether or not calling count on any collection is a constant-time operation, when in fact it only reflects whether or not an object implements the clojure.lang.Counted interface. Since count special-cases a handful of platform types, there are common cases such as Arrays and Strings that are constant time but will return false from counted?.

Proposed:

Returns true if coll, a Clojure collection, implements count in constant time. Note that this function will return false for host types even if the count function can return their size in constant time (as with arrays and strings).



 Comments   
Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 29/Nov/14 9:01 AM ]

Attached CLJ-1607-p1.patch with my first draft of a better docstring.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 29/Nov/14 9:08 AM ]

What would be the most accurate language to describe the exceptions? I used "some collections" in the first patch but perhaps "native collections" or "host collections" would be more helpful?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Nov/14 9:44 AM ]

While I understand where you're coming from, I think the intent of "counted?" is not to answer the question "is this thing countable in constant time" for all possible types, but specifically for collections that participate in the Clojure collection library. This includes both internal collections like PHM, PHS, PV, etc but also external collections that mark their capabilities using those interfaces.

I believe count handles more cases than just collections that are counted in constant time (like seqs) so is not intended to be symmetric with counted?.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 29/Nov/14 9:55 AM ]

Sure, I wasn't suggesting changing what the function does – just changing the docstring to make it less likely to be misleading.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 29/Nov/14 10:00 AM ]

What about this sort of wording?

Returns true if coll, a Clojure collection, implements count in constant time.
Note that this function will return false for host types even if the count 
function can return their size in constant time (as with arrays and strings).
Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Nov/14 9:52 PM ]

I think it's unlikely to pass vetting, but that's just my guess.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 01/Dec/14 8:53 AM ]

I'm trying to figure out where the disagreement is here; are you arguing any of these points, or something different?

  1. The docstring is not likely to confuse people by making them think it gives meaningful responses for host collections
  2. It's not a problem for us to solve if the docstring confuses people
  3. It is a problem we should solve, but the changes I've suggested are a bad solution
Comment by Alex Miller [ 01/Dec/14 9:18 AM ]

In general, the docstrings prefer concision and essence over exhaustive cases or examples. My suspicion is that the docstring says what Rich wants it to say and he would consider the points you've added to be implicit in the current docstring, and thus unnecessary. Specifically, "coll" is used pretty consistently to mean a Clojure collection (or sequence) across all of the docstrings. And there is an implicit else in the docstring that counted? will return false for things that are not Clojure collections. The words that are there (and not there) are carefully chosen.

I agree with you that more words may be necessary to describe fully what to expect from this or any other function in core. My experience from seeing Rich's response on things like this is that he may agree with that too, but he would prefer it to live somewhere outside the doc string in reference material or other sources. Not to say that we don't update docstrings, as that does happen pretty regularly; I just don't think this one will be accepted. I've asked Stu to give me a second set of eyes too.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 01/Dec/14 9:36 AM ]

That was helpful detail, thanks!

Comment by Reid McKenzie [ 01/Dec/14 12:42 PM ]

I think this one is fine as-is, because the docstring for count explicitly notes "Also works on ..." which are implied not to be counted?.





[CLJ-1598] Make if forms compile directly to the appropriate branch expression if the test is a literal Created: 24/Nov/14  Updated: 24/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: compiler, performance, primitives

Attachments: Text File 0001-if-test-expr-of-an-if-statement-is-a-literal-don-t-e.patch    
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

This allows expressions like `(cond (some-expr) 1 :else 2)` to be eligible for unboxed use, which is not currently possible since the cond macro always ends up with a nil else branch that the compiler currently takes into account.

With the attached patch, the trailing (if :else 2 nil) in the macroexpansion will be treated as 2 by the Compiler, thus allowing the unboxed usage of the cond expression.






[CLJ-1542] Docstring for deliver should describe its return value Created: 30/Sep/14  Updated: 30/Sep/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Gary Fredericks Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: docstring

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

It is presumably useful when delivering a promise to know if the delivery was successful or not (where it might be unsuccessful if it was already delivered, perhaps on another thread).

The deliver function seems to currently communicate this by returning a truthy value (the promise itself) on success and a falsy value (nil) on failure. If this is intentional, the docstring should say so so that users can comfortably rely on it.

In CLJ-1038 Rich elected for the docstring to not describe the return value; I'm not sure if that was a reluctance to fully specify the return value (promise vs nil) even if partially describing it (truthy vs falsy) would be okay.






[CLJ-1516] Throw an exception if def name contains a dot Created: 29/Aug/14  Updated: 29/Aug/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler

Attachments: Text File 0001-throw-an-exception-on-def-names-containing-dots.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

In this comment: http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1100?focusedCommentId=35510&page=com.atlassian.jira.plugin.system.issuetabpanels:comment-tabpanel#comment-35510 Rich said that Vars whose name contains a dot are not supported, but the current implementation allows their definition.
This patch makes `(def foo.bar)` throw a compile-time exception



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Aug/14 10:41 AM ]

I'm curious whether this breaks existing code in the wild.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 29/Aug/14 10:45 AM ]

I find this hard to believe given the current behaviour:

user=> (def a.b 1)
#'user/a.b
user=> a.b
CompilerException java.lang.ClassNotFoundException: a.b, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:0:0)

one would need to go out of his way and refer to the var namespace qualified everywhere to make it work

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 29/Aug/14 11:03 AM ]

After a brief conversation on #clojure, I updated the patch to only throw on non-macro defs so that macros like clojure.core/.. and clojure.core.incubator/.?. will work fine





[CLJ-1490] Exception on protocol implementation after protocol reloaded could be improved Created: 04/Aug/14  Updated: 07/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Howard Lewis Ship Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: errormsgs, protocols

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1490.1.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

In a situation where you define a protocol, and then define a class that extends that protocol (e.g., reify, defrecord, deftype) and then later, re-define the protocol (typically, by reloading the namespace that defines the protocol), then the existing instances are no longer valid.

However, the exception that gets generated can be confusing:

     java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: No implementation of method: :injections of protocol: #'fan.microservice/MicroService found for class: fan.auth.AuthService
                                           clojure.core/-cache-protocol-fn                  core_deftype.clj:  544
                                           fan.microservice/eval23300/fn/G                  microservice.clj:   12
                                                       clojure.core/map/fn                          core.clj: 2559
                                                 clojure.lang.LazySeq.sval                      LazySeq.java:   40
                                                  clojure.lang.LazySeq.seq                      LazySeq.java:   49
                                                    clojure.lang.Cons.next                         Cons.java:   39
                                             clojure.lang.RT.boundedLength                           RT.java: 1654
                                               clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo                       RestFn.java:  130
                                                        clojure.core/apply                          core.clj:  626
                 fan.microservice.StandardContainer/construct-ring-handler                  microservice.clj:   51

The confusing part is that (in the above example) AuthService does extend MicroService, just not the correct version of it.

The exception message should be extended to identify that this is "possibly because the protocol was reloaded since the class was defined."

A patch will be ready shortly.



 Comments   
Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 04/Aug/14 12:15 PM ]

Patch with tests





[CLJ-1458] Use transients in merge and merge-with Created: 04/Jul/14  Updated: 14/Sep/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Yongqian Li Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: newbie, performance

Attachments: File transient-merge.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

It would be nice if merge used transients.



 Comments   
Comment by Jason Wolfe [ 13/Sep/14 5:09 PM ]

I will take a crack at a patch today.

Comment by Jason Wolfe [ 13/Sep/14 5:42 PM ]

This patch (transient-merge.diff) makes merge, merge-with, and zipmap (since it was right there and could obviously benefit from transients as well) use transients.

Three potential issues:

  • I had to move the functions, since they depend on transient and friends. I assume this is preferable to a forward declaration. This was the best place I could find, but happy to move them elsewhere.
  • I added multiple arities, to avoid potential performance cost of transient-ing a single argument. Happy to undo this if desired.
  • I had to slightly alter the logic in merge-with, since transient maps don't support contains? (or find).
Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 14/Sep/14 12:43 PM ]

I posted a separate ticket for zipmap, with patch, on 30/May/12: CLJ-1005.

Comment by Jason Wolfe [ 14/Sep/14 5:28 PM ]

Ah, sorry if I overstepped then. Happy to remove that change from this patch then if that will simplify things – just let me know.





[CLJ-1452] clojure.core/*rand* for seedable randomness Created: 20/Jun/14  Updated: 01/Jul/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Gary Fredericks Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: math

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1452.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Clojure's random functions currently use Math.random and related features, which makes them impossible to seed. This seems like an appropriate use of a dynamic var (compared to extra arguments), since library code that wants to behave randomly could transparently support seeding without any extra effort.

I propose (def ^:dynamic *rand* (java.util.Random.)) in clojure.core, and that rand, rand-int, rand-nth, and shuffle be updated to use *rand*.

I think semantically this will not be a breaking change.

Criterium Benchmarks

I did some benchmarking to try to get an idea of the performance implications of using a dynamic var, as well as to measure the changes to concurrent access.

The code used is at https://github.com/gfredericks/clj-1452-tests; the output and interpretation from the README are reproduced below for posterity.

rand is slightly slower, while shuffle is insignificantly faster. Using shuffle from 8 threads is insignificantly slower, but switching to a ThreadLocalRandom manually in the patched version results in a 2.5x speedup.

Running on my 8 core Linode VM:

$ echo "Clojure 1.6.0"; lein with-profile +clj-1.6 run; echo "Clojure 1.6.0 with *rand*"; lein with-profile +clj-1452 run
Clojure 1.6.0

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
;; Testing rand ;;
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
WARNING: Final GC required 1.261632096547911 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 644646900 in 60 samples of 10744115 calls.
             Execution time mean : 61.297605 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 7.057249 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 56.872437 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 84.483045 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 16.319772 ns

Found 6 outliers in 60 samples (10.0000 %)
    low-severe   1 (1.6667 %)
    low-mild     5 (8.3333 %)
 Variance from outliers : 75.5119 % Variance is severely inflated by outliers

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
;; Testing shuffle ;;
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
Evaluation count : 4780800 in 60 samples of 79680 calls.
             Execution time mean : 12.873832 µs
    Execution time std-deviation : 251.388257 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 12.526871 µs ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 13.417559 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 16.319772 ns

Found 3 outliers in 60 samples (5.0000 %)
    low-severe   3 (5.0000 %)
 Variance from outliers : 7.8591 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
;; Testing threaded-shuffling ;;
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
Evaluation count : 420 in 60 samples of 7 calls.
             Execution time mean : 150.863290 ms
    Execution time std-deviation : 2.313755 ms
   Execution time lower quantile : 146.621548 ms ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 155.218897 ms (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 16.319772 ns
Clojure 1.6.0 with *rand*

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
;; Testing rand ;;
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
Evaluation count : 781707720 in 60 samples of 13028462 calls.
             Execution time mean : 63.679152 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 1.798245 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 61.414851 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 67.412204 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 13.008428 ns

Found 3 outliers in 60 samples (5.0000 %)
    low-severe   3 (5.0000 %)
 Variance from outliers : 15.7596 % Variance is moderately inflated by outliers

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
;; Testing shuffle ;;
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
Evaluation count : 4757940 in 60 samples of 79299 calls.
             Execution time mean : 12.780391 µs
    Execution time std-deviation : 240.542151 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 12.450218 µs ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 13.286910 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 13.008428 ns

Found 1 outliers in 60 samples (1.6667 %)
    low-severe   1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 7.8228 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
;; Testing threaded-shuffling ;;
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
Evaluation count : 420 in 60 samples of 7 calls.
             Execution time mean : 152.471310 ms
    Execution time std-deviation : 8.769236 ms
   Execution time lower quantile : 147.954789 ms ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 161.277200 ms (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 13.008428 ns

Found 3 outliers in 60 samples (5.0000 %)
    low-severe   3 (5.0000 %)
 Variance from outliers : 43.4058 % Variance is moderately inflated by outliers

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
;; Testing threaded-local-shuffling ;;
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
Evaluation count : 960 in 60 samples of 16 calls.
             Execution time mean : 64.462853 ms
    Execution time std-deviation : 1.407808 ms
   Execution time lower quantile : 62.353265 ms ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 67.197368 ms (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 13.008428 ns

Found 1 outliers in 60 samples (1.6667 %)
    low-severe   1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 9.4540 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers


 Comments   
Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 21/Jun/14 7:50 PM ]

Attached CLJ-1452.patch, with the same code used in the benchmarks.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 23/Jun/14 8:34 AM ]

Should we be trying to make Clojure's random functions thread-local by default while we're mucking with this stuff? We could have a custom subclass of Random that has ThreadLocal logic in it (avoiding ThreadLocalRandom because Java 6), and make that the default value of *rand*.





[CLJ-1451] Add take-until Created: 20/Jun/14  Updated: 18/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Alexander Taggart Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1451-add-take-until.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1451-add-take-until.patch     Text File 0002-CLJ-1451-add-drop-until.patch     Text File 0003-let-take-until-and-drop-until-return-transducers.patch     Text File CLJ-1451-drop-until.patch     Text File CLJ-1451-take-until.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Discussion: https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure-dev/NaAuBz6SpkY/discussion

It comes up when I would otherwise use (take-while pred coll), but I need to include the first item for which (pred item) is false.

(take-while pos? [1 2 0 3]) => (1 2)
(take-until zero? [1 2 0 3]) => (1 2 0)

Impl:

(defn take-until
  "Returns a lazy sequence of successive items from coll until
  (pred item) returns true, including that item. pred must be
  free of side-effects."
  [pred coll]
  (lazy-seq
    (when-let [s (seq coll)]
      (if (pred (first s))
        (cons (first s) nil)
        (cons (first s) (take-until pred (rest s)))))))

List of other suggested names: take-upto, take-to, take-through. It is not easy to find something in English that is short and unambiguously means "up to and including". That is one of the dictionary definitions for "through".



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Jun/14 10:21 AM ]

Patch welcome (w/tests).

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 20/Jun/14 2:00 PM ]

Impl and tests for take-until and drop-until, one patch for each.

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 20/Jun/14 3:01 PM ]

Please change :added metadata to "1.7".

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 20/Jun/14 3:12 PM ]

Updated to :added "1.7"

Comment by John Mastro [ 21/Jun/14 6:26 PM ]

I'd like to propose take-through and drop-through as alternative names. I think "through" communicates more clearly how these differ from take-while and drop-while.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Aug/14 2:27 PM ]

Both patches CLJ-1451-drop-until.patch and CLJ-1451-take-until.patch dated Jun 20 2014 no longer apply cleanly to latest Clojure master due to some changes committed earlier today. I haven't checked whether they are straightforward to update, but would guess that they merely require updating a few lines of diff context.

See the section "Updating stale patches" at http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches for suggestions on how to update patches.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 13/Nov/14 11:19 PM ]

Would be nice to cover the transducer case too.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 13/Nov/14 11:54 PM ]

rerolled patches

Comment by Michael Blume [ 14/Nov/14 12:11 AM ]

Covered transducer case =)

Comment by Michael Blume [ 14/Nov/14 12:12 AM ]

Actually I like take/drop-through as well

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 16/Nov/14 12:41 PM ]

Michael, no volatile/state is necessary in the transducer, like take-while. Just wrap in 'reduced to terminate

Comment by Michael Blume [ 17/Dec/14 6:47 PM ]

a) you're clearly right about take-until

b) seriously I don't know what I was thinking with my take-until implementation, I'm going to claim lack of sleep.

c) I'm confused about how to make drop-until work without a volatile

Comment by Michael Blume [ 18/Dec/14 1:52 AM ]

Ghadi and I discussed this and couldn't think of a use case for drop-until. Are there any?

Here's a new take-until patch, generative tests included.

Open questions:

Is take-until a good name? My biggest concern is that take-until makes it sound like a slight modification of take, but this function reverses the sense of the predicate relative to take.





[CLJ-1449] Add starts-with? ends-with? contains? to clojure.string Created: 19/Jun/14  Updated: 02/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Bozhidar Batsov Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 24
Labels: string

Attachments: Text File clj-1449-more-v1.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Add clojure.string/starts-with? ends-with? and contains?, similar to java.lang.String's startsWith/endsWith/contains. In addition to making these easier to find and use, this provides a place to add a portable ClojureScript variant.

Patch: clj-1449-more-v1.patch (draft version only – a more serious contender would incorporate Alex Miller's comments from Dec 2 2014)



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jun/14 12:53 PM ]

Re substring, there is a clojure.core/subs for this (predates the string ns I believe).

clojure.core/subs
([s start] [s start end])
Returns the substring of s beginning at start inclusive, and ending
at end (defaults to length of string), exclusive.

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 20/Jun/14 3:21 AM ]

As strings are collection of characters, you can use Clojure's sequence facilities to achieve such functionality:

user=> (= (first "asdf") \a)
true
user=> (= (last "asdf") \a)
false
Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Jun/14 8:33 AM ]

Jozef, String.startsWith() checks for a prefix string, not just a prefix char.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 20/Jun/14 9:42 AM ]

Re substring, I know about subs, but it seems very odd that it's not in the string ns. After all most people will likely look for string-related functionality in clojure.string. I think it'd be best if `subs` was added to clojure.string and clojure.core/subs was deprecated.

Comment by Pierre Masci [ 01/Aug/14 5:27 AM ]

Hi, I was thinking the same about starts-with and .ends-with, as well as (.indexOf s "c") and (.lastIndexOf "c").

I read the whole Java String API recently, and these 4 functions seem to be the only ones that don't have an equivalent in Clojure.
It would be nice to have them.

Andy Fingerhut who maintains the Clojure Cheatsheet told me: "I maintain the cheatsheet, and I put .indexOf and .lastIndexOf on there since they are probably the most common thing I saw asked about that is in the Java API but not the Clojure API, for strings."
Which shows that there is a demand.

Because Clojure is being hosted on several platforms, and might be hosted on more in the future, I think these functions should be part of the de-facto ecosystem.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Aug/14 3:39 PM ]

Updating summary line and description to add contains? as well. I can back this off if it changes your mind about triaging it, Alex.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Aug/14 3:40 PM ]

Patch clj-1449-basic-v1.patch dated Aug 30 2014 adds starts-with? ends-with? contains? functions to clojure.string.

Patch clj-1449-more-v1.patch is the same, except it also replaces several Java method calls with calls to these Clojure functions.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 05/Sep/14 1:02 PM ]

Patch clj-1449-basic-v1.patch dated Sep 5 2014 is identical to the patch I added recently called clj-1149-basic-v1.patch. It is simply renamed without the typo'd ticket number in the file name.

Comment by Yehonathan Sharvit [ 02/Dec/14 3:09 PM ]

What about an implementation that works also in cljs?

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 02/Dec/14 3:11 PM ]

Once this is added to Clojure it will be implemented in ClojureScript as well.

Comment by Yehonathan Sharvit [ 02/Dec/14 3:22 PM ]

Great! Any idea when it will be added to Clojure?
Also, will it be automatically added to Clojurescript or someone will have to write a particular code for it.
The suggested patch relies on Java so I am curious to understand who is going to port the patch to cljs.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 02/Dec/14 3:27 PM ]

No idea when/if this will get merged. Upvote the ticket to improve the odds of this happening sooner.
Someone on the ClojureScript team will have to implement this in terms of JavaScript.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Dec/14 4:01 PM ]

Some things that would be helpful:

1) It would be better to combine the two patches into a single patch - I think changing current uses into new users is a good thing to include. Also, please keep track of the "current" patch in the description.
2) Patch needs tests.
3) Per the instructions at the top of the clojure.string ns (and the rest of the functions), the majority of these functions are implemented to take the broader CharSequence interface. Similar to those implementations, you will need to provide a CharSequence implementation while also calling into the String functions when you actually have a String.
4) Consider return type hints - I'm not sure they're necessary here, but I would examine bytecode for typical calling situations to see if it would be helpful.
5) Check performance implications of the new versions vs the old with a good tool (like criterium). You've put an additional var invocation and (soon) type check in the calling path for these functions. I think providing a portable target is worth a small cost, but it would be good to know what the cost actually is.

I don't expect we will look at this until after 1.7 is released.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 02/Dec/14 8:05 PM ]

Alex, all your comments make sense.

If you think a ready-and-waiting patch that does those things would improve the odds of the ticket being vetted by Rich, please let us know.

My guess is that his decision will be based upon the description, not any proposed patches. If that is your belief also, I'll wait until he makes that decision before working on a patch. Of course, any other contributor is welcome to work on one if they like.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Dec/14 8:40 PM ]

Well nothing is certain of course, but I keep a special report of things I've "screened" prior to vetting that makes possible moving something straight from Triaged all the way through into Screened/Ok when Rich is able to look at them. This is a good candidate if things were in pristine condition.

That said, I don't know whether Rich will approve it or not, so it's up to you. I think the argument for portability is a strong one and complements the feature expression.





[CLJ-1436] Deref throws an unhelpful error message when used on something not dereferencable Created: 03/Jun/14  Updated: 02/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Phillip Lord Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: errormsgs, newbie

Attachments: Text File deref.patch     File tests-patch.diff    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Consider the following code:

(def x 1)
(def y (ref 2))

(+ @x y)

Clojure throws a ClassCastException on cast to Future. This is a very unhelpful error message; why a Future, why not Ref, Atom etc. It would be nice if this failed more gracefully.



 Comments   
Comment by Tobias Kortkamp [ 15/Sep/14 2:08 PM ]

Attached a patch with better error messages for deref. The above example now throws:

IllegalArgumentException class java.lang.Long is not derefable  clojure.core/deref (core.clj:2211)

and e.g.

(deref (delay 1) 500 :foo)

throws

IllegalArgumentException class clojure.lang.Delay is not derefable with a timeout  clojure.core/deref (core.clj:2222)
Comment by Mark Nutter [ 16/Sep/14 6:57 PM ]

Patch file clj-1436-patch-2014-09-16.diff updates the deref function so that it checks whether its arg is a future before sending it to deref-future. It also updates the deref function to provide clearer error messages. If the arg is not a future, and does not implement IDeref, the patched version of deref throws an IllegalArgumentException with a message that the arg cannot be dereferenced because it is not a ref/future/etc.

Comment by Mark Nutter [ 16/Sep/14 7:00 PM ]

Oops, I had this page open from yesterday and didn't see the patch submitted by Tobias. His has everything mine does, so I'll withdraw mine.

Comment by Mark Nutter [ 17/Sep/14 5:13 AM ]

One suggestion: the error message might sound better as "IllegalArgumentException cannot dereference clojure.lang.Delay; not a future or reference type".

Comment by Mark Nutter [ 17/Sep/14 5:44 AM ]

Tobias' patch does not contain the tests I had in mine, so I'm re-submitting just the tests as tests-patch.diff. If you install the tests patch without installing the deref patch, the tests will fail with the error message "Wrong exception type when passing non-IDeref/non-future to deref/@". Applying the deref patch as well will allow the tests to pass.





[CLJ-1418] make as-> macro compatible with destructuring Created: 09/May/14  Updated: 17/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Nahuel Greco Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 10
Labels: None
Environment:

all environments


Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The as-> macro doesn't work with destructuring. This is invalid code:

(-> [1 2] 
    (as-> [a & b] 
          [a (inc b)] 
          [(inc a) b]))

because it is expanded to:

(let [[a & b] [1 2]
        [a & b] [a (inc b)]
        [a & b] [(inc a) b]]
       [a & b])  ;; this last expression will not compile

but with a little redefinition is possible to make as-> work with
destructuring:

(defmacro as->
  "Binds name to expr, evaluates the first form in the lexical context
  of that binding, then binds name to that result, repeating for each
  successive form, returning the result of the last form."
  {:added "1.5"}
  [expr name & forms]
  `(let [~name ~expr
         ~@(interleave (repeat name) (butlast forms))]
     ~(last forms)))

now the previous example will expand to:

(let [[a & b] [1 2]
      [a & b] [a (inc b)]]
     [(inc a) b])

The following example shows why an as-> destructuring compatible
macro can be useful. This code parses a defmulti like parameter list
by reusing a destructuring form:

(defmacro defmulti2 [mm-name & opts]
 (-> [{} opts]
      (as-> [m [e & r :as o]] 
            (if (string? e) 
              [(assoc m :docstring e) r] 
              [m                      o])
            (if (map? e)
              [(assoc m :attr-map e :dispatch-fn (first r)) (next r)]
              [(assoc m             :dispatch-fn e)         r])
            ...

Compare with the original defmulti:

(defmacro defmulti [mm-name & options]
  (let [docstring   (if (string? (first options))
                      (first options)
                      nil)
        options     (if (string? (first options))
                      (next options)
                      options)
        m           (if (map? (first options))
                      (first options)
                      {})
        options     (if (map? (first options))
                      (next options)
                      options)
        dispatch-fn (first options)
        options     (next options)
        m           (if docstring
                      (assoc m :doc docstring)
                      m)
        ...


 Comments   
Comment by Nahuel Greco [ 09/May/14 2:12 AM ]

note, this issue is badly formated, for a more legible form:

https://gist.github.com/nahuel/a34a9fe967c035a3d069

Comment by Nahuel Greco [ 13/Sep/14 6:15 AM ]

Related: you cannot use recur as the last expression of as->, because the macroexpansion will not place it at tail position. The fix proposed above also fixes that, so you can use something like:

(loop []
  (as-> [] x
        ;;  manipulate x
        (when (empty? x) (recur)))))
Comment by Michael Blume [ 17/Oct/14 1:14 PM ]

I don't actually understand what the &s are doing in the example code? In the first step of the first example it looks like you're binding b to the list (2), and then trying to increment that, which fails

user=> (let [[a & b] [1 2]
  #_=>       [a & b] [a (inc b)]]
  #_=>      [(inc a) b])

ClassCastException clojure.lang.PersistentVector$ChunkedSeq cannot be cast to java.lang.Number  clojure.lang.Numbers.inc (Numbers.java:110)
user=> (let [[a b] [1 2]
  #_=>       [a b] [a (inc b)]]
  #_=>      [(inc a) b])
[2 3]
Comment by Nahuel Greco [ 17/Oct/14 2:16 PM ]

Michael Blume: Sorry, example is wrong, replace [a & b] with [a & [b]]:

(-> [1 2] 
    (as-> [a & [b]] 
          [a (inc b)] 
          [(inc a) b]))

;=> expands to: 

(let [[a & [b]] [1 2] 
      [a & [b]] [a (inc b)] 
      [a & [b]] [(inc a) b]] 
    [a & [b]]) ;; this last expression will not compile

;=> expansion using redefined as-> follows:

(let [[a & [b]] [1 2] 
      [a & [b]] [a (inc b)]] 
    [(inc a) b])  ;; now ok




[CLJ-1416] Support transients in gvec Created: 06/May/14  Updated: 02/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Michał Marczyk Assignee: Michał Marczyk
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: collections, transient

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1416-transients-hash-caching-for-gvec-Object-met.patch     Text File 0002-CLJ-1416-transients-hash-caching-interop-improvement.patch     Text File 0003-CLJ-1416-transients-hash-caching-interop-improvement.patch     Text File 0004-CLJ-1416-transients-hash-caching-interop-improvement.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Vectors of primitives produced by vector-of do not support transients.

core.rrb-vector implements transient support for vectors of primitives. Such transient-enabled vectors of primitives can be obtained in a number of ways: (1) using a gvec instance as an argument to fv/catvec (if RRB concatenation happens, which is not guaranteed) or fv/subvec; (2) passing a gvec instance to fv/vec, which as of core.rrb-vector 0.0.11 will simply rewrap the gvec tree in an RRB wrapper; (3) using fv/vector-of instead of clojure.core/vector-of. Native support in gvec would still be useful as part of an effort to make supported functionality consistent across vector flavours (see CLJ-787 in this connection); gvec is also simpler and still has (and is likely to maintain) a performance edge.

A port of core.rrb-vector's transient support to gvec is available here:

https://github.com/michalmarczyk/clojure/tree/transient-gvec

I'll bring it up to date with current master shortly.

See the clojure-dev thread for some benchmarks:

https://groups.google.com/d/msg/clojure-dev/9ozYI1e5SCM/BAIazVOkUmcJ



 Comments   
Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 13/May/14 5:32 AM ]

Here's the current version of the patch (0001-CLJ-1416-transients-hash-caching-for-gvec-Object-met.patch). It includes a few additional changes – here's the commit message:

CLJ-1416: transients, hash caching for gvec, Object methods for gvec seqs

  • Adds transient support to gvec
  • Adds hash{eq,Code} caching to gvec and gvec seqs
  • Implements hashCode, equals, toString for gvec seqs

https://github.com/michalmarczyk/clojure/tree/transient-gvec-1.6

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 05/Jul/14 2:59 AM ]

Here's an updated patch with some additional interop-related improvements.

The new commit message:

CLJ-1416: transients, hash caching, interop improvements for gvec

  • Adds transient support to gvec
  • Adds hash{eq,Code} caching to gvec and gvec seqs
  • Implements hashCode, equals, toString for gvec seqs
  • Correctly implements iterator-related methods for gvec and gvec seqs
  • Introduces throw-unsupported and caching-hash (both marked private)
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 4:48 PM ]

Patch 0002-CLJ-1416-transients-hash-caching-interop-improvement.patch dated Jul 5 2014 no longer applied cleanly to latest master after some commits were made to Clojure on Aug 29, 2014. It did apply cleanly before that day.

I have not checked how easy or difficult it might be to update this patch. See section "Updating Stale Patches" on this wiki page for some tips on updating patches: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 29/Aug/14 5:07 PM ]

Patch updated to apply cleanly to master.

Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 02/Oct/14 12:28 PM ]

Maybe this should be another ticket, but it would affect this patch, so I'll mention it here:

The ArrayManager interface is an incomplete abstraction. The original gvec code plus the new transients codepaths rely on System/arraycopy, rather than .arraycopy on the manager object. This means that it's impossible to create gvecs backed by non-JVM arrays. Or, in my case, to create a gvec of nibbles backed by an array of longs. See https://gist.github.com/brandonbloom/441a4b5712729dec7467

Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 02/Oct/14 1:34 PM ]

The current patch has a bug on line 762:

(let [node ^clojure.core.VecNode (.ensureEditable this node)

There is no such signature, only these:

(ensureEditable [this]
(ensureEditable [this node shift]

I discovered this problem using https://github.com/ztellman/collection-check

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 02/Oct/14 2:46 PM ]

Thanks for the catch! Fixed patch attached. (There was in fact one more bug in editableArrayFor, also fixed in this version.)

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 02/Oct/14 2:57 PM ]

As for gvecs of nibbles, could that be a separate ticket with patches building on top of this one?

On a separate note, core.rrb-vector could support vectors of nibbles as an extra feature (and adopt built-in gvec's representation if indeed the built-in gvec comes to support this feature at some point). Do you think that'd be useful?

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 02/Oct/14 3:01 PM ]

Of course vectors of nibbles could be implemented today with a separate vector type wrapping a gvec of longs, but the implementation would be more involved. I wonder what kind of performance difference there would be between the wrapper approach and the "nibble AM" approach…





[CLJ-1414] sort's docstring should say whether it is stable Created: 02/May/14  Updated: 03/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Phill Wolf Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: collections, docstring, ft

Attachments: Text File clj-1414-v1.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

sort's docstring does not address whether the sort will be stable.

Stability is a useful property. It appears to be customary among programming tools to document whether their sort is stable. Java's Collections javadoc pledges a stable sort. The man-page of GNU coreutils sort in Ubuntu mentions its stability. The perldoc of Perl's sort function indicates it is a stable sort now but was not always.

Pillars of the Clojure community have commented on sort's stability:

(1) A recent book assembled by Cognitect consultants, "Clojure Cookbook", says Clojure's sort function "uses Java's built-in sort" and that "[t]he sort is also stable".

(2) In a 2011 discussion thread, "Clojure sort: is it specified to be stable for all targets?" https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/j3aNAmEJW9A , Stuart Sierra replied that "if it's not specified in the doc string, then it's not a promise. That said, [...] I would generally expect a language built-in `sort` routine to be stable, so take that for what it's worth."

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 05/May/14 10:23 AM ]

Sounds reasonable. Needs patch from contributor.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Aug/14 3:07 PM ]

Patch clj-1414-v1.patch dated Aug 30 2014 adds the sentence "Guaranteed to be stable: equal elements will not be reordered." to the doc strings of both sort and sort-by.





[CLJ-1410] Optimization: allow `set`/`vec` to pass through colls that satisfy `set?`/`vector?` Created: 26/Apr/14  Updated: 05/May/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Peter Taoussanis Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: performance

Attachments: File benchmarks.clj     Text File clj1410-bench.txt     Text File CLJ-1410.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

set and vec currently reconstruct their inputs even when they are already of the requested type. Since it's a pretty common pattern to call set/vec on an input to ensure its type, this seems like an easy performance win in a common case.

Proposed: Check for set? in set and vec? in vec and return the coll as is if already of the requested type.

Performance:

See attached clj1410-bench.txt for test details :

Input/size Function Original Patched Comment
set/10 set 1.452 µs 0.002 µs 726x faster
set/1000 set 248.842 µs 0.006 µs 41473x faster
vector/10 set 1.288 µs 1.323 µs slightly slower
vector/1000 set 222.992 µs 221.116 µs ~same
set/10 vec 0.614 µs 0.592 µs ~same
set/1000 vec 56.876 µs 55.920 µs ~same
vector/10 vec 0.252 µs 0.007 µs 36x faster
vector/1000 vec 24.428 µs 0.007 µs 3500x faster

As expected, if an instance of the correct type is passed, then the difference is large (with bigger savings for sets which do more work for dupe checking). In cases where the type is different, there is an extra instance? check (which looks to be jit'ed away or negligible). We only see a slower time in the case of passing a small vector to the set function - 3% slower (35 ns). The benefit seems greater than the cost for this change.

Screened by:

More info:

Group discussion: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure-dev/fg4wtqzu0eY



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Apr/14 10:18 AM ]

Re:

*Open question*
Would it be better to pass-through arguments that satisfy the general (`set?`,`vec?`) or concrete (`PersistentHashSet`,`PersistentVector`) type?

I don't think there is any question that relying on abstractions via set?/vec? is better than referring to concrete types.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Apr/14 10:20 AM ]

Please add perf difference info in the description. Please also combine the patches into a single patch.

Comment by Peter Taoussanis [ 26/Apr/14 10:52 AM ]

Combined earlier patches, removed docstring changes.

Comment by Peter Taoussanis [ 26/Apr/14 11:39 AM ]

Attached some simple benchmarks. These were run with HotSpot enabled, after a 100k lap warmup.

Google Doc times: http://goo.gl/W7EACR

The `set` benefit can be substantial, and the overhead in non-benefitial cases is negligible.

The effect on `vec` is subtler: the benefit is relatively smaller and the overhead relatively larger.

Comment by Reid McKenzie [ 04/May/14 12:01 PM ]

Patch looks good to me, and I've reproduced the claimed low "worst case" overhead and significant potential savings numbers to within 1ms. +1.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 05/May/14 10:21 AM ]

I added a more extensive set of tests performed using Criterium which should give better insight into single operation performance.





[CLJ-1386] Add transient? predicate Created: 17/Mar/14  Updated: 31/Aug/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Devin Walters Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: collections, transient
Environment:

N/A


Attachments: Text File 0001-Add-transient-predicate.patch     Text File 0002-Add-transient-predicate.patch     Text File 0003-Add-transient-predicate.patch     Text File 0004-Add-transient-predicate.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

I've encountered situations where I wanted to check whether something was transient in order to know whether I should call assoc! or assoc, conj! or conj, etc.

This patch adds `transient?` as a predicate fn.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Mar/14 10:21 AM ]

Patch needs a docstring and a test.

Comment by Devin Walters [ 17/Mar/14 4:42 PM ]

Alex: I figured that would be the case! Sorry about that. I've updated the patch. It now includes a docstring and has tests of `transient?` for #{}, [], and {}.

Thanks!

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Mar/14 9:48 PM ]

Thanks - please don't use the labels "patch" or "test" - those are covered by the Patch field.

Comment by Devin Walters [ 18/Mar/14 9:17 AM ]

Ah, sorry for the mixup Alex. I assumed you removed "patch" as a label the first time around to flag this ticket as still needing a vetted patch. My mistake.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 21/Mar/14 1:42 PM ]

Patch 0001-Add-transient-predicate.patch dated Mar 17, 2014 applies cleanly to latest Clojure master, but fails a test because the new function transient? has no :added metadata. See most other Clojure functions in clojure.core for examples.

It also generates a new warning while running tests:

WARNING: transient? already refers to: #'clojure.core/transient? in namespace: clojure.test-clojure.data-structures, being replaced by: #'clojure.test-clojure.data-structures/transient?

There is an older (but equivalent) definition of transient? in test file data_structures.clj that should be removed when adding it to clojure.core

Comment by Devin Walters [ 22/Mar/14 11:29 PM ]

@Andy, the reason I did not add :added metadata is because I do not know if/when this patch will be accepted, and as a result, I don't really know if it will sneak into 1.6.X or 1.7. For now, I've put it in as 1.7. If it's in the running to be added sooner than that, let me know and I'll adjust it.

RE: The warning. Good catch. I've submitted a new patch which removes the private version of transient? from data_structures.clj. All tests pass.

Edit to Add: The latest patch as of this comment is now 0002-Add-transient-predicate.patch.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Aug/14 2:16 PM ]

Patch 0002-Add-transient-predicate.patch dated Mar 22 2014 no longer applies cleanly to latest Clojure master due to some changes committed earlier today. I haven't checked whether this patch is straightforward to update.

Comment by Devin Walters [ 06/Aug/14 4:11 PM ]

I've updated the patch to 0003-Add-transient-predicate.patch. This patch applies cleanly to the latest version of master.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 4:44 PM ]

Patch 0003-Add-transient-predicate.patch dated Aug 6 2013 no longer applied cleanly to latest master after some commits were made to Clojure on Aug 29, 2014. It did apply cleanly before that day.

I have not checked how easy or difficult it might be to update this patch.

Comment by Devin Walters [ 31/Aug/14 12:01 AM ]

I've updated the patch to 0004-Add-transient-predicate.patch. This patch applies cleanly to the latest version of master.





[CLJ-1351] Clojure emits an unused "swapThunk" method for functions with keyword callsites Created: 14/Feb/14  Updated: 14/Feb/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-remove-unused-swapThunk-method-generation.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

This method is no longer used, I did a quick git blame and it look like it was used for an earlier implementation of keyword callsites and forgot to be removed in this commit https://github.com/clojure/clojure/commit/c7af275d4ee33cdc1794c8df8fa1e6d39039ac84

Removing this should reduce a bit the size of compile functions.






[CLJ-1316] for doesn't support :let binding as its first seq-expr Created: 30/Dec/13  Updated: 16/Feb/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Jay Fields Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None
Environment:

jvm clojure


Approval: Triaged

 Description   
user> (for [y [2 3 4] 
            :let [x 1]]
        [x y])
([1 2] [1 3] [1 4])
user> (for [:let [x 1]
            y [2 3 4]]
        [x y])
IllegalStateException Can't pop empty vector  clojure.lang.PersistentVector.pop (PersistentVector.java:380)

Cause:

Solution:

Patch:
Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Dec/13 9:53 AM ]

Related (perhaps identical?) ticket CLJ-207 was declined.

Comment by Jay Fields [ 30/Dec/13 10:03 AM ]

It does look like a duplicate. I find it surprising that this doesn't work, but it does work for doseq:

main=> (doseq [:let [x 1] y [2 3 4]] (println x y))
1 2
1 3
1 4
nil

I think you'll keep getting this bug report as long as that inconsistency exists.

Comment by Jay Fields [ 30/Dec/13 10:05 AM ]

for completeness, I think it's worth mentioning that I can't simply change the ordering (like Alex's example above), due to the cost of the value I'm calculating. I only want it to occur once, and I have to use a separate 'let (as Rich recommended)

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 05/Jan/14 3:37 PM ]

Brandon Bloom pointed out that one difference between for and doseq is that for is lazy, and so for an initial :let it's not clear whether it should be evaluated immediately or after the first item is requested. doseq doesn't have that ambiguity.

Comment by Jay Fields [ 08/Jan/14 10:42 AM ]

@Gary, I think that's a good question, but either choice would be better than the current inconsistency. If you made it lazy, I can't really think of a downside. Even if it wasn't lazy, that would match the current performance characteristics of code that's already wrapping the for in a let.





[CLJ-1305] Add optional not-found argument when invoking vectors or sets as functions Created: 12/Dec/13  Updated: 12/Nov/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Dave Tenny Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-add-not-found-to-sets-and-vecs-as-functions-refs-130.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Maps, keywords, and symbols when used as operators allow optional second arguments for 'default-not-found' values is if to 'get'.

({:a 1} :b 'b) => b

However sets don't support this behavior (though they do with 'get') and vectors don't allow the optional default-not-found in their pseudo 'nth' semantics.

user=> (#{:a  :b} :b 'notfound)
ArityException Wrong number of args (2) passed to: PersistentHashSet  clojure.lang.AFn.throwArity (AFn.java:437)


 Comments   
Comment by Pepijn de Vos [ 12/Nov/14 1:31 PM ]

I fixed the problem with Dirk at the Amsterdam Clojurians Hackathon.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 12/Nov/14 3:15 PM ]

Guess you can add a couple of unit tests as well.





[CLJ-1298] Add more type predicate fns to core Created: 21/Nov/13  Updated: 07/Dec/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Alex Fowler Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 15
Labels: None

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Add more built-in type predicates:

1) Definitely missing: (atom? x), (ref? x), (deref? x), (named? x), (map-entry? x), (lazy-seq? x).
2) Very good to have: (throwable? x), (exception? x), (pattern? x).

The first group is especially important for writing cleaner code with core Clojure.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 21/Nov/13 8:42 AM ]

In general many of the existing predicates map to interfaces. I'm guessing these would map to checks on the following types:

atom? = Atom (final class)
ref? = IRef (interface)
deref? = IDeref (interface)
named? = Named (interface, despite no I prefix)
map-entry? = IMapEntry (interface)
lazy-seq? = LazySeq (final class)

throwable? = Throwable
exception? = Exception, but this seems less useful as it feels like the right answer when you likely actually want throwable?
pattern? = java.util.regex.Pattern

Comment by Alex Fowler [ 21/Nov/13 9:02 AM ]

Yes, they do, and sometimes the code has many checks like (instance? clojure.lang.Atom x). Ok, you can write a little function (atom? x) but it has either to be written in all relevant namespaces or required/referred there from some extra namespace. All this is just a burden. For example, we have predicates like (var? x) or (future? x) which too map to Java classes, but having them abbreviated often makes possible to write a cleaner code.

I feel the first group to be especially significant for it being about core Clojure concepts like atom and ref. Having to fall to manual Java classes check to work with them feels inorganic. Of course we can, but why then do we have (var? x), (fn? x) and other? Imagine, for example:

(cond
(var? x) (...)
(fn? x) (...)
(instance? clojure.lang.Atom x) (...)
(or (instance? clojure.lang.Named x) (instance? clojure.lang.LazySeq x)) (...))

vs

(cond
(var? x) (...)
(fn? x) (...)
(atom? x) (...)
(or (named? x) (lazy-seq? x)) (...))

The second group is too, essential since these concepts are fundamental for the platform (but you're right with the (exception? x) one).

Comment by Alex Fowler [ 22/Nov/13 6:35 AM ]

Also, obviously I missed the (boolean? x) predicate in the original post. Did not even guess it is absent too until I occasionally got into it today. Currently the most clean way we have is to do (or (true? x) (false? x)). Needles to say, it looks weird next to the present (integer? x) or (float? x).

Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 22/Jul/14 1:02 AM ]

Predicates for core types are also very useful for portability to CLJS.

Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 22/Jul/14 1:05 AM ]

I'd be happy to provide a patch for this, but I'd prefer universal interface support where possible. Therefore, this ticket, in my mind, is behind http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-803 etc.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Jul/14 6:12 AM ]

I don't think it's worth making a ticket for this until Rich has looked at it and determined which parts are wanted.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Dec/14 4:33 PM ]

Someone asked about a boolean? predicate, so throwing this one on the list...

Comment by Reid McKenzie [ 02/Dec/14 4:51 PM ]

uuid? maybe. UUIDs have a bit of a strange position in that we have special printer handling for them built into core implying that they are intentionally part of Clojure, but there is no ->UUID constructor and no functions in core that operate on them so I could see this one being specifically declined.





[CLJ-1293] Portable "catch-all" mechanism Created: 05/Nov/13  Updated: 05/Nov/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Brandon Bloom Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1293-v001.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Design page: http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/Platform+Errors

CLJS ticket/patch: http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJS-661

This patch is more permissive than my patch for CLJS: The CLJS patch ensures :default catch blocks occur between non-default catch blocks and finally blocks, if present. This patch just makes (catch :default ...) a synonym for (catch Throwable ...). I wanted to keep the change to the compiler minimum.






[CLJ-1290] clojure.xml parse docstring omits InputSource Created: 01/Nov/13  Updated: 24/Sep/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Phill Wolf Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: docstring, newbie, xml

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The clojure.xml parse docstring mentions that parameter s "can be a File, InputStream or String naming a URI." But those choices do not cover a common case, parsing the value of a String. Actually, parse also allows InputSource, which solves the problem. The docstring should mention InputSource (or clarify its omission, if not inadvertent).

user> (use '[clojure.xml :as xml])
nil
user> (import '[java.io StringReader])
java.io.StringReader
user> (import '[org.xml.sax InputSource])
org.xml.sax.InputSource
user> (xml/parse (InputSource. (StringReader. "<egg>green</egg>")))
{:tag :egg, :attrs nil, :content ["green"]}


 Comments   
Comment by Édipo L Féderle [ 15/Sep/14 3:57 PM ]

You and mean that de (doc xml/parse) should include also "can be a xml String" ?
I don't know if I understand you right.
Thanks.

Comment by Phill Wolf [ 24/Sep/14 6:06 AM ]

InputSource is the use of xml/parse that is not encompassed by the docstring:

(xml/parse (InputSource. (StringReader. "<egg>green</egg>")))

Perhaps xml/parse aimed to hide InputSource by making specific provision for some of InputSource's capabilities. But reading a String is important, and xml/parse does not accept a StringReader, so InputSource remains important.





[CLJ-1219] Make identical? variadic Created: 19/Jun/13  Updated: 28/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Irakli Gozalishvili Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1219-make-identical-variadic.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

(= 1 1 1) ;; => true
(= 1 1 2) ;; => false
(== 1 1 1) ;; => true
(== 1 1 2) ;; => false
(identical? 1 1 1) ;; ArityException Wrong number of args (3) passed to: core$identical-QMARK- clojure.lang.AFn.throwArity (AFn.java:437)

I think it would make far more sense to make identical? consistent with all other comparison operators
and allow it to take variadic number of arguments.



 Comments   
Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 03/Sep/13 9:43 AM ]

Here's a patch that makes identical? variadic and adds a test for identical?.





[CLJ-1210] error message for (clojure.java.io/reader nil) — consistency for use with io/resource Created: 23/May/13  Updated: 12/Jul/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Trevor Wennblom Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: errormsgs, io

Attachments: File extend-io-factory-to-nil.diff    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

This seems to a common idiom:

(clojure.java.io/reader (clojure.java.io/resource "myfile"))

When a file is available these are the behaviors:

=> (clojure.java.io/reader "resources/myfile")
#<BufferedReader java.io.BufferedReader@1f291df0>

=> (clojure.java.io/resource "myfile")
#<URL file:/project/resources/myfile>

=> (clojure.java.io/reader (clojure.java.io/resource "myfile"))
#<BufferedReader java.io.BufferedReader@1db04f7c>

If the file (resource) is unavailable:

=> (clojure.java.io/reader "resources/nofile")
FileNotFoundException resources/nofile (No such file or directory) java.io.FileInputStream.open (FileInputStream.java:-2)

=> (clojure.java.io/resource "nofile")
nil

=> (clojure.java.io/reader (clojure.java.io/resource "nofile"))
IllegalArgumentException No implementation of method: :make-reader of protocol: #'clojure.java.io/IOFactory found for class: nil clojure.core/-cache-protocol-fn (core_deftype.clj:541)

The main enhancement request is to have a better error message from `(clojure.java.io/reader nil)`. I'm not sure if io/resource should return something like 'resource "nofile" not found' or if io/reader could add a more helpful suggestion.



 Comments   
Comment by Alexander Redington [ 14/Feb/14 3:13 PM ]

This patch extends IOFactory to nil, providing error messages consistent with the default error messages provided for Object.

Comment by Benjamin Peter [ 15/Feb/14 1:31 PM ]

Looks like a good solution to me as a user. Thanks for the effort!

Comment by Dennis Schridde [ 12/Jul/14 2:01 AM ]

I would also be interested in a solution, as I am currently running into this with the ClojureScript compiler.





[CLJ-1117] partition docstring should be more explicit about dropped or partial trailing elements Created: 29/Nov/12  Updated: 28/Mar/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Timothy Baldridge Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: docstring
Environment:

OS X, 10.8


Attachments: Text File clj-1117.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The doc for partition states "In case there are not enough padding elements, return a partition with less than n items." However, the behavior of this function is as follows:

user=> (partition 3 (range 10))
((0 1 2) (3 4 5) (6 7 8))
user=> (partition 4 (range 10))
((0 1 2 3) (4 5 6 7))

Proposed: The docstring should be updated to make it clear that not providing a pad means that items are dropped, and to also see partition-all.

Patch: clj-1117.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Nov/12 2:15 PM ]

That would be a potentially breaking change for some people's code that uses partition. partition-all behaves as you wish.

Also, your concern with the documentation is for when there are padding elements specified as an argument, but your examples don't specify any padding elements.

Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 29/Nov/12 2:55 PM ]

I agree, but I think the docs should then explicitly state: "if no padding is given, not all input elements may be returned in the output partitions" or something to that line.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Nov/12 4:43 PM ]

More precise documentation of current behavior is always welcome in my opinion.

Comment by Gabriel Horner [ 17/May/13 10:14 AM ]

I've uploaded a patch that calls out when and how partition drops tail elements:
"If a pad collection is not supplied, any tail elements that remain from dividing the input collection length by n will not be included in a partition."





[CLJ-1094] Add zero-arity versions of every-pred and some-fn Created: 25/Oct/12  Updated: 08/Nov/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Tassilo Horn Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-Add-zero-arity-variants-for-every-pred-and-some-fn.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Zero-arity versions of these fns are useful in situations like the following:

;; compute-preds-for may return zero or many predicate fns
(let [preds (compute-preds-for something)]
  (filter (apply every-pred preds) some-coll))

Approach: This patch adds zero-arity versions of every-pred and some-fn with these semantics:

(every-pred) === (constantly true)
(some-fn)    === (constantly nil)

Patch: 0001-Add-zero-arity-variants-for-every-pred-and-some-fn.patch

  • Patch adds zero-arity version
  • Patch reformats docstring to 80 character width (matching other core fns) - comments are identical other than the addition of a final sentence stating behavior with zero-arity.

Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 25/Oct/12 7:12 AM ]

This is the thread where Max Penet suggested to have 0-arity versions of the two fns:

https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/clojure/IRlN-4LH_U0

Comment by Alex Miller [ 07/Nov/13 8:20 PM ]

Tassilo, can you undo the line break changes on this patch to minimize the patch differences?

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 08/Nov/13 4:00 AM ]

Rebased patch.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 08/Nov/13 4:05 AM ]

@Alex: That I've reformatted the docstring so that it doesn't look like a comb and fits in 80 columns is a feature. Should I really revert to the original, ugly, less readable formatting only to make the patch 8 lines shorter?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 08/Nov/13 9:14 AM ]

My goal was to simplify the patch so it is easier to review. Since the comment is identical (except for the last line), we can instead note that as a feature of the patch.





[CLJ-1078] Add queue and queue? to clojure.core Created: 26/Sep/12  Updated: 19/Oct/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Timothy Baldridge Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 9
Labels: data-structures, queue

Attachments: File clj-1048-add-queue-functions.diff     Text File queue.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Add queue function to create queues from collections and queue? predicate to check queueness.

Patch: clj-1048-add-queue-functions.diff



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 28/Sep/12 8:43 AM ]

Timothy, I tried applying both of these Sep 26, 2012 patches to latest Clojure master as of that date. I had to apply 0001-make-PersistentQueue-ctor-public.patch by hand since it failed to apply using git or patch. It built fine, but failed to pass several of the Clojure tests. Have you looked into those test failures to see if you can find the cause and fix them? I tested on Ubuntu 11.10 with Oracle JDK 1.6 and 1.7, and saw similar failures with both.

Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 26/Oct/12 5:23 PM ]

Fixed the patch. Tests pass, created the patch, applied it to a different copy of the source and the tests still pass. So this new patch should be good to go.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 26/Oct/12 5:43 PM ]

Timothy, I'm not sure how you are getting successful results when applying this patch. Can you try the steps below and see what happens for you? I get errors trying to apply the patch with latest Clojure master as of Oct 26, 2012. Also please use the steps on the JIRA workflow page to create a git format patch (http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/JIRA+workflow under "Development" heading).

% git clone git://github.com/clojure/clojure.git
% cd clojure
% patch -p1 < queues.patch
patching file src/clj/clojure/core.clj
patching file src/jvm/clojure/lang/PersistentQueue.java
Hunk #1 FAILED at 32.
1 out of 1 hunk FAILED – saving rejects to file src/jvm/clojure/lang/PersistentQueue.java.rej
patching file test/clojure/test_clojure/data_structures.clj
Hunk #1 succeeded at 123 with fuzz 2.
Hunk #2 succeeded at 861 with fuzz 2.
Hunk #3 FAILED at 872.
1 out of 3 hunks FAILED – saving rejects to file test/clojure/test_clojure/data_structures.clj.rej
patching file test/clojure/test_clojure/java_interop.clj

Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 26/Oct/12 6:08 PM ]

I was using git apply. I tried the method you show above, and now I'm seeing the same issues you show above.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 26/Oct/12 6:26 PM ]

Just so you know, the preferred way to create and apply patches are the "git format-patch master --stdout > patch.txt" to create a patch (after doing the branching commands described on the JIRA workflow page to create a branch for your changes), and the "git am --keep-cr -s < patch.txt" to apply a patch. If a patch was created that way and applies cleanly with that command, then you are definitely good to go.

The "patch -p1 < patch.txt" command is just a secondary method sometimes used to try to apply patches that aren't in the format produced above, or have errors when applying using that method.

Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 26/Oct/12 9:15 PM ]

Just so you know, the preferred way to create and apply patches are the "git format-patch master --stdout > patch.txt" to create a patch (after doing the branching commands described on the JIRA workflow page to create a branch for your changes), and the "git am --keep-cr -s < patch.txt" to apply a patch. If a patch was created that way and applies cleanly with that command, then you are definitely good to go.

The "patch -p1 < patch.txt" command is just a secondary method sometimes used to try to apply patches that aren't in the format produced above, or have errors when applying using that method.

Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 26/Oct/12 9:16 PM ]

added patch

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 26/Oct/12 9:37 PM ]

That one applies cleanly and passes all tests. It should show up on the next list of prescreened patches. Thanks.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 29/Nov/12 9:54 AM ]

we don't use the queue* convention elsewhere, e.g. vec and vector. I think queue should take a collection like vec and set. (queue [1 2 3]) could be made to 'adopt' the collection as front.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 11/Dec/12 1:00 PM ]

Patch queue.patch dated Oct 26 2012 no longer applies cleanly after recent CLJ-1000 commits, but only because of one line of changed patch context. It still applies cleanly with "patch -p1 < queue.patch". Not bothering to update the stale patch given Rich's comments suggesting more substantive changes.

Comment by Steve Miner [ 06/Apr/13 8:06 AM ]

See also CLJ-976 (tagged literal support for PersistentQueue)

Comment by John Jacobsen [ 23/May/13 8:54 PM ]

Don't want to step on Timothy B's toes here, but it looks straightforward to adopt his patch to implement Rich's suggestion. I'd offer to give it a whack if nobody else wants the ticket now.

Comment by John Jacobsen [ 26/May/13 9:04 AM ]

Discussion initiated on clojure-dev: https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!topic/clojure-dev/2BOqHm24Vc4

Comment by John Jacobsen [ 31/May/13 9:58 AM ]

This patch (if accepted) supersedes Timothy Baldridge's patch; it implements "queue" and "queue?" (but not "queue*"); "queue" accepts a collection rather than being a variadic function, as per Rich's suggestion.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Jan/14 5:00 PM ]

The patch clj-1048-queue-takes-collections.diff applied cleanly to latest Clojure master as of Jan 23 2014, but not on Jan 30 2014. There were several commits made to Clojure during that week involving updating the hash functions that conflict in some way with this patch. I have not checked to see how easy or difficult it might be to update the patch.

Comment by John Jacobsen [ 05/Feb/14 1:45 PM ]

Hi Andy, I updated the patch and removed my previous version. The new one should apply cleanly and pass all tests.

Comment by John Jacobsen [ 05/Feb/14 2:24 PM ]

Updated ticket title.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 05/Feb/14 5:33 PM ]

Hi John... Can you condense these changes into a single commit? Please also remove the comments above queue* in java_interop.clj. Thanks...

Comment by John Jacobsen [ 05/Feb/14 6:55 PM ]

Hi Alex, the updated patch removes that comment and rebases all three commits into c9f77dd. Let me know if you need anything else. Thanks!

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 19/Oct/14 3:00 AM ]

A tiny remark - I think the docstrings should end with a dot.





[CLJ-1073] Make print-sequential interruptible Created: 21/Sep/12  Updated: 03/Sep/13

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4, Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Colin Jones Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: print

Attachments: Text File 0001-Allow-thread-interruption-in-print-sequential.patch     Text File clj-1073-add-print-interruptibly-patch-v2.txt     File perftest-print.clj     File test.sh    
Patch: Code
Approval: