<< Back to previous view

[CLJ-1146] Symbol name starting with digits to defn throws "Unmatched delimiter )" Created: 13/Jan/13  Updated: 18/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Trivial
Reporter: Linus Ericsson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: errormsgs, reader
Environment:

$java -jar clojure-1.5.0-RC2.jar

$java -version
java version "1.6.0_37"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_37-b06-434-10M3909)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.12-b01-434, mixed mode)
Mac OS X:
System Version: Mac OS X 10.6.8 (10K549)
Kernel Version: Darwin 10.8.0



 Description   

When trying to use an invalid symbol name when defining a function, the error message thrown is a confusing and wrong one. The error message is "RuntimeException Unmatched delimiter: ) clojure.lang.Util.runtimeException (Util.java:219)", which unfortunately is the only message seen in nrepled emacs.

$ java -jar clojure-1.5.0-RC2.jar
Clojure 1.5.0-RC2
user=> (defn 45fn [] nil)
NumberFormatException Invalid number: 45fn clojure.lang.LispReader.readNumber (LispReader.java:255)
[]
nil
RuntimeException Unmatched delimiter: ) clojure.lang.Util.runtimeException (Util.java:219)

Expected:
When trying to (defn or (def a thing with a non valid symbol name, the last thrown error message should be one stating that the given symbol name is not a valid one.



 Comments   
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 18/Apr/14 2:27 AM ]

this is an artifact of how streams and repls work.

when you type (defn 45fn [] nil) and hit enter, the inputstream flushes and "(defn 45fn [] nil)" is made available to the reader, the reader reads up to 45fn, throws an error back to the main repl loop, which prints out the error, then calls read, which still has the unread parts available to it "[] nil)"

changing this behavior would require significant changes to clojure's repl.

checkout https://github.com/trptcolin/reply instead





[CLJ-1296] locking expressions cause vars to be dereferenced, even if not executed, unless wrapped in let Created: 17/Nov/13  Updated: 18/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: performance


 Description   

Description of one example with poor performance discovered by Michał Marczyk in the discussion thread linked below.

The difference between the compiled versions of:

(defn foo [x]
  (if (> x 0)
    (inc x)
    (locking o
      (dec x))))

and

(defn bar [x]
  (if (> x 0)
    (inc x)
    (let [res (locking o
                (dec x))]
      res)))

is quite significant. foo gets compiled to a single class, with invocations handled by a single invoke method; bar gets compiled to a class for bar + an extra class for an inner function which handles the (locking o (dec x)) part – probably very similar to the output for the version with the hand-coded locking-part (although I haven't really looked at that yet). The inner function is a closure, so calling it involves an allocation of a closure object; its ctor receives the closed-over locals as arguments and stores them in two fields (lockee and x). Then they get loaded from the fields in the body of the closure's invoke method etc.

Note: The summary line may be too narrow a description of the root cause, and simply the first example of a case where this issue was noticed and examined. Please make the summary and this description more accurate if you diagnose this issue.

See discussion thread on Clojure group here: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/x86VygZYf4Y



 Comments   
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 18/Apr/14 2:17 AM ]

maybe it is already clear to others, but this was not immediately clear to me:

the reason

(defn bar [x]
  (if (> x 0)
    (inc x)
    (let [res (locking o
                (dec x))]
      res)))

generates a second class is locking is a macro that contains a try/finally form in it's expansion.

binding the result of a try/finally form to a result (as in the let) would require some real tricky code gen without adding the extra function, so of course the clojure compile adds the extra function.





[CLJ-884] Reflector error messages can be improved when no matching method is found. Created: 27/Nov/11  Updated: 18/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.3
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Rahul Pilani Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: errormsgs
Environment:

All


Attachments: Text File diff.patch    
Patch: Code

 Description   

When accessing a java method with an arity mismatch or a mismatched parameter type, Reflector.java returns the following error on REPL:
IllegalArgumentException No matching method found: xyz for class com.abc.MyClass

eventhough method xyz might exist on MyClass, but was being called with the wrong number of arguments.

Attached is a patch that fixes that problem.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 22/Mar/12 8:47 PM ]

diff.patch of Nov 27, 2011 does not apply cleanly to latest master version of Clojure code (using "patch -p1 < diff.patch", at least). It is preferred by Clojure team that patches are in git format-patch format. Instructions for producing such a patch are given at http://clojure.org/patches

Rahul, are you planning to sign a Clojure Contributor Agreement? Without that, this code cannot be included in Clojure, unless a contributor reimplements it on their own.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Mar/12 1:14 AM ]

In private communication with the patch author today, he expressed an interest in submitting a signed CA so this patch can be considered for inclusion in Clojure.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/14 10:48 PM ]

it has been two years, is there a CA to go with this patch yet?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 18/Apr/14 2:01 AM ]

The patch author has not submitted a CA – their name is not listed at http://clojure.org/contributing

Everyone else is free to submit a patch if they wish.





[CLJ-5] Unintuitive error response in clojure 1.0 Created: 17/Jun/09  Updated: 18/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Backlog

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Assembla Importer Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: errormsgs

Attachments: File clj-5-destructure-error.diff     Text File CLJ-5.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

The following broken code:

(let [[x y] {}] x)

provides the following stack trace:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException: nth not supported on this type: PersistentArrayMap (test.clj:0)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:4543)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:4857)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.loadFile(Compiler.java:4824)
at clojure.main$load_script__5833.invoke(main.clj:206)
at clojure.main$script_opt__5864.invoke(main.clj:258)
at clojure.main$main__5888.doInvoke(main.clj:333)
at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:413)
at clojure.lang.Var.invoke(Var.java:346)
at clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:173)
at clojure.lang.Var.applyTo(Var.java:463)
at clojure.main.main(main.java:39)
Caused by: java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException: nth not supported on this type: PersistentArrayMap
at clojure.lang.RT.nth(RT.java:800)
at clojure.core$nth__3578.invoke(core.clj:873)
at user$eval__1.invoke(test.clj:1)
at clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:4532)
... 10 more

The message "nth not supported on this type" while correct doesn't make the cause of the error very clear. Better error messages when destructuring would be very helpful.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 10:44 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/5

Comment by Eugene Koontz [ 11/Nov/11 7:36 PM ]

Please see the attached patch which produces a (hopefully more clear) error message as shown below (given the broken code shown in the original bug report):

Clojure 1.4.0-master-SNAPSHOT
user=> (let [x 42 y 43] (+ x y))
85
user=> (let [[x y] {}] x)
UnsupportedOperationException left side of binding must be a symbol (found a PersistentVector instead).  clojure.lang.Compiler.checkLet (Compiler.java:6545)
user=>

In addition, this patch checks the argument of (let) as shown below:

user=> (let 42)
UnsupportedOperationException argument to (let)  must be a vector (found a Long instead).  clojure.lang.Compiler.checkLet (Compiler.java:6553)
Comment by Eugene Koontz [ 11/Nov/11 7:38 PM ]

Patch produced by doing git diff against commit ba930d95fc (master branch).

Comment by Eugene Koontz [ 13/Nov/11 11:24 PM ]

Sorry, this patch is wrong: it assumes that the left side of the binding is wrong - the [x y] in :

(let [[x y] {}] x)

because [x y] is a vector, when in fact, the left side is fine (per http://clojure.org/special_forms#let : "Clojure supports abstract structural binding, often called destructuring, in let binding lists".)

So it's the right side (the {}) that needs to be checked and flagged as erroneous, not the [x y].

Comment by Carin Meier [ 30/Nov/11 12:15 PM ]

Add patch better-error-for-let-vector-map-binding

This produces the following:

(let [[x y] {}] x)
Exception map binding to vector is not supported

There are other cases that are not handled by this though — like binding vector to a set

user=> (let [[x y] #{}] x)
UnsupportedOperationException nth not supported on this type: PersistentHashSet

Wondering if it might be better to try convert the map to a seq to support? Although this might be another issue.

Thoughts?

Comment by Aaron Bedra [ 30/Nov/11 7:12 PM ]

This seems too specific. Is this issue indicative of a larger problem that should be addressed? Even if this is the only case where bindings produce poor error messages, all the cases described above should be addressed in the patch.

Comment by Carin Meier [ 16/Dec/11 7:47 AM ]

Unfortunately, realized that this still does not cover the nested destructuring cases. Coming to the conclusion, that my approach above is not going to work for this.

Comment by Carin Meier [ 28/Apr/12 10:46 PM ]

File: clj-5-destructure-error.diff

Added support for nested destructuring errors

let [[[x1 y1][x2 y2]] [[1 2] {}]]
;=> UnsupportedOperationException let cannot destructure class clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap.
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 18/Apr/14 1:45 AM ]

I am not wild about that error message, let can destructure a map fine.

If there error message were to change, I would prefer to get something like "sequential destructing not supported on maps".

I actually like the "nth not supported" error message, because it is exactly the problem, nth, used by sequential destructuring, doesn't work on maps.

it conveys exactly what the problem is if you know how destructing works and what nth means, where as "UnsupportedOperationException let cannot destructure class clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap" seems misleading when you are in the know





[CLJ-1124] for-as Created: 10/Dec/12  Updated: 18/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Yongqian Li Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

A common pattern in programming is building up some data structure step by step:

In Python:

x = {0: 1}
for item in stuff:
    x[item] = item * x.get(item - 1, 0)

etc.

In an imperative for loop this is easy since we have easy access to the "current" data structure being built up.

I propose the addition of a function for-as similar to as-> except the value of the last loop iteration is bound to the name.

So we can write the above as:

(last (for-as [x {0 1}]
        [item stuff]
  (assoc x item (* item (get x (- item 1) 0)))))

An (un-optimized) implementation might be something like:

(defmacro reduce-for [[res init] for-seq-exprs body-expr]
  `(reduce #(%2 %1) ~init
    (for ~for-seq-exprs
      (fn [~res]
        ~body-expr))))

Note: reduce-for does not return a seq, instead it returns the result of the last loop body iteration.



 Comments   
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 18/Apr/14 1:30 AM ]

this is not super clear to me, but it seems like a request for a `for` like macro for reduce.

(reduce (fn [x item] (assoc x item (* item (get x (- item 1) 0)))) {0 1} stuff)




[CLJ-1013] Clojure's classloader cannot handle out-of-order loading Created: 13/Jun/12  Updated: 18/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Edward Z. Yang Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None


 Description   

Here is a minimal test-case:

import java.io.IOException;

import clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap;
import clojure.lang.RT;

public class TestClass {

static Class y = RT.class;
//static PersistentTreeMap x = PersistentTreeMap.EMPTY;

/**

  • @param args
  • @throws ClassNotFoundException
  • @throws IOException
    */
    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException { PersistentTreeMap x = PersistentTreeMap.EMPTY; }

}

This results in the exception:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ExceptionInInitializerError
at java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method)
at java.lang.Class.forName(Class.java:247)
at clojure.lang.RT.loadClassForName(RT.java:2056)
at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:419)
at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:400)
at clojure.lang.RT.doInit(RT.java:436)
at clojure.lang.RT.<clinit>(RT.java:318)
at clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap.<init>(PersistentTreeMap.java:45)
at clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap.<clinit>(PersistentTreeMap.java:32)
at TestClass.main(TestClass.java:19)
Caused by: java.lang.NullPointerException
at clojure.lang.APersistentSet.contains(APersistentSet.java:33)
at clojure.lang.RT.contains(RT.java:700)
at clojure.core$contains_QMARK_.invoke(core.clj:1386)
at clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj:5255)
at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:603)
at clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj:5298)
at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
at clojure.core$apply.invoke(core.clj:603)
at clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj:5381)
at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
at clojure.core__init.load(Unknown Source)
at clojure.core__init.<clinit>(Unknown Source)
... 10 more

The crux of the issue appears Clojure's classloader doesn't understand how to handle out-of-order classloading.



 Comments   
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 18/Apr/14 12:31 AM ]

exception still happens with clojure 1.6





[CLJ-1276] Can't make a dispatch map containing forward-declared fns Created: 09/Oct/13  Updated: 18/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Coventry Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: File unbound-eg.tgz    

 Description   

If from (ns tst2) you try to call tst1/c, which calls tst1/f via dispatch map which was defined when tst1/f was forward declared, you get an "unbound fn" error. E.g.

user=> (dorun (map eval 
                   '[(ns tst1) 
                     (declare f) 
                     (def d {:k f}) 
                     (defn c [] ((d :k)))
                     (defn f [] :success)
                     (ns tst2 (:require [tst1]))
                     (tst1/c)]))

IllegalStateException Attempting to call unbound fn: #'tst1/f  clojure.lang.Var$Unbound.throwArity (Var.java:43)
tst2=> (clojure.repl/pst *e)
IllegalStateException Attempting to call unbound fn: #'tst1/f
	clojure.lang.Var$Unbound.throwArity (Var.java:43)
	tst1/c (NO_SOURCE_FILE:5)
	tst2/eval25 (NO_SOURCE_FILE:8)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6642)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6605)
	clojure.core/eval (core.clj:2883)
	clojure.core/map/fn--4222 (core.clj:2513)
	clojure.lang.LazySeq.sval (LazySeq.java:40)
	clojure.lang.LazySeq.seq (LazySeq.java:49)
	clojure.lang.RT.seq (RT.java:484)
	clojure.core/seq (core.clj:133)
	clojure.core/dorun (core.clj:2811)


 Comments   
Comment by Alex Coventry [ 09/Oct/13 10:43 PM ]

TEttinger pointed out on IRC that the forms in the example run without error if you wrap them in a (do) block. Here is an example using files. Relevant code is in src/unbound_eg/tst[12].clj. Example output shown below.

http://clojure-log.n01se.net/date/2013-10-09.html#23:52

lap% lein repl
nREPL server started on port 50125 on host 127.0.0.1
REPL-y 0.2.1
Clojure 1.5.1
Docs: (doc function-name-here)
(find-doc "part-of-name-here")
Source: (source function-name-here)
Javadoc: (javadoc java-object-or-class-here)
Exit: Control+D or (exit) or (quit)

user=> (require '[unbound-eg.tst2 :as t2])

IllegalStateException Attempting to call unbound fn: #'unbound-eg.tst1/f clojure.lang.Var$Unbound.throwArity (Var.java:43)
user=> (pst)
IllegalStateException Attempting to call unbound fn: #'unbound-eg.tst1/f
clojure.lang.Var$Unbound.throwArity (Var.java:43)
unbound-eg.tst1/c (tst1.clj:4)
unbound-eg.tst2/eval2233 (tst2.clj:3)
clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6619)
clojure.lang.Compiler.load (Compiler.java:7064)
clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript (RT.java:370)
clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript (RT.java:361)
clojure.lang.RT.load (RT.java:440)
clojure.lang.RT.load (RT.java:411)
clojure.core/load/fn--5018 (core.clj:5530)
clojure.core/load (core.clj:5529)
clojure.core/load-one (core.clj:5336)
nil

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 18/Apr/14 12:23 AM ]

this is just a fact of clojure's compilation model and how vars work.

a var is a little mutable cell

(declare foo) declares that a mutable cell exists with the name foo, it doesn't contain a value

foo then gets the value of the mutable cell (which has none)

(defn foo [] 1) then sets the value of the cell named foo to the function created from (fn [] 1)





[CLJ-1322] doseq with several bindings causes "ClassFormatError: Invalid Method Code length" Created: 10/Jan/14  Updated: 18/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Miikka Koskinen Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None
Environment:

Clojure 1.5.1, java 1.7.0_25, OpenJDK Runtime Environment (IcedTea 2.3.10) (7u25-2.3.10-1ubuntu0.12.04.2)


Approval: Triaged

 Description   
user=> (def a1 (range 10))
#'user/a1
user=> (doseq [x1 a1 x2 a1 x3 a1 x4 a1 x5 a1 x6 a1 x7 a1 x8 a1] (do))
CompilerException java.lang.ClassFormatError: Invalid method Code length 69883 in class file user$eval1032, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:2:1)

While this example is silly, it's a problem we've hit a couple of times. It's pretty surprising when you have just a couple of lines of code and suddenly you get the code length error.



 Comments   
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 18/Apr/14 12:20 AM ]

reproduces with jdk 1.8.0 and clojure 1.6





[CLJ-1280] Create reusable exception that can carry file/line/col info Created: 18/Oct/13  Updated: 18/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None


 Description   

This concept already exists in multiple places in Clojure - Compiler$CompilerException and the Exception classes buried in EdnReader and LispReader. It would also be useful in other places where IllegalArgument or other other exceptions are thrown.

For example, this protocol exception throws an IllegalArgumentException and could transmit the file, line, and column info at the location of the error but it seems weird to use any of the existing exceptions for this purpose.

(defprotocol Bar (m [this]) (m [this arg]))


 Comments   
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 18/Apr/14 12:09 AM ]

seems like ExceptionInfo can do this





[CLJ-127] DynamicClassLoader's call to ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader is prohibited in some environments Created: 18/Jun/09  Updated: 18/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: classloader


 Description   

Currently, clojure.lang.DynamicClassLoader's constructor has the
following call to super():

super(EMPTY_URLS,
      (Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader() == null ||
        Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader() == ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader()) ?
          Compiler.class.getClassLoader() : Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader());

That call to ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader() is forbidden by Google
AppEngine's security policies. That restricts you from being able to
load any resources from the classpath that haven't been AOT-compiled.
I've verified that just removing that removing the " ||
Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader() ==
ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader()" does in fact result in something
that works in GAE (as far as my needs go). Unfortunately, I'm not sure
whether that breaks anything, which, presumably, it does.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/127

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

jmcconnell said: I'd be happy to take this up with the GAE folks if it winds up looking like this is something they should probably allow or if we need any further information from them on their policies.

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#127, #128, #129, #130)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

mikehinchey said: GAE made some changes a few weeks ago, maybe changed this because I'm able to load from .clj files now (not the servlet, of course, which must be gen-class).

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #42, #113, #2, #20, #94, #96, #104, #119, #124, #127, #149, #162)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 3:45 AM ]

mattrevelle said: J. McConnell, was this issue resolved by a change in GAE policy?

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 18/Apr/14 12:05 AM ]

hard to say if this is still an issue, but I have been able to run clojure code on GAE in the past





[CLJ-760] ClassNotFound when AOT compiling a self-referring deftype extended to a protocol Created: 18/Mar/11  Updated: 17/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.2
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Ryan Senior Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: aot
Environment:

Clojure 1.2.0, 1.2.1, 1.3.0-alpha6, JDK 1.6.0_24, Ubuntu 10.10


Attachments: Text File stacktraces.txt    

 Description   

If I create a deftype that refers to itself in a protocol extension like below:

(ns type-test)

(defprotocol Foo
  (isa-foo [x]))

(deftype TypeTest []
  Foo
  (isa-foo [x]
           (instance? TypeTest x)))

And use that code via another namespace:

(ns test-type-user
  (:use [type-test :only (isa-foo)])
  (:import [type-test TypeTest]))

(isa-foo (TypeTest.))

When I try to AOT compile the test-type-user namespace with Clojure 1.2.0, I get java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: compilestub/type-test/TypeTest (test_type_user.clj:5). Full stack trace attached. Running the same code on 1.2.1 and 1.3.0-alpha6 yielded the same exception with a slightly different error message (stacktrace for 1.2.1 is also in the attached file).

This came up in a test at Revelytix. We worked around this issue by not using instance? and instead comparing based on class name. Another workaround is to define the deftype and the extension separately (using extend-type or something similar). This problem also doesn't occur if the usage of the deftype and the definition of it are in the same namespace (i.e. if type-test and test-type-user were in the same file).



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Mar/11 10:27 AM ]

The first case where we saw this was actually in having a deftype implement a Java interface (not a protocol) and in that case you cannot extend the interface outside the deftype (although comparing based on class name of course works).

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/14 10:55 PM ]

I wonder if this could be a problem with the way the compiler does intrinsic magic for "instance?", there have been other bugs and significant changes to that part of the compiler in 2 years.

I am unable to reproduce this issue on clojure 1.6 or 1.5.1

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/14 10:57 PM ]

may be a dup of http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-698





[CLJ-1214] Compiler runs out of memory on a small snippet of code Created: 31/May/13  Updated: 17/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Praki Prakash Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler
Environment:

Linux 3.2.0-39-generic


Attachments: File fubar.clj    

 Description   

Clojure compiler runs out of memory when loading the attached file. Transcript below.

$ java -cp ~/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.5.1/clojure-1.5.1.jar:. clojure.main
Clojure 1.5.1
user=> (load "fubar")
OutOfMemoryError GC overhead limit exceeded  [trace missing]
user=> 

The file contents are:

  (ns fu.bar)

  (defn foo[l] (concat (drop-last l) (repeat (last l))))

  (def ^:const bar (foo [#(print "") #(println ";")]))

  bar

If I remove the metadata on bar, it works. Removal of namespace seems to fix it as well. Pretty strange.

Although I realize this code is not quite kosher, it would be nice to have the compiler deal with it.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Jun/13 7:40 PM ]

If you really do have 'bar' on a line by itself at the end of file fubar.clj, it seems you are asking it to evaluate the value of bar, which by the definitions is an infinite list, and will of course exhaust all available memory if you attempt to evaluate it.

It seems to me the more odd thing is not that it runs out of memory as shown, but that it does not run out of memory when you remove the metadata on bar.

What is the purpose of having 'bar' on a line by itself at the end of the file?

If I try this but remove 'bar' as the last line of the file, loading the file causes no errors regardless of whether there is metadata on bar's definition or not. It is strange that doing (load "fubar") followed by (first fu.bar/bar) seems to go into an infinite loop if the :const is there on bar, but quickly returns the correct answer if the metadata is removed.

Comment by Praki Prakash [ 01/Jun/13 8:40 PM ]

This code snippet is a minimal test case to show that the compiler runs out of memory. What I meant by "it works" was that the compiler doesn't run out of memory and successfully loads the file (or in my real code base, the namespace is compiled).

In my code, I use bar (or whatever the real thing is) as source of sequence of functions. The sole reference to bar is needed to trigger this issue. I believe that bar is not being fully evaluated here and thus no infinite loop. If I try to print it, yes, it will ultimately fail.

Comment by Praki Prakash [ 01/Jun/13 9:04 PM ]

Having thought about this a bit more, it seems to me that when bar is annotated with const, the compiler is trying to evaluate the associated expression which exhausts the heap? I have never looked at the compiler source and thus not sure if this is what is happening. If it is, then it seems like one should be really careful when adding metadata.

That still leaves the other question about the namespace requirement to cause memory exhaustion. I quite distinctly recall having to add the namespace when trying to come up with minimal test case to reproduce the bug.

If you think this is really user error, I would accept it

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 02/Jun/13 4:56 AM ]

It is not just any old metadata that causes this issue, only :const metadata. I tried testing with :const replaced with :dynamic and :private, and there was no problem.

This might shed some light on the issue: https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/changes.md#215-const-defs

It appears that ^:const is causing the compiler to evaluate the value at compile time. The value in your example is unbounded, so that can never complete.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/14 10:39 PM ]

the problem is for complex objects :const results in the pr-str of the object being embedded in the bytecode, a pr-str of an infinite seq is going to blow the heap. I think the limits on the usage of :const are not well defined and instead of falling back on pr-str it should throw a compilation error for constants that are not jvm primitves or strings

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Apr/14 10:46 PM ]

There is support for handling a variety of other useful cases (core Clojure collections for example) as constant objects. And it is useful to allow code that is not constant but evaluates to a constant result (for creating data tables, etc). In the face of that, I'm not sure it's possible to bound this usefully without solving the halting problem. I'm tempted to just put this issue in the category of "don't do that".





[CLJ-450] Add default predicate argument to filter, every?, take-while Created: 01/Oct/10  Updated: 17/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File clj-450-add-default-pred-arg-to-core-fns-patch.txt     Text File clojure-default-every-argument-v1.patch    

 Description   

Some seq processing functions that take predicates could be improved by the addition of a default value of identity for the predicate argument.

This has been discussed on the mailing list, and people seem favorable:
http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/600559b7ee261908/3bc5d144ac54854e?lnk=gst&q=filter+identity#3bc5d144ac54854e
http://groups.google.com/group/clojure-dev/browse_thread/thread/0a9b5750dd7ec4ca

I can put together a patch.



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 01/Oct/10 4:39 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/450

Comment by Jason Orendorff [ 13/Mar/12 2:51 PM ]

I independently wanted this. Here's a patch for: some, not-any?, every?, not-every?. If this is roughly what's wanted I'll be happy to add filter, remove, take-while, drop-while.

Comment by Jason Orendorff [ 13/Mar/12 4:57 PM ]

Note that there are a few cases of (every? identity ...) and (some identity ...) in core.clj itself; the patch removes "identity" from those.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 26/Apr/12 7:51 PM ]

clj-450-add-default-pred-arg-to-core-fns-patch.txt dated Apr 26 2012 is identical to Jason Orendorff's, except it is in git format. Jason is not on the list of Clojure contributors as of today. I have sent him an email asking if he has done so, or is planning to.

Comment by Jason Orendorff [ 27/Apr/12 10:35 AM ]

Of course I'd be happy to send in a contributor agreement. ...Is there actually any interest in taking this patch or something like it?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 27/Apr/12 11:38 AM ]

I don't know if there is any interest in taking this patch. Perhaps a Clojure screener will take a look at it and comment, but I am not a screener and can't promise anything.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/14 10:33 PM ]

it doesn't seem productive to dance around: "I'll send in a ca, if you agree to take my patch" "We might take your patch but first send in a ca"

if there is no signed ca I think the patch should be removed from jira

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Apr/14 10:39 PM ]

Generally, I do not look at patches from people that have not signed a CA in case I need to write a patch later that is "clean".





[CLJ-273] def with a function value returns meta {:macro false}, but def itself doesn't have meta Created: 23/Feb/10  Updated: 17/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Rich Hickey
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

On the master (1.2) branch, if you create a def with an initial function value, {:macro false} is added to the metadata of the return value for def. However, if you look again at the metadata on the var itself, the {:macro false} is not present! This breaks the use of contrib's defalias when aliasing macros, because the new alias is marked as {:macro false}.

The code below demonstrates the issue, which was introduced in http://github.com/richhickey/clojure/commit/430dd4fa711d0008137d7a82d4b4cd27b6e2d6d1, "metadata for fns."

;; all running on 1.2, DIFF noted in comments

(defmacro foo [])
-> #'user/foo

(meta (def bar (.getRoot #'foo)))
-> {:macro false, :ns #<Namespace user>, :name bar, :file "NO_SOURCE_PATH", :line 83}
;; DIFF: where did that :macro false come from??

(def bar (.getRoot #'foo))
-> #'user/bar

(meta #'bar)
-> {:ns #<Namespace user>, :name bar, :file "NO_SOURCE_PATH", :line 84}
;; LIKE 1.1, but really weird: now the :macro false is gone again!


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 9:32 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/273

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/14 10:27 PM ]

this belongs in the isssues for one of the new contrib projects (if defalias ever got moved)

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Apr/14 10:35 PM ]

actually, it sounds like defalias is just a place where the issue is observed but the issue is in core. The old contrib/def.clj moved to core.incubator, but defalias did not go with it.





[CLJ-366] Multiplatform command-line clojure launcher Created: 28/May/10  Updated: 17/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Backlog
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Assembla Importer Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

Clojure needs a lower barrier of entry, long java commands scare people away! We need a script that conveniently launches a clojure repl or executes clojure files, much like the ruby/python/perl/other-favorite-interpreted-language behavior.

NOTES:

From Russ Olson (regarding Dejure/Dejour):

  • I just fixed a bunch of bugs in the script, so make sure you get the latest from download from: http://github.com/russolsen/dejour
  • After looking at jruby, scala, and groovy, it seems that the only way to do this right on windows is to write a C or C++ program and have a .exe.


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 8:21 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/366

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 8:21 AM ]

stu said: Updating tickets (#370, #366, #374)

Comment by Aaron Bedra [ 10/Dec/10 10:13 AM ]

Design page is at http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/CLJ+Launcher and should be the basis for all future discussion

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/14 10:22 PM ]

is the priority on this, as the ticket says, Major?

the last commit on https://github.com/russolsen/dejour was 2 years ago.
the last edit to the wikipage was 3 years ago.





[CLJ-1037] Allow doc strings for both interfaces and concrete implementations Created: 04/Aug/12  Updated: 17/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Warren Lynn Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

In this post
http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/84de74740928da76#

I mentioned the rationale (I think) why this is important and needed. Thank you for consideration.



 Comments   
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/14 10:08 PM ]

clojure's documentation system has two parts:

1. docstrings are attached to the metadata of objects

2. the doc macro (and some other tools) read the docstrings from objects and display them

the two parts work together, without the doc macro, docstrings are just comments that also take up memory at runtime, and the doc macro has no purpose without the docstrings.

the two main places docstrings are hung are var metadata and namespace metadata.

for multimethods and protocol functions the docstrings are hung on vars.

for the implementations of multimethods and protocols there are no distinct vars to hang documentation information on, and it is not clear how you would look up those doc strings.

so to support docs on defmethods and protocol implementations would require enhancements to doc and some design work, so a wiki page to come up with a design would be a good idea.





[CLJ-1407] Recur mismatch might cause multiple evaluation Created: 17/Apr/14  Updated: 17/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler, macro


 Description   

Since mismatching recurs cause the loop body to be re-analyzed, macroexpansion in the loop body might happen more than once, causing any side effects that happen during macroexpansion to be evaluated potentially multiple times

Clojure 1.7.0-master-SNAPSHOT
user=> (defmacro x [] (println "foo"))
#'user/x
user=> (fn [] (loop [y 1] (x) (recur (Integer. 1))))
foo
foo
#<user$eval6$fn__7 user$eval6$fn__7@71687585>


 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 17/Apr/14 6:59 PM ]

This is not a question about whether the behavior in the description is a bug or not, but rather a curiosity about how often people write macros that have side effects at macroexpansion time. I think the following in Clojure itself do, but there may be others:

  • gen-class, and also ns because it uses gen-class
  • gen-interface, and also definterface because it uses gen-interface
  • clojure.core/compile-if (private) calls eval on its expr arg, but as used now doesn't cause macroexpansion-time side effects
  • doc seems to have one case that prints at macroexpansion time
  • I am not sure whether defprotocol or deftype have macroexpansion time side effects, or whether they are limited to run time
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 17/Apr/14 9:20 PM ]

Andy, I don't think there are that many macros that side-effect at macroexpansion time and I haven't discovered this bug in real code but while thinking about how loop locals invalidation was implemented in Compiler.java.

Because there are a really a small number of side-effecting macros, this is unlikely to cause problems in real code, so I changed the priority to minor.





[CLJ-1152] PermGen leak in multimethods and protocol fns when evaled Created: 30/Jan/13  Updated: 17/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Chouser Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: memory, protocols

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

There is a PermGen memory leak that we have tracked down to protocol methods and multimethods called inside an eval, because of the caches these methods use. The problem only arises when the value being cached is an instance of a class (such as a function or reify) that was defined inside the eval. Thus extending IFn or dispatching a multimethod on an IFn are likely triggers.

My fellow LonoClouder, Jeff Dik describes how to reproduce and work around the problem:

The easiest way that I have found to test this is to set "-XX:MaxPermSize" to a reasonable value so you don't have to wait too long for the PermGen space to fill up, and to use "-XX:+TraceClassLoading" and "-XX:+TraceClassUnloading" to see the classes being loaded and unloaded.

leiningen project.clj
(defproject permgen-scratch "0.1.0-SNAPSHOT"
  :dependencies [[org.clojure/clojure "1.5.0-RC1"]]
  :jvm-opts ["-XX:MaxPermSize=32M"
             "-XX:+TraceClassLoading"
             "-XX:+TraceClassUnloading"])

You can use lein swank 45678 and connect with slime in emacs via M-x slime-connect.

To monitor the PermGen usage, you can find the Java process to watch with "jps -lmvV" and then run "jstat -gcold <PROCESS_ID> 1s". According to the jstat docs, the first column (PC) is the "Current permanent space capacity (KB)" and the second column (PU) is the "Permanent space utilization (KB)". VisualVM is also a nice tool for monitoring this.

Multimethod leak

Evaluating the following code will run a loop that eval's (take* (fn foo [])).

multimethod leak
(defmulti take* (fn [a] (type a)))

(defmethod take* clojure.lang.Fn
  [a]
  '())

(def stop (atom false))
(def sleep-duration (atom 1000))

(defn run-loop []
  (when-not @stop
    (eval '(take* (fn foo [])))
    (Thread/sleep @sleep-duration)
    (recur)))

(future (run-loop))

(reset! sleep-duration 0)

In the lein swank session, you will see many lines like below listing the classes being created and loaded.

[Loaded user$eval15802$foo__15803 from __JVM_DefineClass__]
[Loaded user$eval15802 from __JVM_DefineClass__]

These lines will stop once the PermGen space fills up.

In the jstat monitoring, you'll see the amount of used PermGen space (PU) increase to the max and stay there.

-    PC       PU        OC          OU       YGC    FGC    FGCT     GCT
 31616.0  31552.7    365952.0         0.0      4     0    0.000    0.129
 32000.0  31914.0    365952.0         0.0      4     0    0.000    0.129
 32768.0  32635.5    365952.0         0.0      4     0    0.000    0.129
 32768.0  32767.6    365952.0      1872.0      5     1    0.000    0.177
 32768.0  32108.2    291008.0     23681.8      6     2    0.827    1.006
 32768.0  32470.4    291008.0     23681.8      6     2    0.827    1.006
 32768.0  32767.2    698880.0     24013.8      8     4    1.073    1.258
 32768.0  32767.2    698880.0     24013.8      8     4    1.073    1.258
 32768.0  32767.2    698880.0     24013.8      8     4    1.073    1.258

A workaround is to run prefer-method before the PermGen space is all used up, e.g.

(prefer-method take* clojure.lang.Fn java.lang.Object)

Then, when the used PermGen space is close to the max, in the lein swank session, you will see the classes created by the eval'ing being unloaded.

[Unloading class user$eval5950$foo__5951]
[Unloading class user$eval3814]
[Unloading class user$eval2902$foo__2903]
[Unloading class user$eval13414]

In the jstat monitoring, there will be a long pause when used PermGen space stays close to the max, and then it will drop down, and start increasing again when more eval'ing occurs.

-    PC       PU        OC          OU       YGC    FGC    FGCT     GCT
 32768.0  32767.9    159680.0     24573.4      6     2    0.167    0.391
 32768.0  32767.9    159680.0     24573.4      6     2    0.167    0.391
 32768.0  17891.3    283776.0     17243.9      6     2   50.589   50.813
 32768.0  18254.2    283776.0     17243.9      6     2   50.589   50.813

The defmulti defines a cache that uses the dispatch values as keys. Each eval call in the loop defines a new foo class which is then added to the cache when take* is called, preventing the class from ever being GCed.

The prefer-method workaround works because it calls clojure.lang.MultiFn.preferMethod, which calls the private MultiFn.resetCache method, which completely empties the cache.

Protocol leak

The leak with protocol methods similarly involves a cache. You see essentially the same behavior as the multimethod leak if you run the following code using protocols.

protocol leak
(defprotocol ITake (take* [a]))

(extend-type clojure.lang.Fn
  ITake
  (take* [this] '()))

(def stop (atom false))
(def sleep-duration (atom 1000))

(defn run-loop []
  (when-not @stop
    (eval '(take* (fn foo [])))
    (Thread/sleep @sleep-duration)
    (recur)))

(future (run-loop))

(reset! sleep-duration 0)

Again, the cache is in the take* method itself, using each new foo class as a key.

A workaround is to run -reset-methods on the protocol before the PermGen space is all used up, e.g.

(-reset-methods ITake)

This works because -reset-methods replaces the cache with an empty MethodImplCache.



 Comments   
Comment by Chouser [ 30/Jan/13 9:10 AM ]

I think the most obvious solution would be to constrain the size of the cache. Adding an item to the cache is already not the fastest path, so a bit more work could be done to prevent the cache from growing indefinitely large.

That does raise the question of what criteria to use. Keep the first n entries? Keep the n most recently used (which would require bookkeeping in the fast cache-hit path)? Keep the n most recently added?

Comment by Jamie Stephens [ 18/Oct/13 9:35 AM ]

At a minimum, perhaps a switch to disable the caches – with obvious performance impact caveats.

Seems like expensive LRU logic is probably the way to go, but maybe don't have it kick in fully until some threshold is crossed.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Oct/13 4:28 PM ]

A report seeing this in production from mailing list:
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/_n3HipchjCc

Comment by Adrian Medina [ 10/Dec/13 11:43 AM ]

So this is why we've been running into PermGen space exceptions! This is a fairly critical bug for us - I'm making extensive use of multimethods in our codebase and this exception will creep in at runtime randomly.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/14 9:52 PM ]

it might be better to split this in to two issues, because at a very abstract level the two issues are the "same", but concretely they are distinct (protocols don't really share code paths with multimethods), keeping them together in one issue seems like a recipe for a large hard to read patch





[CLJ-971] Jar within a jar throws a runtime error Created: 10/Apr/12  Updated: 17/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.2, Release 1.3
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Ron Romero Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None
Environment:

Maven using the one-jar plugin


Attachments: Text File clj-971-1.patch     Text File clj-971-2.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

I've created two jar files in my multi-project Maven setup. The first jar is the "engine", and it includes the clojure jar in it. The other jar is the "application". It includes the engine and then packages itself into a one-jar jar file. This means we have a jar within a jar: The "onejar" contains the engine jar, which in turn contains that clojure jar.

I then get an error in the runtime:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException
at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:57)
at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:616)
at com.simontuffs.onejar.Boot.run(Boot.java:340)
at com.simontuffs.onejar.Boot.main(Boot.java:166)
Caused by: java.lang.ExceptionInInitializerError
at com.ziroby.clojure.App.main(App.java:14)
... 6 more
Caused by: java.lang.NullPointerException
at clojure.lang.RT.lastModified(RT.java:374)
at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:408)
at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:398)
at clojure.lang.RT.doInit(RT.java:434)
at clojure.lang.RT.<clinit>(RT.java:316)
... 7 more

See also my Stack Overflow question on this at http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7763480/making-an-executable-jar-that-evals-clojure-strings

In researching it, I've found the problem lies in RT.lastModified, where it tries to determine last modified time by looking at the modified time on the jar file for Clojure. But there's not actually a jar file, since it's embedded in another.

I've found that adding a null check solves the problem. My lastModified looks like this now:

static public long lastModified(URL url, String libfile) throws Exception{
if(url.getProtocol().equals("jar")) { ZipEntry entry = ((JarURLConnection) url.openConnection()).getJarFile().getEntry(libfile); if (entry != null) return entry.getTime(); }

return url.openConnection().getLastModified();
}

This runs successfully.

If you'd prefer, I can submit a patch, or commit directly.



 Comments   
Comment by Anders Sveen [ 11/Nov/13 3:29 AM ]

Would be awesome if you could get this working. Wanting to use som Clojure libs in Java so Leiningen uberjar is not an option right now.

Comment by Paavo Parkkinen [ 24/Nov/13 7:11 AM ]

Took the code change in the description and rolled it into a patch to hopefully push this forward a little bit.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 24/Nov/13 10:06 AM ]

Thanks Paavo - on a quick scan, it looks like in the case you're interested in the updated code would now call url.openConnection() twice - perhaps that could be factored out?

Comment by Paavo Parkkinen [ 25/Nov/13 6:19 AM ]

New patch with duplicate calls to url.openConnection() factored out.

Comment by Gleb Kanterov [ 13/Dec/13 4:30 AM ]

I had the same issue, adding following line to manifest file worked for me

One-Jar-URL-Factory: com.simontuffs.onejar.JarClassLoader$OneJarURLFactory
Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 31/Jan/14 1:04 PM ]

Can we get a test showing the normal path and the can't-read-inside path?

Comment by Sean Shubin [ 17/Apr/14 9:34 PM ]

I notice this solution falls back on the last modified date for the entire jar, while it is still possible to get the date of the individual file, albeit less efficiently.
I posted a way to get the individual file date in CLJ-1405.
Perhaps you don't need the date of the individual file, but I am having a hard time groking the calling code so I am not sure what its intent is.
I did notice in the calling code that the if statement
(classURL != null && (cljURL == null || lastModified(classURL, classfile) > lastModified(cljURL, cljfile))) || classURL == null
Is logically equivalent to the much simpler
classURL == null || cljURL == null || lastModified(classURL, classfile) > lastModified(cljURL, cljfile)





[CLJ-1406] Libs are blindly added into loaded-libs even if an error occurs during loading Created: 17/Apr/14  Updated: 17/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: OHTA Shogo Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-modify-clojure.core-load-lib-so-that-it-removes-the-.patch    
Patch: Code

 Description   

Suppose you have a lib that causes some errors during loading, like the following:

(ns broken-lib)

(} ; this line will cause a reader error

And then, if you require the lib, it would be added into loaded-libs in spite of the reader error, which makes require succeed silently after that.

user=> (contains? (loaded-libs) 'broken-lib)
false
user=> (require 'broken-lib)
CompilerException java.lang.RuntimeException: Unmatched delimiter: }, compiling:(broken_lib.clj:3:3) 
user=> (contains? (loaded-libs) 'broken-lib)
true
user=> (require 'broken-lib)
nil
user=>

Cause:
The patch for CLJ-1116 made the ns macro blindly add the lib being defined into loaded-libs even if an error occurs during loading.

Approach:
Modify clojure.core/load-lib so that it removes the lib from loaded-libs on error.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Apr/14 9:07 AM ]

This patch seems somewhat removed from the cause - is there some way to instead prevent the lib from being added to loaded-libs in the first place?

Comment by OHTA Shogo [ 17/Apr/14 9:21 AM ]

To do so, I think we need to revert CLJ-1116.





[CLJ-1232] Functions with non-qualified return type hints force import of hinted classes when called from other namespace Created: 18/Jul/13  Updated: 17/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Tassilo Horn Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: typehints


 Description   

You can add a type hint to function arglists to indicate the return type of a function like so.

user> (import '(java.util List))
java.util.List
user> (defn linkedlist ^List [] (java.util.LinkedList.))
#'user/linkedlist
user> (.size (linkedlist))
0

The problem is that now when I call `linkedlist` exactly as above from another namespace, I'll get an exception because java.util.List is not imported in there.

user> (in-ns 'user2)
#<Namespace user2>
user2> (refer 'user)
nil
user2> (.size (linkedlist))
CompilerException java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Unable to resolve classname: List, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:1:1)
user2> (import '(java.util List)) ;; Too bad, need to import List here, too.
java.util.List
user2> (.size (linkedlist))
0

There are two workarounds: You can import the hinted type also in the calling namespace, or you always use fully qualified class names for return type hints. Clearly, the latter is preferable.

But clearly, that's a bug that should be fixed. It's not in analogy to type hints on function parameters which may be simple-named without having any consequences for callers from other namespaces.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 16/Apr/14 3:47 PM ]

To make sure I understand, Nicola, in this ticket you are asking that the Clojure compiler change behavior so that the sample code works correctly with no exceptions, the same way as it would work correctly without exceptions if one of the workarounds were used?

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 17/Apr/14 12:18 AM ]

Hi Andy. Tassilo here, not Nicola. But yes, the example should work as-is. When I'm allowed to use type hints with simple imported class names for arguments, then doing so for return values should work, too.





[CLJ-1405] clojure runtime does not work with onejar-maven-plugin Created: 16/Apr/14  Updated: 16/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Sean Shubin Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None
Environment:

I was able to repeat this problem on windows, linux, and osx


Attachments: Text File onejar-maven-plugin-fix.patch    
Patch: Code

 Description   

I have created a sample project, steps to repeat the problem, and a proposed patch here:
https://github.com/SeanShubin/clojure-one-jar

I have also attached my proposed patch to this ticket, and pasted the relevant portion of README.md below:

clojure-one-jar
===============

Sample project to demonstrate problem with combining clojure runtime with onejar-maven-plugin

Steps to repeat the problem
===========================

  • mvn package
  • java -jar target/greeter.jar

Behavior before patch is applied
================================
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException
at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:62)
at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:483)
at com.simontuffs.onejar.Boot.run(Boot.java:340)
at com.simontuffs.onejar.Boot.main(Boot.java:166)
Caused by: java.lang.ExceptionInInitializerError
at com.seanshubin.clojure_one_jar.Greeter.main(Greeter.java:12)
... 6 more
Caused by: java.lang.NullPointerException
at clojure.lang.RT.lastModified(RT.java:387)
at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:421)
at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:411)
at clojure.lang.RT.doInit(RT.java:447)
at clojure.lang.RT.<clinit>(RT.java:329)
... 7 more

Behavior after patch is applied
===============================
No need to call RT.init() anymore
Hello, world!

Patch
=====
I applied this patch to my local copy of clojure 1.7.0-master-SNAPSHOT
https://github.com/SeanShubin/clojure-one-jar/blob/master/onejar-maven-plugin-fix.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 16/Apr/14 9:45 PM ]

I think this is a dupe of CLJ-971 - can you verify?

Comment by Sean Shubin [ 16/Apr/14 9:49 PM ]

Yes, I looked over CLJ-971 and can confirm this matches my observations regarding why this is happening.

Comment by Sean Shubin [ 16/Apr/14 9:54 PM ]

My solution is a bit different in that it still tries to get the date of the file rather than defaulting to the date of the entire jar. I don't have a solid enough understanding of the calling code to know if this is important.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 16/Apr/14 10:17 PM ]

FYI, to consider your patch, I would need you to sign a Contributor Agreement - see http://clojure.org/contributing for details. I do think that is an area that something is needed, will need to assess the options a bit more.

Comment by Sean Shubin [ 16/Apr/14 10:56 PM ]

Sure thing, I just signed and sent a Contributor Agreement, per the instructions at http://clojure.org/contributing





[CLJ-1325] Add *warn-on-boxed-math* warning Created: 16/Jan/14  Updated: 15/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Release 1.7

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Alex Miller
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: errormsgs, math

Attachments: File boxed.diff     Text File boxedmath.txt    
Patch: Code
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Currently, it is difficult to tell that the compiler is using boxed math unless you look at the generated bytecode. Adding warn-on-boxed-math warning (similar in use to warn-on-reflection) to warn when these calls are being made.

Approach: In the compiler, when compiling a StaticMethodExpr that is specifying a call into certain boxed math methods on Number, and if the warning is enabled, print the warning. The list of calls would need to be in a boxed math "black list" which would probably be created manually.

Patch: The attached patch is an incomplete sketch of the solution. It is not yet specific enough in determining whether the particular call to Numbers is doing boxed math - it merely looks for an Object argument, which does catch a large set of the actual calls, but may also ensnare some calls that should not be included. One option would be to mark the offending methods in Numbers with an annotation that could be checked in isBoxedMath.

Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Apr/14 10:56 PM ]

Moving to 1.7.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 15/Apr/14 10:17 AM ]

List of methods in Numbers and whether they should be considered "boxed math" or not, with some questions.





[CLJ-1404] clojure.core/vals returns nil on an empty map instead of an empty sequence Created: 14/Apr/14  Updated: 14/Apr/14  Resolved: 14/Apr/14

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Trivial
Reporter: Satshabad Khalsa Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Declined Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

Is this a bug? maybe I just don't understand. The documentation says: Returns a sequence of the map's values. Is nil a sequence?

This caused an unexpected nil to propagate through a bunch of list processing stuff.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Apr/14 10:54 PM ]

An empty sequence is represented by nil, so this is consistent. For example: (seq (range 0)) => nil





[CLJ-1403] ns-resolve might throw ClassNotFoundException but should return nil Created: 14/Apr/14  Updated: 14/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None


 Description   

The doc of ns-resolve states that in case the symbol cannot be resolved, it should return nil.

user=> (doc ns-resolve)
-------------------------
clojure.core/ns-resolve
([ns sym] [ns env sym])
  Returns the var or Class to which a symbol will be resolved in the
  namespace (unless found in the environment), else nil.  Note that
  if the symbol is fully qualified, the var/Class to which it resolves
  need not be present in the namespace.
nil

However if the symbol contains dots and is not a resolvable Class, a ClassNotFoundException is thrown

user=> (ns-resolve *ns* 'foo.bar)
ClassNotFoundException foo.bar  java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run (URLClassLoader.java:372)
user=> (pst *e)
ClassNotFoundException foo.bar
	java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run (URLClassLoader.java:372)
	java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run (URLClassLoader.java:361)
	java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged (AccessController.java:-2)
	java.net.URLClassLoader.findClass (URLClassLoader.java:360)
	clojure.lang.DynamicClassLoader.findClass (DynamicClassLoader.java:61)
	java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass (ClassLoader.java:424)
	java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass (ClassLoader.java:357)
	java.lang.Class.forName0 (Class.java:-2)
	java.lang.Class.forName (Class.java:340)
	clojure.lang.RT.classForName (RT.java:2065)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.maybeResolveIn (Compiler.java:6963)
	clojure.core/ns-resolve (core.clj:4026)
nil


 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Apr/14 2:07 PM ]

Can you include the (pst *e) ?

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 14/Apr/14 2:10 PM ]

Added result of (pst *e) in the description





[CLJ-1134] star-directive in clojure.pprint/cl-format with an at-prefix ("~n@*") do not obey its specifications Created: 18/Dec/12  Updated: 14/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4, Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Jean Niklas L'orange Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: print

Attachments: Text File clj-1134-star-directive-in-cl-format.txt    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The star-directive in clojure.pprint/cl-format with an at-prefix (~n@*) does not obey its specifications according to Common Lisp the Language, 2nd Edition. There are two bugs within ~n@* as of right now:

  1. When ~n@* is supposed to jump forward over more than one argument, it jumps one step backward as if it had seen ~:*. For instance, (cl-format nil "~D ~3@*~D" 0 1 2 3) will return "0 0" and not "0 3" as expected.
  2. When ~@* is seen, the formatter is supposed to jump to the first argument (as n defaults to 0, see specification linked above). However, whenever a ~@*-directive is seen, the formatter jumps to the second argument instead.

What (small set of) steps will reproduce the problem?

Inside a clean Clojure repl, perform these steps:

user=> (require '[clojure.pprint :refer [cl-format]])
nil
user=> (cl-format nil "~D ~3@*~D" 0 1 2 3)
"0 0"                                           ;; Expected: "0 3"
user=> (cl-format nil "~D~D~D~D ~@*~D" 0 1 2 3)
"0123 1"                                        ;; Expected: "0123 0"

What is the expected output? What do you see instead?

The expected output is "0 3" and "0123 0", but is "0 0" and "0123 1" as shown above.

What version are you using?

Tested on both 1.4.0 and 1.5.0-beta2, both have the defect described.

Please provide any additional information below.

The format strings which reproduces the problem has been compared with the format function from the Common Lisp implementations SBCL, CLisp and Clozure. All of them print the expected output.



 Comments   
Comment by Jean Niklas L'orange [ 18/Dec/12 9:28 PM ]

Patch attached.

It may be easier to read the changes the patch does from within JIRA instead from the commit message, so I've added it here:

This solves two issues as specified by #CLJ-1134. Issue #1 is solved by doing a
relative jump forward within absolute-reposition in cl_format.clj, line 114 by
switching (- (:pos navigator) position) with (- position (:pos navigator)).

Issue #2 is handled by changing the default n-parameter to * depending on
whether the @-prefix is placed or not. If it is placed, then n defaults to
0, otherwise it defaults to 1.

In addition, new tests have been appended to test_cl_format.clj to ensure the
correctness of this patch. The tests have been tested on the Common Lisp
implementation GNU CLISP 2.49, which presumably handle the ~n@*
correctly. This patch and GNU CLISP returns the same output for each format
call, sans case for printed symbols; Common Lisp has case-insensitive symbols,
whereas Clojure has not.

Comment by Tom Faulhaber [ 14/Apr/14 11:12 AM ]

I walked through this patch and it looks just right. Thanks!

Let's get it applied for 1.7.





[CLJ-1039] Using 'def with metadata {:type :anything} throws ClassCastException during printing Created: 09/Aug/12  Updated: 14/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Gunnar Völkel Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None
Environment:

Ubuntu, lein 1.7.1 - lein repl


Attachments: Text File CLJ-1039-tolerate-misleading-type-metadata-on-var-wh.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Specific to setting :type meta on a var:

user=> (def ^{:type :anything} mydef 1)
#<main$repl clojure.main$repl@6193b845>
CompilerException java.lang.ClassNotFoundException: main.clj:257, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:13:20)
ClassCastException clojure.lang.Var cannot be cast to clojure.lang.IObj  clojure.core/with-meta (core.clj:214)
user=> (pst *e)
ClassCastException clojure.lang.Var cannot be cast to clojure.lang.IObj
	clojure.core/with-meta (core.clj:214)
	clojure.core/vary-meta (core.clj:640)
	clojure.core/fn--5420 (core_print.clj:76)
	clojure.lang.MultiFn.invoke (MultiFn.java:232)
	clojure.core/pr-on (core.clj:3392)
	clojure.core/pr (core.clj:3404)
	clojure.core/apply (core.clj:624)
	clojure.core/prn (core.clj:3437)
	clojure.main/repl/read-eval-print--6627 (main.clj:241)
	clojure.main/repl/fn--6636 (main.clj:258)
	clojure.main/repl (main.clj:258)
	clojure.main/repl-opt (main.clj:324)

If it is intended to forbid setting the :type metadata, then there should be an appropriate error message instead of the ClassCastException.

Cause: This is caused by the printer dispatch function

(defmulti print-method (fn [x writer]
                         (let [t (get (meta x) :type)]
                           (if (keyword? t) t (class x)))))

which ends up calling the default dispatch, which tries to vary-meta.

Solution:

Patch:

Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 10/Aug/12 1:40 PM ]

This is caused by the printer dispatch function

(defmulti print-method (fn [x writer]
                         (let [t (get (meta x) :type)]
                           (if (keyword? t) t (class x)))))

which ends up calling the default dispatch, which tries to vary-meta.

Comment by Steve Miner [ 14/Apr/14 10:13 AM ]

The :type metadata is used internally by Clojure. For the situation in this bug report, you have to take responsibility for providing a print-method if you put :type metatdata on your var.

This is not a good example, but it shows one way to work around the bug:

(defmethod print-method :anything [obj w] (print-method {:anything @obj} w))
Comment by Steve Miner [ 14/Apr/14 10:21 AM ]

On the other hand, the :default print-method probably should be more robust. I think a check for (instance? clojure.lang.IObj o) before calling vary-meta would be appropriate. Added a patch that calls print-simple if the o isn't an IObj. That works around the issue for Var, and seems reasonable for other exotic types. The only downside I can imagine is if someone had a custom print-method but accidentally had a typo in their :type metadata, they will no longer get an error. This was an edge case to begin with so that probably doesn't matter.





[CLJ-1185] `reductions should respect `reduced Created: 16/Mar/13  Updated: 14/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Brandon Bloom Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1181-v001.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

This returns 16:

(reduce (fn [acc x]
          (let [x' (* x x)]
            (if (> x' 10)
              (reduced x')
              x')))
        (range))

But replacing `reduce with `reductions will never terminate:

(reductions (fn [acc x]
              (let [x' (* x x)]
                (if (> x' 10)
                  (reduced x')
                  x')))
            (range))

This is because `reductions ignores 'clojure.lang.Reduced, it never tests for `reduced?

I know that I only just discovered the `reduced, function, but `reductions is a big part of my debugging process, so it's unfortunate that they don't work together.



 Comments   
Comment by Brandon Bloom [ 16/Mar/13 6:10 PM ]

Attaching patch

Comment by Satshabad Khalsa [ 13/Apr/14 1:53 AM ]

Would love some progress on this!

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 13/Apr/14 11:37 AM ]

It isn't guaranteed to help, but it can't hurt to vote on the ticket, and encourage anyone else you know who wants this fixed to vote on it.





[CLJ-1401] CompilerException / IllegalStateException when reloading namespaces Created: 10/Apr/14  Updated: 12/Apr/14

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Mike Anderson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler, errormsgs


 Description   
user> (ns op)
nil
op> (defn * [a b] (clojure.core/* a b))
WARNING: * already refers to: #'clojure.core/* in namespace: op, being replaced by: #'op/*
#'op/*
op> (ns use-op (:require [op :refer :all]))
WARNING: * already refers to: #'clojure.core/* in namespace: use-op, being replaced by: #'op/*
nil
use-op> (ns use-op (:require [op :refer :all]))
IllegalStateException * already refers to: #'op/* in namespace: use-op  clojure.lang.Namespace.warnOrFailOnReplace (Namespace.java:88)
use-op> (clojure.repl/pst *e)
IllegalStateException * already refers to: #'op/* in namespace: use-op
	clojure.lang.Namespace.warnOrFailOnReplace (Namespace.java:88)
	clojure.lang.Namespace.reference (Namespace.java:110)
	clojure.lang.Namespace.refer (Namespace.java:168)
	clojure.core/refer (core.clj:3920)
	use-op/eval2402/loading--4958--auto----2403 (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)
	use-op/eval2402 (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6703)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6692)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6666)
	clojure.core/eval (core.clj:2927)
	clojure.main/repl/read-eval-print--6625/fn--6628 (main.clj:239)
	clojure.main/repl/read-eval-print--6625 (main.clj:239)

I would expect (at worst) a similar warning to the initial namespace loading, rather than an exception here.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Apr/14 8:26 AM ]

Could you put together a better reproducible test case for this that does not depend on core.matrix? Also, please include the (pst *e) when it occurs.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 11/Apr/14 10:19 AM ]

I have tried the smallest possible Leiningen project I could think of that would cause the warnings about redefinitions, to see if I could get the exception to occur. 'lein new try1' to create the skeleton project, then edit src/try1/core.clj to contain only the following function definitions:

(defn merge
  "This definition of merge replaces clojure.core/merge"
  [x y]
  (- x y))

(defn *
  [x y]
  (* x y))

Then start a REPL with 'lein repl', and I see this behavior:

user=> (require '[try1.core :as c])
WARNING: merge already refers to: #'clojure.core/merge in namespace: try1.core, being replaced by: #'try1.core/merge
WARNING: * already refers to: #'clojure.core/* in namespace: try1.core, being replaced by: #'try1.core/*
nil
user=> (require '[try1.core :as c] )
nil
user=> (require '[try1.core :as c] :reload)
WARNING: merge already refers to: #'clojure.core/merge in namespace: try1.core, being replaced by: #'try1.core/merge
WARNING: * already refers to: #'clojure.core/* in namespace: try1.core, being replaced by: #'try1.core/*
nil

Ths all looks like behavior as I would expect, and I did not see the exception that Mike reports.

It seems that either Ctrl+Alt+L in Counterclockwise does something different than (require ... :reload), or there is something different about Mike's namespace in addition to redefining names in clojure.core that is causing the problem.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Apr/14 11:17 AM ]

Marking this as NR for now - would be happy to see it reopened with an easily reproducible test case.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 12/Apr/14 12:41 AM ]

To reproduce:

(ns op)
(defn * [a b] (clojure.core/* a b)) ;; gives warning
(ns use-op (:require [op :refer :all])) ;; gives warning
(ns use-op (:require [op :refer :all])) ;; gives error!

I believe Counterclockwise is simply loading the namespace again with CTRL-Alt+L, which is causing the ns form to be re-executed.

The docstring implies that ns can be used multiple times ("Sets ns to the namespace named by name (unevaluated), creating it if needed") so I would certainly expect multiple invocations of ns to be a no-op





[CLJ-809] fn's created using defn should not lexical shadow the var that holds them Created: 11/Jun/11  Updated: 11/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.2
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Kevin Downey Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

currently (defn foo [x] (foo x)) expands to something like (def foo
(fn foo [x] (foo x))) so the fn is bound to foo lexically in the scope
of the fn body.

because of this lexical shadowing self calls to fns defined with defn
do not incur the overhead of var dereferencing, I assume this is the
reason it was added.

the lexical shadowing also breaks memoization if you create the
memoized functions via (alter-var-root #'foo memoize) and several
macros here and there emit code in this style, since reusing defn is
the easiest way to get all the good juicy metadata bits like arglists,
etc.

1.3 has changes to eliminate some of the cost of going through the var.

since going through the var is much cheaper now it would be nice to
eliminate the lexical shadowing.

http://groups.google.com/group/clojure-dev/browse_thread/thread/33b52b24616967f?hl=en



 Comments   
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 11/Jun/11 2:40 PM ]

tests indicate that accessing the fn through the var vs. accessing through the lexical binding have very similar access times

https://gist.github.com/1013008

results in

$ java -jar clojure.jar ~/src/lexicaltest.clj
lexical binding run 0
"Elapsed time: 86.739 msecs"
lexical binding run 1
"Elapsed time: 8.062 msecs"
lexical binding run 2
"Elapsed time: 16.182 msecs"
var binding run 0
"Elapsed time: 61.136 msecs"
var binding run 1
"Elapsed time: 40.317 msecs"
var binding run 2
"Elapsed time: 11.641 msecs"
$

Comment by Jason Wolfe [ 13/Jun/11 5:05 PM ]

Here's another test that makes sure no JIT funny business (e.g. dead code elimination) is going on, and also looks at primitive hinted versions.

https://gist.github.com/1023816

var-obj result, time: 14930352 ,"Elapsed time: 965.577 msecs"
lex-obj result, time: 14930352 ,"Elapsed time: 957.741 msecs"
var-prim result, time: 14930352 ,"Elapsed time: 770.411 msecs"
lex-prim result, time: 14930352 ,"Elapsed time: 113.412 msecs"
nil

I'm not sure how to properly hint the var in the var-prim version to get truly comparable results. In any case, this use case should definitely be kept in mind.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 13/Jun/11 5:35 PM ]

I think the point is we want to make sure the jvm can optimize both just as well, so making the code purposefully unoptimizable is kind of silly, yes?

Comment by Jason Wolfe [ 21/Jun/11 4:41 PM ]

@Kevin In your gist, the return value of foo is not used, and foo has no side effects. A sufficiently smart compiler could optimize the calls out entirely, which would not tell us much about the runtime of foo.

Comment by Aaron Bedra [ 28/Jun/11 6:49 PM ]

Rich: Given the performance testing (in the email thread) what is the next step here?

  • more thorough testing
  • patch?

Are there things that this might break that we need to consider?

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 29/Jul/11 7:39 AM ]

Someone needs to make a patch, and then test perf with and without the patch. These simulated tests aren't necessarily indicative. Naive fib is an ok test once you have a patch. And yes, more things might break - needs careful assessment.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 11/Apr/14 5:29 PM ]

If I understand this ticket correctly, it looks like this has been done at some point in time.

Clojure 1.7.0-master-SNAPSHOT
user=> (macroexpand-1 '(defn x []))
(def x (clojure.core/fn ([])))




[CLJ-1192] vec function is substantially slower than into function Created: 06/Apr/13  Updated: 11/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Luke VanderHart Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: performance

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

(vec coll) and (into [] coll) do exactly the same thing. However, due to into using transients, it is substantially faster. On my machine:

(time (dotimes [_ 100] (vec (range 100000))))
"Elapsed time: 732.56 msecs"

(time (dotimes [_ 100] (into [] (range 100000))))
"Elapsed time: 491.411 msecs"

This is consistently repeatable.

Since vec's sole purpose is to transform collections into vectors, it should do so at the maximum speed available.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 07/Apr/13 5:50 PM ]

I am pretty sure that Clojure 1.5.1 also uses transient vectors for (vec (range n)) (probably also some earlier versions of Clojure, too).

Look at vec in core.clj. It checks whether its arg is a java.util.Collection, which lazy seqs are, so calls (clojure.lang.LazilyPersistentVector/create coll).

LazilyPersistentVector's create method checks whether its argument is an ISeq, which lazy seqs are, so it calls PersistentVector.create(RT.seq(coll)).

All 3 of PersistentVector's create() methods use transient vectors to build up the result.

I suspect the difference in run times are not because of transients or not, but because of the way into uses reduce, and perhaps may also have something to do with the perhaps-unnecessary call to RT.seq in LazilyPersistentVector's create method (in this case, at least – it is likely needed for other types of arguments).

Comment by Alan Malloy [ 14/Jun/13 2:17 PM ]

I'm pretty sure the difference is that into uses reduce: since reducers were added in 1.5, chunked sequences know how to reduce themselves without creating unnecessary cons cells. PersistentVector/create doesn't use reduce, so it has to allocate a cons cell for each item in the sequence.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 08/Sep/13 1:55 PM ]

Is there any downside to (defn vec [coll] (into [] coll)) (or the inlined equivalent)?

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 11/Apr/14 5:13 PM ]

While I agree that there are improvements and possibly low-hanging fruit, FWIW https://github.com/clojure/tools.analyzer/commit/cf7dda81a22f4c9c1fe64c699ca17e7deed61db4#commitcomment-5989545

showed a 5% slowdown from a few callsites in tools.analyzer.

This ticket's benchmark is incomplete in that it covers a single type of argument (chunked range), and flawed as it timing the expense of realizing the range. (That could be a legit benchmark case, but it shouldn't be the only one).

Sorry to rain on a parade. I promise like speed too!





[CLJ-99] GC Issue 95: max-key and min-key evaluate k multiple times for arguments Created: 17/Jun/09  Updated: 11/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: File clj-99-v1.diff    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   
Reported by H.Duerer, Mar 13, 2009

max-key or min-key will evaluate (k value) multiple times for arguments if
more than 2 arguments are passed.

This is undesirable if k is expensive to calculate.

Something like the code below would avoid these double calculations (at the
price of generating more ephemeral garbage)

(defn max-key
  "Returns the x for which (k x), a number, is greatest."
  ([k x] x)
  ([k x y] (if (> (k x) (k y)) x y))
  ([k x y & more]
     (second (reduce (fn [x y] (if (> (first x) (first y)) x y))
                     (map #(vector (k %) %) (cons x (cons y more)))))))


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 5:45 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/99

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 5:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#8, #19, #30, #31, #126, #17, #42, #47, #50, #61, #64, #69, #71, #77, #79, #84, #87, #89, #96, #99, #103, #107, #112, #113, #114, #115, #118, #119, #121, #122, #124)

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 15/Nov/12 9:36 PM ]

clj-99-min-key-max-key-performance-v1.txt dated Nov 15 2012 changes min-key and max-key to evaluate the function k on each of its other arguments at most once.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 22/Oct/13 7:54 PM ]

Patch clj-99-v1.diff is same as previously attached patch, but with .diff suffix for easier diff-style viewing in some editors.

Comment by Steve Kim [ 11/Apr/14 10:48 AM ]

sort-by is similarly inefficient. It calls keyfn for every comparison in sort, not once for every element to be sorted.

I'm not familiar with this project's preferred workflow, so I have to ask: Do you want me to open a separate ticket for sort-by, or do you prefer to consolidate that issue into this ticket?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Apr/14 10:50 AM ]

Separate.

Comment by Steve Kim [ 11/Apr/14 11:47 AM ]

I created CLJ-1402 for sort-by





[CLJ-1402] sort-by calls keyfn more times than is necessary Created: 11/Apr/14  Updated: 11/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Steve Kim Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: performance


 Description   

clojure.core/sort-by evaluates keyfn for every pairwise comparison. This is wasteful when keyfn is expensive to compute.

user=> (def keyfn-calls (atom 0))
#'user/keyfn-calls
user=> (defn keyfn [x] (do (swap! keyfn-calls inc) x))
#'user/keyfn
user=> @keyfn-calls
0
user=> (sort-by keyfn (repeatedly 10 rand))
(0.1647483850582695 0.2836687590331822 0.3222305842748623 0.3850390922996001 0.41965440953966326 0.4777580378736771 0.6051704988802923 0.659376178201709 0.8459820304223701 0.938863131161208)
user=> @keyfn-calls
44


 Comments   
Comment by Steve Kim [ 11/Apr/14 11:46 AM ]

CLJ-99 is a similar issue





[CLJ-1384] clojure.core/set should use transients Created: 15/Mar/14  Updated: 11/Apr/14

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Gary Fredericks Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: performance

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1384-p1.patch     File set-bench.tar    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

clojure.core/vec calls (more or less) PersistentVector.create(...), which uses a transient vector to build up the result.

clojure.core/set on the other hand, calls PersistentHashSet.create(...), which repeatedly calls .cons on a PersistentHashSet, with all the associated speed/GC issues.

Operation count now w/transients
set 5 1.771924 µs 1.295637 µs
into 5 1.407925 µs 1.402995 µs
set 1000000 2.499264 s 1.196653 s
into 1000000 0.977555 s 1.006951 s


 Comments   
Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 15/Mar/14 10:13 PM ]

PersistentHashSet has six methods for creating sets – one for each combination of {with check, without check} and {array (varargs), List, ISeq}. Each of them does not use transients but could.

I believe clojure.core/set only depends on the (without check, ISeq) version.

Should all of these be changed? Three of them? One of them?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 15/Mar/14 10:21 PM ]

I believe that the 'with check' versions are only intended to be used when reading set literals in Clojure source code, and give an error if there are duplicate elements. If you find examples where those set creation functions are called in other situations, I would be interested to learn about them to find out where my misunderstanding lies, or whether that is a problem with the current code.

If the belief above is correct, I would suggest not changing the 'with check' versions, since their speed isn't as critical.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 15/Mar/14 10:23 PM ]

Thanks Andy, I'll submit a patch that changes the three non-checked methods.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 15/Mar/14 10:46 PM ]

Attached CLJ-1384-p1.patch, which updates the three non-check create methods.

I also added benchmarks. It's about 2-3 times faster for large collections.

Comment by Ambrose Bonnaire-Sergeant [ 11/Apr/14 11:15 AM ]

Added benchmark suite (set-bench.tar).

FWIW results are similar to gfrederick's on my machine:

Clojure 1.6

Small collections (5 elements)

set averages 1.220601 µs
into averages 1.597991 µs

Large collections (1,000,000 elements)

set averages 2.429066 sec
into averages 1.006249 sec

After transients

Small collections (5 elements)

set averages 999.248325 ns
into averages 1.162889 µs

Large collections (1,000,000 elements)

set averages 1.003792 sec
into averages 889.993185 ms

Add full output to the tar.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 11/Apr/14 11:35 AM ]

CLJ-1192 is related to this, but and Andy seems to be indicating the use of reduce as the means to better performance there.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 11/Apr/14 11:41 AM ]

Oh that's a good point about reduce. The difference should only apply to chunked seqs, right? It's worth noting that the benchmarks above used range which creates chunked seqs, so that might be why into looks faster on the large collections?

So this change only makes set act like vec; I think whether either/both of them should use reduce is a different question.





[CLJ-1182] Regexp are never equal Created: 12/Mar/13  Updated: 11/Apr/14  Resolved: 05/Sep/13

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Christian Fortin Assignee: Omer Iqbal
Resolution: Declined Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: File fix-CLJ-1182.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The following (= #"asd" #"asd") will return false in CLJ, even if they are the same.

Consequently, everything with a regexp in it (lists, vectors, maps...) will never be equal.

It seems to have been fixed for CLJS, but not for CLJ.
https://github.com/clojure/clojurescript/commit/e35c3a57472fa62ae41591418a73794dc8ac6dde



 Comments   
Comment by Omer Iqbal [ 12/Mar/13 4:08 PM ]

added an implementation for the equiv method if both args are java.util.regex.Pattern

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 12/Mar/13 5:54 PM ]

Omer, could you also include in your patch a few test cases? At least one that validates that two regex's that should be equal, are equal, and another that two regex's that should be different, are non-equal. Preferably the first of those tests should fail with the existing Clojure code, and pass with your changes.

Comment by Omer Iqbal [ 13/Mar/13 5:39 AM ]

I updated the patch with some tests. Hope I added them in the correct file. I also changed the implementation a bit, by instead of adding another implementation of equiv with a different signature, checking the type of the Object in the equiv method with signature (Object k1, Object k2).
For the sake of consistency I also added an EquivPred implementation, though I'm not entirely sure when its used.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 13/Mar/13 1:04 PM ]

All comments here refer to the patch named fix-CLJ-1182.diff dated Mar 13, 2013.

The location for the new tests looks reasonable. However, note that your new patch has your old changes plus some new ones, not just the new ones. In particular, the new signature for equiv is still in your latest patch. You should start from a clean pull of the latest Clojure master and make only the changes you want when creating a patch, not build on top of previous changes you have made.

Also, there are several whitespace-only changes in your patch that should not be included.

Comment by Omer Iqbal [ 13/Mar/13 1:39 PM ]

I uploaded a clean patch, removing the whitespace diff and only adding the latest changes. Thanks for clarifying the workflow!
Just to clarify, this refers to the patch named fix-CLJ-1182.diff dated Mar 13 1:34 PM

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 29/Mar/13 5:46 AM ]

I am recategorizing this as an enhancement, because if this is a bug it is a bug in Java – the Java Patterns class documents being immutable, but apparently does not implement .equals.

Other recent "make Clojure more complicated to work around problems in Java" patches have been rejected, and I suspect this one will be too, because it might impact the performance of equality everywhere.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 12/Apr/13 9:04 AM ]

At first pass, Rich and I both believe that, as regex equality is undecidable, that Java made the right choice in using identity for equality, that this ticket should be declined, and the ClojureScript should revert to match.

But leaving this ticket open for now so that ClojureScript dev can weigh in.

Comment by Michael Drogalis [ 12/Apr/13 9:32 AM ]

What do you mean when you say "undecidable"?

Comment by Alexander Redington [ 12/Apr/13 10:03 AM ]

If Regex instances were interned by the reader, but still used identity for equality, then code like

(= #"abc" #"abc")

would return true, but it wouldn't diverge in the definition of equality for regular expressions between Java and Clojure.

Comment by Fogus [ 12/Apr/13 10:13 AM ]

Undecidable means that for any given regular expression, there is no single way to write it. For example #"[a]" #"a" both match the same strings, but are they the same? Maybe. But how can we decide if /any/ given regular expression matches all of the same strings as any other? The answer is, you can't. Java does provide a Pattern#pattern method that returns the string that was used to build it, but I'm not sure if that could/should be used as a basis for equality given the potential perf hit.

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 12/Apr/13 10:31 AM ]

I posted in Stu's thread: https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure-dev/OTPNJQbPtds/discussion
TL;DR: Disagree with undecidability, agree with reverting to identity based equality

Comment by Michael Drogalis [ 12/Apr/13 10:32 AM ]

That makes sense to me. Thanks Fogus.

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 12/Apr/13 9:42 PM ]

From my post to the ml thread, it might not be entirely clear, why I don't think we should implement equality for host regexes:

It would involve parsing and would leave a lot of room for errors and platform-idiosycracies to leak. And it would be different for every platform.

As Alexander said, I also think this ticket could be resolved by interning regex literals, akin to keywords. That, however, would warrant a design page first, because there are tradeoffs to be made about how far the interning should go.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 13/Apr/13 8:51 AM ]

Why are we spending time on this? Where is the problem statement? Does someone actually need this for a real world purpose not solved by using regex strings as keys?

Comment by Michael Drogalis [ 13/Apr/13 9:13 PM ]

It was prompted as a matter of consistency, which I think is valid. I can't think of a good reason to use regex's as keys though.

Comment by Trevor Hartman [ 11/Apr/14 11:13 AM ]

This issue surfaced as a bug in my code, e.g.: (get {#"^named$" 1} #"^named$") ;=> nil ; surprise!





Generated at Fri Apr 18 05:56:15 CDT 2014 using JIRA 4.4#649-r158309.