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[CLJ-1987] Update clojure.java.javadoc to open JDK8 docs by default Created: 24/Jul/16  Updated: 24/Jul/16  Resolved: 24/Jul/16

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.9
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Trivial
Reporter: Richard Hull Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Duplicate Votes: 0
Labels: documentation

Attachments: Text File jdk8_javadoc.patch    

 Description   

The clojure.java.javadoc function opens up JavaSE 7 docs in a browser - looking at the source (https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/src/clj/clojure/java/javadoc.clj#L21-L24), this hasn't been updated for a few years.

The attached trivial patch to set the default to use the Java 8 docs



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 24/Jul/16 6:32 AM ]

There is already a ticket/patch for this at http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1398 - any comments should go there.





[CLJ-1986] Suppress printing namespace map literal syntax when only one namespaced key Created: 21/Jul/16  Updated: 21/Jul/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.9
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: maps, print

Attachments: Text File clj-1986.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Prescreened

 Description   

Really an aesthetic choice, but right now maps with only a single namespaced key are printed in namespace map literal syntax:

user=> {:my.ns/b 1}
#:my.ns{:b 1}

And that seems unnecessarily complicated (and longer).

Proposal: Only print namespace map literal syntax when >1 key is using the same namespace.

Patch: clj-1986.patch






[CLJ-1985] with-gen of conformer loses unform fn Created: 21/Jul/16  Updated: 21/Jul/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.9
Fix Version/s: Release 1.9

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: spec

Attachments: Text File conformer-with-gen.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted

 Description   
(def ex (s/conformer inc dec))
(s/conform ex 1) ;; 2
(s/unform ex 2)  ;; 1
(def exc
  (s/with-gen
    (s/conformer inc dec)
    (fn [] (s/gen int?))))
(s/conform exc 1) ;; 2
(s/unform exc 2) ;; fails, no unformer

Cause: with-gen doesn't re-apply the unform fn to the new spec

Patch: conformer-with-gen.patch






[CLJ-1984] clojure.spec/double-in should allow strict greater-than, less-than tests Created: 20/Jul/16  Updated: 21/Jul/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.9
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Marshall Abrams Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: spec


 Description   

clojure.spec/double-in defines a spec that tests whether a double is greater than or equal to a minimum value and less than or equal to a maximum value. This seems like an arbitrary choice from the point of view of mathematics and practical concerns. Sometimes you need to test whether a double is greater than a minimum or less than a maximum. Example: The application will divide by the tested double later.

Of course we can add tests to double-in, e.g. like

(s/and (s/double-in :min 0.0 :max 1.0) #(not= 0.0 %))}}

but

#(and (> % 0.0) (<= % 1))

might be clearer if double-in's NaN and Infinity tests aren't needed.

Why not have a common interface to all four interval tests? Rather than four different spec functions, which is one option, I suppose, I suggest adding two keywords to double-in. When true, these would change the >= or <= tests to > or < tests:

:min-greater

(or? :min+, :min-greater-than, :greater-than-min, :strict-min, :min-open, or possibly :infinmum, :inf, but that could be misleading)

:max-less

(or :max- :max-less-than, :less-than-max, :strict-max, :max-open, or possibly :supremum, :sup etc.)

For example,

(s/valid? (s/double-in :min 0.0 :max 0.1 :min-greater true) 0.0)

would return false, but

(s/valid? (s/double-in :min 0.0 :max 0.1 :min-greater false) 0.0)

would return true.

Default values for these keywords should probably be false, for compatibility with the current definition of double-in.






[CLJ-1959] adding functions `map-vals` and `map-keys` Created: 14/Jun/16  Updated: 21/Jul/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Hiroyuki Fudaba Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File map-mapper.patch     Text File map-mapper-v2.patch     Text File map-mapper-v3.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Many people have been writing a function to map values in HashMap:

Proposal: Add `map-keys` and `map-values` which: maps keys in HashMap, and map values in HashMap. They return HashMap as a result.

Workaround: Using function `reduce-kv` or ordinary `map` and `into` is a common solution, but they are confusing and types change, which makes it tricky and tedious.

Discussions: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure-dev/kkPYIl5qj0o



 Comments   
Comment by Hiroyuki Fudaba [ 14/Jun/16 11:22 AM ]

code and test for map-keys and map-vals

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 14/Jun/16 1:05 PM ]

I propose those functions being called `update-vals` and `update-keys` rather than `map-vals` and `map-keys`

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Jun/16 2:03 PM ]

It's not worth bike-shedding names on this - Rich will have his own opinion regardless.

On the patch:

  • remove the :static metadata, that's not used anymore
  • needs docstrings, which should be written in the style of other Clojure docstrings. map is probably a good place to draw from.
  • rather than declare into, defer the definition of these till whatever it needs has been defined. There is no reason to add more declares for this.

There are other potential implementations - these should be implemented and compared for performance across a range of input sizes. In addition to the current approach, I would investigate:

  • reduce-kv with construction into a transient map. This allows the map to reduce itself (no seq caching needed) and avoid creating entries only to tear them apart again.
  • transducers with (into {} (map ...) m)

Also should consider

  • whether to build a k/v vector and convert to a map, or build a map directly (the former may be faster, not sure)
  • if building the map, how to construct the map entries (vector vs creating a mapentry object directly)
  • in map-keys, is there any open question when map generates new overlapping keys?
  • are there places in existing core code where map-keys/map-vals could be used (I am pretty certain there are)
Comment by Hiroyuki Fudaba [ 15/Jun/16 11:01 AM ]

Thanks for comments

> I propose those functions being called `update-vals` and `update-keys` rather than `map-vals` and `map-keys`
Maybe. But I name it `map-*` just for now, we can choose it later

about potential implementations:
I have tried several implementations, and seems to be the current implementation is the fastest.
You can see it here: https://github.com/delihiros/performance

about considerings:
> whether to build a k/v vector and convert to a map, or build a map directly (the former may be faster, not sure)
> are there places in existing core code where map-keys/map-vals could be used (I am pretty certain there are)
> if building the map, how to construct the map entries (vector vs creating a mapentry object directly)
I'll check which them as soon as possible. I haven't done it yet.

> in map-keys, is there any open question when map generates new overlapping keys?
I believe it should be overwritten by latter applied key and value.

Comment by Nathan Marz [ 15/Jun/16 11:35 AM ]

I've done quite a bit of investigation into this through building Specter. Here are some benchmarks of numerous ways of doing map-vals, including using Specter.

Code: https://github.com/nathanmarz/specter/blob/4778500e0370fb211f47ebf4d69ca64366117b6c/scripts/benchmarks.clj#L87
Results: https://gist.github.com/nathanmarz/bf571c9ed86bfad09816e17b9b6e59e3

A few comments:

  • Implementations that build and tear apart MapEntry's perform much worse.
  • Transients should be used for large maps but not for small ones.
  • This benchmark shows that the property of maintaining the type of the map in the output can be achieved without sacrificing performance (the test cases using Specter or "empty" have this property).
Comment by Hiroyuki Fudaba [ 11/Jul/16 3:27 AM ]

I've modified the implementation. It should be faster than before.

Comment by Steve Miner [ 20/Jul/16 10:46 AM ]

Implementations that call reduce-kv are not lazy so the documentation should be clarified in the proposed patch (map-mapper-v3.patch). Also, it's probably better to say "map" (as the noun) rather than to specify a particular concrete type "hash map".

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 21/Jul/16 4:30 AM ]

map->map operations can't be lazy either way. Even if one implementation used lazy operations to iterate over the original map, the `into {}` would realize it later.





[CLJ-1982] Better explain reporting on a failed zero or one match with an embedded spec. Created: 18/Jul/16  Updated: 19/Jul/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.9
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Nick Jones Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: spec
Environment:

OSX, Java 8, Clojure 1.9.0-alpha10



 Description   

Problem:

When attempting to validate a vector containing an optional map, the spec will validate correctly if the vector contains a valid map. If however the optional map does not satisfy the spec misleading error messages are produced. It would be nice if on a partial match of an optional map that some indication of this would be given to the user.

Example REPL session to illustrate problem:

The optional nested map (:optional-nested-map) below fails validation because :nested-element-b is a string instead of an int however the explain report says the spec fails at the parent predicate: :user/vector-schema at: [:element-value] predicate: string?.

It would be more helpful for the user in this case if spec reported that the optional nested map at :optional-nested-map had failed due to ::nested-element-b failing the int? predicate.

user=> (require '[clojure.spec :as s])
nil
user=> (s/def ::nested-element-a string?)
:user/nested-element-a
user=> (s/def ::nested-element-b int?)
:user/nested-element-b
user=> (s/def ::nested-element-schema
          (s/keys :opt-un [::nested-element-a ::nested-element-b]))
:user/nested-element-schema
user=> (s/def ::vector-schema
         (s/cat :tag-kw               #{:tag}
                :optional-nested-map  (s/? (s/spec ::nested-element-schema))
                :element-value        string?))
:user/vector-schema
user=> (s/valid? ::vector-schema [:tag {:nested-element-a "bla" :nested-element-b 10} "Element"])
true
user=> (s/valid? ::vector-schema [:tag {:nested-element-a "bla" :nested-element-b ""} "Element"])
false
user=> (s/explain ::vector-schema [:tag {:nested-element-a "bla" :nested-element-b ""} "Element"])
In: [1] val: {:nested-element-a "bla", :nested-element-b ""} fails spec: :user/vector-schema at: [:element-value] predicate: string?
nil
user=>


 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jul/16 7:43 AM ]

Can you update this description with a self-contained example that demonstrates the problem? It's too hard to repro and understand this larger example.

Comment by Nick Jones [ 19/Jul/16 3:30 AM ]

Hi,

Sorry I don't seem to have access to edit the description of the ticket after creation. Here is a simplified sample that I hope will help illustrate the case better.

When the optional nested map below fails validation because :nested-element-b is a string instead of an int the explain report says the spec fails at the parent predicate: :user/vector-schema at: [:element-value] predicate: string?.

As it is an optional map I could see how this would be the case. When no match is found it moves onto the next predicate in the parent.

That said I think it could be helpful (especially in a large optional nested data structure) that if a partial match is achieved that that could be reported to the user as a potential spot for the spec failing.

user=> (require '[clojure.spec :as s])
nil
user=> (s/def ::nested-element-a string?)
:user/nested-element-a
user=> (s/def ::nested-element-b int?)
:user/nested-element-b
user=> (s/def ::nested-element-schema
          (s/keys :opt-un [::nested-element-a ::nested-element-b]))
:user/nested-element-schema
user=> (s/def ::vector-schema
         (s/cat :tag-kw               #{:tag}
                :optional-nested-map  (s/? (s/spec ::nested-element-schema))
                :element-value        string?))
:user/vector-schema
user=> (s/valid? ::vector-schema [:tag {:nested-element-a "bla" :nested-element-b 10} "Element"])
true
user=> (s/valid? ::vector-schema [:tag {:nested-element-a "bla" :nested-element-b ""} "Element"])
false
user=> (s/explain ::vector-schema [:tag {:nested-element-a "bla" :nested-element-b ""} "Element"])
In: [1] val: {:nested-element-a "bla", :nested-element-b ""} fails spec: :user/vector-schema at: [:element-value] predicate: string?
nil
user=>
Comment by Nick Jones [ 19/Jul/16 3:45 AM ]

Added simplified version of project archive matching comment at 2016-07-19.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jul/16 8:27 AM ]

Nick, I've given you edit rights here. Generally, we don't like to have external projects for repro - if you can boil it down to a few line example in the description, that would be ideal.

Comment by Nick Jones [ 19/Jul/16 8:15 PM ]

Thanks Alex. I've updated the description and removed the project attachments. I've also added a REPL session to the description to reproduce the problem in a standalone Clojure 1.9.0-alpha10 REPL.





[CLJ-1242] = on sorted collections with different key types incorrectly throws Created: 31/Jul/13  Updated: 19/Jul/16

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: collections

Attachments: Text File 0001-fix-for-CLJ-1242-tests.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Comparing a sorted-set with numbers to a set with keywords is not symmetric:

user=> (= #{:a} (sorted-set 1))
false
user=> (= (sorted-set 1) #{:a})
ClassCastException java.lang.Long cannot be cast to clojure.lang.Keyword  clojure.lang.Keyword.compareTo (Keyword.java:109)

The latter case should return false instead of throwing.

Cause: APersistentMap.equiv() and APersistentSet.equiv() do not expect this exception be thrown from the containsKey()/contains() check. It would probably be best for PersistentTreeMap and PersistentTreeMap to implement equiv() and handle that possibility appropriately. Should also consider similar changes in equals() if necessary.

See also: CLJ-1983 (downstream example with clojure.data/diff)



 Comments   
Comment by OHTA Shogo [ 31/Jul/13 8:02 PM ]

PersistentVector also has the same problem.

user=> (compare [1] [:a])
java.lang.ClassCastException: clojure.lang.Keyword cannot be cast to java.lang.Number

The cause of this problem is that Util.compare() casts the second argument
to Number without checking its type when the first argument is a Number.

Comment by OHTA Shogo [ 31/Jul/13 8:26 PM ]

Umm, my brain was not working right.
Util.compare() should raise an Exception when the arguments' type are different.

Comment by Fran├žois Rey [ 02/May/15 4:44 PM ]

Upvoting.
Here's a instance of this bug in codox:
https://github.com/weavejester/codox/issues/91

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 30/Jul/15 11:09 AM ]

The behavior of get is consistent with Java collections, so I think changing that expectation should be considered a feature request and not a bug.

The fix for equals should be informed by the approach taken in the JDK, where the implementation of equals (not get) has exception catchers.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 21/Jan/16 10:33 AM ]

I re-focused this ticket on just the equality aspect. The other request regarding `get` with a value of a different type is consistent with Java behavior and should be considered "as designed" - a separate enhancement ticket could be considered for that one.

user=> (def s (java.util.TreeSet.))
#'user/s
user=> (.add s 1)
true
user=> (.contains s "a")
ClassCastException java.lang.Long cannot be cast to java.lang.String  java.lang.String.compareTo (String.java:108)
Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jul/16 2:00 PM ]

oops, sorry for the close/reopen.





[CLJ-1983] clojure.data/diff throws an exception when comparing map keys of different types when used on sorted maps Created: 19/Jul/16  Updated: 19/Jul/16  Resolved: 19/Jul/16

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Thomas Scheiblauer Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Duplicate Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

e.g.

(clojure.data/diff (sorted-map :foo 42) (sorted-map 1 42))
(clojure.data/diff (sorted-map :foo 42) (sorted-map "x" 42))
(clojure.data/diff (hash-map :foo 42) (sorted-map 1 42))
(clojure.data/diff (hash-map :foo 42) (sorted-map "x" 42))

will throw
java.lang.ClassCastException: java.lang.Long cannot be cast to clojure.lang.Keyword
while e.g.

(clojure.data/diff (hash-map :foo 42) (hash-map 1 42))
(clojure.data/diff (hash-map :foo 42) (hash-map "x" 2))
(clojure.data/diff (sorted-map :foo 42) (sorted-map :bar 42))

will not.

The same applies to ClojureScript with a different exception (e.g. "Error: Cannot compare :foo to 1")



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jul/16 8:23 AM ]

This is the same root problem as CLJ-1242, so duping to that one.

Comment by Thomas Scheiblauer [ 19/Jul/16 10:30 AM ]

It's not exactly a duplicate since diff should work in any case regardless of (compare x y) not working in this situation (possibly by design?).
(= (sorted-map :foo 42) (sorted-map 1 42)) works by the way.
(compare (sorted-map :foo 42) (sorted-map 1 42)) throws the exception.
In my opinion this could (and maybe should) be fixed in diff.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jul/16 12:41 PM ]

The stack traces for the two tickets are identical. diff is not using compare, it's using =. (= (sorted-map :foo 42) (sorted-map 1 42)) throws.

user=> (clojure.data/diff (hash-map :foo 42) (sorted-map "x" 42))
ClassCastException java.lang.String cannot be cast to clojure.lang.Keyword  clojure.lang.Keyword.compareTo (Keyword.java:114)
user=> (pst *e)
ClassCastException java.lang.String cannot be cast to clojure.lang.Keyword
	clojure.lang.Keyword.compareTo (Keyword.java:114)
	clojure.lang.Util.compare (Util.java:153)
	clojure.lang.RT$DefaultComparator.compare (RT.java:280)
	clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap.doCompare (PersistentTreeMap.java:311)
	clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap.entryAt (PersistentTreeMap.java:298)
	clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap.containsKey (PersistentTreeMap.java:94)
	clojure.lang.APersistentMap.equiv (APersistentMap.java:87)
	clojure.lang.Util.pcequiv (Util.java:124)
	clojure.lang.Util.equiv (Util.java:32)
	clojure.data/diff (data.clj:134)
	clojure.data/diff (data.clj:120)
	user/eval20 (NO_SOURCE_FILE:11)
Comment by Thomas Scheiblauer [ 19/Jul/16 1:28 PM ]

You are of course right as I can see clearly now.
I did overlook the asymmetrical behavior of '=' in context of a sorted map.
Please excuse my ignorance.





[CLJ-1981] `spec/merge` does not flow conformed values across preds per docstring Created: 13/Jul/16  Updated: 18/Jul/16  Resolved: 18/Jul/16

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.9
Fix Version/s: Release 1.9

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Moritz Ulrich Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Declined Votes: 0
Labels: spec
Environment:

[org.clojure/clojure "1.9.0-alpha10"]


Approval: Vetted

 Description   

The order of specs passed to spec/merge affect the spec/conform behavior of the keys specified. This seem to happen only with non-prefixed keys via (spec/keys :req-un [..])

The following code snippet shows the broken/non-intuitive behavior:

(require '[clojure.spec :as s])

(s/def ::id (s/conformer str))
(s/def ::m (s/keys :req-un [::id]))

;; Correct behavior on ::id
(s/conform ::id 42)
;;=> "42"

;; Fine if unmerged
(s/conform ::m {:id 42})
;;=> {:id "42"}

;; Fine if merged with ::m in the *last* position
(s/conform (s/merge map? ::m) {:id 42})
;;=> {:id "42"}

;; Broken because `map?` is the last arg
(s/conform (s/merge ::m map?) {:id 42})
;;=> {:id 42}

;; Broken because another `s/keys` is used as the last argument
(s/conform (s/merge ::m (s/keys :req-un [::foo]))
           {:id 42 :foo 23})
;;=> {:id 42, :foo 23}


 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Jul/16 8:36 AM ]

Perhaps a simpler pair of examples - the first should return the result of the second if conformed values are flowing through the predicates.

(s/conform
  (s/merge (s/map-of keyword? (s/or :s string? :n number?))
           map?)
  {:x "s"})
=> {:x "s"}
(s/conform
  (s/merge map?
           (s/map-of keyword? (s/or :s string? :n number?)))
  {:x "s"})
=> {:x [:s "s"]}
Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jul/16 9:04 AM ]

This is working as designed. s/merge should not flow conformed values. The docstring has been corrected in https://github.com/clojure/clojure/commit/d920ada9fab7e9b8342d28d8295a600a814c1d8a





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