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[CLJ-457] lazy recursive definition giving incorrect results Created: 13/Oct/10  Updated: 03/Aug/15

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Assembla Importer Assignee: Christophe Grand
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: File CLJ-457-2.diff     File clj-457-3.diff    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

If you define a global data var in terms of a lazy sequence referring to that same var, you can get different results depending on the chunkiness of laziness of the functions being used to build the collection.

Clojure's lazy sequences don't promise to support this, but they shouldn't return wrong answers. In the example given in http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/1c342fad8461602d (and repeated below), Clojure should not return bad data. An error message would be good, and even an infinite loop would be more reasonable than the current behavior.

(Similar issue reported here: https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure/yD941fIxhyE/discussion)

(def nums (drop 2 (range Long/MAX_VALUE)))
(def primes (cons (first nums)
             (lazy-seq (->>
               (rest nums)
               (remove
                 (fn [x]
                   (let [dividors (take-while #(<= (* % %) x)
primes)]
                     (println (str "primes = " primes))
                     (some #(= 0 (rem x %)) dividors))))))))
(take 5 primes)

It prints out:
(primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
2 3 5 7 9)


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 13/Oct/10 3:00 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/457

Comment by Aaron Bedra [ 10/Dec/10 9:08 AM ]

Stu and Rich talked about making this an error, but it would break some existing code to do so.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 17/Dec/10 8:03 AM ]

Is there a specific question on this?

Comment by Aaron Bedra [ 05/Jan/11 9:05 PM ]

Stu, you and I went over this but I can't remember exactly what the question was here.

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 28/Nov/12 12:24 PM ]

Tentative patch attached.
Have you an example of existing code which is broken by such a patch (as mention by Aaron Bedra)?

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 30/Nov/12 9:43 AM ]

The patch intends to do what? We have only a problem description and code. Please enumerate the plan rather than make us decipher the patch.

As a first principle, I don't want Clojure to promise that such recursively defined values are possible.

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 30/Nov/12 10:23 AM ]

The proposal here is to catch recursive seq realization (ie when computing the body of a lazy-seq attempts to access the same seq) and throw an exception.

Currently when such a case happens, the recursive access to the seq returns nil. This results in incorrect code seemingly working but producing incorrect results or even incorrect code producing correct results out of luck (see https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure/yD941fIxhyE/discussion for such an example).

So this patch moves around the modification to the LazySeq state (f, sv and s fields) before all potentially recursive method call (.sval in the while of .seq and .invoke in .sval) so that, upon reentrance, the state of the LazySeq is coherent and able to convey the fact the seq is already being computed.

Currently a recursive call may find f and sv cleared and concludes the computation is done and the result is in s despite s being unaffected yet.

Currently:

State f sv s
Unrealized not null null null
Realized null null anything
Being realized/recursive call from fn.invoke not null null null
Being realized/recursive call from ls.sval null null null

Note that "Being realized" states overlap with Unrealized or Realized.
(NB: "anything" includes null)

With the patch:

State f sv s
Unrealized not null null null
Realized null null anything but this
Being realized null null this
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Nov/12 2:06 PM ]

That last comment, Christophe, goes a long way to explaining the idea to me, at least. Any chance comments with similar content could be added as part of the patch?

Comment by Christophe Grand [ 03/Dec/12 11:18 AM ]

New patch with a comment explaining the expected states.
Note: I tidied the states table up.

// Before calling user code (f.invoke() in sval and, indirectly,
// ((LazySeq)ls).sval() in seq -- and even RT.seq() in seq), ensure that 
// the LazySeq state is in one of these states:
//
// State            f          sv
// ================================
// Unrealized       not null   null
// Realized         null       null
// Being realized   null       this

CLJ-1119 is also fixed by this patch.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Nov/13 12:35 AM ]

Patch clj-457-3.diff is identical to Christophe's CLJ-457-2.diff, except it has been updated to no longer conflict with the commit made for CLJ-949 on Nov 22, 2013, which basically removed the try/catch in method sval(). It passes tests, and I don't see anything wrong with it, but it would be good if Christophe could give it a look, too.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Aug/15 7:46 PM ]

No longer reproducible

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 03/Aug/15 10:01 AM ]

Alex, the posted example is no longer reproducible because `(range)` does not produce a chunked-seq anymore.
OTOH `(range n)` does so replacing `(range)` with something like `(range Long/MAX_VALUE)` in the code example in the ticket description is sufficient to resurface the bug:

Clojure 1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT
user=> (def nums (drop 2 (range Long/MAX_VALUE)))
#'user/nums
(def primes (cons (first nums)
             (lazy-seq (->>
               (rest nums)
               (remove
                 (fn [x]
                   (let [dividors (take-while #(<= (* % %) x)
primes)]
                     (println (str "primes = " primes))
                     (some #(= 0 (rem x %)) dividors))))))))
#'user/primes
user=> (take 5 primes)
(primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
primes = (2)
2 3 5 7 9)




[CLJ-401] Add seqable? predicate Created: 13/Jul/10  Updated: 03/Aug/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: None

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Many people have found a need for this function and one exists in clojure.core.incubator that is sometimes used and/or copied elsewhere:

https://github.com/clojure/core.incubator/blob/master/src/main/clojure/clojure/core/incubator.clj#L83

This predicate would be valuable to have as it is not a simple check on Seqable since RT.seq() covers a number of additional cases. Alternatively, there could be a protocol for this that could be extended to both Seqable as well as other supported Java use cases turning this into a satisfies? check.

Old prior discussion (although this also comes up regularly on #clojure):



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 9:19 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/401

Comment by Jeremy Heiler [ 26/Jul/14 5:37 PM ]

A reference to the implementation in contrib: https://github.com/clojure/clojure-contrib/blob/master/modules/core/src/main/clojure/clojure/contrib/core.clj#L78

It seems like that the only thing that is inconsistent with RT.seqFrom is that seqable? checks for String instead of CharSequence.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 03/Aug/15 10:11 AM ]

In the proposed patch referenced in the ticket above, if seqable? could be used in place of sequential? flatten could be more powerful and work with maps/sets/java collections. Here's how it would look:

(defn flatten [coll] 
  (lazy-seq 
    (when-let [coll (seq coll)] 
      (let [x (first coll)] 
        (if (seqable? x) 
          (concat (flatten x) (flatten (next coll))) 
          (cons x (flatten (next coll))))))))

And an example:

user=> (flatten #{1 2 3 #{4 5 {6 {7 [8 9 10 #{11 12 (java.util.ArrayList. [13 14 15]) (int-array [16 17 18])}]}}}}) 
(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18)




[CLJ-1212] Silent truncation/downcasting of primitive type on reflection call to overloaded method (Math/abs) Created: 28/May/13  Updated: 03/Aug/15

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Matthew Willson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: primitives, typehints
Environment:

Clojure 1.5.1
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (IcedTea6 1.12.5) (6b27-1.12.5-0ubuntu0.12.04.1)



 Description   

I realise relying on reflection when calling these kinds of methods isn't a great idea performance-wise, but it shouldn't lead to incorrect or dangerous behaviour.

Here it seems to trigger a silent downcast of the input longs, giving a truncated integer output:

user> (defn f [a b] (Math/abs (- a b)))
Reflection warning, NO_SOURCE_PATH:1:15 - call to abs can't be resolved.
#'user/f
user> (f 1000000000000 2000000000000)
727379968
user> (class (f 1000000000000 2000000000000))
java.lang.Integer
user> (defn f [^long a ^long b] (Math/abs (- a b)))
#'user/f
user> (f 1000000000000 2000000000000)
1000000000000
user> (class (f 1000000000000 2000000000000))
java.lang.Long



 Comments   
Comment by Matthew Willson [ 28/May/13 12:50 PM ]

For an even simpler way to replicate the issue:

user> (#(Math/abs %) 1000000000000)
Reflection warning, NO_SOURCE_PATH:1:3 - call to abs can't be resolved.
727379968

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 28/May/13 1:36 PM ]

I was able to reproduce the behavior you see with these Java 6 JVMs on Ubuntu 12.04.2:

java version "1.6.0_27"
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (IcedTea6 1.12.5) (6b27-1.12.5-0ubuntu0.12.04.1)
OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.0-b12, mixed mode)

java version "1.6.0_45"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_45-b06)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.45-b01, mixed mode)

However, I tried two Java 7 JVMs, and it gave the following behavior which looks closer to what you would hope for. I do not know what is the precise difference between Java 6 and Java 7 that leads to this behavior difference, but this is some evidence that this has something to do with Java 6 vs. Java 7.

user=> (set! warn-on-reflection true)
true
user=> (defn f [a b] (Math/abs (- a b)))
Reflection warning, NO_SOURCE_PATH:1:15 - call to abs can't be resolved.
#'user/f
user=> (f 1000000000000 2000000000000)
1000000000000
user=> (class (f 1000000000000 2000000000000))
java.lang.Long

Above behavior observed with Clojure 1.5.1 on these JVMs:

Ubuntu 12.04.2 plus this JVM:
java version "1.7.0_21"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.7.0_21-b11)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 23.21-b01, mixed mode)

Mac OS X 10.8.3 plus this JVM:
java version "1.7.0_15"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.7.0_15-b03)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 23.7-b01, mixed mode)

Comment by Matthew Willson [ 29/May/13 5:17 AM ]

Ah, interesting.
Maybe it's a difference in the way the reflection API works in java 7?

Here's the bytecode generated incase anyone's curious:

public java.lang.Object invoke(java.lang.Object);
Code:
0: ldc #14; //String java.lang.Math
2: invokestatic #20; //Method java/lang/Class.forName:(Ljava/lang/String;)Ljava/lang/Class;
5: ldc #22; //String abs
7: iconst_1
8: anewarray #24; //class java/lang/Object
11: dup
12: iconst_0
13: aload_1
14: aconst_null
15: astore_1
16: aastore
17: invokestatic #30; //Method clojure/lang/Reflector.invokeStaticMethod:(Ljava/lang/Class;Ljava/lang/String;[Ljava/lang/Object;)Ljava/lang/Object;
20: areturn

Comment by Matthew Willson [ 29/May/13 5:20 AM ]

Just an idea (and maybe this is what's happening under java 7?) but given it's a static method and all available overloaded variants are presumably known at compile time, perhaps it could generate code along the lines of:

(cond
(instance? Long x) (Math/abs (long x))
(instance? Integer x) (Math/abs (int x))
;; ...
)

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/May/13 3:19 PM ]

In Reflector.java method invokeStaticMethod(Class c, String methodName, Object[] args) there is a call to getMethods() followed by a call to invokeMatchingMethod(). getMethods() returns the 4 java.lang.Math/abs methods in different orders on Java 6 and 7, causing invokeMatchingMethod() to pick a different one on the two JVMs:

java version "1.6.0_39"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_39-b04)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.14-b01, mixed mode)

user=> (pprint (seq (clojure.lang.Reflector/getMethods java.lang.Math 1 "abs" true)))
(#<Method public static int java.lang.Math.abs(int)>
#<Method public static long java.lang.Math.abs(long)>
#<Method public static float java.lang.Math.abs(float)>
#<Method public static double java.lang.Math.abs(double)>)
nil

java version "1.7.0_21"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.7.0_21-b11)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 23.21-b01, mixed mode)

user=> (pprint (seq (clojure.lang.Reflector/getMethods java.lang.Math 1 "abs" true)))
(#<Method public static double java.lang.Math.abs(double)>
#<Method public static float java.lang.Math.abs(float)>
#<Method public static long java.lang.Math.abs(long)>
#<Method public static int java.lang.Math.abs(int)>)
nil

That might be a sign of undesirable behavior in invokeMatchingMethod() that is too dependent upon the order of methods given to it.

As you mention, type hinting is good for avoiding the significant performance hit of reflection.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Aug/15 8:24 PM ]

Not reproducible on 1.8.0-alpha3.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 03/Aug/15 9:52 AM ]

Alex, I could reproduce using 1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT and jdk 1.8:

[~]> java -version
java version "1.8.0_45"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_45-b14)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.45-b02, mixed mode)
[~]> clj
Clojure 1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT
user=> (set! *warn-on-reflection* true)
true
user=> (#(Math/abs %) 1000000000000)
Reflection warning, NO_SOURCE_PATH:2:3 - call to static method abs on java.lang.Math can't be resolved (argument
727379968
user=> (class *1)
java.lang.Integer

Andy's last comment mentions that clojure.lang.Reflector.invokeStaticMethod is dependant on the order of methods passed to it and that that order can change between jdk versions so maybe that's why you couldn't reproduce it





[CLJ-1319] array-map fails lazily if passed an odd number of arguments Created: 08/Jan/14  Updated: 03/Aug/15

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Stuart Sierra Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: errormsgs, ft

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1319-Throw-on-odd-arguments-to-PersistentArrayMa.patch     Text File 0002-CLJ-1319-Throw-on-odd-arguments-to-PersistentArrayMa.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Ok

 Description   

If called with an odd number of arguments, array-map does not throw an exception until the map is realized, when it throws the confusing ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException.

Example, in 1.5.1 and 1.6.0-alpha3:

user=> (def m (hash-map :a 1 :b))
IllegalArgumentException No value supplied for key: :b  clojure.lang.PersistentHashMap.create (PersistentHashMap.java:77)

user=> (def m (array-map :a 1 :b))
#'user/m
user=> (prn m)
ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException 3
  clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap$Seq.first
  (PersistentArrayMap.java:313)

Approach: Catch on construction and throw same error as hash-map.

user=> (def m (array-map :a 1 :b))
IllegalArgumentException No value supplied for key: :b  clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap.createAsIfByAssoc (PersistentArrayMap.java:78)

Patch: 0002-CLJ-1319-Throw-on-odd-arguments-to-PersistentArrayMa.patch
Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 08/Jan/14 11:01 AM ]

PersistentArrayMap.createAsIfByAssoc could check length is even to catch this

Comment by Jason Felice [ 27/Jan/14 1:01 PM ]

A better error message would be nice... this is the best I could think of.

Comment by OHTA Shogo [ 14/May/15 7:06 AM ]

I suffered from this problem recently. Anything to resolve before applying the patch?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/May/15 8:21 AM ]

The error message should match the message for hash-map:

user=> (hash-map 1 2 3)
IllegalArgumentException No value supplied for key: 3  clojure.lang.PersistentHashMap.create (PersistentHashMap.java:77)
user=> (array-map 1 2 3)
IllegalArgumentException Odd number of arguments when creating map  clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap.createAsIfByAssoc (PersistentArrayMap.java:78)
Comment by OHTA Shogo [ 14/May/15 8:49 PM ]

Let me have a try. I just updated the patch!

0002-CLJ-1319-Throw-on-odd-arguments-to-PersistentArrayMa.patch

Comment by Alex Miller [ 15/May/15 9:10 AM ]

Looks good.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 03/Aug/15 8:05 AM ]

Reopened - does not seem to have correct behavior in 1.8.0-alpha4.

user=> (array-map 1 2 3)
ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException 3  clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap$Seq.first (PersistentArrayMap.java:321)
user=> (def m (array-map :a 1 :b))
#'user/m
Comment by Alex Miller [ 03/Aug/15 8:17 AM ]

Doesn't like this was merged so moving to Ok but not closed for next round.





[CLJ-1229] count silently overflows for sequences with more than Integer/MAX_VALUE elements Created: 09/Jul/13  Updated: 02/Aug/15  Resolved: 02/Aug/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Duplicate Votes: 1
Labels: math

Attachments: Text File clj-1229-count-overflow-patch-v1.txt    
Patch: Code

 Description   

Found by John Jacobsen: https://mail.google.com/mail/?shva=1#label/clojure/13fbba0c3e4ba6b7

user> (time (count (range (*' 1000 1000 1000 3))))
"Elapsed time: 375225.663 msecs"
-1294967296



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 09/Jul/13 1:41 AM ]

Patch clj-1229-count-overflow-patch-v1.txt dated Jul 8 2013 modifies count to throw an ArithmeticException for sequences with more than Integer/MAX_VALUE elements.

Performance experiments with this expression show no significant time differences before and after the change. I verified with -XX:+PrintCompilation, and only paid attention to timing results after no further JIT compilation was performed when executing the expression:

(defn foo [n m] (doall (for [i (range n)] (count (range m)))))
(time (foo 100 1000000))

No tests are added. A test verifying that an exception is thrown for such a long sequence would be prohibitively slow.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 09/Jul/13 3:08 AM ]

I think a better strategy might be to convert all count-like functions from int to long. int overflow exceptions aren't a particularly nice result, especially since they probably won't get picked up in tests for the reasons Andy mentioned.

That buys us a quite a few years more future proofing...

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 09/Jul/13 10:15 AM ]

Mike, unless I am missing something, that would require changing the method count() in the Counted interface to return a long, and that in turn requires little changes throughout the code base wherever Counted is used. It could be done, of course, but it is not a small change.

Comment by John Jacobsen [ 09/Jul/13 12:35 PM ]

I agree that Mike's approach is nicer overall, but think Andy's patch is an immediate improvement over what we have now, and could be implemented until someone takes the time to correctly make all the detailed changes Mike is suggesting.

Comment by John Jacobsen [ 09/Jul/13 12:52 PM ]

FWIW I did apply the patch, build, and test manually:

user=> (count (range (* 1000 1000 1000 3)))
ArithmeticException integer overflow clojure.lang.RT.countFrom (RT.java:549)
user=>

Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Jul/13 3:26 PM ]

Perhaps of interest, Java's Collection.size() returns Integer.MAX_VALUE if the size of the collection > MAX_VALUE. I can't say that either that behavior or overflow is particularly helpful in practice of course.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Aug/15 8:27 PM ]

Dupe to CLJ-1729 (similar change logged at Rich's request)





[CLJ-1207] Importing a class that does not exist fails to report the name of the class that did not exist Created: 29/Apr/13  Updated: 02/Aug/15  Resolved: 02/Aug/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Howard Lewis Ship Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Not Reproducible Votes: 1
Labels: errormsgs
Environment:

1.5.1, OS X


Waiting On: Howard Lewis Ship

 Description   

Pop quiz: What Java class is missing from the classpath?

java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: Could not initialize class com.annadaletech.nexus.util.logging__init
 at java.lang.Class.forName0 (Class.java:-2)
    java.lang.Class.forName (Class.java:264)
    clojure.lang.RT.loadClassForName (RT.java:2098)
    clojure.lang.RT.load (RT.java:430)
    clojure.lang.RT.load (RT.java:411)
    clojure.core$load$fn__5018.invoke (core.clj:5530)
    clojure.core$load.doInvoke (core.clj:5529)
    clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke (RestFn.java:408)
    clojure.core$load_one.invoke (core.clj:5336)
    clojure.core$load_lib$fn__4967.invoke (core.clj:5375)
    clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke (core.clj:5374)
    clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo (RestFn.java:142)
    clojure.core$apply.invoke (core.clj:619)
    clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke (core.clj:5413)
    clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo (RestFn.java:137)
    clojure.core$apply.invoke (core.clj:619)
    clojure.core$require.doInvoke (core.clj:5496)
    clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke (RestFn.java:512)
    novate.console.app$eval1736$loading__4910__auto____1737.invoke (app.clj:1)
    novate.console.app$eval1736.invoke (app.clj:1)
    clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6619)
    clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6608)
    clojure.lang.Compiler.load (Compiler.java:7064)
    user$eval1732.invoke (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)
    clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6619)
    clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6582)
    clojure.core$eval.invoke (core.clj:2852)
    clojure.main$repl$read_eval_print__6588$fn__6591.invoke (main.clj:259)
    clojure.main$repl$read_eval_print__6588.invoke (main.clj:259)
    clojure.main$repl$fn__6597.invoke (main.clj:277)
    clojure.main$repl.doInvoke (main.clj:277)
    clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke (RestFn.java:1096)
    clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$evaluate$fn__584.invoke (interruptible_eval.clj:56)
    clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper (AFn.java:159)
    clojure.lang.AFn.applyTo (AFn.java:151)
    clojure.core$apply.invoke (core.clj:617)
    clojure.core$with_bindings_STAR_.doInvoke (core.clj:1788)
    clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke (RestFn.java:425)
    clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$evaluate.invoke (interruptible_eval.clj:41)
    clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$interruptible_eval$fn__625$fn__628.invoke (interruptible_eval.clj:171)
    clojure.core$comp$fn__4154.invoke (core.clj:2330)
    clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$run_next$fn__618.invoke (interruptible_eval.clj:138)
    clojure.lang.AFn.run (AFn.java:24)
    java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor.runWorker (ThreadPoolExecutor.java:1110)
    java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor$Worker.run (ThreadPoolExecutor.java:603)
    java.lang.Thread.run (Thread.java:722)

If you guess "com.annadaletech.nexus.util.logging__init" you are wrong!

Wait, I'll give you a hint:

(ns com.annadaletech.nexus.util.logging
  (:use [clojure.string :only [trim-newline]]
        [clojure.pprint :only [code-dispatch pprint with-pprint-dispatch *print-right-margin*]])
  (:import [java.io StringWriter]
           [org.slf4j MDC MarkerFactory Marker LoggerFactory]
           [java.util.concurrent.locks ReentrantLock]))

Oh, sorry, did that not help?

The correct answer is "org.slf4j.MDC".

Having that information in the stack trace would have saved me nearly an hour. I think it is worth the effort to get that reported correctly.



 Comments   
Comment by Gabriel Horner [ 10/May/13 1:56 PM ]

When I try this on a fresh project, I get this error:
"ClassNotFoundException org.slf4j.MDC
java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run (URLClassLoader.java:202)
java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged (AccessController.java:-2)"

Howard, could you give us a project.clj or better yet a github repository that recreates this issue?

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 10/May/13 4:51 PM ]

I'll see what I can do. Probably be next week. Thanks for looking at this.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 26/May/13 8:20 AM ]

This reminds me of an issue with `lein run` that resulted from it trying to figure out whether you wanted to run a namespace or a java class:

https://github.com/technomancy/leiningen/issues/1182

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Aug/15 8:23 PM ]

I tried a few things but there is not enough info here for me to reproduce it. Please re-open if you can do so.





[CLJ-1199] Record values are not 'eval'uated, unlike values of PersistentMap: Created: 13/Apr/13  Updated: 02/Aug/15  Resolved: 02/Aug/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Jason Wolfe Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Declined Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

I'm not sure if this is by design, but it caught me off guard.

user> (defrecord A [x])
user.A

user> (eval (hash-map :x `long))
{:x #<core$long clojure.core$long@5de54eb7>}
user> (eval (->A `long))
#user.A{:x clojure.core/long}
user> (eval (map->A (hash-map :x `long)))
#user.A{:x clojure.core/long}

and in case it matters, here's a simplified version of the real use case where this came up, with no eval – just a macro:

user> (defmacro munge-meta1 [x] (assoc x :schema (->A (:schema (meta x)))))
#'user/munge-meta1
user> (munge-meta1 ^{:schema long} {})
{:schema #user.A{:x long}}

user> (defmacro munge-meta2 [x] (assoc x :schema (hash-map :x (:schema (meta x)))))
#'user/munge-meta2
user> (munge-meta2 ^{:schema long} {})
{:schema {:x #<core$long clojure.core$long@5de54eb7>}}

This seems to be fixed by moving the record creation post-evaluation, so it's not a big deal, just surprising (plus I haven't yet convinced myself that this will always work if the user's schema itself contains record-creating forms, although it seems to work OK):

user> (defmacro munge-meta1 [x] (assoc x :schema `(->A ~(:schema (meta x)))))
#'user/munge-meta1
user> (munge-meta1 ^{:schema long} {})
{:schema #user.A{:x #<core$long clojure.core$long@5de54eb7>}}

I brought this up on the mailing list here:

https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/clojure-dev/UgD35E1RQTo



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Aug/15 8:18 PM ]

This is by design, see http://clojure.org/datatypes - "each element in the vector form is passed to the deftype/defrecord's constructor un-evaluated"





[CLJ-1189] Map-destructuring :or fumble needs compiler warning Created: 31/Mar/13  Updated: 02/Aug/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Phill Wolf Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: errormsgs

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1189-p1.patch    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   

Here is a map-destructuring blunder that I wish the compiler warned about:

(defn server
[{servlet ::servlet
type ::type
:or {::type :jetty}
:as service-map}]

It would be splendid to get a warning that :or keys that are not symbols being bound have no effect.

The incomplete code snippet above comes from Pedestal.service 0.1.0.

Here is a complete one-line example with the coding error:

user> (defn picnic [{botulism :botulism :or {:botulism 6}}] botulism)
#'user/picnic
user> (picnic {})
nil
user> ;; I intended 6.



 Comments   
Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 26/May/13 8:25 AM ]

Should this be a warning or an exception? I don't know of any similar example of the compiler giving a warning, so I would expect the latter.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 26/May/13 9:54 AM ]

Added a patch that throws an exception when :or is not a map or its keys are not symbols. Also some tests.





[CLJ-1138] data-reader returning nil causes exception Created: 22/Dec/12  Updated: 02/Aug/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4, Release 1.5, Release 1.6, Release 1.7, Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Steve Miner Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: reader
Environment:

clojure 1.5 beta2, Mac OS X 10.8.2, java version "1.6.0_37"


Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1139-allow-nil-in-data-reader.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

If a data-reader returns nil, the reader throws java.lang.RuntimeException: No dispatch macro... The error message implies that there is no dispatch macro for whatever the first character of the tag happens to be.

Here's a simple example:

(binding [*data-readers* {'f/ignore (constantly nil)}] (read-string "#f/ignore 42 10"))

RuntimeException No dispatch macro for: f clojure.lang.Util.runtimeException (Util.java:219)



 Comments   
Comment by Steve Miner [ 22/Dec/12 9:43 AM ]

clj-1138-allow-data-reader-to-return-nil-instead-of-throwing.patch allows a data-reader to return nil instead of throwing. Does sanity check that possible tag or record isJavaIdentifierStart(). Gives better error message for special characters that might actually be dispatch macros (rather than assuming it's a tagged literal).

Comment by Steve Miner [ 22/Dec/12 10:06 AM ]

clj-1138-data-reader-return-nil-for-no-op.patch allows a data-reader returning nil to be treated as a no-op by the reader (like #_). nil is not normally a useful value (actually it causes an exception in Clojure 1.4 through 1.5 beta2) for a data-reader to return. With this patch, one could get something like a conditional feature reader using data-readers.

Comment by Steve Miner [ 22/Dec/12 10:26 AM ]

clj-1138-allow-data-reader-to-return-nil-instead-of-throwing.patch is the first patch to consider. It merely allows nil as a value from a data-reader and returns nil as the final value. I think it does what was originally intended for dispatch macros, and gives a better error message in many cases (mostly typos).

The second patch, clj-1138-data-reader-return-nil-for-no-op.patch, depends on the other being applied first. It takes an extra step to treat a nil value returned from a data-reader as a no-op for the reader (like #_).

Comment by Steve Miner [ 23/Dec/12 11:52 AM ]

It turns out that you can work around the original problem by having your data-reader return '(quote nil) instead of plain nil. That expression conveniently evaluates to nil so you can get a nil if necessary. This also works after applying the patches so there's still a way to return nil if you really want it.

(binding [*data-readers* {'x/nil (constantly '(quote nil))}] (read-string "#x/nil 42"))
;=> (quote nil)

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 07/Feb/13 9:20 AM ]

Patch clj-1138-allow-data-reader-to-return-nil-instead-of-throwing.patch dated Dec 22 2012 still applies cleanly to latest master if you use the following command:

% git am --keep-cr -s --ignore-whitespace < clj-1138-allow-data-reader-to-return-nil-instead-of-throwing.patch

Without the --ignore-whitespace option, the patch fails only because some whitespace was changed in Clojure master recently.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 13/Feb/13 11:24 AM ]

OK, now with latest master (1.5.0-RC15 at this time), patch clj-1138-allow-data-reader-to-return-nil-instead-of-throwing.patch no longer applies cleanly, not even using --ignore-whitespace in the 'git am' command given above. Steve, if you could see what needs to be updated, that would be great. Using the patch command as suggested in the "Updating stale patches" section of http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/JIRA+workflow wasn't enough, so it should probably be carefully examined by hand to see what needs updating.

Comment by Steve Miner [ 14/Feb/13 12:21 PM ]

I removed my patches. Things have changes recently with the LispReader and new EdnReader.





[CLJ-955] java object reader constructor doesn't work Created: 18/Mar/12  Updated: 02/Aug/15  Resolved: 02/Aug/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Brent Millare Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Declined Votes: 0
Labels: reader


 Description   

Here is a transcript:

;user=> clojure-version
{:major 1, :minor 4, :incremental 0, :qualifier "beta5"}
;user=> (.getProtocol #java.net.URL["file:/home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs"])
java.lang.RuntimeException: Can't embed object in code, maybe print-dup not defined: file:/home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs, compiling:(null:2)
;user=> (.getProtocol (java.net.URL. "file:/home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs"))
"file"

Another transcript from google groups https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups&hl=en#!topic/clojure/vlsFgVaKcSQ

user=> (def x #java.net.URL["file:/home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs"])
#'user/x
user=> x
#<URL file:/home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs>
user=> (.getProtocol x)
"file"

user=> (.getProtocol #java.net.URL["file:/home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs"])
CompilerException java.lang.RuntimeException: Can't embed object in code, maybe print-dup not defined: file:/home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:5)
user=> (defmethod print-dup java.net.URL [o, ^java.io.Writer w] (.write w (str o)))
#<MultiFn clojure.lang.MultiFn@2e694f12>

user=> (.getProtocol #java.net.URL["file:/home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs"])
ClassCastException clojure.lang.Symbol cannot be cast to java.net.URL user/eval11 (NO_SOURCE_FILE:7)
user=>

user=> (def x #java.net.URL["file:///home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs"])
#'user/x
user=> (printf "(class x)=%s x='%s'\n" (class x) x)
(class x)=class java.net.URL x='file:/home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs'
nil
user=> (let [x #java.net.URL["file:///home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs"]]
(printf "(class x)=%s x='%s'\n" (class x) x))
CompilerException java.lang.RuntimeException: Can't embed object in code, maybe print-dup not defined: file:/home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:4)

user=> (defmethod print-dup java.net.URL [o, ^java.io.Writer w] (.write w (str o)))
#<MultiFn clojure.lang.MultiFn@3362a63>
user=> (let [x #java.net.URL["file:///home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs"]]
(printf "(class x)=%s x='%s'\n" (class x) x))
(class x)=class clojure.lang.Symbol x='file:/home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs'
nil



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 19/Mar/12 2:58 AM ]

I've confirmed this behavior with 1.4.0 beta5. I've only tracked it down as far as finding the "Can't embed object in code" message, which is easy to find in Compiler.java in method emitValue. That exception is thrown because printString in RT.java throws an exception.

It isn't clear to me what should be done instead, though.

Comment by Fogus [ 19/Mar/12 9:03 AM ]

What would it mean to construct an arbitrary Java object for the purpose of embedding it in code in a generic way? You could say that it's just a matter of calling its constructor with the right args but very often in Java that is not enough to make an object considered "initialize". Sometimes there are init methods or putters or whatever that are required for object construction. So right there I hope it's clear that even though #some.Klass["foo"] provides a way to call an arbitrary constructor, it's in no way a guarantee that an instance is properly constructed. The reason that (for example) defrecords are embeddable anywhere is because we know for certain that the constructor creates a fully initialized instance. If you need to embed specific instances in your own code then you have two options:

  • Implement a print-dup for the class that guarantees a fully initialized object is built.
  • Use Clojure 1.4's tagged literal feature to do the same.

Quick point of note:

Your code

(defmethod print-dup java.net.URL [o, ^java.io.Writer w] (.write w (str o)))

Doesn't do what you think it does. It spits out exactly file:///home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs that Clojure reads in as a symbol. Something like the following might be more appropriate:

(defmethod print-dup java.net.URL [o, ^java.io.Writer w] (.write w "#java.net.URL") (.write w (str [ (str o) ])))

(let [x #java.net.URL["file:///home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs"]]                             
  (printf "(class x)=%s x='%s'\n" (class x) x) x)                                                                          

; (class x)=class java.net.URL x='file:/home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs'

;=> #<URL file:/home/hara/dj/usr/src/clojurescript/src/cljs/cljs/core.cljs>

(.getProtocol *1)                        
;=> "file"
Comment by Brent Millare [ 19/Mar/12 10:09 AM ]

Fogus, can you please elaborate on using clojure 1.4's tagged literal features. While I understand that you can define data-reader functions, for example

(binding [*data-readers* {'user/f (fn [x] (java.io.File. (first x)))}] (read-string "#user/f [\"hello\"]")) ;=> #<File hello>

however, I feel this is only half a fix, compared with the first mentioned solution (involving print-dup), since clojure's tagged literals only are important for reading, not for printing. Does using tagged literals, so that (read-string (pr-str (read-string ...) works, imply that you must also define print methods per class? If this is true, it seems problematic since if different code wants to define different print methods, this will conflict since defining print-dup methods is global. Is there a good solution for printing objects depending on the context? As an alternative solution, I propose making the default print-method of all objects that didn't already have a printed representation to be a tagged literal, this way, users can customize what it means to read it. (See https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups&hl=en#!topic/clojure/GdT5cO6JoSQ )

Comment by Fogus [ 19/Mar/12 10:18 AM ]

"Fogus, can you please elaborate on using clojure 1.4's tagged literal features."

I can, but it falls outside of the scope of this particular ticket. It might be better to take the broader conversation to the design page at http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/Tagged+Literals and the clojure-dev list.

Has the original motivation for this ticket been addressed?

Comment by Brent Millare [ 19/Mar/12 10:26 AM ]

I think you've explained the underlying problem, so yes. One possible caveat might be that it may be a concern that the current error message is not telling that the underlying problem lies in an improperly initialized object. (or maybe it is, and that's the error message I should expect).





[CLJ-878] DispatchReader always calls CtorReader when no dispatch macro found Created: 15/Nov/11  Updated: 02/Aug/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.3
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Greg Chapman Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: reader
Environment:

Windows 7, Java 1.7



 Description   

At the REPL, I accidentally typed:

user=> # "\w+"
RuntimeException Unsupported escape character: \w clojure.lang.Util.runtimeExce
ption (Util.java:156)
#<core$PLUS clojure.core$PLUS@6b7dc78>

You can see the confusing result (the REPL is also left in an unclosed string). After looking at LispReader.java, it seems to me DispatchReader ought to at least check for whitespace before calling CtorReader (perhaps better would be to check for a valid symbol character).



 Comments   
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 25/Mar/15 5:33 PM ]

No longer reproducible

Comment by Alex Miller [ 25/Mar/15 9:33 PM ]

Seems at least partially reproducible to me. I see same behavior on first example. Second example works with a symbol {{# user.X[5]}} but fails with a reasonable error on the given case.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 25/Mar/15 9:56 PM ]

Ah, right.
The only way to fix the first error is to make `# "\w+"` a valid regex literal, that is, allowing whitespaces between # and the next dispatch char.
Is this something we want?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 25/Mar/15 10:06 PM ]

dunno

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Aug/15 7:53 PM ]

Removed 2nd (no longer present) example in description.





[CLJ-379] problem with classloader when run as windows service Created: 13/Jun/10  Updated: 02/Aug/15  Resolved: 02/Aug/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Anonymous Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Declined Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

I found following error when I run clojure application as MS Windows service (via procrun from Apache Daemon project). When I tried to do 'require' during run-time, I got NullPointerException. This happened as baseLoader function from RT class returned null in such environment (the value of Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader()). (Although my app works fine when I run my application as standalone program, not as service).
This error was fixed by explicit setting of class loader with following code:

(.setContextClassLoader (Thread/currentThread) (java.lang.ClassLoader/getSystemClassLoader))

before any call to 'require'....

May be you need to modify 'baseLoader' function, so it will check is value of Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader() is null or not, and if null, then return value of java.lang.ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader() ?



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 10:40 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/379
Attachments:
ticket-379-fix.diff - https://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/documents/c5XWHcD4yr34HveJe5ccaP/download/c5XWHcD4yr34HveJe5ccaP

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 10:40 AM ]

alexott said: possible fix is attached

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 10:40 AM ]

alexott said: [file:c5XWHcD4yr34HveJe5ccaP]

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Aug/15 7:42 PM ]

Too old, too few details to repro, too many changes since logging to properly evaluate.





[CLJ-1364] Primitive VecSeq does not implement equals or hashing methods Created: 19/Feb/14  Updated: 02/Aug/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: collections

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

VecSeq (as produced by (seq (vector-of :int 1 2 3))) does not implements equals, hashCode, or hasheq and does not play with any other Clojure collections or sequences appropriately in this regard.

user=> (def rs (range 3))
user=> (def vs (seq (vector-of :int 0 1 2)))
user=> rs
(0 1 2)
user=> vs
(0 1 2)
user=> (.equals rs vs)
true
user=> (.equals vs rs)    ;; expect: true
false
user=> (.equiv rs vs)
true
user=> (.equiv vs rs)
true
user=> (.hashCode rs)
29824
user=> (.hashCode vs)     ;; expect to match (.hashCode rs)
2081327893
user=> (System/identityHashCode vs)  ;; show that we're just getting Object hashCode
2081327893
user=> (.hasheq rs)
29824
user=> (.hasheq vs)       ;; expect same as (.hasheq rs) but not implemented at all
IllegalArgumentException No matching field found: hasheq for class clojure.core.VecSeq  clojure.lang.Reflector.getInstanceField (Reflector.java:271)





[CLJ-1517] Unrolled small vectors Created: 01/Sep/14  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Backlog

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Zach Tellman Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 20
Labels: collections, performance

Attachments: File unrolled-collections-2.diff     File unrolled-collections.diff     Text File unrolled-vector-2.patch     Text File unrolled-vector.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Incomplete

 Description   

As discussed on the mailing list [1], this patch has two unrolled variants of vectors and maps, with special inner classes for each cardinality. Currently both grow to six elements before spilling over into the general versions of the data structures, which is based on rough testing but can be easily changed. At Rich's request, I haven't included any integration into the rest of the code, and there are top-level static create() methods for each.

The sole reason for this patch is performance, both in terms of creating data structures and performing operations on them. This can be seen as a more verbose version of the trick currently played with PersistentArrayMap spilling over into PersistentHashMap. Based on the benchmarks, which can be run by cloning cambrian-collections [2] and running 'lein test :benchmark', this should supplant PersistentArrayMap. Performance is at least on par with PAM, and often much faster. Especially noteworthy is the creation time, which is 5x faster for maps of all sizes (lein test :only cambrian-collections.map-test/benchmark-construction), and on par for 3-vectors, but 20x faster for 5-vectors. There are similar benefits for hash and equality calculations, as well as calls to reduce().

This is a big patch (over 5k lines), and will be kind of a pain to review. My assumption of correctness is based on the use of collection-check, and the fact that the underlying approach is very simple. I'm happy to provide a high-level description of the approach taken, though, if that will help the review process.

I'm hoping to get this into 1.7, so please let me know if there's anything I can do to help accomplish that.

[1] https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure-dev/pDhYoELjrcs
[2] https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections

Patch: unrolled-vector-2.patch

Screener Notes: The approach is clear and understandable. Given the volume of generated code, I believe that best way to improve confidence in this code is to get people using it asap, and add collection-test [3] to the Clojure test suite. I would also like to get the generator [4] included in the Clojure repo. We don't need to necessarily automate running it, but would be nice to have it nearby if we want to tweak something later.

[3] https://github.com/ztellman/collection-check/blob/master/src/collection_check.clj
[4] https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections/blob/master/generate/cambrian_collections/vector.clj



 Comments   
Comment by Zach Tellman [ 01/Sep/14 10:13 PM ]

Oh, I forgot to mention that I didn't make a PersistentUnrolledSet, since the existing wrappers can use the unrolled map implementation. However, it would be moderately faster and more memory efficient to have one, so let me know if it seems worthwhile.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 02/Sep/14 5:23 AM ]

Zach, the patch you added isn't in the correct format, they need to be created using `git format-patch`

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 02/Sep/14 5:31 AM ]

Also, I'm not sure if this is on-scope with the ticket but those patches break with *print-dup*, as it expects a static create(x) method for each inner class.

I'd suggest adding a create(Map x) static method for the inner PersistentUnrolledMap classes and a create(ISeq x) one for the inner PersistentUnrolledVector classes

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Sep/14 8:14 AM ]

Re making patches, see: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 02/Sep/14 9:16 AM ]

I wonder what is the overhead of having meta and 2 hash fields in the class. Have you considered a version where the hash is computed on the fly and where you have two sets of collections, one with meta field and one without, using former when the actual metadata is attached to the collection?

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 02/Sep/14 12:13 PM ]

I've attached a patch using the proper method. Somehow I missed the detailed explanation for how to do this, sorry. I know the guidelines say not to delete previous patches, but since the first one isn't useful I've deleted it to minimize confusion.

I did the print-dup friendly create methods, and then realized that once these are properly integrated, 'pr' will just emit these as vectors. I'm fairly sure the create methods aren't necessary, so I've commented them out, but I'm happy to add them back in if they're useful for some reason I can't see.

I haven't given a lot of thought to memory efficiency, but I think caching the hashes are worthwhile. I can see an argument for creating a "with-meta" version of each collection, but since that would double the size of an already enormous patch, I think that should probably wait.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 03/Sep/14 4:31 PM ]

I found a bug! Like PersistentArrayMap, I have a special code path for comparing keywords, but my generators for collection-check were previously using only integer keys. There was an off-by-one error in the transient map implementation [1], which was not present for non-keyword lookups.

I've taken a close look for other gaps in my test coverage, and can't find any. I don't think this substantively changes the risk of this patch (an updated version of which has been uploaded as 'unrolled-collections-2.diff'), but obviously where there's one bug, there may be others.

[1] https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections/commit/eb7dfe6d12e6774512dbab22a148202052442c6d#diff-4bf78dbf5b453f84ed59795a3bffe5fcR559

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 03/Oct/14 2:34 PM ]

As an additional data point, I swapped out the data structures in the Cheshire JSON library. On the "no keyword-fn decode" benchmark, the current implementation takes 6us, with the unrolled data structures takes 4us, and with no data structures (just lexing the JSON via Jackson) takes 2us. Other benchmarks had similar results. So at least in this scenario, it halves the overhead.

Benchmarks can be run by cloning https://github.com/dakrone/cheshire, unrolled collections can be tested by using the 'unrolled-collections' branch. The pure lexing benchmark can be reproduced by messing around with the cheshire.parse namespace a bit.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 06/Oct/14 1:31 PM ]

Is there no way to get this into 1.7? It's an awfully big win to push off for another year.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 07/Oct/14 2:08 PM ]

Hey Zach, it's definitely considered important but we have decided to drop almost everything not fully done for 1.7. Timeframe for following release is unknown, but certainly expected to be significantly less than a year.

Comment by John Szakmeister [ 30/Oct/14 2:53 PM ]

You are all free to determine the time table, but I thought I'd point out that Zach is not entirely off-base. Clojure 1.4.0 was released April 5th, 2012. Clojure 1.5.0 was released March 1st, 2013 with 1.6.0 showing up March 25th, 2014. So it appears that the current cadence is around a year.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Oct/14 3:40 PM ]

John, there is no point to comments like this. Let's please keep issue comments focused on the issue.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 13/Nov/14 12:23 PM ]

I did a small write-up on this patch which should help in the eventual code review: http://blog.factual.com/using-clojure-to-generate-java-to-reimplement-clojure

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 07/Dec/14 10:34 PM ]

Per my conversation with Alex at the Conj, here's a patch that only contains the unrolled vectors, and uses the more efficient constructor for PersistentVector when spilling over.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 08/Dec/14 1:10 PM ]

Zach, I created a new placeholder for the map work at http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1610.

Comment by Jean Niklas L'orange [ 09/Dec/14 1:52 PM ]

It should probably be noted that core.rrb-vector will break for small vectors by this patch, as it peeks into the underlying structure. This will also break other libraries which peeks into the vector implementation internals, although I'm not aware of any other – certainly not any other contrib library.

Also, two comments on unrolled-vector.patch:

private transient boolean edit = true;
in the Transient class should probably be
private volatile boolean edit = true;
as transient means something entirely different in Java.

conj in the Transient implementation could invalidate itself without any problems (edit = false;) if it is converted into a TransientVector (i.e. spills over) – unless it has a notable overhead. The invalidation can prevent some subtle bugs related to erroneous transient usage.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 09/Dec/14 1:58 PM ]

Jean - understanding the scope of the impact will certainly be part of the integration process for this patch. I appreciate the heads-up. While we try to minimize breakage for things like this, it may be unavoidable for libraries that rely on implementation internals.

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 09/Dec/14 2:03 PM ]

I'll add support for unrolled vectors to core.rrb-vector the moment they land on master. (Probably with some conditional compilation so as not to break compatibility with earlier versions of Clojure – we'll see when the time comes.)

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 09/Dec/14 2:06 PM ]

I should say that it'd be possible to add generic support for any "vector lookalikes" by pouring them into regular vectors in linear time. At first glance it seems to me that that'd be out of line with the basic promise of the library, but I'll give it some more thought before the changes actually land.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 09/Dec/14 5:43 PM ]

Somewhat predictably, the day after I cut the previous patch, someone found an issue [1]. In short, my use of the ArrayChunk wrapper applied the offset twice.

This was not caught by collection-check, which has been updated to catch this particular failure. It was, however, uncovered by Michael Blume's attempts to merge the change into Clojure, which tripped a bunch of alarms in Clojure's test suite. My own attempt to do the same to "prove" that it worked was before I added in the chunked seq functionality, hence this issue persisting until now.

As always, there may be more issues lurking. I hope we can get as many eyeballs on the code between now and 1.8 as possible.

[1] https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections/commit/2e70bbd14640b312db77590d8224e6ed0f535b43
[2] https://github.com/MichaelBlume/clojure/tree/test-vector

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 10/Jul/15 1:54 PM ]

As a companion to the performance analysis in the unrolled map issue, I've run the benchmarks and posted the results at https://gist.github.com/ztellman/10e8959501fb666dc35e. Some notable results:

Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Jul/15 9:02 AM ]

Stu: I do not think this patch should be marked "screened" until the actual integration and build work (if the generator is integrated) has been completed.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Jul/15 4:33 PM ]

FYI, we have "reset" all big features for 1.8 for the moment (except the socket repl work). We may still include it - that determination will be made later.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 14/Jul/15 4:43 PM ]

Okay, any idea when the determination will be made? I was excited that we seemed to be finally moving forward on this.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Jul/15 4:51 PM ]

No, but it is now on my work list.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 15/Jul/15 8:17 AM ]

I wonder if all of the overriding of APersistentVector yields important benefits - e.g. iterator, hashcode etc.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 15/Jul/15 11:51 AM ]

In the case of hashcode, definitely: https://gist.github.com/ztellman/10e8959501fb666dc35e#file-gistfile1-txt-L1013-L1076. This was actually one of the original things I wanted to speed up.

In the case of the iterator, probably not. I'd be fine removing that.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 16/Jul/15 5:17 PM ]

So am I to infer from https://github.com/clojure/clojure/commit/36d665793b43f62cfd22354aced4c6892088abd6 that this issue is defunct? If so, I think there's a lot of improvements being left on the table for no particular reason.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 16/Jul/15 6:34 PM ]

Yes, that commit covers this functionality. It takes a different approach from the patch in building up from a small core, and maximizing improvements to the bases rather than having a lot of redundant definitions per class. That also allowed for immediate integration without as much concern for correctness, as there is little new code. It also emphasizes the use case for tuples, e.g. small vectors used as values that won't be changed, thus de-emphasizing the 'mutable' functions. I disagree that many necessary improvements are being left out. The patch 'optimized' many things that don't matter. Further, there are not big improvements to the pervasive inlining. In addition, the commit includes the integration work at a fraction of the size of the patch. In all, it would have taken much more back and forth to get the patch to conform with this approach than to just get it all done, but I appreciate the inspiration and instigation - thanks!

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 16/Jul/15 6:46 PM ]

That said, this commit need not be the last word - it can serve as a baseline for further optimization. But I'd rather that be driven by need. Clojure could become 10x as large optimizing things that don't matter.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 19/Jul/15 1:36 PM ]

What is our reference for "relevant" performance? I (or anyone else) can provide microbenchmarks for calculating hashes or whatever else, but that doesn't prove that it's an important improvement. I previously provided benchmarks for JSON decoding in Cheshire, but that's just one of many possible real-world benchmarks. It might be useful to have an agreed-upon list of benchmarks that we can use when debating what is and isn't useful.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 19/Jul/15 11:14 PM ]

I was interested in this implementation so created a branch that integrates Zach's unrolled vectors on top of clojure 1.8.0-alpha2. I also simplified some of the code (I don't think the metadata handling or unrolled seqs are worthwhile, for example)

Github branch: https://github.com/mikera/clojure/tree/clj-1517

Then I ran a set of micro-benchmarks created by Peter Taoussanis

Results: https://gist.github.com/mikera/72a739c84dd52fa3b6d6

My findings from this testing:

  • Performance is comparable (within +/- 20%) on the majority of tests
  • Zach's approach is noticeably faster (by 70-150%) for 4 operations (reduce, mapv, into, equality)

My view is that these additional optimisations are worthwhile. In particular, I think that reduce and into are very important operations. I also care about mapv quite a lot for core.matrix (It's fundamental to many numerical operations on arrays implemented using Clojure vectors).

Happy to create a patch along these lines if it would be acceptable.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 19/Jul/15 11:45 PM ]

The `reduce` improvements are likely due to the unrolled reduce and kvreduce impls, but the others are probably because of the unrolled transient implementation. The extra code required to add these would be pretty modest.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 20/Jul/15 9:20 PM ]

I actually condensed the code down to a single implementation for `Transient` and `TupleSeq`. I don't think these really need to be fully unrolled for each Tuple type. That helps by making the code even smaller (and probably also helps performance, given JVM inline caching etc.)

Comment by Peter Taoussanis [ 21/Jul/15 11:46 AM ]

Hey folks,

Silly question: is there actually a particular set of reference benchmarks that everyone's currently using to test the work on tuples? It took me a while to notice how bad the variance was with my own set of micro benchmarks.

Bumping all the run counts up till the noise starts ~dying down, I'm actually seeing numbers now that don't seem to agree with others here .

Google Docs link: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1QHY3lehVF-aKrlOwDQfyDO5SLkGeb_uaj85NZ7tnuL0/edit?usp=sharing
gist with the benchmarks: https://gist.github.com/ptaoussanis/0a294809bc9075b6b02d

Thanks, cheers!

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 21/Jul/15 6:52 PM ]

Hey Peter, I can't reproduce your results, and some of them are so far off what I'd expect that I have to think there was some data gathering error. For instance, the assoc operation being slower is kind of inexplicable, considering the unrolled version doesn't do any copying, etc. Also, all of your numbers are significantly slower than the ones on my 4 year old laptop, which is also a bit strange.

Just to make sure that we're comparing apples to apples, I've adapted your benchmarks into something that pretty-prints the mean runtime and variance for 1.7, 1.8-alpha2, and Mike's 1517 fork. It can be found at https://github.com/ztellman/tuple-benchmark, and the results of a run at https://gist.github.com/ztellman/3701d965228fb9eda084.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 22/Jul/15 2:24 AM ]

Hey Zach just looked at your benchmarks and they are definitely more consistent with what I am seeing. The overall nanosecond timings look about right from my experience with similar code (e.g. working with small vectors in vectorz-clj).

Comment by Peter Taoussanis [ 22/Jul/15 2:41 AM ]

Hi Zach, thanks for that!

Have updated the results -
Gist: https://gist.github.com/ptaoussanis/0a294809bc9075b6b02d
Google docs: https://goo.gl/khgT83

Note that I've added an extra sheet/tab to the Google doc for your own numbers at https://gist.github.com/ztellman/3701d965228fb9eda084.

Am still struggling to produce results that show any consistent+significant post-JIT benefit to either of the tuple implementations against the micro benchmarks and one larger small-vec-heavy system I had handy.

It's looking to me like it's maybe possible that the JIT's actually optimising away most of the non-tuple inefficiencies in practice?

Of course it's very possible that my results are off, or my expectations wrong. The numbers have been difficult to pin down.

It definitely helped to have a standardised reference micro benchmark to work against (https://github.com/ztellman/tuple-benchmark). Could I perhaps suggest a similar reference macro benchmark (maybe something from core.matrix, Mike?)

Might also be a good idea to define a worthwhile target performance delta for ops like these that run in the nanosecond range (or for the larger reference macro benchmark)?

Just some thoughts from someone passing through in case they're at all useful; know many of you have been deeply involved in this for some time so please feel free to ignore any input that's not helpful

Appreciate all the efforts, cheers!

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 22/Jul/15 9:24 AM ]

I think everyone should back off on their enthusiasm for this approach. After much analysis, I am seeing definite negative impacts to tuples, especially the multiple class approach proposed by Zach. What happens in real code is that the many tuple classes cause call sites that see different sized vectors to become megamorphic, and nothing gets adequately optimized. In particular, call sites that will see tuple-sized and large vectors (i.e. a lot of library code) will optimize differently depending upon which they see often first. So, if you run your first tight loop on vector code that sees tuples, that code could later do much worse (50-100%) on large vectors than before the tuples patch was in place. Being much slower on large collections is a poor tradeoff for being slightly faster on small ones.

Certainly different tuple classes for arity 0-6 is a dead idea. You get as good or better optimization (at some cost in size) from a single class e.g. one with four fields, covering sizes 0-4. I have a working version of this in a local branch. It is better in that sites that include pvectors are only bi-morphic, but I am still somewhat skittish given what I've seen.

The other takeaway is that the micro benchmarks are nearly worthless for detecting these issues.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 22/Jul/15 11:07 AM ]

I'm pretty sure that all of my real-world applications of the tuples (via clj-tuple) have been fixed cardinality, and wouldn't have surfaced any such issue. Thanks for putting the idea through its paces.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 22/Jul/15 10:37 PM ]

Rich these are good insights - do you have a benchmark that you are using as representative of real world code?

I agree that it is great if we can avoid call sites becoming megamorphic, though I also believe the ship has sailed on that one already when you consider the multiple types of IPersistentVector that already exist (MapEntry, PersistentVector, SubVector plus any library-defined IPersistentVector instances such as clojure.core.rrb-vector). As a consequence, the JVM is usually not going to be able to prove that a specific IPersistentVector interface invocation is monomorphic, which is when the really big optimisations happen.

In most of the real world code that I've been working with, the same size/type of vector gets used repeatedly (Examples: iterating over map entries, working with a sequence of size-N vectors), so in such cases we should be able to rely on the polymorphic inline cache doing the right thing.

The idea of a single Tuple class for sizes 0-4 is interesting, though I can't help thinking that a lot of the performance gain from this may stem from the fact that a lot of code does stuff like (reduce conj [] .....) or the transient equivalent which is a particularly bad use case for Tuples, at least from the call site caching perspective. There may be a better way to optimise such cases rather than simply trying to make Tuples faster.... e.g. calling asTransient() on a Tuple0 could perhaps switch straight into the PersistentVector implementation.





[CLJ-1785] Reader conditionals throws when they have nil expressions Created: 21/Jul/15  Updated: 31/Jul/15  Resolved: 31/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Jozef Wagner Assignee: Jozef Wagner
Resolution: Completed Votes: 1
Labels: reader, readerconditionals

Attachments: Text File clj-1785.patch     Text File clj-1785-v2.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Ok

 Description   

Reader conditional that has nil as an expression fails.

e.g. (read-string {:read-cond :allow} "#?(:default nil)")

The fact that nil values are valid expressions are documented at both official documentation and design page.

Patch: clj-1785-v2.patch

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 21/Jul/15 3:53 PM ]

Added patch with tests

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 21/Jul/15 4:06 PM ]

v2 patch that uses static final sentinel value

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 22/Jul/15 7:23 AM ]

CLJ-1138 reports a similar bug with data readers.





[CLJ-130] Namespace metadata lost in AOT compile Created: 19/Jun/09  Updated: 31/Jul/15  Resolved: 31/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Stuart Sierra Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Completed Votes: 5
Labels: aot, metadata

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-130-preserve-metadata-for-AOT-compiled-namespace.patch     File aot-drops-metadata-demo.sh     File aot-drops-metadata-demo.sh     File aot-drops-metadata-demo-w-direct-linkage.sh    
Patch: Code
Approval: Ok

 Description   

AOT-compilation drops namespace metadata.

This also affects all of the namespaces packaged with Clojure, except clojure.core, for which metadata is explicitly added in core.clj.

Cause of the bug:

  • a namespace inherits the metadata of the symbol used to create that namespace the first time
  • the namespace is created in the load() method, that is invoked after the __init() method
  • the __init0() method creates all the Vars of the namespace
  • interning a Var in a namespace that doesn't exist forces that namespace to be created

This means that the namespace will have been already created (with nil metadata) by the time the load() method gets invoked and thus the call to in-ns will be a no-op and the metadata will be lost.

Approach: The attached patch fixes this issue by explicitely attaching the metadata to the namespace after its creation (via ns) using a .resetMeta call
Patch: 0001-CLJ-130-preserve-metadata-for-AOT-compiled-namespace.patch
Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:45 AM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/130

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:45 AM ]

richhickey said: Updating tickets (#127, #128, #129, #130)

Comment by Assembla Importer [ 24/Aug/10 6:45 AM ]

juergenhoetzel said: This is still a issue on

Clojure 1.2.0-master-SNAPSHOT

Any progress, hints? I prefer interactive documentiation via slime/repl

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 09/Sep/14 9:44 AM ]

This is of great concern to me, as the Rook web services framework we're building depends on availability of namespace metadata at runtime.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 09/Sep/14 9:53 AM ]

BTW, I verified that this still exists in 1.6.0.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 09/Sep/14 10:11 AM ]

For me personally, I would raise the priority of this issue. And I think in general, anything that works differently with AOT vs. non-AOT should be major, if not blocker, priority.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 09/Sep/14 10:25 AM ]

Alex Miller:

@hlship I think the question is where it would go. note no one has suggested a solution in last 5 yrs.

Alas, I have not delved into the AOT compilation code (since, you know, I value my sanity). But it seems to me like the __init class for the namespace could construct the map and update the Namespace object.

Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 09/Sep/14 4:27 PM ]

Just playing with javap, I can see that the meta data is being assembled in some way, so it's a question of why it is not accessible ...

  public static void __init0();
    Code:
       0: ldc           #108                // String clojure.core
       2: ldc           #110                // String in-ns
       4: invokestatic  #116                // Method clojure/lang/RT.var:(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;)Lclojure/lang/Var;
       7: checkcast     #12                 // class clojure/lang/Var
      10: putstatic     #10                 // Field const__0:Lclojure/lang/Var;
      13: aconst_null
      14: ldc           #118                // String fan.auth
      16: invokestatic  #122                // Method clojure/lang/Symbol.intern:(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;)Lclojure/lang/Symbol;
      19: checkcast     #124                // class clojure/lang/IObj
      22: iconst_4
      23: anewarray     #4                  // class java/lang/Object
      26: dup
      27: iconst_0
      28: aconst_null
      29: ldc           #126                // String meta-foo
      31: invokestatic  #130                // Method clojure/lang/RT.keyword:(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;)Lclojure/lang/Keyword;
      34: aastore
      35: dup
      36: iconst_1
      37: aconst_null
      38: ldc           #132                // String meta-bar
      40: invokestatic  #130                // Method clojure/lang/RT.keyword:(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;)Lclojure/lang/Keyword;
      43: aastore
      44: dup
      45: iconst_2
      46: aconst_null
      47: ldc           #134                // String doc
      49: invokestatic  #130                // Method clojure/lang/RT.keyword:(Ljava/lang/String;Ljava/lang/String;)Lclojure/lang/Keyword;
      52: aastore
      53: dup
      54: iconst_3
      55: ldc           #136                // String Defines the resources for the authentication service.
      57: aastore
      58: invokestatic  #140                // Method clojure/lang/RT.map:([Ljava/lang/Object;)Lclojure/lang/IPersistentMap;
      61: checkcast     #64                 // class clojure/lang/IPersistentMap
      64: invokeinterface #144,  2          // InterfaceMethod clojure/lang/IObj.withMeta:(Lclojure/lang/IPersistentMap;)Lclojure/lang/IObj;

If I'm reading the code correctly, a Symbol named after the namespace is interned, and the meta-data for the namespace is applied to the symbol, so it's just a question of commuting that meta data to the Namespace object. I must be missing something.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 30/Sep/14 6:45 PM ]

Attached patch fixes this issue by explicitely attaching the metadata to the namespace after its creation using a .resetMeta call.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 30/Sep/14 7:46 PM ]

Here's an explaination of why this bug happens:

  • a namespace inherits the metadata of the symbol used to create that namespace the first time
  • the namespace is created in the load() method, that is invoked after the __init() method
  • the __init0() method creates all the Vars of the namespace
  • interning a Var in a namespace that doesn't exist forces that namespace to be created

This means that the namespace will have been already created (with nil metadata) by the time the load() method gets invoked and thus the call to in-ns will be a no-op and the metadata will be lost.

Comment by Fogus [ 31/Jul/15 11:06 AM ]

Added new test script that works with 1.8.0-master. Also, added a script that will enable direct linkage before testing.

Comment by Fogus [ 31/Jul/15 11:08 AM ]

Tested with the latest 1.8.0-master source and ran modified versions of the test script to ensure that the patch worked with and without direct linking.





[CLJ-1134] star-directive in clojure.pprint/cl-format with an at-prefix ("~n@*") do not obey its specifications Created: 18/Dec/12  Updated: 31/Jul/15  Resolved: 31/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4, Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Jean Niklas L'orange Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Completed Votes: 0
Labels: ft, print

Attachments: Text File clj-1134-star-directive-in-cl-format.txt    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Ok

 Description   

The star-directive in clojure.pprint/cl-format with an at-prefix (~n@*) does not obey its specifications according to Common Lisp the Language, 2nd Edition. There are two bugs within ~n@* as of right now:

  1. When ~n@* is supposed to jump forward over more than one argument, it jumps one step backward as if it had seen ~:*. For instance, (cl-format nil "~D ~3@*~D" 0 1 2 3) will return "0 0" and not "0 3" as expected.
  2. When ~@* is seen, the formatter is supposed to jump to the first argument (as n defaults to 0, see specification linked above). However, whenever a ~@*-directive is seen, the formatter jumps to the second argument instead.

Inside a clean Clojure repl, perform these steps:

user=> (require '[clojure.pprint :refer [cl-format]])
nil
user=> (cl-format nil "~D ~3@*~D" 0 1 2 3)
"0 0"                                           ;; Expected: "0 3"
user=> (cl-format nil "~D~D~D~D ~@*~D" 0 1 2 3)
"0123 1"                                        ;; Expected: "0123 0"

The format strings which reproduce the problem has been compared with the format function from the Common Lisp implementations SBCL, CLisp and Clozure. All of them print the expected output.

Patch: clj-1134-star-directive-in-cl-format.txt

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Jean Niklas L'orange [ 18/Dec/12 9:28 PM ]

Patch attached.

It may be easier to read the changes the patch does from within JIRA instead from the commit message, so I've added it here:

This solves two issues as specified by #CLJ-1134. Issue #1 is solved by doing a
relative jump forward within absolute-reposition in cl_format.clj, line 114 by
switching (- (:pos navigator) position) with (- position (:pos navigator)).

Issue #2 is handled by changing the default n-parameter to * depending on
whether the @-prefix is placed or not. If it is placed, then n defaults to
0, otherwise it defaults to 1.

In addition, new tests have been appended to test_cl_format.clj to ensure the
correctness of this patch. The tests have been tested on the Common Lisp
implementation GNU CLISP 2.49, which presumably handle the ~n@*
correctly. This patch and GNU CLISP returns the same output for each format
call, sans case for printed symbols; Common Lisp has case-insensitive symbols,
whereas Clojure has not.

Comment by Tom Faulhaber [ 14/Apr/14 11:12 AM ]

I walked through this patch and it looks just right. Thanks!

Let's get it applied for 1.7.

Comment by Jean Niklas L'orange [ 23/Jun/15 10:53 AM ]

I'm assuming this will not get in 1.7 as the RC2 is out right now, but I wish it could be prioritised into 1.8.

As it is a triaged bugfix that applies cleanly, I'm not sure there's anything more I can do here. But if there is, don't hesitate to ask for it.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 23/Jun/15 11:20 AM ]

Pre-screened for next release.





[CLJ-1137] Metadata on a def gets evaluated twice Created: 21/Dec/12  Updated: 31/Jul/15  Resolved: 31/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Ghadi Shayban Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Completed Votes: 2
Labels: compiler, ft, meta

Attachments: File CLJ-1137-eval-metadata-once.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Ok

 Description   

Metadata on the symbol of a def special form is evaluated twice.

(def ^{:foo (println "HA")} a [])

prints out HA HA. Offending line is in Compiler$DefExpr, fixed.

Patch: CLJ-1137-eval-metadata-once.diff

Screened by: Alex Miller






[CLJ-1361] Pretty printing code using pprint with code-dispatch incorrectly prints a simple ns macro call. Created: 18/Feb/14  Updated: 31/Jul/15  Resolved: 31/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Russ Olsen Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Completed Votes: 0
Labels: ft, print
Environment:

java version "1.6.0_65"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_65-b14-462-11M4609)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.65-b04-462, mixed mode)

Mac OS X 10.9.1


Attachments: Text File simple-ns-pprint-fix.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Ok

 Description   

Pretty printing code using pprint with code-dispatch incorrectly prints a simple ns macro call.
The problem is that "nil" is added to the output after the namespace name.

user> (use 'clojure.pprint)
nil
user> (def code '(ns foo.bar))
#'user/code
user> (with-out-str (with-pprint-dispatch code-dispatch (pprint code)))
"(ns foo.barnil)\n"   ;; Expected: {{"(ns foo.bar)\n"}}

Cause: In clojure.pprint/pprint-ns-reference, reference is printed regardless, but may be nil.
Solution: Omit printing reference if nil.
Patch: simple-ns-pprint-fix.patch
Screened by: Alex Miller






[CLJ-1390] pprint a GregorianCalendar results in Arity exception Created: 25/Mar/14  Updated: 31/Jul/15  Resolved: 31/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Steve Suehs Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Completed Votes: 1
Labels: ft, print

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1390.patch     Text File 0002-CLJ-1390-test2.patch     Text File 0002-CLJ-1390-test.patch     Text File CLJ-1390-pprint-GregorianCalendar.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Ok

 Description   

What I was doing: attempting to pretty-print nested structures from Things mac app, which include instances of java.util.GregorianCalendar.
What I expected to happen: output should have an #inst very much like printing java.util.Date.
What happened instead: ArityException Wrong number of args (4) passed to: pprint$pretty-writer$fn

thingsplay.core=> (def nowish (java.util.GregorianCalendar.))
#'thingsplay.core/nowish
thingsplay.core=> nowish
#inst "2014-03-25T22:43:29.240-05:00"
thingsplay.core=> (use 'clojure.pprint)
nil
thingsplay.core=> (pprint nowish)
ArityException Wrong number of args (4) passed to: pprint$pretty-writer$fn  clojure.lang.AFn.throwArity (AFn.java:437)
#inst "
thingsplay.core=> (simple-dispatch nowish)
#inst "2014-03-25T22:43:29.240-05:00"nil
thingsplay.core=> nowish
#inst "2014-03-25T22:43:29.240-05:00"
thingsplay.core=> (write nowish)
ArityException Wrong number of args (4) passed to: pprint$pretty-writer$fn  clojure.lang.AFn.throwArity (AFn.java:437)
#inst "

Cause: clojure.pprint/pretty-writer does not fully implement the Writer interface used in printing the calendar.

Approach: Better implement Writer interface.

Patch: CLJ-1390-pprint-GregorianCalendar.patch

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Norman Richards [ 29/Mar/14 4:15 PM ]

The print-calendar function introduced in CLJ-928 doesn't work with clojure.pprint/pretty-writer since pretty-writer does not correctly implement the java.io.Writer interface. It only implements write(String) but print-calendar wants write(String,int,int) among others. Although pretty-writer should probably correctly implement java.io.Writer, it's pretty easy to rewrite print-calendar to use the supported subset of java.io.Writer that is implemented.

Comment by Steve Suehs [ 29/Mar/14 4:20 PM ]

Thank you, "random person at the Austin Clojure Hack Day" "that I don't know" that has a CA in place. You are awesome!

See you at the next Austin Clojure Meetup.

-s

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 04/Apr/14 2:51 PM ]

Norman, it would be good if the patch included a few test cases, especially ones that fail without the patch, and succeed with the patch.

Comment by Norman Richards [ 04/Apr/14 3:09 PM ]

Absolutely. I have no idea how test cases work on Clojure core, but I assume it should be easy enough to do.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 04/Apr/14 3:15 PM ]

I would recommend looking at the following file in the Clojure repo, which already contains other pprint tests. It shouldn't be too difficult to get an idea from one or more of the tests there. Actually those might be slightly unusual in that many of them use a simple-tests macro defined in file test_helper.clj that most of the Clojure tests do not use, but ask questions if you have trouble, e.g. on the Clojure Google group or IRC channel.

test/clojure/test_clojure/pprint/test_pretty.clj

Comment by Steve Suehs [ 04/Apr/14 7:50 PM ]

Alright...you two are inspiring me to go work on getting my CA in.

Comment by Norman Richards [ 04/Apr/14 8:31 PM ]

Test case attached. Apply the test patch, "mvn test" fails. Apply the fix, test passes.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Apr/14 3:32 PM ]

It would be better if the "is" were of the form:

(is (= calculated-value "constant string to compare against") "string to show if test fails")

rather than just (is calculated-value "string to show if test fails"). The second form will fail if calculating the value throws an exception, but only the first form will calculate it, and then verify that the value is the expected one (and fail if it is not the expected one).

Comment by Norman Richards [ 07/Apr/14 10:49 AM ]

Ok - here's an alternative test case. I'm less happy with this test case, since I have to add the TimeZone and make assumptions about how the specifics of how the pretty printer formats. But, it does test the fix adequately, so if you like the test2 patch better, that's perfectly fine with me.

Comment by Steve Miner [ 10/Apr/14 4:23 PM ]

I would rather fix the actual bug in pretty_writer.clj. The proxy needs to support more of the java.io.Writer interface. I think adding another arity to the write method would work. Something like:

(write 
   ...
  ([x off len]
      (.write this (subs (str x) off (+ off len)))))
Comment by Steve Miner [ 10/Apr/14 4:38 PM ]

CLJ-1390-pprint-GregorianCalendar.patch fixes the pretty_writer.clj proxy to support the missing version of the write method. Includes the same test as the previous patch.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 28/Dec/14 10:53 AM ]

Agreed with Steve on approach.





[CLJ-1485] clojure.test.junit/with-junit-output doesn't handle multiple expressions Created: 29/Jul/14  Updated: 31/Jul/15  Resolved: 31/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Howard Lewis Ship Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Completed Votes: 0
Labels: clojure.test, ft

Attachments: Text File clj-1485.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Ok

 Description   

From the docstring description, and the use of ~@body, the intent of with-junit-output was to support a body containing multiple forms (for side-effects). However, calling it with multiple expressions will yield an error about the bindings in the let form.

(defmacro with-junit-output
  "Execute body with modified test-is reporting functions that write
  JUnit-compatible XML output."
  {:added "1.1"}
  [& body]
  `(binding [t/report junit-report
             *var-context* (list)
             *depth* 1]
     (t/with-test-out
       (println "<?xml version=\"1.0\" encoding=\"UTF-8\"?>")
       (println "<testsuites>"))
     (let [result# ~@body]
       (t/with-test-out (println "</testsuites>"))
       result#)))

Cause: The ~@body in the macro is spliced into code expecting a single expression.

Approach: Wrap a (do ) around the ~@body.

Patch: clj-1485.patch

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Howard Lewis Ship [ 29/Jul/14 4:59 PM ]

Patch for issue





[CLJ-1722] Typo in the doc string of `with-bindings` Created: 03/May/15  Updated: 31/Jul/15  Resolved: 31/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Trivial
Reporter: Blake West Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Completed Votes: 0
Labels: docstring, ft

Attachments: Text File fixwithbindingsdocs.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Ok

 Description   

The doc string says "the execute body". It should say "then execute body".



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 26/May/15 8:47 AM ]

Alex, this one 'falls off the JIRA state chart' since Rich hasn't assigned it a Fix Version. Should Approval be Triaged instead?





[CLJ-1769] Docstrings for *' and +' refer to * and + instead of *' and +' Created: 28/Jun/15  Updated: 31/Jul/15  Resolved: 31/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Trivial
Reporter: Mark Simpson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Completed Votes: 0
Labels: docstring, ft

Attachments: Text File docstringfix.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Ok

 Description   

The docstrings for *' and +' refer to the behavior of * and + if they are passed no arguments. The docstrings should refer to the behavior of *' and +' instead.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 02/Jul/15 3:49 PM ]

Mark, your patch "patch.txt" is not in the expected format for a patch, and please use a file name ending with ".diff" or ".patch", for the convenience of patch reviewers. See this link for instructions on creating a patch in the expected format: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Comment by Mark Simpson [ 02/Jul/15 4:36 PM ]

Sorry about that. Hopefully I got things right this time.





[CLJ-1772] Spelling mistake in clojure.test/use-fixtures Created: 01/Jul/15  Updated: 31/Jul/15  Resolved: 31/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Trivial
Reporter: Daniel Compton Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Completed Votes: 0
Labels: docstring, ft

Attachments: Text File clj-1772.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Ok

 Description   

Part of the docstring for `use-fixtures` is:

individually, while:once wraps the whole run in a single function.

this should be

individually, while :once wraps the whole run in a single function.

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 01/Jul/15 12:42 AM ]

If you can get me a patch, happy to pre-screen for next release.

Comment by Daniel Compton [ 01/Jul/15 12:43 AM ]

2015-07-01 17:43:02





[CLJ-1157] Classes generated by gen-class aren't loadable from remote codebase for mis-implementation of static-initializer Created: 04/Feb/13  Updated: 31/Jul/15  Resolved: 31/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4, Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Tsutomu Yano Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Completed Votes: 1
Labels: gen-class
Environment:

Tested on Mac OS X 10.9.1 and Oracle JVM 1.7.0_51 with Clojure 1.6 master SNAPSHOT


Attachments: File 20140121_fix_classloader.diff     File clj-1157-v2.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Ok

 Description   

When a genclass'ed object is serialized and sent to a remote system, the remote system throws an exception loading the object:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ExceptionInInitializerError
        at java.io.ObjectStreamClass.hasStaticInitializer(Native Method)
        at java.io.ObjectStreamClass.computeDefaultSUID(ObjectStreamClass.java:1723)
        at java.io.ObjectStreamClass.access$100(ObjectStreamClass.java:69)
        at java.io.ObjectStreamClass$1.run(ObjectStreamClass.java:247)
        at java.io.ObjectStreamClass$1.run(ObjectStreamClass.java:245)
        at java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(Native Method)
        at java.io.ObjectStreamClass.getSerialVersionUID(ObjectStreamClass.java:244)
        at java.io.ObjectStreamClass.initNonProxy(ObjectStreamClass.java:600)
        at java.io.ObjectInputStream.readNonProxyDesc(ObjectInputStream.java:1601)
        at java.io.ObjectInputStream.readClassDesc(ObjectInputStream.java:1514)
        at java.io.ObjectInputStream.readOrdinaryObject(ObjectInputStream.java:1750)
        at java.io.ObjectInputStream.readObject0(ObjectInputStream.java:1347)
        at java.io.ObjectInputStream.readObject(ObjectInputStream.java:369)
        at sun.rmi.server.UnicastRef.unmarshalValue(UnicastRef.java:324)
        at sun.rmi.server.UnicastRef.invoke(UnicastRef.java:173)
        at java.rmi.server.RemoteObjectInvocationHandler.invokeRemoteMethod(RemoteObjectInvocationHandler.java:194)
        at java.rmi.server.RemoteObjectInvocationHandler.invoke(RemoteObjectInvocationHandler.java:148)
        at $Proxy0.getResult(Unknown Source)
        at client.SampleClient$_main.doInvoke(SampleClient.clj:12)
        at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:397)
        at clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:159)
        at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:132)
        at client.SampleClient.main(Unknown Source)
 Caused by: java.io.FileNotFoundException: Could not locate remoteserver/SampleInterfaceImpl__init.class or remoteserver/SampleInterfaceImpl.clj on classpath: 
        at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:434)
        at clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:402)
        at clojure.core$load$fn__5039.invoke(core.clj:5520)
        at clojure.core$load.doInvoke(core.clj:5519)
        at clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:408)
        at clojure.lang.Var.invoke(Var.java:415)
        at remoteserver.SampleInterfaceImpl.<clinit>(Unknown Source)
        ... 23 more

Reproduce:

// build
git clone git://github.com/tyano/clojure_genclass_fix.git
cd clojure_genclass_fix
sh build.sh
// start rmiregistry
rmiregistry -J-Djava.rmi.server.useCodebaseOnly=false &
// start server
cd remoteserver
sh start.sh
// Start client
cd ../client
sh start.sh

Cause:

A gen-classed class (in this case, SampleInterfaceImpl.class) uses a static-initializer for loading SampleInterfaceImpl__init.class like:

static
  {
    RT.var("clojure.core", "load").invoke("/remoteserver/SampleInterfaceImpl");
  }

RT.load in default uses a context-classloader for loading __init.class but all classes depending on a gen-classed class must be loaded from the same classloader. In this case, RT.load must use a remote URLClassLoader which loads the main class.

Proposed:

Instead produce the equivalent of this in the static initializer:

static
  {
    Var.pushThreadBindings(RT.map(new Object[] { Compiler.LOADER, SampleInterfaceImpl.class.getClassLoader() }));
    try {
        RT.var("clojure.core", "load").invoke("/remoteserver/SampleInterfaceImpl");
    }
    finally 
    {
        Var.popThreadBindings();
    }
  }

With this code, RT.load will uses a same classloader which load SampleInterfaceImpl.class.

Patch: clj-1157-v2.diff

Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 01/Mar/13 10:20 AM ]

This sounds reasonable, but anything touching classloaders must be considered very carefully.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 01/Mar/13 12:12 PM ]

It seems overly complex to have the patch do so much code generation. Why not implement a method that does this job, and have the generated code call that?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 11/Jan/14 2:47 PM ]

Patch 20130204_fix_classloader.diff dated Feb 3, 2013 no longer applies cleanly as of the latest commits to Clojure master on Jan 11, 2014. The only conflict in applying the patch appears to be in the file src/jvm/clojure/asm/commons/GeneratorAdapter.java. This is probably due to the commit for ticket CLJ-713 that was committed today, updating the ASM library.

Comment by Tsutomu Yano [ 21/Jan/14 3:01 AM ]

I put a new patch applicable on the latest master branch.
This new patch is simpler and robust because the code-generation becomes very simple. Now It just call a method implemented with Java.

And I fixed my sample program and the 'HOW TO REPRODUCT THIS ISSUE' section of this ticket, because old description is not runnable on newest JVM. It is because the specification of remote method call of the newest JVM was changed from the old one. In the newest JVM, we need a 'java.rmi.server.useCodebaseOnly=false' option for making the behavior of remote call same as old one.
pull the newest sample.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 25/Sep/14 10:16 AM ]

Added almost the same patch that does not have whitespace error.





[CLJ-1225] quot overflow issues around Long/MIN_VALUE for BigInt Created: 25/Jun/13  Updated: 31/Jul/15  Resolved: 31/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Andy Fingerhut Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Completed Votes: 1
Labels: ft, math

Attachments: Text File clj-1225-2.txt     Text File clj-1225-fix-division-overflow-patch-v1.txt    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Ok

 Description   

In Clojure 1.5.1, see the following undesirable behavior regarding incorrect quot results for BigInts:

user=> (quot Long/MIN_VALUE -1N)
-9223372036854775808N
user=> (quot (bigint Long/MIN_VALUE) -1)
-9223372036854775808N

Similar issue to CLJ-1222. The root cause is that Java division of longs gives a numerically incorrect answer of Long.MIN_VALUE for (Long.MIN_VALUE / -1), because the numerically correct answer does not fit in a long. I believe this is the only pair of arguments for long division that gives a numerically incorrect answer, because division with a denominator having an absolute value of 2 or more gives a result closer to 0 than the numerator, and everything works fine for a denominator of 1 or -1, except this one case.

Related issues: CLJ-1222 for multiply, CLJ-1253 for / on longs, CLJ-1254 for quot on longs

Patch: clj-1225-2.txt
Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 25/Jun/13 11:03 AM ]

Patch clj-1225-fix-division-overflow-patch-v1.txt dated Jun 25 2013 may be one good way to address this issue. It modifies quot and / to return the numerically correct (BigInt) answer when given args Long/MIN_VALUE and -1.

It also removes the quotient intrinsic that does a JVM LDIV operation on longs for quot, since that operation is one of those that gives the incorrect result. I have not done any performance testing with this patch yet, but I have verified that it does not introduce any new reflection warnings when compiling Clojure itself.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 25/Jun/13 11:13 AM ]

Another possible approach would be to create unchecked-quotient and quot', which together with quot would correspond to the existing unchecked-multiply, *' and *. That is a more significant change. One potential concern it addresses that patch clj-1225-fix-division-overflow-patch-v1.txt does not is that patch leaves a Clojure developer with no way to do a primitive Java long division except by writing Java code.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 05/Sep/13 8:39 AM ]

this is two separate issues, one with longs and one with bigints. long problem should throw

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Sep/13 12:37 AM ]

Updating description for BigInt issue only. Will create separate ticket for incorrect behavior of / and quot on long type args Long/MIN_VALUE and -1.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 06/Sep/13 12:41 AM ]

Patch clj-1225-2.txt fixes this issue with quot on BigInts, with tests for quot and / on these values. / on BigInt worked fine before, but added the tests in case someone decides to change the implementation and forgets this corner case.





[CLJ-1060] 'list*' returns not a list Created: 03/Sep/12  Updated: 31/Jul/15  Resolved: 31/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Trivial
Reporter: Andrei Zhlobich Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Completed Votes: 0
Labels: ft

Attachments: File list-star-docstring.diff     File list-star-fix.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Ok

 Description   

Function 'list*' returns sequence, but not a list.
It is a bit confusing.

user=> (list? (list* 1 '(2 3)))
false

Approach: Change the doc string to say that it returns a seq, not a list.

Patch: list-star-docstring.diff



 Comments   
Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 17/Sep/12 6:52 AM ]

should the docstring for list* change to say it returns a seq?

Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 27/Nov/12 11:58 AM ]

Is there a reason why we can't have list* actually return a list? The cost of creating a list vs a cons is negligible.

Comment by Marek Srank [ 04/Jan/13 2:02 PM ]

The question is what to do with the one-argument case of list*, because in cases like: (list* {:a 1 :b 2}) it doesn't return IPersistentList as well. I propose just applying 'list'.

I added patch 'list-star-fix.diff' (dated 04/Jan/2013) with Cons implementing IPersistentList and doing (apply list args) in one-argument case of list*. To be able to use 'apply' in list* I had to declare it before the definition of list* in the source code. The apply itself also uses list*, but luckily not the one-argument version of list*, so it should be safe... The patch also contains simple unit tests.

Discussion is also here: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/co8lcKymfi8

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 04/Jan/13 4:11 PM ]

(apply list args) would make (list* (range)) hang, where currently it returns a partially-realized lazy seq. Also, even for non-lazy seqs – possibly lists themselves – it would always build a new list from scratch, right?

Also, if I'm reading the patch correctly, it would make 2+-ary list* overloads and cons return lists – that is, IPersistentList instances – always (Conses would now be lists), but repeatedly calling next on such a list might eventually produce a non-list. The only way around that would be to make all seqs into IPersistentLists – that doesn't seem desirable at first glance...?

On a side note, for the case where the final "args" argument is in fact a list, we already have a "prepend many items" function, namely conj. list* currently acts as the vararg variant of cons (in line with Lisp tradition); I'm actually quite happy with that.

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 04/Jan/13 4:19 PM ]

I'm in favour of the "list" -> "seq" tweak to the docstring though, assuming impl remains unchanged.

Comment by Marek Srank [ 04/Jan/13 6:13 PM ]

Yep, these are all valid points, thanks! I see this as a question whether the list* function is a list constructor or not. If yes (and it would be possible to implement it in a satisfactory way), it should probably return a list.

We could avoid building a new list by sth like:

(if (list? args)
  args
  (apply list args))

(btw, 'vec' also creates a new vector even when the argument itself is a vector)

The contract of next seems to be to return a seq, not a list - its docstring reads: "Returns a seq of the items after the first. Calls seq on its argument. If there are no more items, returns nil."

Btw, in some Lisp/Scheme impls I checked, cons seems to be a list as well. E.g. in CLisp (and similar in Guile and Racket):

> (listp (cons 2 '()))
T
> (listp (list* 1 2 '()))
T
Comment by Steve Miner [ 26/Feb/15 3:11 PM ]

I bump into this every once in a while and it bothers my pedantic side.

I think it's too late to change the implementation of `list*`. There's a risk of breaking existing code (dealing with lazy-seqs, etc.) It would be good to change the doc string to say it returns a seq, not a list.

But the real issue is the name of the function implies that it will return a list. You could deprecate `list*` (but keep it forever for backwards compatibility.) A better name for the same implementation might be `seq*`.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 02/Jul/15 3:13 PM ]

To Andy Sheldon, author of patch list-star-docstring.diff: Clojure only accepts patches written by those who have signed a contributor agreement. If you were interested in doing that, details on how are here: http://clojure.org/contributing

Comment by Andy Sheldon [ 02/Jul/15 8:34 PM ]

@AndyFingerhut - Thanks for the reminder. Signed, sealed, delivered.





[CLJ-1714] Some static initialisers still run at compile time if used in type hints Created: 22/Apr/15  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Adam Clements Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: compiler, typehints

Attachments: Text File CLJ-1714.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

AOT compiling on an x86 machine to be run on an ARM machine when a Java dependency has a native component and the class with the native dependency is used in a type hint.

In this situation, the only native library available on the classpath is the ARM dependency, and obviously won't load on the compiling x86 machine. Java libraries tend to load the native dependencies in the static initialiser of the class, which will fail in this situation as the architecture is x86 and the dependencies are ARM, for which reason CLJ-1315 made the change to not run static initialisers at compile time.

This covers a case which didn't come up as part of CLJ-1315, that the same problem occurs if rather than constructing the class, you simply use it as a type hint (which IMO is doubly surprising as something to have a side-effect).

This patch fixes that - happy to try and create a test, but would appreciate some advice on the shape such a test would take - presumably loading a java native library would be undesirable. I could simply check for static initialisers being run, but first would need some agreement that this is universally undesirable at compile time.

I have been using this patch in production for over a year with no adverse effects (as has anybody using the clojure-android build of clojure).



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Apr/15 10:53 AM ]

I think this might have been logged already but I'm not sure.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 22/Apr/15 12:30 PM ]

Patch won't apply to master for me

Comment by Adam Clements [ 22/Apr/15 2:39 PM ]

Really sorry, don't know what happened there. I checked out a fresh copy of the repo and re-applied the changes, deleted the old patch as it was garbage. Try the new one, timestamped 2:37pm

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 30/Jul/15 1:52 PM ]

Please add an example of the problem, and if possible a failing test.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Jul/15 5:14 PM ]

Reset to "Open" as moving from Triaged->Incomplete is not valid in our current workflow.

Comment by Adam Clements [ 31/Jul/15 10:56 AM ]

Example problem:
AOT compiling on an x86 machine to be run on an ARM machine when a Java dependency has a native component and the class with the native dependency is used in a type hint.

In this situation, the only native library available on the classpath is the ARM dependency, and obviously won't load on the compiling x86 machine. Java libraries tend to load the native dependencies in the static initialiser of the class, which will fail in this situation as the architecture is x86 and the dependencies are ARM, for which reason CLJ-1315 made the change to not run static initialisers at compile time.

This covers a case which didn't come up as part of CLJ-1315, that the same problem occurs if rather than constructing the class, you simply use it as a type hint (which IMO is doubly surprising as something to have a side-effect).

This patch fixes that - happy to try and create a test, but would appreciate some advice on the shape such a test would take - presumably loading a java native library would be undesirable. I could simply check for static initialisers being run, but first would need some agreement that this is universally undesirable at compile time.

I have been using this patch in production for over a year with no adverse effects (as has anybody using the clojure-android build of clojure).

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 31/Jul/15 11:34 AM ]

Hi Adam,

Thanks for the quick response. I think checking for static initializers being run is OK for a test.





[CLJ-1403] ns-resolve might throw ClassNotFoundException but should return nil Created: 14/Apr/14  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1403-ns-resolve-returns-nil-if-class-is-not-foun.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The doc of ns-resolve states that in case the symbol cannot be resolved, it should return nil.

user=> (doc ns-resolve)
-------------------------
clojure.core/ns-resolve
([ns sym] [ns env sym])
  Returns the var or Class to which a symbol will be resolved in the
  namespace (unless found in the environment), else nil.  Note that
  if the symbol is fully qualified, the var/Class to which it resolves
  need not be present in the namespace.
nil

However if the symbol contains dots and is not a resolvable Class, a ClassNotFoundException is thrown

user=> (ns-resolve *ns* 'foo.bar)
ClassNotFoundException foo.bar  java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run (URLClassLoader.java:372)
user=> (pst *e)
ClassNotFoundException foo.bar
	java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run (URLClassLoader.java:372)
	java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run (URLClassLoader.java:361)
	java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged (AccessController.java:-2)
	java.net.URLClassLoader.findClass (URLClassLoader.java:360)
	clojure.lang.DynamicClassLoader.findClass (DynamicClassLoader.java:61)
	java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass (ClassLoader.java:424)
	java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass (ClassLoader.java:357)
	java.lang.Class.forName0 (Class.java:-2)
	java.lang.Class.forName (Class.java:340)
	clojure.lang.RT.classForName (RT.java:2065)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.maybeResolveIn (Compiler.java:6963)
	clojure.core/ns-resolve (core.clj:4026)
nil

The attached patch makes ns-resolve return nil in that case instead of throwing an exception



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Apr/14 2:07 PM ]

Can you include the (pst *e) ?

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 14/Apr/14 2:10 PM ]

Added result of (pst *e) in the description

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 02/Oct/14 11:36 AM ]

Nicola, the patch 0001-CLJ-1403-ns-resolve-returns-nil-if-class-is-not-foun.patch dated 31 Aug 2014 applies cleanly to latest Clojure master as of Oct 1 2014, but fails to compile with JDK8. I haven't checked whether it compiles cleanly with other JDK versions yet.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 02/Oct/14 11:48 AM ]

Updated the patch so that it compiles fine on JDK8





[CLJ-1401] CompilerException / IllegalStateException when overriding vars Created: 10/Apr/14  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Mike Anderson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler, errormsgs

Approval: Triaged

 Description   
=> (ns foo)
nil
=> (def a 1)
#'foo/a
=> (ns bar (:require [foo :refer :all]))
nil
=> (def a 2)
CompilerException java.lang.IllegalStateException: a already refers to: #'foo/a in namespace: bar, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:4:1)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq (Compiler.java:6745)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6529)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6490)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6801)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6760)
	clojure.core/eval (core.clj:3079)
	clojure.main/repl/read-eval-print--7095/fn--7098 (main.clj:240)
	clojure.main/repl/read-eval-print--7095 (main.clj:240)
	clojure.main/repl/fn--7104 (main.clj:258)
	clojure.main/repl (main.clj:258)
	clojure.main/repl-opt (main.clj:324)
	clojure.main/main (main.clj:422)
Caused by:
IllegalStateException a already refers to: #'foo/a in namespace: bar
	clojure.lang.Namespace.warnOrFailOnReplace (Namespace.java:88)
	clojure.lang.Namespace.intern (Namespace.java:72)
	clojure.lang.Compiler$DefExpr$Parser.parse (Compiler.java:534)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq (Compiler.java:6738)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6529)

I would expect (at worst) a similar warning to the initial namespace loading, rather than an exception here.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Apr/14 8:26 AM ]

Could you put together a better reproducible test case for this that does not depend on core.matrix? Also, please include the (pst *e) when it occurs.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 11/Apr/14 10:19 AM ]

I have tried the smallest possible Leiningen project I could think of that would cause the warnings about redefinitions, to see if I could get the exception to occur. 'lein new try1' to create the skeleton project, then edit src/try1/core.clj to contain only the following function definitions:

(defn merge
  "This definition of merge replaces clojure.core/merge"
  [x y]
  (- x y))

(defn *
  [x y]
  (* x y))

Then start a REPL with 'lein repl', and I see this behavior:

user=> (require '[try1.core :as c])
WARNING: merge already refers to: #'clojure.core/merge in namespace: try1.core, being replaced by: #'try1.core/merge
WARNING: * already refers to: #'clojure.core/* in namespace: try1.core, being replaced by: #'try1.core/*
nil
user=> (require '[try1.core :as c] )
nil
user=> (require '[try1.core :as c] :reload)
WARNING: merge already refers to: #'clojure.core/merge in namespace: try1.core, being replaced by: #'try1.core/merge
WARNING: * already refers to: #'clojure.core/* in namespace: try1.core, being replaced by: #'try1.core/*
nil

Ths all looks like behavior as I would expect, and I did not see the exception that Mike reports.

It seems that either Ctrl+Alt+L in Counterclockwise does something different than (require ... :reload), or there is something different about Mike's namespace in addition to redefining names in clojure.core that is causing the problem.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Apr/14 11:17 AM ]

Marking this as NR for now - would be happy to see it reopened with an easily reproducible test case.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 12/Apr/14 12:41 AM ]

To reproduce:

(ns op)
(defn * [a b] (clojure.core/* a b)) ;; gives warning
(ns use-op (:require [op :refer :all])) ;; gives warning
(ns use-op (:require [op :refer :all])) ;; gives error!

I believe Counterclockwise is simply loading the namespace again with CTRL-Alt+L, which is causing the ns form to be re-executed.

The docstring implies that ns can be used multiple times ("Sets ns to the namespace named by name (unevaluated), creating it if needed") so I would certainly expect multiple invocations of ns to be a no-op

Comment by Alex Miller [ 03/Nov/14 10:24 AM ]

Duped in CLJ-1578.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 09/Jun/15 3:54 AM ]

This is still affecting me, and causing breakage with the latest versions of core.matrix. I don't know if this is a regression or not, but it certainly happens in 1.7.0-RC1

Any chance we can get a fix for 1.7? It is really annoying to have code fail because of this and force of refactoring of user code (my use case is adding a new var to clojure.core.matrix namespace, compiler error in user code that previously defined a var with the same name).

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 09/Jun/15 3:59 AM ]

Closing because I think this is better handled in the related issue

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 09/Jun/15 5:05 AM ]

Reopening because CLJ-1578 apparently does not resolve this specific issue, it only covers vars in clojure.core.

I'd still like to see this fixed for all namespaces, not just clojure.core.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 09/Jun/15 5:08 AM ]

Reproduction:

=> (ns foo)
nil
=> (def a 1)
#'foo/a
=> (ns bar (:require [foo :refer :all]))
nil
=> (def a 2)
CompilerException java.lang.IllegalStateException: a already refers to: #'foo/a in namespace: bar, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:1:1)
=> clojure-version
{:major 1, :minor 7, :incremental 0, :qualifier "RC1"}

Stack trace:

CompilerException java.lang.RuntimeException: Unable to resolve symbol: pst in this context, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:1:1)
clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6543)
clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6485)
clojure.lang.Compiler$InvokeExpr.parse (Compiler.java:3737)
clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq (Compiler.java:6735)
clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6524)
clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6485)
clojure.lang.Compiler$BodyExpr$Parser.parse (Compiler.java:5861)
clojure.lang.Compiler$FnMethod.parse (Compiler.java:5296)
clojure.lang.Compiler$FnExpr.parse (Compiler.java:3925)
clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq (Compiler.java:6731)
clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6524)
clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6789)
Caused by:
RuntimeException Unable to resolve symbol: pst in this context
clojure.lang.Util.runtimeException (Util.java:221)
clojure.lang.Compiler.resolveIn (Compiler.java:7029)
clojure.lang.Compiler.resolve (Compiler.java:6973)
clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSymbol (Compiler.java:6934)
clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6506)
clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6485)

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 09/Jun/15 5:16 AM ]

As I already commented in CLJ-1578, I don't think this is a bug and I think this ticket should be declined.

Overriding non clojure.core vars has always (since 1.2 at least) caused an exception to be thrown.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 09/Jun/15 5:23 AM ]

Mike, maybe it would make sense to bring this issue up in the clojure-dev ml to get some opinions?

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 09/Jun/15 5:42 AM ]

Re-classify it as a feature request, if you prefer.

I still regard it as a defect because I expect :refer :all to work sanely.

Either way, this issue keeps breaking user code in my area (data science / exploratory statistics / data management). The ability to use / refer all is very useful for setting up a convenient namespace for exploratory work, so I don't accept that forcing users to explicitly require every single var used (as Nicola suggests in CLJ-1578) is a practical workaround.

I've also had it cause problems when working at the REPL and reloading namespaces.

If the Clojure core team really wants to keep this annoying behaviour, can we at least have some way to turn it off at the library level? Perhaps some namespace metadata that I can add to the clojure.core.matrix namespace to stop this from triggering?

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 09/Jun/15 6:23 AM ]

Mike, this is just my personal opinion, I'm not a part of the core team and I don't speak for them, this is why I suggested you wrote on the clojure-dev ml.

Also to clarify, this issue you're reporting cannot manifest itself while reloading namespaces as the exception is thrown as soon as the redefinition happens.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 09/Jun/15 8:47 AM ]

You could use :exclude for this

(ns bar (:require [foo :refer :all :exclude (a)]))
Comment by Mike Anderson [ 09/Jun/15 9:30 AM ]

Hi Alex, that works as a fix when the problem occurs, but doesn't solve the problem of future user code breakage, unless the user accurately anticipates what symbols might get added to "bar" in the future. Which again seems like an unreasonable burden on the user.

What I'm arguing for, I guess, is a default presumption that if the user defines a var in their own namespace, they are happy to replace a similarly named var in any namespaces that they have previously use'd / refer-all'd.

If the user is genuinely concerned about overriding things by accident, I'd be happy with a warn-on-replace which does something analogous to warn-on-reflection. I proposed something similar in CLJ-1257 a while back, even wrote a patch that solves the whole problem in this way. Can we get that patch or something similar in 1.7?

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 09/Jun/15 10:22 AM ]

CLJ-1746 is relevant and I like that proposal much better than CLJ-1257

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 09/Jun/15 10:43 AM ]

Hi Nicola, CLJ-1746 looks like a reasonable suggestion but still doesn't address the problem here, for the same reason that :exclude doesn't (see my comment to Alex)

The fundamental issue is that the current behaviour causes user code to break when libraries are upgraded to add new vars and requires changes to user code to fix / work around it. I consider that broken behaviour, or at least very bad design.

This is especially since we are encouraged to choose good names: I quote from the library coding standards(http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Library+Coding+Standards)

"Use good names, and don't be afraid to collide with names in other namespaces. That's what the flexible namespace support is there for."

It isn't very flexible when user code keep breaking.....

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 09/Jun/15 10:53 AM ]

From the same page, just a two lines below:
"Be explicit and minimalist about dependencies on other packages. (Prefer :require :refer in 1.4+ or :use :only in 1.0-1.3)."

If users carelessly import a whole package, I'd say that's their fault. Since clojure >1.3 the popular consensus has been that :use/:refer :all are not a good idea and people have been moving away from that, preferring :require :refer or :require :as instead.

The few that still use :use/:refer :all do it mostly for backward compatibility or in tests (I myself do it in tools.reader for the former reason).

I really don't think this is such a bad design choice as you seem to think, and I think that most people in the community would agree that the current behaviour and drive towards using :require :refer/require :as in lieu of :use/:refer :all is way more beneficial than harmful

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 09/Jun/15 11:42 AM ]

Hi Nicola, I have no issue with people using explicit :refer / :require, and I agree it is normal practice. It's good to be explicit and I generally do that myself (except in test / demo code).

However we aren't talking about that case : this issue is most relevant in those situations where users (for their own legitimate reasons) have decided to import a whole namespace. This is often convenient (e.g. REPL usage), sometimes it is valuable for specific purposes (e.g. testing).

I personally care about this mostly from the perspective of a library author: I want users to be able to use the library in whatever way is most convenient (which may include importing all vars), and I don't want user code to break randomly when I make a new release. Note that this also means I don't have control over user code so any solution that involves explicit requires, excludes, or some other manual workarounds is not a practical solution.

You can say "that's their fault" but this is currently supposed to be supported in Clojure so I think it ought to work sanely.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 09/Jun/15 12:00 PM ]

I think the library / evolution argument is a good one and I like that it reduces breakage due to evolution of 3rd party libraries. (I feel very strongly about this in clojure.core itself which is auto-referred, less strongly otherwise.)

On the flip side, if we remove this error, we should be explicit about what we are giving up to fully consider it. Presumably we are at least giving up a helpful error that occurs in the case of an accidental override. Are there other impacts?

I do not expect that we're going to change anything in 1.7.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 31/Jul/15 3:10 PM ]

Recategorizing as a feature request, as the current behavior was the original intent.

Could a namespace-reflecting macro provide for this use case without requiring a change to core?





[CLJ-1074] Read/print round-trip for +/-Infinity and NaN Created: 21/Sep/12  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Colin Jones Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: print, reader

Attachments: Text File 0001-Read-Infinity-and-NaN.patch     Text File clj-1074-read-infinity-and-nan-patch-v2-plus-edn-reader.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

A few float-related forms (namely, Double/POSITIVE_INFINITY, Double/NEGATIVE_INFINITY, Double/NaN) are not eval-able after a round-trip via

(read-string (binding [*print-dup* true] (pr-str f))

The two options I see are to provide print-method implementations for these and their Float cousins, or to make Infinity, -Infinity, +Infinity, and NaN readable values. Since it sounds like edn may want to provide a spec for these values (see https://groups.google.com/d/topic/clojure-dev/LeJpOhHxESs/discussion and https://github.com/edn-format/edn/issues/2), I think making these values directly readable as already printed is preferable. Something like Double/POSITIVE_INFINITY seems too low-level from edn's perspective, as it would refer to a Java class and constant.

I'm attaching a patch implementing reader support for Infinity, -Infinity, +Infinity, and NaN.



 Comments   
Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 03/Dec/12 11:34 AM ]

Please bring this up on clojure-dev. We'll be able to vet this ticket after that.

Comment by Colin Jones [ 03/Dec/12 1:18 PM ]

Should I respond to my original clojure-dev post about this (linked in the issue description above), or start a new one?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 24/May/13 1:11 PM ]

Patch clj-1074-read-infinity-and-nan-patch-v2.txt dated May 24 2013 is identical to 0001-Read-Infinity-and-NaN.patch dated Sep 21 2012, except it applies cleanly to latest master. The older patch conflicts with a recent commit made for CLJ-873.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 25/May/13 11:55 AM ]

clj-1074-read-infinity-and-nan-patch-v2-plus-edn-reader.patch is the same as clj-1074-read-infinity-and-nan-patch-v2.txt except it patches EdnReader too, but it must be applied after #CLJ-873 0001-Fix-CLJ-873-for-EdnReader-too.patch get merged

Comment by Andrew Tarzwell [ 12/Feb/15 12:01 PM ]

We're running into this bug now, applying the patch clj-1074-read-infinity-and-nan-patch-v2-plus-edn-reader.patch seems to resolve it on 1.7 master, but it would be an improvement to not depend on a patched version.

Is there a fix in the works? Or a more up to date conversation on why this hasn't been addressed?

Thanks,
Andrew

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 12/Feb/15 12:23 PM ]

Andrew, the tools.reader library provides this enhancement today, if you would prefer using unpatched software, and if it meets your needs. There are a few other small differences between it and the reader built into Clojure, which you can see near the end of its README: https://github.com/clojure/tools.reader

As far as why it hasn't been addressed yet, I think a short accurate answer is that the Clojure developers have been working on other issues, and this one has not been high enough priority to be addressed yet (disclaimer: This is in no way an official answer, just the best guess of an observer who watches this stuff too much).

I see you have voted on the ticket. Good. More votes can in some cases influence the Clojure developers to respond to a ticket earlier rather than later. You may try to persuade others to vote on it, too, if you wish.

If there is some production use of Clojure hindered by the lack of a fix, bringing this up in the Clojure or Clojure Dev Google groups couldn't hurt (signed CA on file required for Clojure Dev group membership – see http://clojure.org/contributing )

Comment by Andrew Tarzwell [ 12/Feb/15 1:46 PM ]

Andy,

Thank you for the quick response, I was unaware of tools.reader having this fixed. That should do us for now.





[CLJ-1446] (def v) with no init supplied destroys #'v metadata Created: 13/Jun/14  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Nahuel Greco Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

(def a) destroys #'a metadata, check this:

(def ^:mykey a 1)

(meta #'a)              ;; ok, :mykey is present

(let [v (def a)]
   [(meta v)            ;; NO :mykey present, metadata destroyed
    (identical? v #'a)  ;; true, we are talking of the same var
   ])

(meta #'a)              ;; NO :mykey present

If this is not a bug but a "feature", then we have at least two problems:

1- The def special form documentation doesn't state this behaviour at all, it needs to be clarified. With the current documentation it seems as doing a def with no init supplied will not make any side-effect at all, and this is not true for the var metadata.

2- defmulti uses this form to lookup the var and check if it already binds to a MultiFn, if that is the case then defmulti does nothing... but it really does something, defmulti will destroy the original var metadata in the (supposedly non-destructive) check. This is the involved defmulti fragment:

(let [v# (def ~mm-name)]
  (when-not (and (.hasRoot v#) (instance? clojure.lang.MultiFn (deref v#)))
   ...


 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Jun/14 4:14 PM ]

I think this is mostly a dupe of CLJ-1148 but I'll leave it as it states the specific problem more precisely.

Comment by Nahuel Greco [ 13/Jun/14 7:35 PM ]

Alex Miller: It seems CLJ-1148 is an special case where this problem shows, but the patches in CLJ-1148 only fixes the issues for defonce, not generally for def, not for defmulti and not clarifies this behaviour in the def special form documentation.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 31/Jul/15 2:49 PM ]

I am pretty sure we have been here before, and decided that def is working as desired. (If anybody can find the thread/ticket please add a link.) I think this should be a doc enhancement.

If the behavior of defmethod is a separate bug, please make a separate ticket for that, showing an example problem.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 31/Jul/15 3:00 PM ]

CLJ-1213 might be related, but it doesn't mention metadata, only (def foo) without init value given.





[CLJ-1461] print-dup form unreadable for collections without create(IPV) Created: 06/Jul/14  Updated: 31/Jul/15  Resolved: 31/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Duplicate Votes: 0
Labels: collections

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

print-dup assumes all IPersistentCollections not defined via defrecord have a static create method that take an IPersistentCollection, but this is not true for many clojure collections

Printing

user=> (print-dup (sorted-set 1) *out*)
#=(clojure.lang.PersistentTreeSet/create [1])

Can't read back

(read-string "#=(clojure.lang.PersistentTreeSet/create [1])")
ClassCastException Cannot cast clojure.lang.PersistentVector to clojure.lang.ISeq  java.lang.Class.cast (Class.java:3356)

Possible Fixes

  • add create methods taking IPersistentVector to collections
  • emit something different from print-dup

See also CLJ-1733.



 Comments   
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 13/Jul/15 9:40 AM ]

CLJ-1733 adds a fix for sorted sets

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 31/Jul/15 11:50 AM ]

Would be nice to have a test that looped through all the collection types.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 31/Jul/15 2:59 PM ]

Moving the conversation to CLJ-1733 since that already has a partial patch.





[CLJ-1733] print-dup form unreadable for sorted sets and maps Created: 19/May/15  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Nikita Prokopov Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None
Environment:

Clojure 1.6.0
Clojure 1.7.0-alpha5
Clojure 1.7.0-beta3

java version "1.8.0"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0-b132)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.0-b70, mixed mode)


Attachments: Text File clj-1733-tagged-literals-throw-on-sorted-set.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

print-dup for sorted sets and maps presume a nonexistent static create method that takes an IPersistentCollection

Printing

user=> (print-dup (sorted-set 1) *out*)
#=(clojure.lang.PersistentTreeSet/create [1])

Can't read back

(read-string "#=(clojure.lang.PersistentTreeSet/create [1])")
ClassCastException Cannot cast clojure.lang.PersistentVector to clojure.lang.ISeq  java.lang.Class.cast (Class.java:3356)

Possible Fixes

  • add create methods taking IPersistentVector to collections
  • emit something different from print-dup


 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/May/15 4:55 PM ]

It's trying to invoke PersistentTreeSet.create(ISeq) with ["123"]. It's not clear to me where the vector comes from?

Comment by Nikita Prokopov [ 19/May/15 5:04 PM ]

It’s a particular case of CLJ-1461. Vector comes from reading output of print-dup:

(defrecord Rec [f])

(binding [*print-dup* true]
  (prn (Rec. (sorted-set 1))))
;; => #tonsky.Rec[#=(clojure.lang.PersistentTreeSet/create [1])]

I already have a patch for PersistentTreeSet (attached here). Can look into CLJ-1461 later.





[CLJ-1449] Add clojure.string functions for portability to ClojureScript Created: 19/Jun/14  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Bozhidar Batsov Assignee: Nola Stowe
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 29
Labels: ft, string

Attachments: Text File add_functions_to_strings-2.patch     Text File add_functions_to_strings-3.patch     Text File add_functions_to_strings-4.patch     Text File add_functions_to_strings-5.patch     Text File add_functions_to_strings-6.patch     Text File add_functions_to_strings.patch     Text File clj-1449-more-v1.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

It would be useful if a few common functions from Java's String were available as Clojure functions for the purposes of increasing portability to other Clojure platforms like ClojureScript.

The functions below also cover the vast majority of cases where Clojure users currently drop into Java interop for String calls - this tends to be an issue for discoverability and learning. While the goal of this ticket is increased portability, improving that is a nice secondary benefit.

Proposed clojure.string fn java.lang.String method
index-of indexOf
last-index-of lastIndexOf
starts-with? startsWith
ends-with? endsWith
includes? contains

Patch:

  • add_functions_to_strings-4.patch - uses -1 to indicate not-found in index-of
  • add_functions_to_strings-6.patch - uses nil to indicate not-found in index-of

Performance: Tested the following with criterium for execution mean time (all times in ns).

Java Clojure Java Clojure (-4 patch) Clojure (-6 patch)
(.indexOf "banana" "n") (clojure.string/index-of "banana" "n") 8.70 9.03 9.27
(.indexOf "banana" "n" 1) (clojure.string/index-of "banana" "n" 1) 7.29 7.61 7.66
(.indexOf "banana" (int \n)) (clojure.string/index-of "banana" \n) 5.34 6.20 6.20
(.indexOf "banana" (int \n) 1) (clojure.string/index-of "banana" \n 1) 5.38 6.19 6.24
(.startsWith "apple" "a") (clojure.string/starts-with? "apple" "a") 4.84 5.71 5.65
(.endsWith "apple" "e") (clojure.string/ends-with? "apple" "e") 4.82 5.68 5.70
(.contains "baked apple pie" "apple") (clojure.string/includes? "baked apple pie" "apple") 10.78 11.99 12.17

Screened by:

Note: In both Java and JavaScript, indexOf will return -1 to indicate not-found, so this is (at least in these two cases) the status quo. The benefit of nil return in Clojure is that it can be used as a found/not-found condition. The benefit of a -1 return is that it matches Java/JavaScript and that the return type can be hinted as a primitive long, allowing you to feed it into some other arithmetic or string operation without boxing.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jun/14 12:53 PM ]

Re substring, there is a clojure.core/subs for this (predates the string ns I believe).

clojure.core/subs
([s start] [s start end])
Returns the substring of s beginning at start inclusive, and ending
at end (defaults to length of string), exclusive.

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 20/Jun/14 3:21 AM ]

As strings are collection of characters, you can use Clojure's sequence facilities to achieve such functionality:

user=> (= (first "asdf") \a)
true
user=> (= (last "asdf") \a)
false
Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Jun/14 8:33 AM ]

Jozef, String.startsWith() checks for a prefix string, not just a prefix char.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 20/Jun/14 9:42 AM ]

Re substring, I know about subs, but it seems very odd that it's not in the string ns. After all most people will likely look for string-related functionality in clojure.string. I think it'd be best if `subs` was added to clojure.string and clojure.core/subs was deprecated.

Comment by Pierre Masci [ 01/Aug/14 5:27 AM ]

Hi, I was thinking the same about starts-with and .ends-with, as well as (.indexOf s "c") and (.lastIndexOf "c").

I read the whole Java String API recently, and these 4 functions seem to be the only ones that don't have an equivalent in Clojure.
It would be nice to have them.

Andy Fingerhut who maintains the Clojure Cheatsheet told me: "I maintain the cheatsheet, and I put .indexOf and .lastIndexOf on there since they are probably the most common thing I saw asked about that is in the Java API but not the Clojure API, for strings."
Which shows that there is a demand.

Because Clojure is being hosted on several platforms, and might be hosted on more in the future, I think these functions should be part of the de-facto ecosystem.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Aug/14 3:39 PM ]

Updating summary line and description to add contains? as well. I can back this off if it changes your mind about triaging it, Alex.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Aug/14 3:40 PM ]

Patch clj-1449-basic-v1.patch dated Aug 30 2014 adds starts-with? ends-with? contains? functions to clojure.string.

Patch clj-1449-more-v1.patch is the same, except it also replaces several Java method calls with calls to these Clojure functions.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 05/Sep/14 1:02 PM ]

Patch clj-1449-basic-v1.patch dated Sep 5 2014 is identical to the patch I added recently called clj-1149-basic-v1.patch. It is simply renamed without the typo'd ticket number in the file name.

Comment by Yehonathan Sharvit [ 02/Dec/14 3:09 PM ]

What about an implementation that works also in cljs?

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 02/Dec/14 3:11 PM ]

Once this is added to Clojure it will be implemented in ClojureScript as well.

Comment by Yehonathan Sharvit [ 02/Dec/14 3:22 PM ]

Great! Any idea when it will be added to Clojure?
Also, will it be automatically added to Clojurescript or someone will have to write a particular code for it.
The suggested patch relies on Java so I am curious to understand who is going to port the patch to cljs.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 02/Dec/14 3:27 PM ]

No idea when/if this will get merged. Upvote the ticket to improve the odds of this happening sooner.
Someone on the ClojureScript team will have to implement this in terms of JavaScript.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Dec/14 4:01 PM ]

Some things that would be helpful:

1) It would be better to combine the two patches into a single patch - I think changing current uses into new users is a good thing to include. Also, please keep track of the "current" patch in the description.
2) Patch needs tests.
3) Per the instructions at the top of the clojure.string ns (and the rest of the functions), the majority of these functions are implemented to take the broader CharSequence interface. Similar to those implementations, you will need to provide a CharSequence implementation while also calling into the String functions when you actually have a String.
4) Consider return type hints - I'm not sure they're necessary here, but I would examine bytecode for typical calling situations to see if it would be helpful.
5) Check performance implications of the new versions vs the old with a good tool (like criterium). You've put an additional var invocation and (soon) type check in the calling path for these functions. I think providing a portable target is worth a small cost, but it would be good to know what the cost actually is.

I don't expect we will look at this until after 1.7 is released.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 02/Dec/14 8:05 PM ]

Alex, all your comments make sense.

If you think a ready-and-waiting patch that does those things would improve the odds of the ticket being vetted by Rich, please let us know.

My guess is that his decision will be based upon the description, not any proposed patches. If that is your belief also, I'll wait until he makes that decision before working on a patch. Of course, any other contributor is welcome to work on one if they like.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Dec/14 8:40 PM ]

Well nothing is certain of course, but I keep a special report of things I've "screened" prior to vetting that makes possible moving something straight from Triaged all the way through into Screened/Ok when Rich is able to look at them. This is a good candidate if things were in pristine condition.

That said, I don't know whether Rich will approve it or not, so it's up to you. I think the argument for portability is a strong one and complements the feature expression.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/May/15 8:55 AM ]

I'd love to have a really high-quality patch on this ticket to consider for 1.8 that took into account my comments above.

Also, it occurred to me that I don't think this should be called "contains?", overlapping the core function with a different meaning (contains value vs contains key). Maybe "includes?"?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 14/May/15 9:14 AM ]

clojure.string already has 2 name conflicts with clojure.core, for which most people probably do something like (require '[clojure.string :as str]) to avoid that:

user=> (use 'clojure.string)
WARNING: reverse already refers to: #'clojure.core/reverse in namespace: user, being replaced by: #'clojure.string/reverse
WARNING: replace already refers to: #'clojure.core/replace in namespace: user, being replaced by: #'clojure.string/replace
nil
Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/May/15 10:05 AM ]

I'm not concerned about overlapping the name. I'm concerned about overlapping it and meaning something different, particularly vs one of the most confusing functions in core already. clojure.core/contains? is better than linear time key search. clojure.string/whatever will be a linear time subsequence match.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/May/15 10:18 AM ]

Ruby uses "include?" for this.

Comment by Devin Walters [ 19/May/15 4:56 PM ]

I agree with Alex's comment about the overlap. Personally, I prefer the way "includes?" reads over "include?", but IMO either one is better than adding to the "contains?" confusion.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 20/May/15 12:10 AM ]

I'm fine with `includes?`. Ruby is famous for the bad English used in its core library.

Comment by Andrew Rosa [ 17/Jun/15 12:29 PM ]

Andy Fingerhut, since you are the author of the original patch do you desire to continue the work on it? If you prefer (or even need) to focus on different stuff, I would like to tackle this issue.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 17/Jun/15 1:08 PM ]

Andrew Rosa, I am perfectly happy if someone else wants to work on a revised patch for this. If you are interested, go for it! And from Alex's comments, I believe my initial patch covers such a small fraction of what he wants, do not worry about keeping my name associated with any patch you submit – if yours is accepted, my patch will not have helped you in getting there.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 03/Jul/15 9:01 AM ]

Andrew Rosa, I am interested on working on this. Are you currently working it?

Comment by Andrew Rosa [ 03/Jul/15 12:08 PM ]

Thanks Andy Fingerhut, didn't saw the answer here. I'm happy that Nola Stowe could take this one.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 08/Jul/15 12:46 PM ]

Updated patch to rename methods as specified and add tests.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 08/Jul/15 3:26 PM ]

A few remarks:

1. added should say 1.8, not 1.9.
2. The docstrings could be improved a bit - normally they should end with a . and refer to all the params of the function in question.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 08/Jul/15 3:29 PM ]

Thanks Bozhidar Batsov .. I will, and I also got feedback from the slack clojure-dev group (Alex, Ghadi, AndrewHr) so I will be submitting an improved patch soon

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 09/Jul/15 11:57 AM ]

Also, I am not sure, but Alex Miller made this comment earlier: "Per the instructions at the top of the clojure.string ns, functions should take the broader CharSequence interface instead of String. Similar to existing clojure.string functions, you will need to provide a CharSequence implementation while also calling into the String functions when you actually have a String."

Looking at the Java classes and interfaces, one of the classes that implements CharSequence is CharBuffer, and it has no indexOf or lastIndexOf methods. If one were to call the proposed index-of or last-index-of with a CharBuffer, I believe you would get an exception for an unknown method.

I don't know if Alex's sentence is essential to any patch to be considered, but wanted to point out that it seems like it effectively means writing your own implementation of each of these methods for some of the classes implementing the CharSequence interface.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 09/Jul/15 4:15 PM ]

Andy, yes you are right. Alex helped me with my current changes (not posted yet) and where needed I cast the value to a string so that it would have the indexOf methods.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 10/Jul/15 7:43 AM ]

Added type hints, using StringBuffer instead of string in tests.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 10/Jul/15 11:53 PM ]

Use critium and did some bench marking, I am not familiar enough to say "hey its good or no, too slow". I tried an optimization but it didn't make much difference.

notes here:

https://www.evernote.com/l/ABLYZbDr8ElIs6fkODAd3poBfIm_Bfr5kLo

Appreciate any feedback

Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Jul/15 10:37 AM ]

Nola, some comments:

1) In index-of and last-index-of, I think we should use (instance? Character value) instead of char? - this will avoid a function invocation.

2) In index-of and last-index-of, in the branches where you know you have a Character, we should just invoke the proper function on the character instance directly rather than calling int. In this case that is (.charValue ^Character value). However, this function returns char so you still want the ^int hint.

3) In index-of and last-index-of, we should do a couple of things to maximally utilize primitive support for from-index. We should type-hint the incoming value as a ^long (only long and double are specialized cases in Clojure, not int). We should then use the function unchecked-int to optimally convert the long primitive to an int primitive.

4) We should type-hint the return value to a primitive long to avoid boxing the return.

Putting 1+2+3+4 together:

(defn index-of
  "Return index of value (string or char) in s, optionally searching forward from from-index."
  {:added "1.8"}
  (^long [^CharSequence s value]
   (if (instance? Character value)
     (.indexOf (.toString s) ^int (.charValue ^Character value))
     (.indexOf (.toString s) ^String value)))
  (^long [^CharSequence s value ^long from-index]
  (if (instance? Character value)
    (.indexOf (.toString s) ^int (.charValue ^Character value) (unchecked-int from-index))
    (.indexOf (.toString s) ^String value (unchecked-int from-index)))))

Similar changes in last-index-of.

5) In starts-with? and ends-with?, I would move the type hint for substr to the parameter declaration. This is more of a style preference on my part, no functional difference I believe.

6) On includes? I would do the same as #5, except .contains actually takes a CharSequence for the substr, so I would change the type hint from ^String to the broader ^CharSequence.

7) Can you edit the description and add a table with the "execution time mean" number for direct Java vs new Clojure fn for the patch after these changes? Please add tests for the from-index variants of index-of and last-index-of as well.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 14/Jul/15 5:46 PM ]

optimizations as suggested by Alex Miller

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 14/Jul/15 5:50 PM ]

Nola, not a big deal, but Rich has requested that patch file names end with ".patch" or ".diff", I think because whatever he uses to view them recognizes that suffix and puts it in a different viewing/editing mode.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 14/Jul/15 6:03 PM ]

Andy, so no need to keep around patches when used in comparisons?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 14/Jul/15 8:31 PM ]

It is ok to have multiple versions of patches attached, but names like add_functions_to_strings-2.patch etc. would be preferred over names like add_functions_to_strings.patch-2, so the suffix is ".patch".

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 14/Jul/15 8:55 PM ]

original patch submitted by Nola

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 14/Jul/15 8:56 PM ]

Optimizations suggested by Alex

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Jul/15 9:44 PM ]

Nola, I re-did the timings on my machine - these were done with Java 1.8 and no Leiningen involved.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Jul/15 9:57 PM ]

-4 patch is identical to -3 but removes one errant ^long type hint

Otherwise, looks good to me!

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Jul/15 10:24 PM ]

Rich, since you didn't put any comments on here, I'm not sure if there's anything else you wanted, so marking screened.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 19/Jul/15 7:36 AM ]

I dislike the approach here for several reasons:

  • floats Java-isms (-1 for missing instead of nil?) up into the Clojure API
  • makes narrow string fns out of things that could/should be seq fns

Stepping back, this is all library work. Why should it be in core? If this started in a contrib, it could evolve much more freely.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jul/15 8:49 AM ]

re Java-isms: totally fair comment worth changing

re narrow string fns: if these were seq fns, they would presumably take seqables of chars and return seqables of chars. When I have strings, I want to work with strings (as with clojure.string/join and clojure.string/reverse vs their seq equivalents).

re library: these particular functions are the most commonly used string functions where current users drop to Java interop. Note that all 5 of these functions have over time been added to the cheatsheet (http://clojure.org/cheatsheet) because they are commonly used. I believe there is significant value in including them in core and standardizing their name and behavior across to CLJS.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 19/Jul/15 10:29 AM ]

I'm obviously biased, but I totally agree with everything Alex said. Having one core string library and a separate contrib string library is just impractical. With clojure.string already part of the language it's much more sensible to extend it where/when needed instead of encouraging the proliferation of tons of alternative libraries (there are already a couple of those out there, mostly because essential functions are missing). Initial designs are rarely perfect, there's nothing wrong in revisiting and improving them.

I believe this is one of the top voted tickets, which clearly indicates that the Clojure community is quite supportive of this additions.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 19/Jul/15 12:26 PM ]

None of these functions return Strings so they could very easily be seq functions which use the String methods as a fast path when called with Strings, the trouble is then they wouldn't necessarily belong in clojure.string.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 19/Jul/15 1:49 PM ]

Such an argument can be made for existing functions like clojure.core/subs and clojure.string/reverse - we could have just went with generic functions that operate on seqs and converted the results to strings, but we didn't. It might be just me, but I'm really thinking this is being overanalysed. Sometimes it's really preferable to deal with some things as strings (not to mention more efficient).

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 20/Jul/15 9:39 AM ]

I completely agree with Alex and Bozhidar re: strings vs seqs. Other langs that have only lists and use them for strings are really bad at strings. So - string-specific fns are ok. What about the Java-isms?

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 20/Jul/15 10:08 AM ]

We should address them for sure. Let's wait for a couple of days for Nola to update the patch. If she's too busy I'll do the update myself.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 20/Jul/15 10:50 AM ]

I will be happy to work on it Saturday. Is nil an acceptable response when index-of "apple" "p" is not found? The other functions return booleans and I think those are ok.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 20/Jul/15 10:55 AM ]

Yep, we should go with nil.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 25/Jul/15 4:33 PM ]

Changed index-of and last-index-of to return nil instead of -1 (java-ism), thus had to remove the type hint for the return value.

Seems to have slowed down the function compared to having the function return -1. My benchmarks: https://www.evernote.com/l/ABL2wead73BJZYAkpH5yxsfX9JM8cpUiNhw

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 25/Jul/15 9:05 PM ]

Updated patch to include return value in doc string for index-of last-index-of, otherwise same as last update.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Jul/15 8:40 AM ]

Removing the hint causes the return type to be Object, which forces boxing in the "found" cases.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 26/Jul/15 8:56 AM ]

Is it worth it to remove the java-ism of returning -1 when not found? Personally, I don't really like a function returning one of two things... found index or nil ... I prefer it being an int at all times.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Jul/15 9:00 AM ]

There is one whitespace issue in the -5 patch:

[~/code/clojure (master)]$ git apply ~/Downloads/add_functions_to_strings-5.patch
/Users/alex/Downloads/add_functions_to_strings-5.patch:34: trailing whitespace.
  (let [result
warning: 1 line adds whitespace errors.

I updated the timings in the description to include both -4 and -5 - the boxing there does have a significant impact.

Comment by Nola Stowe [ 26/Jul/15 9:28 AM ]

Fixed whitespace issue.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Jul/15 9:32 AM ]

Added -6 patch and timings that address most of the performance impact.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 27/Jul/15 9:35 AM ]

Alex: Note that all of these functions return numbers and booleans, not strings nor seqs of anything. This is partially why they were left out of the original string implementation.

It isn't clear to me why index-of should be purely a string fn, I regularly need index-of with other things, and both my book and JoC use index-of as an example of a nice-to-have.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 27/Jul/15 9:44 AM ]

Stuart, I don't think the fact that those functions don't return string is really relevant, the important fact is that they operate on strings (just like c.set/superset? or subset? don't return sets) and are frequently used on them.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 27/Jul/15 9:51 AM ]

I'm with Nicola on this one - we have to be practical. There's a reason why this is the top-voted JIRA ticket - Clojure programmers want those functions. That's says plenty.

Anyways, having a generic `index-of` is definitely not a bad idea.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 31/Jul/15 11:27 AM ]

How does this compare to making them all seq fns and adding them to clojure.core?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 31/Jul/15 11:39 AM ]

Given Rich's comment earlier "I completely agree with Alex and Bozhidar re: strings vs seqs. Other langs that have only lists and use them for strings are really bad at strings. So - string-specific fns are ok.", do we need to write a separate patch that makes these all into seq fns and do performance comparisons between those vs. the string-specific ones?

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 31/Jul/15 1:26 PM ]

Andy,

Definitely not! I want to have a design conversation.

We have protocols, and could use them to provide core fns that are specialized to strings, so it isn't clear to me why we would have to be really bad at it.





[CLJ-1708] Volatile mutable in deftype is not settable when using try..finally and returning this Created: 17/Apr/15  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Patrick Gombert Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler, deftype
Environment:

clojure 1.6.0, clojure 1.7.0-beta1


Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Reproducible Code: https://gist.github.com/patrickgombert/1bcb8a051aeb3e82d855

When using a volatile-mutable field in deftype, compilation fails if the field is set! in a method call that uses both try..finally and returns itself from the method call. Leaving out either the try..finally or returning itself from the method causes compilation to succeed.

Expected behavior: set! should set the volatile-mutable variable and compilation should succeed.



 Comments   
Comment by Kevin Downey [ 17/Apr/15 7:15 PM ]

this must be the same issue as CLJ-1422 and CLJ-701, it has nothing to do with returning `this`, but with the try being in a tail position or not. if the try is not in a tail position the compiler hoists it out in to a thunk. effectively the code is

(deftype SomeType [^:volatile-mutable foo]
  SomeProtocol
  (someFn [_] ((fn [] (try (set! foo 1))))))

which the compiler also rejects, because it doesn't let you mutate fields from functions that are not the immediate protocol functions





[CLJ-1770] atom watchers are not atomic with respect to reset! Created: 29/Jun/15  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Eric Normand Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: atom

Attachments: Text File atom-reset-atomic-watch-2015-06-30.patch     File timingtest.clj    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

It is possible that two threads calling `reset!` on an atom can interleave, causing the corresponding watches to be called with the same old value but different new values. This contradicts the guarantee that atoms update atomically.

(defn reset-test []
  (let [my-atom (atom :start
                      :validator (fn [x] (Thread/sleep 100) true))
        watch-results (atom [])]
    (add-watch my-atom :watcher (fn [k a o n] (swap! watch-results conj [o n])))
  
    (future (reset! my-atom :next))
    (future (reset! my-atom :next))
    (Thread/sleep 500)
    @watch-results))

(reset-test)

Yields [[:start :next] [:start :next]]. Similar behavior can be observed when mixing reset! and swap!.

Expected behavior

Under atomic circumstances, (reset-test) should yield [[:start :next] [:next :next]]. This would "serialize" the resets and give more accurate information to the watches. This is the same behavior one would achieve by using (swap! my-atom (constantly :next)).

(defn swap-test []
  (let [my-atom (atom :start
                      :validator (fn [x] (Thread/sleep 100) true))
        watch-results (atom [])]
    (add-watch my-atom :watcher (fn [k a o n] (swap! watch-results conj [o n])))
  
    (future (swap! my-atom (constantly :next)))
    (future (swap! my-atom (constantly :next)))
    (Thread/sleep 500)
    @watch-results))

(swap-test)

Yields [[:start :next] [:next :next]]. The principle of least surprise suggests that these two functions should yield similar output.

Alternative expected behavior

It could be that atoms and reset! do not guarantee serialized updates with respect to calls to watches. In this case, it would be prudent to note this in the docstring for atom.

Analysis

The code for Atom.reset non-atomically reads and sets the internal AtomicReference. This allows for multiple threads to interleave the gets and sets, resulting in holding a stale value when notifying watches. Note that this should not affect the new value, just the old value.

Approach

Inside Atom.reset(), validation should happen first, then a loop calling compareAndSet on the internal state (similar to how it is implemented in swap()) should run until compareAndSet returns true. Note that this is still faster than the swap! constantly pattern shown above, since it only validates once and the tighter loop should have fewer interleavings. But it has the same watch behavior.

public Object reset(Object newval){
    validate(newval);
    for(;;)
        {
            Object oldval = state.get();
            if(state.compareAndSet(oldval, newval))
                {
                    notifyWatches(oldval, newval);
                    return newval;
                }
        }
}


 Comments   
Comment by Eric Normand [ 30/Jun/15 9:24 AM ]

I've made a test just to back up the timing claims I made above. If you run the file timingtest.clj, it will run code with both reset! and swap! constantly, with a validator that sleeps for 10ms. In both cases, it will print out the number of uniques (should be equal to number of reset!s, in this case 1000) and the time (using clojure.core/time). The timing numbers are relative to the machine, so should not be taken as absolutes. Instead, the ratio between them is what's important.

Run with: java -cp clojure-1.7.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar clojure.main timingtest.clj

Results

Existing implementation:

"Elapsed time: 1265.228 msecs"
Uniques with reset!: 140
"Elapsed time: 11609.686 msecs"
Uniques with swap!: 1000
"Elapsed time: 7010.132 msecs"
Uniques with swap! and reset!: 628

Note that the behaviors differ: swap! serializes the watchers, reset! does not (# of uniques).

Suggested implementation:

"Elapsed time: 1268.778 msecs"
Uniques with reset!: 1000
"Elapsed time: 11716.678 msecs"
Uniques with swap!: 1000
"Elapsed time: 7015.994 msecs"
Uniques with swap! and reset!: 1000

Same tests being run. This time, they both serialize watchers. Also, the timing has not changed significantly.

Comment by Eric Normand [ 30/Jun/15 10:16 AM ]

Adding atom-reset-atomic-watch-2015-06-30.patch. Includes test and implementation.





[CLJ-700] contains? broken for transient collections Created: 01/Jan/11  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.2
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Herwig Hochleitner Assignee: Rich Hickey
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 17
Labels: transient

Attachments: Java Source File 0001-Refactor-of-some-of-the-clojure-.java-code-to-fix-CL.patch     File clj-700-7.diff     File clj-700-8.diff     Text File clj-700-9.patch     File clj-700.diff     Text File clj-700-patch4.txt     Text File clj-700-patch6.txt     Text File clj-700-rt.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Incomplete

 Description   

Behavior with Clojure 1.6.0:

user=> (contains? (transient {:x "fine"}) :x)
IllegalArgumentException contains? not supported on type: clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap$TransientArrayMap  clojure.lang.RT.contains (RT.java:724)
;; expected: true

user=> (contains? (transient (hash-map :x "fine")) :x)
IllegalArgumentException contains? not supported on type: clojure.lang.PersistentHashMap$TransientHashMap  clojure.lang.RT.contains (RT.java:724)
;; expected: true

user=> (contains? (transient [1 2 3]) 0)
IllegalArgumentException contains? not supported on type: clojure.lang.PersistentVector$TransientVector  clojure.lang.RT.contains (RT.java:724)
;; expected: true

user=> (contains? (transient #{:x}) :x)
IllegalArgumentException contains? not supported on type: clojure.lang.PersistentHashSet$TransientHashSet  clojure.lang.RT.contains (RT.java:724)
;; expected: true

user=> (:x (transient #{:x}))
nil
;; expected: :x

user=> (get (transient #{:x}) :x)
nil
;; expected: :x

Cause: This is caused by expectations in clojure.lang.RT regarding the type of collections for some methods, e.g. contains() and getFrom(). Checking for contains looks to see if the instance passed in is Associative (a subinterface of PersistentCollection), or IPersistentSet.

Approach: Expand the types that RT.getFrom(), RT.contains(), and RT.find() can handle to cover the additional transient interfaces.

Alternative: Other older patches (prob best exemplified by clj-700-8.diff) restructure the collections type hierarchy. That is a much bigger change than the one taken here but is perhaps a better long-term path. That patch refactors several of the Clojure interfaces so that logic abstract from the issue of immutability is pulled out to a general interface (e.g. ISet, IAssociative), but preserves the contract specified (e.g. Associatives only return Associatives when calling assoc()). With more general interfaces in place the contains() and getFrom() methods were then altered to conditionally use the general interfaces which are agnostic of persistence vs. transience.

Screening Notes

  • the extra conditions in RT add branches to some key functions. get already has a getFrom optimization, but there is no similar containsFrom or findFrom. Is it worth measuring the possible impact of these?
  • I believe the interface refactoring approach (not taken here) is worth separate consideration as an enhancement. If this is done, I think leveraging valAt would be simpler, e.g. allowing HashMap and ArrayMap to share code
  • it is not evident (to me anyway) why some API fns consume ILookup and others do not, among e.g. contains?, get, and find. Possible doc enhancement?
  • there is test code already in place (data_structures.clj) that could easily be expanded to cover transients. It would be nice to do this, or better yet get some test.check tests in place

Patch: clj-700-9.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 01/Jan/11 8:01 PM ]

the same is also true for TransientVectors

{{(contains? (transient [1 2 3]) 0)}}

false

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 01/Jan/11 8:25 PM ]

As expected, TransientSets have the same issue; plus an additional, probably related one.

(:x (transient #{:x}))

nil

(get (transient #{:x}) :x)

nil

Comment by Alexander Redington [ 07/Jan/11 2:07 PM ]

This is caused by expectations in clojure.lang.RT regarding the type of collections for some methods, e.g. contains() and getFrom(). Checking for contains looks to see if the instance passed in is Associative (a subinterface of PersistentCollection), or IPersistentSet.

This patch refactors several of the Clojure interfaces so that logic abstract from the issue of immutability is pulled out to a general interface (e.g. ISet, IAssociative), but preserves the contract specified (e.g. Associatives only return Associatives when calling assoc()).

With more general interfaces in place the contains() and getFrom() methods were then altered to conditionally use the general interfaces which are agnostic of persistence vs. transience. Includes tests in transients.clj to verify the changes fix this problem.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 28/Jan/11 10:35 AM ]

Rich: Patch doesn't currently apply, but I would like to get your take on approach here. In particular:

  1. this represents working back from the defect to rethinking abstractions (good!). Does it go far enough?
  2. what are good names for the interfaces introduced here?
Comment by Alexander Redington [ 25/Mar/11 7:44 AM ]

Rebased the patch off the latest pull of master as of 3/25/2011, it should apply cleanly now.

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 17/Feb/12 2:59 PM ]

Latest patch does not apply as of f5bcf647

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 17/Feb/12 5:59 PM ]

clj-700-patch2.txt does patch cleanly to latest Clojure head as of a few mins ago. No changes to patch except in context around changed lines.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 07/Mar/12 3:23 AM ]

Sigh. Git patches applied via 'git am' are fragile beasts indeed. Look at them the wrong way and they fail to apply.

clj-700-patch3.txt applies cleanly to latest master as of Mar 7, 2012, but not if you use this command:

git am -s < clj-700-patch3.txt

I am pretty sure this is because of DOS CR/LF line endings in the file src/jvm/clojure/lang/Associative.java. The patch does apply cleanly if you use this command:

git am --keep-cr -s < clj-700-patch3.txt

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Mar/12 6:34 PM ]

This ticket was changed to Incomplete and waiting on Rich when Stuart Halloway asked for feedback on the approach on 28/Jan/2011. Stuart Sierra changed it to not waiting on Rich on 17/Feb/2012 when he noted the patch didn't apply cleanly. Latest patch clj-700-patch3.txt does apply cleanly, but doesn't change the approach used since the time Stuart Halloway's concern was raised. Should it be marked as waiting on Rich again? Something else?

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 08/Jun/12 12:44 PM ]

Patch 4 incorporates patch 3, and brings it up to date on hashing (i.e. uses hasheq).

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Jun/12 12:52 PM ]

Removed clj-700-patch3.txt in favor of Stuart Halloway's improved clj-700-patch4.txt dated June 8, 2012.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 18/Jun/12 3:06 PM ]

clj-700-patch5.txt dated June 18, 2012 is the same as Stuart Halloway's clj-700-patch4.txt, except for context lines that have changed in Clojure master since Stuart's patch was created. clj-700-patch4.txt no longer applies cleanly.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 19/Aug/12 4:47 AM ]

Adding clj-700-patch6.txt, which is identical to Stuart Halloway's clj-700-patch4.txt, except that it applies cleanly to latest master as of Aug 19, 2012. Note that as described above, you must use the --keep-cr option to 'git am' when applying this patch for it to succeed. Removing clj-700-patch5.txt, since it no longer applies cleanly.

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 24/Aug/12 1:08 PM ]

Patch fails as of commit 1c8eb16a14ce5daefef1df68d2f6b1f143003140

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 24/Aug/12 1:53 PM ]

Which patch did you try, and what command did you use? I tried applying clj-700-patch6.txt to the same commit, using the following command, and it applied, albeit with the warning messages shown:

% git am --keep-cr -s < clj-700-patch6.txt
Applying: Refactor of some of the clojure .java code to fix CLJ-700.
/Users/jafinger/clj/latest-clj/clojure/.git/rebase-apply/patch:29: trailing whitespace.
public interface Associative extends IPersistentCollection, IAssociative{
warning: 1 line adds whitespace errors.
Applying: more CLJ-700: refresh to use hasheq

Note the --keep-cr option, which is necessary for this patch to succeed. It is recommended in the "Screening Tickets" section of the JIRA workflow wiki page here: http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/JIRA+workflow

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 28/Aug/12 5:48 PM ]

Presumptuously changing Approval from Incomplete back to None, since the latest patch does apply cleanly if the --keep-cr option is used. It was in Screened state recently, but I'm not so presumptuous as to change it to Screened

Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Aug/13 12:26 PM ]

I think through a series of different hands on this ticket it got knocked way back in the list. Re-marking vetted as it's previously been all the way up through screening. Should also keep an eye on CLJ-787 as it may have some collisions with this one.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Nov/13 10:14 AM ]

clj-700-7.diff is identical to clj-700-patch6.txt, except it applies cleanly to latest master. Only some lines of context in a test file have changed.

When I say "applies cleanly", I mean that there is one warning when using the proper "git am" command from the dev wiki page. This is because one line replaced in Associative.java has a CR/LF at the end of the line, because all lines in that file do.

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 17/Feb/14 9:54 AM ]

Since clojure 1.5, contains? throws an IllegalArgumentException on transients.
In 1.6.0-beta1, transients are no longer marked as alpha.

Does this mean, that we won't be able to distinguish between a nil value and no value on a transient?

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 27/Jun/14 10:20 AM ]

Request for someone to (1) update patch to apply cleanly, and (2) summarize approach so I don't have to read through the comment history.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 27/Jun/14 11:02 AM ]

The latest patch is clj-700-7.diff dated Nov 8, 2013. I believe it is impossible to create a patch that applies any more cleanly using git for source files that have carriage returns in them, which at least one modified source file does. Here is the command I used on latest Clojure master as of today (Jun 27 2014), which is the same as that of March 25 2014:

% git am -s --keep-cr --ignore-whitespace < ~/clj/patches/clj-700-7.diff 
Applying: Refactor of some of the clojure .java code to fix CLJ-700.
/Users/admin/clj/latest-clj/clojure/.git/rebase-apply/patch:29: trailing whitespace.
public interface Associative extends IPersistentCollection, IAssociative{
warning: 1 line adds whitespace errors.
Applying: more CLJ-700: refresh to use hasheq

If you want a patch that doesn't have the 'trailing whitespace' warning in it, I think someone would have to commit a change that removed the carriage returns from file Associative.java. If you want such a patch, let me know and we can remove all of them from every source file and be done with this annoyance.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 27/Jun/14 11:19 AM ]

Updated description to contain a copy of only those comments that seemed 'interesting'. Most comments have simply been "attached an updated patch that applies cleanly", or "changed the state of this ticket for reason X".

Comment by Alex Miller [ 27/Jun/14 1:19 PM ]

Looks like Andy did as requested, moving back to Screenable.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 4:27 PM ]

Patch clj-700-7.diff dated Nov 8 2013 no longer applied cleanly to latest master after some commits were made to Clojure on Aug 29, 2014. It did apply cleanly before that day.

I have not checked how easy or difficult it might be to update this patch.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Sep/14 3:59 AM ]

Patch clj-700-8.diff dated Sep 1 2014 is identical to clj-700-7.diff, except that it applies "cleanly" to latest master, by which I mean it applies as cleanly as I think it is possible to apply for a git patch to a file with carriage return/line feed line endings, as one of the modified files still does.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Dec/14 3:12 PM ]

Added new patch with alternate approach that just makes RT know about transients instead of refactoring the class hierarchy.

clj-700-rt.patch

In some ways I think the class hierarchy refactoring is due, but I'm not totally on board with all the changes in those patches and it has impacts on collections outside Clojure itself that are hard to reason about.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 31/Jul/15 11:35 AM ]

I'd like to look at the type hierarchy myself





[CLJ-1224] Records do not cache hash like normal maps Created: 24/Jun/13  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Brandon Bloom Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 17
Labels: defrecord, performance

Attachments: Text File 0001-cache-hasheq-and-hashCode-for-records.patch     Text File 0001-cache-hasheq-and-hashCode-for-records-v2.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1224-cache-hasheq-and-hashCode-for-records.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1224-cache-hasheq-and-hashCode-for-records-v2.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Screened

 Description   

Records do not cache their hash codes like normal Clojure maps, which affects their performance. This problem has been fixed in CLJS, but still affects JVM CLJ.

Approach: Cache hash values in record definitions, similar to maps.

Timings:

coll 1.8.0-master 1.8.0-master+patch
small record 99 ns 9 ns
big record 455 ns 9 ns
(defrecord R [a b])  ;; small
(def r  (R. (range 1e3) (range 1e3)))
(bench (hash r))
(defrecord R [a b c d e f g h i j])  ;; big
(def r (map->R (zipmap [:a :b :c :d :e :f :g :h :i :j] (repeat (range 1e3)))))
(bench (hash r))

Patch: 0001-CLJ-1224-cache-hasheq-and-hashCode-for-records-v2.patch

Screened by: Alex Miller

Also see: http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJS-281



 Comments   
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 14/Feb/14 5:46 PM ]

I want to point out that my patch breaks ABI compatibility.
A possible approach to avoid this would be to have 3 constructors instead of 2, I can write the patch to support this if desired.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 27/Jun/14 11:09 AM ]

The patch 0001-CLJ-1224-cache-hasheq-and-hashCode-for-records.patch is broken in at least two ways:

  • The fields __hash and __hasheq are adopted by new records created by .assoc and .without, which will cause those records to have incorrect (and likely colliding) hash values
  • The addition of the new fields breaks the promise of defrecord, which includes an N+2 constructor taking meta and extmap. With the patch, defrecords get an N+4 constructor letting callers pick hash codes.

I found these problems via the following reasoning:

  • Code has been touched near __extmap
  • Grep for all uses of __extmap and see what breaks
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 27/Jun/14 2:53 PM ]

Patch 0001-cache-hasheq-and-hashCode-for-records.patch fixes both those issues, reintroducing the N+2 arity constructor

Comment by Alex Miller [ 27/Jun/14 4:08 PM ]

Questions addressed, back to Vetted.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Aug/14 4:32 PM ]

All patches dated Jun 7 2014 and earlier no longer applied cleanly to latest master after some commits were made to Clojure on Aug 29, 2014. They did apply cleanly before that day.

I have not checked how easy or difficult it might be to update this patch.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Aug/14 4:40 PM ]

Would be great to get this one updated as it's otherwise ready to screen.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 29/Aug/14 4:58 PM ]

Updated patch to apply to lastest master

Comment by Alex Miller [ 16/Jun/15 4:06 PM ]

1) hash and hasheq are stored as Objects, which seems kind of gross. It would be much better to store them as primitive longs and check whether they'd been calculated by comparing to 0. We still end up with a long -> int conversion but at least we'd avoid boxing.

2) assoc wrongly copies over the __hash and __hasheq to the new instance:

(defrecord R [a])
(def r (->R "abc"))
(hash r)                   ;; -1544829221
(hash (assoc r :a "def"))  ;; -1544829221

3) Needs some tests if they don't already exist:

  • with-meta on a record should not affect hashcode
  • modifying a record with assoc or dissoc should affect hashcode
  • maybe something else?

4) Needs some perf tests with a handful of example records (at least: 1 field, many fields, extmap, etc).

Nicola, I'm happy to let you continue to do dev on this patch with me doing the screening if you have time. Or if you don't have time, let me know and I (or someone else) can work on the dev parts. Would like to get this prepped and clean for 1.8.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 16/Jun/15 5:56 PM ]

Updated patch addresses the issues raised, will add some benchmarks later

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 16/Jun/15 5:59 PM ]

Alex, regarding point 1, I stored __hash and __hasheq as ints rather than longs and compared to -1 rather than 0, to be consistent with how it's done elsewhere in the clojure impl

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Jun/15 11:39 AM ]

Looking at the bytecode for hashcode and hasheq, I had two questions:

1) the -1 there is a long and requires an upcast of the private field from int to long. I'm sure that's not a big deal, but wish there was a way to avoid it. I didn't try it but maybe (int -1) would help the compiler out?

2) I wonder whether something like this would perform better:

`(hasheq [this#] 
   (if (== -1 ~'__hasheq)
     (set! ~'__hasheq (int (bit-xor ~type-hash (clojure.lang.APersistentMap/mapHasheq this#)))))
   ~'__hasheq)

The common case will be a failed compare and then the field can be loaded and returned directly without any casting.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 17/Jun/15 11:54 AM ]

1- there's no Numbers.equiv(int, int) so even casting -1 to an int wouldn't solve this. a cast is always necessary. if we were to make hasheq a long, we'd need l2i in the return path, making hasheq an int we need an i2l in the comparison.
2- that doesn't remove any casting, it just replaces a load from the local variable stack with a field load:

;; current version
0: ldc2_w        #203                // long -1l
3: aload_0
4: getfield      #236                // Field __hasheq:I
7: i2l
8: lcmp
9: ifne          38
12: ldc2_w        #267                // long 1340417398l
15: aload_0
16: checkcast     #16                 // class clojure/lang/IPersistentMap
19: invokestatic  #274                // Method clojure/lang/APersistentMap.mapHasheq:(Lclojure/lang/IPersistentMap;)I
22: i2l
23: lxor
24: invokestatic  #278                // Method clojure/lang/RT.intCast:(J)I
27: istore_1
28: aload_0
29: iload_1
30: putfield      #236                // Field __hasheq:I
33: iload_1
34: goto          42
37: pop
38: aload_0
39: getfield      #236                // Field __hasheq:I
42: ireturn
;; your version
0: ldc2_w        #203                // long -1l
3: aload_0
4: getfield      #236                // Field __hasheq:I
7: i2l
8: lcmp
9: ifne          35
12: aload_0
13: ldc2_w        #267                // long 1340417398l
16: aload_0
17: checkcast     #16                 // class clojure/lang/IPersistentMap
20: invokestatic  #274                // Method clojure/lang/APersistentMap.mapHasheq:(Lclojure/lang/IPersistentMap;)I
23: i2l
24: lxor
25: invokestatic  #278                // Method clojure/lang/RT.intCast:(J)I
28: putfield      #236                // Field __hasheq:I
31: goto          37
34: pop
35: aconst_null
36: pop
37: aload_0
38: getfield      #236                // Field __hasheq:I
41: ireturn
Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Jun/15 12:01 PM ]

Fair enough! Looks pretty good to me, still needs the perf numbers.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 17/Jun/15 1:00 PM ]
coll 1.7.0-RC2 1.7.0-RC2+patch
big record ~940ns ~10ns
small record ~150ns ~11ns
;; big record, 1.7.0-RC2
user=> (use 'criterium.core)
nil
user=> (defrecord R [a b c d e f g h i j])
user.R
user=> (def r (map->R (zipmap [:a :b :c :d :e :f :g :h :i :j] (repeat (range 1e3)))))
#'user/r
user=> (bench (hash r))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.291182176566658 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 63385020 in 60 samples of 1056417 calls.
             Execution time mean : 943.320293 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 44.001842 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 891.919381 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 1.033894 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.980453 ns

;; big record, 1.7.0-RC2 + patch
user=> (defrecord R [a b c d e f g h i j])
user.R
user=> (def r (map->R (zipmap [:a :b :c :d :e :f :g :h :i :j] (repeat (range 1e3)))))
#'user/r
user=> (bench (hash r))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.0097162582088168 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 4820968380 in 60 samples of 80349473 calls.
             Execution time mean : 10.657581 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.668011 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 9.975656 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 12.190471 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 2.235715 ns

;; small record 1.7.0-RC2
user=> (defrecord R [a b])
user.R
user=> (def r  (R. (range 1e3) (range 1e3)))
#'user/r
user=> (bench (hash r))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.456092401467115 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 423779160 in 60 samples of 7062986 calls.
             Execution time mean : 147.154359 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 8.148340 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 138.052054 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 165.573489 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.629944 ns

;; small record 1.7.0-RC2+patch
user=> (defrecord R [a b])
user.R
user=> (def r  (R. (range 1e3) (range 1e3)))
#'user/r
user=>  (bench (hash r))
WARNING: Final GC required 1.720638384341818 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 4483195020 in 60 samples of 74719917 calls.
             Execution time mean : 11.696574 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.506482 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 10.982760 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 12.836103 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 2.123801 ns
Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Jun/15 3:36 PM ]

Screened for 1.8.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Jun/15 8:38 AM ]

Note that using -1 for the uncomputed hash value can cause issues with transient lazily computed hash codes on serialization (CLJ-1766). In this case, the defrecord cached code is not transient so I don't think it's a problem, but something to be aware of. Using 0 would avoid this potential issue.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 17/Jul/15 12:00 PM ]

So, why not use 0? You won't need initialization then either

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 17/Jul/15 7:50 PM ]

Updated patch so that it applies on current master and changed the default hash value from -1 to 0.

Rich, we still need initialization since all the record ctors delegate to the ctor arity with explicit __hash and __hasheq, following the approach of the alt ctors for __extmap and __meta

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/Jul/15 10:30 PM ]

Moving back to vetted for screening

Comment by Alex Miller [ 28/Jul/15 6:17 PM ]

Hey Nicola, two comments on the hasheq/hashcode impl:

1) I don't think there's any reason to use == in the check instead of =, and = seems better (I think the resulting bytecode is same either way though).

2) The generated bytecode in these cases will call getfield twice in the cached case (once for the check, and once for the return):

public int hasheq();
    Code:
       0: lconst_0      
       1: aload_0       
       2: getfield      #232                // Field __hasheq:I     ;; <-- HERE
       5: i2l           
       6: lcmp          
       7: ifne          36
      10: ldc2_w        #263                // long -989260517l
      13: aload_0       
      14: checkcast     #16                 // class clojure/lang/IPersistentMap
      17: invokestatic  #270                // Method clojure/lang/APersistentMap.mapHasheq:(Lclojure/lang/IPersistentMap;)I
      20: i2l           
      21: lxor          
      22: invokestatic  #274                // Method clojure/lang/RT.intCast:(J)I
      25: istore_1      
      26: aload_0       
      27: iload_1       
      28: putfield      #232                // Field __hasheq:I
      31: iload_1       
      32: goto          40
      35: pop           
      36: aload_0       
      37: getfield      #232                // Field __hasheq:I   ;; <-- HERE
      40: ireturn

Letting a local will avoid that:

`(hasheq [this#] (let [hv# ~'__hasheq]     ;; ADDED
                                  (if (= 0 hv#)           ;; USED
                                    (let [h# (int (bit-xor ~type-hash (clojure.lang.APersistentMap/mapHasheq this#)))]
                                      (set! ~'__hasheq h#)
                                      h#)
                                    hv#)))                ;; USED

Output bytecode:

public int hasheq();
    Code:
       0: aload_0       
       1: getfield      #227                // Field __hasheq:I
       4: istore_1      
       5: lconst_0      
       6: iload_1       
       7: i2l           
       8: lcmp          
       9: ifne          38
      12: ldc2_w        #258                // long -989260517l
      15: aload_0       
      16: checkcast     #16                 // class clojure/lang/IPersistentMap
      19: invokestatic  #265                // Method clojure/lang/APersistentMap.mapHasheq:(Lclojure/lang/IPersistentMap;)I
      22: i2l           
      23: lxor          
      24: invokestatic  #269                // Method clojure/lang/RT.intCast:(J)I
      27: istore_2      
      28: aload_0       
      29: iload_2       
      30: putfield      #227                // Field __hasheq:I
      33: iload_2       
      34: goto          39
      37: pop           
      38: iload_1       
      39: ireturn

For me, this was about 2% faster in bench too.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 28/Jul/15 6:18 PM ]

Equivalent change in hashCode too.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 29/Jul/15 4:06 AM ]

Updated patch takes into account Alex's last notes





[CLJ-1586] Compiler doesn't preserve metadata for LazySeq literals Created: 12/Nov/14  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler, metadata, typehints

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1586-Compiler-doesn-t-preserve-metadata-for-lazy.patch     Text File 0001-Compiler-doesn-t-preserve-metadata-for-lazyseq-liter.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

The analyzer in Compiler.java forces evaluation of lazyseq literals, but loses the compile time original metadata of that form, meaning that a type hint will be lost.

Example demonstrating this issue:

user=> (set! *warn-on-reflection* true)
true
user=> (list '.substring (with-meta (concat '(identity) '("foo")) {:tag 'String}) 0)
(.substring (identity "foo") 0)
user=> (eval (list '.substring (with-meta (concat '(identity) '("foo")) {:tag 'String}) 0))
Reflection warning, NO_SOURCE_PATH:6:1 - call to method substring on java.lang.Object can't be resolved (no such method).
"foo"

Forcing the concat call to an ASeq rather than a LazySeq fixes this issue:

user=> (eval (list '.hashCode (with-meta (seq (concat '(identity) '("foo"))) {:tag 'String})))
101574

This ticket blocks http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1444 since clojure.core/sequence might return a lazyseq.

This bug affected both tools.analyzer and tools.reader and forced me to commit a fix in tools.reader to work around this issue, see: http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/TANAL-99

The proposed patch trivially preserves the form metadata after realizing the lazyseq

Approach: Keep a copy of the original form, and apply its metadata to the realized lazyseq
Patch: 0001-CLJ-1586-Compiler-doesn-t-preserve-metadata-for-lazy.patch
Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 31/Jul/15 9:19 AM ]

Please add a test case.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 31/Jul/15 9:32 AM ]

Updated patch with testcase





[CLJ-1657] proxy creates bytecode that calls super methods of abstract classes Created: 08/Feb/15  Updated: 31/Jul/15  Resolved: 31/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Alexander Yakushev Assignee: Stuart Halloway
Resolution: Completed Votes: 1
Labels: None
Environment:

Everywhere, but so far relevant only on Android 5.0


Attachments: File CLJ-1657-patch.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Ok

 Description   

When proxy is used to extend abstract classes (e.g. java.io.Writer), the bytecode it produces include the call to non-existing super methods. For example, here's decompiled method from clojure/pprint/column_writer.clj:

public void close()
    {
        Object obj;
label0:
        {
            obj = RT.get(__clojureFnMap, "close");
            if(obj == null)
                break label0;
            ((IFn)obj).invoke(this);
            break MISSING_BLOCK_LABEL_31;
        }
        JVM INSTR pop ;
        super.close();
    }

As you can see on the last line, super.close() tries to call a non-defined method (because close() is abstract in Writer).

This hasn't been an issue anywhere until Android 5.0 came out. Its bytecode optimizer is very aggressive and rejects such code. Google guys claim that it is a bug in their code, which they already fixed[1]. Still I wonder if having faulty bytecode, that is not valid by Java standards, might cause issues in future (not only on Android, but in other enviroments too).

[1] https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=80687



 Comments   
Comment by Alexander Yakushev [ 18/Mar/15 5:31 AM ]

I attached a patch that resolves the issue. The change makes `generate-proxy` treat abstract methods like interface methods. Which means, if the implementation for the method is not provided, it will throw unsupported exception rather than try to call the parent method (which doesn't exist).

Comment by Michael Blume [ 18/Mar/15 12:50 PM ]

Alexander: Awesome, thanks =)

Note: If you use git format-patch after making a commit, you can generate a patch file with your name/e-mail and a commit message that a clojure maintainer can apply directly to clojure as a new commit.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Mar/15 12:53 PM ]

The patch process is documented here: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Comment by Alexander Yakushev [ 18/Mar/15 4:38 PM ]

Sorry, I should have checked the guidelines first. I uploaded a new patch, hope it is correct now.

Comment by Alexander Yakushev [ 18/Jul/15 10:59 AM ]

Anything that holds this back? Now that Clojure is in volatile after-release state it's a good time to deal with it.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jul/15 12:25 PM ]

No, wasn't in triaged but is now.





[CLJ-1766] Serializing+deserializing lists breaks their hash Created: 21/Jun/15  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Chris Vermilion Assignee: Andrew Rosa
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: interop
Environment:

Tested on OS X 10.10.3, Clojure 1.6.0, Java 1.8.0_45-b14, but don't think this is a factor.


Attachments: File serialization_test_mod.diff    
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

clojure.lang.PersistentList implements Serializable but a serialization roundtrip results in a hash of 0. This appears to be caused by ASeq marking its _hash property as transient; other collection base classes don't do this. I don't know if there is a rational for the distinction, but the result is that serializing, then deserializing, a list results in its _hash property being 0 instead of either its previous, calculated value, or -1, which would trigger recalculation.

This means that any code that relies on a list's hash value can break in subtle ways.

Examples:

(import '[java.io ByteArrayInputStream ByteArrayOutputStream ObjectInputStream ObjectOutputStream])

(defn obj->bytes [obj]
  (let [bytestream (ByteArrayOutputStream.)]
    (doto (ObjectOutputStream. bytestream) (.writeObject obj))
    (.toByteArray bytestream)))

(defn bytes->obj [bs]
  (.readObject (ObjectInputStream. (ByteArrayInputStream. bs)))

(defn round-trip [x] (bytes->obj (obj->bytes x)))
user=> (hash '(1))
-1381383523
user=> (hash (round-trip '(1)))
0
user=> #{'(1) (round-trip '(1))}
#{(1) (1)}
user=> (def m {'(1) 1})
#'user/m
user=> (= m (round-trip m))
true
user=> (= (round-trip m) m)
false

Approach: Use 0 as the "uncomputed" hash value, not -1. The auto initialized value on serialization construction will then automatically trigger a re-computation.

Alternate approaches:

  • Implement a readObject method that sets the _hash property to -1. This is somewhat complicated in the face of subclasses, etc.

Note: Also need to consider other classes that use -1 instead of 0 as the uncomputed hash value: APersistentMap, APersistentSet, APersistentVector, PersistentQueue - however I believe in those cases they are not transient and thus may avoid the issue. Perhaps they should be transient though.



 Comments   
Comment by Chris Vermilion [ 21/Jun/15 1:10 PM ]

Yikes, sorry about the formatting above; JIRA newbie and looks like I can't edit. Also, I should have noted that the above functions require an import: (import '[java.io ByteArrayInputStream ByteArrayOutputStream ObjectInputStream ObjectOutputStream]).

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Jun/15 7:55 AM ]

Yes, this is a bug. My preference would be to use 0 to indicate "not computed" and thus sidestep this issue. The downside of changing from -1 to 0 is that serialization/deserialization is then broken between versions of Clojure (although maybe if it was already broken, that's not an issue). -1 is used like this for lazily computed hashes in many classes in Clojure so the issue should really be fixed across the board.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Jun/15 8:22 AM ]

There are some serialization round-trip tests in clojure.test-clojure.serialization - seems like those should be updated to compare the .hashCode and hash before/after, which should catch this. I attached a diff (not a proper patch) with that change just as a demonstration, which indeed produces a bunch of failures. That should be incorporated into any fix, possibly along with other failures.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 31/Jul/15 9:04 AM ]

Also, don't worry about crediting me on that test change, please just incorporate it into whatever gets made here.

Comment by Andrew Rosa [ 31/Jul/15 9:31 AM ]

Alex Miller I hope to work on this issue this weekend. There are some conflict with the alpha release schedule?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 31/Jul/15 9:47 AM ]

No conflict - when it's ready we'll look at it.





[CLJ-1232] Functions with non-qualified return type hints force import of hinted classes when called from other namespace Created: 18/Jul/13  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Tassilo Horn Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 8
Labels: compiler, typehints

Attachments: Text File 0001-auto-qualify-arglists-class-names.patch     Text File 0001-auto-qualify-arglists-class-names-v2.patch     Text File 0001-auto-qualify-arglists-class-names-v3.patch     Text File 0001-auto-qualify-arglists-class-names-v4.patch     Text File 0001-throw-on-non-qualified-class-names-that-are-not-auto.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

You can add a type hint to function arglists to indicate the return type of a function like so.

user> (import '(java.util List))
java.util.List
user> (defn linkedlist ^List [] (java.util.LinkedList.))
#'user/linkedlist
user> (.size (linkedlist))
0

The problem is that now when I call `linkedlist` exactly as above from another namespace, I'll get an exception because java.util.List is not imported in there.

user> (in-ns 'user2)
#<Namespace user2>
user2> (refer 'user)
nil
user2> (.size (linkedlist))
CompilerException java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Unable to resolve classname: List, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:1:1)
user2> (import '(java.util List)) ;; Too bad, need to import List here, too.
java.util.List
user2> (.size (linkedlist))
0

There are two workarounds: You can import the hinted type also in the calling namespace, or you always use fully qualified class names for return type hints. Clearly, the latter is preferable.

But clearly, that's a bug that should be fixed. It's not in analogy to type hints on function parameters which may be simple-named without having any consequences for callers from other namespaces.

Approach: Make the compiler resolve the return tags when necessary (tag is not a string, primitive tag (^long) or array tag (^longs)) and update the Var's :arglist appropriately.

Patch: 0001-auto-qualify-arglists-class-names-v4.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 16/Apr/14 3:47 PM ]

To make sure I understand, Nicola, in this ticket you are asking that the Clojure compiler change behavior so that the sample code works correctly with no exceptions, the same way as it would work correctly without exceptions if one of the workarounds were used?

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 17/Apr/14 12:18 AM ]

Hi Andy. Tassilo here, not Nicola. But yes, the example should work as-is. When I'm allowed to use type hints with simple imported class names for arguments, then doing so for return values should work, too.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 10/Jun/14 10:41 AM ]

Type hints on function params are only consumed by the function definition, i.e. in the same module as the import/alias. Type hints on returns are just metadata, they don't get 'compiled' and if the metadata is not useful to consumers in other namespaces, it's not a useful hint. So, if it's not a type in the auto-imported set (java.lang), it should be fully qualified.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Jun/14 11:55 AM ]

Based on Rich's comment, this ticket should probably morph into an enhancement request on documentation, probably on http://clojure.org/java_interop#Java Interop-Type Hints.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 10/Jun/14 3:13 PM ]

I would suggest something like the following for a documentation change, after this part of the text on the page Alex links in the previous comment:

For function return values, the type hint can be placed before the arguments vector:

(defn hinted
(^String [])
(^Integer [a])
(^java.util.List [a & args]))

-> #user/hinted

If the return value type hint is for a class that is outside of java.lang, which is the part auto-imported by Clojure, then it must be a fully qualified class name, e.g. java.util.List, not List.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 10/Jun/14 4:02 PM ]

I don't understand why we should enforce this complexity to the user.
Why can't we just make the Compiler (or even defn itself) update all the arglists tags with properly resolved ones? (that's what I'm doing in tools.analyzer.jvm)

Comment by Alexander Kiel [ 19/Jul/14 10:02 AM ]

I'm with Nicola here. I also think that defn should resolve the type hint according the imports of the namespace defn is used in.

Comment by Max Penet [ 22/Jul/14 7:06 AM ]

Same here, I was bit by this in the past. The current behavior is clearly counterintuitive.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 28/Aug/14 12:58 PM ]

Attached two patches implementing two different solutions:

  • 0001-auto-qualify-arglists-class-names.patch makes the compiler automatically qualify all the tags in the :arglists
  • 0001-throw-on-non-qualified-class-names-that-are-not-auto.patch makes the compiler throw an exception for all public defs whose return tag is a symbol representing a non-qualified class that is not in the auto-import list (approach proposed in IRC by Alex Miller)
Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 29/Aug/14 1:49 AM ]

For what it's worth, I'd prefer the first patch because the second doesn't help in situations where the caller lives in a namespace where the called function's return type hinted class is `ns-unmap`-ed. And there a good reasons for doing that. For example, Process is a java.lang class and Process is a pretty generic name. So in some namespace, I want to define my own Process deftype or defrecord. Without unmapping 'Process first to get rid of the java.lang.Process auto-import, I'd get an exception:

user> (deftype Process [])
IllegalStateException Process already refers to: class java.lang.Process in namespace: user  clojure.lang.Namespace.referenceClass (Namespace.java:140)

Now when I call some function from some library that has a `^Process` return type hint (meaning java.lang.Process there), I get the same exception as in my original report.

I can even get into troubles when only using standard Clojure functions because those have `^String` and `^Class` type hints. IMO, Class is also a pretty generic name I should be able to name my custom deftype/defrecord. And I might also want to have a custom String type/record in my astrophysics system.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Sep/14 4:39 PM ]

Not sure whether the root cause of this behavior is the same as the example in the description or not, but seems a little weird that even for fully qualified Java class names hinting the arg vector, it makes a difference whether it is done with defn or def:

Clojure 1.6.0
user=> (set! *warn-on-reflection* true)
true
user=> (defn f1 ^java.util.LinkedList [coll] (java.util.LinkedList. coll))
#'user/f1
user=> (def f2 (fn ^java.util.LinkedList [coll] (java.util.LinkedList. coll)))
#'user/f2
user=> (.size (f1 [2 3 4]))
3
user=> (.size (f2 [2 3 4]))
Reflection warning, NO_SOURCE_PATH:5:1 - reference to field size can't be resolved.
3
Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Sep/14 6:21 PM ]

Andy, can you file that as a separate ticket?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Sep/14 9:08 PM ]

Created ticket CLJ-1543 for the issue raised in my comment earlier on 30 Sep 2014.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Oct/14 12:38 PM ]

Tassilo (or anyone), is there a reason to prefer putting the tag on the argument vector in your example? It seems that putting it on the Var name instead avoids this issue:

user=> (clojure-version)
"1.6.0"
user=> (set! *warn-on-reflection* true)
true
user=> (import '(java.util List))
java.util.List
user=> (defn ^List linkedlist [] (java.util.LinkedList.))
#'user/linkedlist
user=> (.size (linkedlist))
0
user=> (ns user2)
nil
user2=> (refer 'user)
nil
user2=> (.size (linkedlist))
0

I suppose that only allows a single type tag, rather than an independent one for each arity.

Comment by Tassilo Horn [ 02/Oct/14 3:16 AM ]

I wasn't aware of the fact that you can put it on the var's name. That's not documented at http://clojure.org/java_interop#Java Interop-Type Hints. But IMHO the documented version with putting the tag on the argument vector is more general since it supports different return type hints for the different arity version. In any case, if both forms are permitted then they should be equivalent in the case the function has only one arity.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 16/Mar/15 12:02 PM ]

Please work on the simplest patch that resolves the names

Comment by Alex Miller [ 16/Mar/15 4:34 PM ]

Nicola, in this:

if (tag != null &&
                        !(tag instanceof String) &&
                        primClass((Symbol)tag) == null &&
                        !tagClass((Symbol) tag).getName().startsWith("["))
                        {
                            argvec = (IPersistentVector)((IObj)argvec).withMeta(RT.map(RT.TAG_KEY, Symbol.intern(tagClass((Symbol)tag).getName())));
                        }

doesn't tagClass already handle most of these cases properly already? Can this be simplified? Is there an optimization case in avoiding lookup for a dotted name?

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 16/Mar/15 5:10 PM ]

Patch 0001-auto-qualify-arglists-class-names-v2.patch avoids doing unnecessary lookups (dotted names, special tags (primitive tags, array tags)) and adds a testcase

Comment by Michael Blume [ 20/May/15 1:13 PM ]

I'm seeing an odd failure with this patch and hystrix defcommands, will post a small reproduction shortly

Comment by Michael Blume [ 20/May/15 1:20 PM ]

https://github.com/MichaelBlume/hystrix-demo

passes lein check with 1.7 beta3, fails with v3 patch applied

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 20/May/15 1:40 PM ]

During analysis the compiler understands only arglists in the form of (quote ([..]*)) (see https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/master/src/jvm/clojure/lang/Compiler.java#L557-L558), hystrix emits arglists in the form of (list (quote [..])*).

Not sure what to do about this.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 20/May/15 1:51 PM ]

Possibly just ask Hystrix not to do that?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/May/15 2:30 PM ]

test.generative uses non-standard arglists too. I haven't looked at the patch, but if it's sensitive to that, it's probably not good enough.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 20/May/15 6:51 PM ]

test.generative uses non-standard :tag, not :arglists

Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/May/15 10:22 PM ]

ah, yes. sorry.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 10/Jul/15 12:15 PM ]

Opened https://github.com/Netflix/Hystrix/issues/831 to see what is up with hystrix.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 31/Jul/15 9:16 AM ]

Can somebody with context update this patch to apply to latest master?

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 31/Jul/15 9:37 AM ]

patch updated





[CLJ-1609] Fix an edge case in the Reflector's search for a public method declaration Created: 05/Dec/14  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Jeremy Heiler Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: interop

Attachments: Text File reflector_method_bug.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

The Reflector was not taking into account that a non-public class can implement an interface, and have a non-public parent class contain an implementation of a method on that interface.

The solution I took is to pass in the target object's class instead of the declaring class of the method object.

I've outlined a small example here: https://github.com/jeremyheiler/clj-reflector-bug

The repo contains a Java example that works, and the same example in Clojure that doesn't work. It also includes a patched version of Clojure 1.6.0, and shows that the patch solves the issue. Also, in `src/foo/m.clj`, there is a real example of this bug occurring by using the Java Debug Interface API in the tools.jar library.

I would have added tests to the patch, but I don't think the test runner compiles test Java code, which is required.

Approach: pass the target objects class instead of the declaring class of the method object
Patch: reflector_method_bug.patch
Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 05/Dec/14 8:48 AM ]

Probably a dupe of CLJ-259. I'll probably dupe that one to this though.

Comment by Jeremy Heiler [ 05/Dec/14 1:33 PM ]

Thanks. Sorry for not finding that myself. CLJ-259 refers to CLJ-126, which I think is covered with this patch.

Comment by Jeremy Heiler [ 06/Dec/14 12:37 PM ]

I was looking into whether or not the target could be null, and it can be when invoking a static method. However, I don't think that code path would make it to the target.getClass() because non-public static methods aren't returned by getMethods().

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 31/Jul/15 9:24 AM ]

Jeremy,

The compile-tests phase of the build provides a point for compiling Java classes that that tests can then consume. Does that provide the hook you would need to add a test?





[CLJ-1527] Clarify and align valid symbol and keyword rules for Clojure (and edn) Created: 18/Sep/14  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Herwig Hochleitner Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 11
Labels: reader

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Known areas of under-specificity (http://clojure.org/reader#The%20Reader--Reader%20forms):

  • symbols (and keywords) description do not mention constituent characters that are currently in use by Clojure functions such as <, >, =, $ (for Java inner classes), & (&form and &env in macros), % (stated to be valid in edn spec)
  • keywords currently accept leading numeric characters which is at odds with the spec - see CLJ-1286

References:



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 17/Oct/14 2:13 AM ]

The Clojure reader documentation also does not mention the following symbols as valid constituent characters. They are all mentioned as valid symbol constituent characters in the EDN readme here: https://github.com/edn-format/edn#symbols

dollar sign - used in Clojure/JVM to separate Java subclass names from class names, e.g. java.util.Map$Entry
percent sign - not sure why this is part of edn spec. In Clojure it seems only to be used inside #() for args like % %1 %&
ampersand - like in &form and &env in macro definitions
equals - clojure.core/= and many others
less-than - clojure.core/< clojure.core/<=
greater-than - clojure.core/> clojure.core/>=

I don't know whether Clojure and edn specs should be the same in this regard, but it seemed worth mentioning for this ticket.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Jun/15 12:22 AM ]

Alex, Rich made this comment on CLJ-17 in 2011: "Runtime validation off the table for perf reasons. cemerick's suggestion that arbitrary symbol support will render them valid is sound, but arbitrary symbol support is a different ticket/idea." I am not aware of any tickets that propose the enhancement of allowing arbitrary symbols to be supported by Clojure, e.g. via a syntax like

#|white space and arbitrary #$@)$~))@ chars here|

Do you think it is reasonable to create an enhancement ticket for supporting arbitrary characters in symbols and keywords?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 01/Jun/15 6:36 AM ]

Sure. I looked into this a bit as a digression off of feature expressions and #| has been reserved for this potential use. However, there are many tricky issues with it and I do not expect this to happen soon - more likely to be something we're pushed to do when necessary for some other reason.

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 01/Jun/15 8:46 AM ]

Wrong ticket, but to anybody thinking about #|arbitrary symbols (or strings)|, please do consider making the delimiters configurable, as in mime multipart.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Jun/15 8:54 AM ]

I've created a design page for now. I'm sure it does not list many of the tricky issues you have found. I'd be happy to take a shot at documenting them if you have any notes you are willing to share.

http://dev.clojure.org/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=11862058

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Jun/15 9:01 AM ]

Herwig, can you edit the design page linked in my previous comment, to add a reference or example to precisely how mime multipart allows delimiters to be configurable, and why you believe fixed delimeters would be a bad idea?

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 01/Jun/15 9:46 AM ]

I've commented on the design page.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Jul/15 12:44 PM ]

Removed a couple of issues that have been clarified on the reader page and are no longer issues.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 13/Jul/15 12:45 PM ]

Related to CLJ-1530

Comment by Adam Frey [ 15/Jul/15 11:55 AM ]

Related to this: The Clojure reader will not accept symbols and keywords that contain consecutive colons (See LispReader.java), although that is permitted by the current EDN spec. Here is a GitHub issue regarding consecutive colons. I would like to qualify why consecutive colons are disallowed, and sync up the Clojure Reader and the EDN spec on this.

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 31/Jul/15 8:03 AM ]

The updated reader spec says that a symbol can contain a single / to separate the namespace. It also mentions a bare / to be the division function.
So what about clojure.core//? That still got to be a readable symbol right? So is that an exception to the 'single /' rule?
Will foo.bar// also be readable? What about foo//bar?





[CLJ-1610] Unrolled small maps Created: 08/Dec/14  Updated: 31/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Zach Tellman
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 6
Labels: collections

Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Placeholder for unrolled small maps enhancement (companion for vectors at CLJ-1517).



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 09/Jul/15 10:59 PM ]

Is there an expectation that these would perform better that PersistentArrayMap?

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 09/Jul/15 11:53 PM ]

Yes, in some cases significantly so, for three reasons (in rough order of importance):

  • positional constructors, without any need for array instantiation/population
  • short-circuiting equality checks using hash comparisons
  • no iteration on any operation

There are a series of benchmarks at https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections/blob/master/test/cambrian_collections/map_test.clj#L64-L148, which compare operations against maps with both keywords (which don't benefit from the hash comparisons) and symbols (which do). The 7-entry map cases cause the unrolled maps to overflow, so they only exist to test the overflow mechanism.

I've run the benchmark suite on my laptop, and the results are at https://gist.github.com/ztellman/961001e1a77e4f76ee1d. Some notable results:

The rest of the benchmarks are marginally faster due to unrolling, but most of the performance benefits are from the above behaviors. In a less synthetic benchmark, I found that Cheshire JSON decoding (which is 33% JSON lexing and 66% data structure building) was sped up roughly 30-40%.





[CLJ-1453] Most Iterator implementations do not correctly implement next failing to throw the required NoSuchElementException Created: 24/Jun/14  Updated: 30/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Meikel Brandmeyer Assignee: Andrew Rosa
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: interop

Attachments: Text File 0001-Fix-iterator-implementations-to-throw-NSEE-when-exha.patch     Text File 0001-Throw-NSEE-in-gvec-iterator.patch     Text File clj-1453-2.patch     Text File CLJ-1453.patch     Text File CLJ-1453-tests.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Screened

 Description   

Iterators on Clojure's collections should follow the expected JDK behavior of throwing NoSuchElementException on next() when an iterator is exhausted. Current collections have a variety of other behaviors.

Issue encountered in real world code using http://pipes.tinkerpop.com.

To reproduce:

(-> [] .iterator .next)

This throws a NPE instead of NSEE.

(doto (.iterator [1 2]) .next .next .next)

This throws an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException instead of NSEE.

The attached patch fixes the methods by adding a check for hasNext before actually trying to provide the next element. If there is no next element the correct exception is thrown.

Patch: clj-1453-2.patch and tests: CLJ-1453-tests.patch

Screened by: Alex Miller



 Comments   
Comment by Tim McCormack [ 15/Jul/14 9:56 PM ]

To establish a baseline, this piece of code checks all the iterators I could find within Clojure 1.6.0 and makes sure they throw an appropriate exception:

iterator-checker.clj
(defn next-failure
  []
  (let [ok (atom [])]
    (doseq [[tp v]
            (sorted-map
             :vec-0 []
             :vec-n [1 2 3]
             :vec-start (subvec [1 2 3 4] 0 1)
             :vec-end (subvec [1 2 3 4] 3 4)
             :vec-ls-0 (.listIterator [])
             :vec-ls-n (.listIterator [1 2 3])
             :vec-start-ls (.listIterator (subvec [1 2 3 4] 0 1))
             :vec-end-ls (.listIterator (subvec [1 2 3 4] 3 4))
             :seq ()
             :list-n '(1 2 3)
             :set-hash-0 (hash-set)
             :set-hash-n (hash-set 1 2 3)
             :set-sor-0 (sorted-set)
             :set-sor-n (sorted-set 1 2 3)
             :map-arr-0 (array-map)
             :map-arr-n (array-map 1 2, 3 4)
             :map-hash-0 (hash-map)
             :map-hash-n (hash-map 1 2, 3 4)
             :map-sor-n (sorted-map)
             :map-sor-n (sorted-map 1 2, 3 4)
             :map-sor-ks-0 (.keys (sorted-map))
             :map-sor-ks-n (.keys (sorted-map 1 2, 3 4))
             :map-sor-vs-0 (.vals (sorted-map))
             :map-sor-vs-n (.vals (sorted-map 1 2, 3 4))
             :map-sor-rev-0 (.reverseIterator (sorted-map))
             :map-sor-rev-n (.reverseIterator (sorted-map 1 2, 3 4))
             :map-ks-0 (.keySet {})
             :map-ks-n (.keySet {1 2, 3 4})
             :map-vs-0 (.values {})
             :map-vs-n (.values {1 2, 3 4})
             :gvec-int-0 (vector-of :long)
             :gvec-int-n (vector-of :long 1 2 3))]
      (let [it (if (instance? java.util.Iterator v)
                 v
                 (.iterator v))]
        (when-not it
          (println "Null iterator:" tp))
        (try (dotimes [_ 50]
               (.next it))
             (catch java.util.NoSuchElementException nsee
               (swap! ok conj tp))
             (catch Throwable t
               (println tp "threw" (class t))))))
    (println "OK:" @ok)))

The output as of current Clojure master (201a0dd970) is:

:gvec-int-0 threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:gvec-int-n threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-arr-0 threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-arr-n threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-hash-0 threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-ks-0 threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-ks-n threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-sor-ks-0 threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-ks-n threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-n threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-rev-0 threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-rev-n threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-vs-0 threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-sor-vs-n threw java.util.EmptyStackException
:map-vs-0 threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:map-vs-n threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-0 threw java.lang.NullPointerException
:vec-end threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-end-ls threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-ls-0 threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-ls-n threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-n threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-start threw java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException
:vec-start-ls threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
OK: [:list-n :map-hash-n :seq :set-hash-0 :set-hash-n :set-sor-0 :set-sor-n]
Comment by Tim McCormack [ 15/Jul/14 9:57 PM ]

0001-Fix-iterator-implementations-to-throw-NSEE-when-exha.patch missed one thing: clojure.gvec. With the patch in place, my checker outputs the following:

:gvec-int-0 threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
:gvec-int-n threw java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException
OK: [:list-n :map-arr-0 :map-arr-n :map-hash-0 :map-hash-n :map-ks-0 :map-ks-n :map-sor-ks-0 :map-sor-ks-n :map-sor-n :map-sor-rev-0 :map-sor-rev-n :map-sor-vs-0 :map-sor-vs-n :map-vs-0 :map-vs-n :seq :set-hash-0 :set-hash-n :set-sor-0 :set-sor-n :vec-0 :vec-end :vec-end-ls :vec-ls-0 :vec-ls-n :vec-n :vec-start :vec-start-ls]

That should be a quick fix.

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 15/Jul/14 10:01 PM ]

CLJ-1416 includes a fix for gvec's iterator impls (and some other improvements to interop).

Comment by Tim McCormack [ 15/Jul/14 10:17 PM ]

Attaching a fix for the gvec iterator. Combined with the existing patch, this fixes all broken iterators that I could find.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 07/Aug/14 10:25 AM ]

I believe this Clojure commit: https://github.com/clojure/clojure/commit/e7215ce82215bda33f4f0887cb88570776d558a0

introduces more implementations of the java.util.Iterator interface where next() returns null instead of throwing a NoSuchElementException

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Apr/15 11:34 AM ]

Would love to have a patch that:
1) combined patches to date
2) updated to master
3) reviewed for new iterators since this ticket was written
4) added the tests in the comments

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jun/15 3:30 PM ]

Bump - would be happy to screen this for 1.8 if my last comments were addressed.

Comment by Andrew Rosa [ 18/Jul/15 4:38 PM ]

Alex Miller Addressed you comments on the first patch. On the process of applying them to master, I've changed the code to follow a single "format" of bound checking and throw, so everything will be more consistent with the code style of Clojure codebase. The commit themselves still maintain the original authors, to give correct credit.

The second patch includes only the tests for these features, which I used test.check to do them, as I talked to you on clojure-dev channel. If you think they are too much complex or prefer a different style of testing, please let me know - that's why I made a separate patch only for the tests.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jul/15 5:04 PM ]

Thanks Andrew. It will likely be a couple weeks before I have time to look at this.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Jul/15 11:02 PM ]

clj-1453-2.patch squashes CLJ-1453.patch and updates to current master.





[CLJ-1460] Clojure transforms literals of custom IPersistentCollections not created via deftype/defrecord to their generic clojure counterpart Created: 06/Jul/14  Updated: 30/Jul/15  Resolved: 30/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Declined Votes: 0
Labels: None

Approval: Triaged

 Description   
user=> (class (eval (sorted-map 1 1)))
clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap ;; expected: clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap


 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 06/Jul/14 5:35 PM ]

Seems related to CLJ-1093.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Jul/14 5:51 PM ]

The symptoms are indeed similar but there are differences: CLJ-1093 affects all empty IPersistentCollections, this one affects all {ISeq,IPersistentList,IPersistentMap,IPersistentVector,IPersistentSet} collections that are not IRecord/IType.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 30/Jul/15 2:10 PM ]

Clojure never promised otherwise.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 30/Jul/15 2:16 PM ]

I'm honestly disturbed that this is not considered a bug.
Could we have at least a documentation enhancement expliciting this behaviour? I really don't understand how one is supposed to know that this is expected behaviour.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 30/Jul/15 2:19 PM ]

At least mentioning that there is a limited set of types that can be returned by macroexpand would be reasonable.

user=> (defmacro foo [] (sorted-map 1 1))
#'user/foo
user=> (class (foo))
clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap
Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 30/Jul/15 2:51 PM ]

Hi Nicola,

The relevant doc, including enumeration of the possible types returned, is at http://clojure.org/evaluation: "Vectors, Sets and Maps yield vectors and (hash) sets and maps whose contents are the evaluated values of the objects they contain."

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 30/Jul/15 3:12 PM ]

OK, thanks.

I still disagree that clojure should silently coerce IPCs to generic colls (I, and others, have been bitten by this bug and have wasted hours of debugging), but at least it's coherent with the documentation.

Comment by Daniel Compton [ 30/Jul/15 5:08 PM ]

It's probably worth making this point explicit in the docs, you could easily miss the implications of that section on first read.





[CLJ-1093] Empty PersistentCollections get incorrectly evaluated as their generic clojure counterpart Created: 24/Oct/12  Updated: 30/Jul/15  Resolved: 30/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.4, Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Declined Votes: 5
Labels: collections, compiler

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1093-fix-compilation-of-empty-PersistentCollecti.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1093-v2.patch     Text File clj-1093-fix-empty-record-literal-patch-v2.txt    
Patch: Code and Test

 Description   
user> (defrecord x [])
user.x
user> #user.x[]   ;; expect: #user.x{}
{}
user> #user.x{}   ;; expect: #user.x{}
{}
user> #clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap[]
{}
user> (class *1)  ;; expect: clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap
clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap

Cause: Compiler's ConstantExpr parser returns an EmptyExpr for all empty persistent collections, even if they are of types other than the core collections (for example: records, sorted collections, custom collections). EmptyExpr reports its java class as one the classes - IPersistentList/IPersistentVector/IPersistentMap/IPersistentSet rather than the original type.

Proposed: If one of the Persistent* classes, then create EmptyExpr as before, otherwise retain the ConstantExpression of the original collection.
Since EmptyExpr is a compiler optimization that applies only to some concrete clojure collections, making EmptyExpr dispatch on concrete types rather than on generic interfaces makes the compiler behave as expected

Patch: 0001-CLJ-1093-v2.patch

Screened by:



 Comments   
Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 27/Nov/12 11:41 AM ]

Unable to reproduce this bug on latest version of master. Most likely fixed by some of the recent changes to data literal readers.

Marking Not-Approved.

Comment by Timothy Baldridge [ 27/Nov/12 11:41 AM ]

Could not reproduce in master.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 01/Mar/13 1:23 PM ]

I just checked, and the problem still exists for records with no arguments:

Clojure 1.6.0-master-SNAPSHOT
user=> (defrecord a [])
user.a
user=> #user.a[]
{}

Admittedly it's an edge case and I see little usage for no-arguments records, but I think it should be addressed aswell since the current behaviour is not what one would expect

Comment by Herwig Hochleitner [ 02/Mar/13 8:14 AM ]

Got the following REPL interaction:

% java -jar ~/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.5.0/clojure-1.5.0.jar
user=> (defrecord a [])
user.a
user=> (a.)
#user.a{}
user=> #user.a{}
{}
#user.a[]
{}

This should be reopened or declined for another reason than reproducability.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 10/Mar/13 2:18 PM ]

I'm reopening this since the bug is still there.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 13/Mar/13 2:04 PM ]

Patch clj-1093-fix-empty-record-literal-patch-v2.txt dated Mar 13, 2013 is identical to Bronsa's patch 001-fix-empty-record-literal.patch dated Oct 24, 2012, except that it applies cleanly to latest master. I'm not sure why the older patch doesn't but git doesn't like something about it.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 26/Jun/13 8:06 PM ]

Patch 0001-CLJ-1093-fix-empty-records-literal-v2.patch solves more issues than the previous patch that was not evident to me at the time.

Only collections that are either PersistentList or PersistentVector or PersistentHash[Map|Set] or PersistentArrayMap can now be EmptyExpr.
This is because we don't want every IPersistentCollection to be emitted as a generic one eg.

user=> (class #clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap[])
clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap

Incidentally, this patch also solves CLJ-1187
This patch should be preferred over the one on CLJ-1187 since it's more general

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 09/Aug/13 2:08 AM ]

Maybe this is related:

user=> (def x `(quote ~(list 1 (clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap/create (seq [1 2 3 4])))))
#'user/x
user=> x
(quote (1 {1 2, 3 4}))
user=> (class (second (second x)))
clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap
user=> (eval x)
(1 {1 2, 3 4})
user=> (class (second (eval x)))
clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap

Even if the collection is not evaluated, it is still converted to the generic clojure counterpart.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 24/Apr/14 4:44 PM ]

In the change for ObjectExpr.emitValue() where you've added PersistentArrayMap to the PersistentHashMap case, should the IPersistentVector case below that be PersistentVector instead, otherwise it would snare a custom IPersistentVector that's not a PersistentVector, right?

This line: "else if(form instanceof ISeq)" at the end of the Compiler diff has different leading tabs which makes the diff slightly more confusing than it could be.

Would be nice to add a test for the sorted map case in the description.

Marking incomplete to address some of these.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/May/14 10:43 PM ]

bump

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 14/May/14 4:24 AM ]

Attached patch 0001-CLJ-1093-fix-empty-collection-literal-evaluation.patch which implements your suggestions.

replacing IPersistentVector with PersistentVector in ObjectExpr.emitValue() exposes a print-dup limitation: it expects every IPersistentCollection to have a static "create" method.

This required special casing for MapEntry and APersistentVector$SubVector

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 16/May/14 3:57 PM ]

I updated the patch adding print-dups for APersistentVector$SubVec and other IPersistentVectors rather than special casing them in the compiler

Comment by Alex Miller [ 23/May/14 4:21 PM ]

All of the checks on concrete classes in the Compiler parts of this patch don't sit well with me. I understand how you got to this point and I don't have an alternate recommendation (yet) but all of that just feels like the wrong direction.

We want to be built on abstractions such that internal collections are not special; they should conform to the same expectations as an external collection and both should follow the same paths in the compiler - needing to check for those types is a flag for me that something is amiss.

I am marking Incomplete for now based on these thoughts.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Jul/14 10:01 AM ]

I've been thinking for a while about this issue and I've come to the conclusion that in my later patches I've been trying to incorporate fixes for 3 different albeit related issues:

1- Clojure transforms all empty IPersistentCollections in their generic Clojure counterpart

user> (defrecord x [])
user.x
user> #user.x[]   ;; expected: #user.x{}
{}
user> #user.x{}   ;; expected: #user.x{}
{}
user> #clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap[]
{}
user> (class *1)  ;; expected: clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap
clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap

2- Clojure transforms all the literals of collections implementing the Clojure interfaces (IPersistentList, IPersistentVector ..) that are NOT defined with deftype or defrecord, to their
generic Clojure counterpart

user=> (class (eval (sorted-map 1 1)))
clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap ;; expected: clojure.lang.PersistentTreeMap

3- print-dup is broken for some Clojure persistent collections

user=> (print-dup (subvec [1] 0) *out*)
#=(clojure.lang.APersistentVector$SubVector/create [1])
user=> #=(clojure.lang.APersistentVector$SubVector/create [1])
IllegalArgumentException No matching method found: create  clojure.lang.Reflector.invokeMatchingMethod (Reflector.java:53)

I'll keep this ticket regarding issue #1 and open two other tickets for issue #2 and #3

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 06/Jul/14 10:15 AM ]

I've attached a new patch fixing only this issue, the approach is explained in the description

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 12/Sep/14 5:45 PM ]

0001-CLJ-1093-v2.patch is an updated patch that correctly handles metadata evaluation semantics on empty literals and adds some tests for it

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 10/Jul/15 12:12 PM ]

Nicola, thanks for making this smaller. Two questions:

  • why is the meta check added only to parse, and not analyze
  • do the tests cover both the parse and analyze code paths?
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 10/Jul/15 12:25 PM ]

Stuart, the meta check is added only in ConstantExpr.parse and not in analyze because:

  • EmptyExpr.parse which all codepaths delegate to has a meta check that wraps it in a MetaExpr if meta is found
  • We don't want metadata on ConstantExprs to be handled by MetaExpr since MetaExpr handles metadata on non-quoted literals, evaluating the meta.

IOW it encodes the difference between

^{:foo (println "bar")} {}
and
'^{:foo (println "bar")} {}

The tests handle both code paths

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 10/Jul/15 3:34 PM ]

Just a note that this patch will probably need to be updated considering CLJ-1517 and CLJ-1610 if the compiler will be changed to emit those unrolled collections (which is not in the current patches)

Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Jul/15 9:08 AM ]

Nicola, I think that highlights my biggest qualm with this patch: the hardcoded list of concrete classes in the compiler. To me, that just feels wrong as I do not want that set of classes to be "special". I have not thought about it enough to have an alternative suggestion though.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 13/Jul/15 9:43 AM ]

Alex, I generally would agree with you that hardcoding concrete classes is a wrong approach but I honestly think that in this particular case it's the sanest thing to do.

This also reflects my opinion that, with the ever growing number of custom collections and the addition of tagged literals and ctor literals in clojure allowing for the embedding custom collections at read-time, the current approach the compiler has of relying on generic interfaces rather than on a closed set of known internal classes to guide code emission, is and will be more and more problematic (see also CLJ-1460,CLJ-1492, CLJ-1575, CLJ-1461)

This is an optimization and as such it makes sense for it to target specific classes: we only want to apply the optimization on such empty literals whose "conversion" to a generic impl won't change behaviour, and this is a decision the compiler can only do using a closed set of classes. Using interfaces or the abstract classes won't be possible (sorted maps implement APersistentMap too).

Other than my proposed solution or removing EmptyExpr altogether I can't think of any other way to fix this issue without

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 30/Jul/15 2:55 PM ]

More subtle than, but not a bug for the same reasons as, CLJ-1460.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 30/Jul/15 3:13 PM ]

Really? The fact that record ctor syntax doesn't roundtrip is not a bug?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Jul/15 4:04 PM ]

Is it true that the only record ctors affected by this are those that have 0 fields? At least cursory testing with similar examples as in the description, but with 1 field in the record, show what seems to be the expected behavior.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 30/Jul/15 4:08 PM ]

Yes, this ticket is about empty IPCs, and the only way a record can be empty is if it has 0 fields





[CLJ-1077] thread-bound? returns true (implying set! should succeed) even for non-binding thread Created: 26/Sep/12  Updated: 30/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Paul Stadig Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 3
Labels: None

Attachments: File thread-bound.diff    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

thread-bound? returns true for a non-binding thread, this result (according to the docstring) implies that set! should succeed. However, thread-bound? does not check that any binding that might exist was created by the current thread, and calling set! fails with an exception when it is called from a non-binding thread, even though thread-bound? returns true.

thread-bound? should return false if there is a binding, and that binding was not established by the current thread.

Here is an example REPL session where a thread establishes a binding, those bindings are conveyed to a second thread, the second thread checks thread-bound? to see if it can set the binding, thread-bound? returns true indicating that the binding can be set, the second thread tries to set the binding, and the second thread gets an IllegalStateException:

    Clojure 1.5.1
    user=> (def ^:dynamic *set-me* nil)
    #'user/*set-me*
    user=> (defn try-to-set [] (binding [*set-me* 1] (doall (pcalls #(if (thread-bound? #'*set-me*) (set! *set-me* (inc *set-me*)))))))
    #'user/try-to-set
    user=> (try-to-set)
    IllegalStateException Can't set!: *set-me* from non-binding thread  clojure.lang.Var.set (Var.java:230)
    user=> 


 Comments   
Comment by Paul Stadig [ 01/Oct/12 10:07 AM ]

I have attached a patch that changes clojure.lang.Var and clojure.core/thread-bound? to only return true if a Var is set!-able.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Aug/13 12:16 PM ]

REPL example?

Comment by Joe Gallo [ 20/Aug/13 7:55 AM ]

Sure thing, Alex – here's a repl example I just ran this morning.

; nREPL 0.1.7
user> (def ^:dynamic *set-me* nil)
#'user/*set-me*
user> (defn try-to-set [] (binding [*set-me* 1] (doall (pcalls #(if (thread-bound? #'*set-me*) (set! *set-me* (inc *set-me*)))))))
#'user/try-to-set
user> (try-to-set)
IllegalStateException Can't set!: *set-me* from non-binding thread  clojure.lang.Var.set (Var.java:230)
user>




[CLJ-1381] Improve support for extending protocols to primitive arrays Created: 13/Mar/14  Updated: 30/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: protocols

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

It is possible to extend protocols to primitive arrays but specifying the class for the type is a little tricky:

(defprotocol P (p [_]))
(extend-protocol P (Class/forName "[B") (p [_] "bytes"))
(p (byte-array 0))   ;; => "bytes"

However, things go bad if you try to do more than one of these:

(extend-protocol P 
  (Class/forName "[B") (p [_] "bytes")
  (Class/forName "[I") (p [_] "ints"))
CompilerException java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException: nth not supported on this type: Character, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:1:1)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6380)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6322)
	clojure.lang.Compiler$MapExpr.parse (Compiler.java:2879)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6369)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6322)
	clojure.lang.Compiler$InvokeExpr.parse (Compiler.java:3624)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyzeSeq (Compiler.java:6562)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6361)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6322)
	clojure.lang.Compiler$BodyExpr$Parser.parse (Compiler.java:5708)
	clojure.lang.Compiler$FnMethod.parse (Compiler.java:5139)
	clojure.lang.Compiler$FnExpr.parse (Compiler.java:3751)
Caused by:
UnsupportedOperationException nth not supported on this type: Character
	clojure.lang.RT.nthFrom (RT.java:857)
	clojure.lang.RT.nth (RT.java:807)
	clojure.core/emit-hinted-impl/hint--5951/fn--5953 (core_deftype.clj:758)
	clojure.core/map/fn--4207 (core.clj:2487)
	clojure.lang.LazySeq.sval (LazySeq.java:42)
	clojure.lang.LazySeq.seq (LazySeq.java:60)
	clojure.lang.RT.seq (RT.java:484)
	clojure.lang.RT.countFrom (RT.java:537)
	clojure.lang.RT.count (RT.java:530)
	clojure.lang.Cons.count (Cons.java:49)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6352)
	clojure.lang.Compiler.analyze (Compiler.java:6322)

The code in {parse-impls} is seeing the second {(Class/forName "[I")} as a function, not as a new type. One workaround for this is to only extend the protocol to one type at a time.

It would be even better (moving into enhancement area) if there was a syntax here to specify primitive array types - we already have the syntax of {bytes, ints, longs}, etc for type hints and those seem perfectly good to me.



 Comments   
Comment by Nahuel Greco [ 18/Sep/14 6:08 PM ]

It also breaks when extending only one array type:

(extend-protocol P
  String               (p [_] "string")
  (Class/forName "[B") (p [_] "ints") 
  )

;=> CompilerException java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException: nth not supported on this type ...

But changing the declaration order fixes it:

(extend-protocol P
  (Class/forName "[B") (p [_] "ints") 
  String               (p [_] "string")
  )

;=> OK




[CLJ-1781] Tuples don't extend IKVReduce Created: 19/Jul/15  Updated: 30/Jul/15  Resolved: 30/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Declined Votes: 0
Labels: regression
Environment:

1.8.0-alpha1 or 1.8.0-alpha2


Approval: Vetted

 Description   

This is a regression from the tuple stuff (both return nil in 1.7):

(reduce-kv (fn [acc idx in] acc) nil [1 2 3 4 5 6 7]) ; => nil
(reduce-kv (fn [acc idx in] acc) nil [1 2])
;; =>  No implementation of method: :kv-reduce of protocol:
;; #'clojure.core.protocols/IKVReduce found for class: clojure.lang.Tuple$T2


 Comments   
Comment by Michael Blume [ 19/Jul/15 11:47 AM ]

CLJ-1689 would sort this.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Jul/15 1:14 PM ]

Since tuples were pulled out in 1.8.0-alpha3, declining.





[CLJ-1778] let-bound namespace-qualified bindings should throw (if not map destructuring) Created: 16/Jul/15  Updated: 30/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Release 1.8

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Ragnar Dahlen
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: compiler

Attachments: Text File clj-1778-2-with-tests.patch     Text File clj-1778.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Seen in a tweet...

user=> (let [a/x 42] x) ; throws CompilerException "Can't let qualified name ..."
user=> (let [a/x 42, [y] [1]] x) ;=> 42

The second one should throw like the first one.

Presume linkage to CLJ-1318.

Current patch: clj-1778-2-with-tests.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Ragnar Dahlen [ 16/Jul/15 11:41 AM ]

I can confirm that this is a regression from CLJ-1318. After that change, namespaces were removed from symbols regardless of whether they were used as part of a map destruring or not. The only reason the exception is caught in the first test case is because that binding form has no destructuring at all, in which case the destructuring logic is bypassed.

I've attached a patch that moves the namespace removal (and keyword handling) into `pmap` instead as it's really a special case for map destructuring only.

Comment by Ragnar Dahlen [ 16/Jul/15 3:53 PM ]

Updated patch with two changes:

1. Removed initial check for keywords in binding keys as that only looked for keywords at top-level and failed to catch cases like:

(let [[:x] [1]] x)
;; => 1

Keywords in non-map destructuring binding positions (like the example) will now fail with "Unsupported binding form: :x" instead. This is a change from the current behaviour where only top-level keywords would be caught, but the current exception is the slightly more specific "Unsupported binding key: :x". If a better, more specific exception is required, I'd be happy to update the patch.

2. Tests: added test for regression, updated/amended existing tests.





[CLJ-1613] :or defaults should refer to enclosing scope in map destructuring Created: 12/Dec/14  Updated: 30/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Michał Marczyk Assignee: Michał Marczyk
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1613-evaluate-or-defaults-in-enclosing-scope-in-.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Michael Blume noticed that :or defaults can depend on the values of other keys, see https://groups.google.com/d/msg/clojure/6kOhpPOpHWM/ITjWwQFS_VQJ

Michael's Gist https://gist.github.com/MichaelBlume/4891dafdd31f0dcbc727 displays a case where an associative form involving :keys and :or compiles or not depending on the order of symbols in :keys. By tweaking that case one can arrive at expressions which always compile, but produce different values depending on :keys:

(let [foo 1
       bar 2
       {:keys [bar foo]
        :or {foo 3 bar (inc foo)}} {}]
  {:foo foo :bar bar})
;= {:foo 3, :bar 4}

(let [foo 1
      bar 2
      {:keys [foo bar]
       :or {foo 3 bar (inc foo)}} {}]
  {:foo foo :bar bar})
;= {:foo 3, :bar 2}

I believe that the most natural solution is to demand that :or defaults be evaluated in an enclosing scope where none of the destructuring-introduced locals are present. This approach is taken by the 0001 patch.



 Comments   
Comment by Michael Blume [ 12/Dec/14 2:27 AM ]

I suspect that this is the right thing to do but I think it's important to note that this will break existing code https://github.com/ngrunwald/ring-middleware-format/blob/master/src/ring/middleware/format_params.clj#L214

Comment by Michael Blume [ 06/Apr/15 4:43 PM ]

Update on my previous comment – ring-middleware-params has updated so that it doesn't depend on this behavior. I think we should definitely merge this patch so no one else depends on it.

Comment by Max Penet [ 08/Apr/15 10:46 AM ]

Since this involves :or keys evaluation, this might be worth checking if this should/could have an impact on http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1676 as well.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 30/Jul/15 11:11 AM ]

This is a behavior change, the docs do not promise the requested behavior and existing code may depend on the current behavior.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 30/Jul/15 12:47 PM ]

Isn't this a case where if existing code works, it works by accident of the seq order of an unordered map? If so, any code that depends upon the existing behavior sometimes breaks, sometimes does not break, when the Clojure seq order on maps changes, which occurred Clojure 1.5.1 to Clojure 1.6.0, and again from 1.6.0 to 1.7.0.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 30/Jul/15 1:08 PM ]

Yes, it does, and I've seen existing code break due to those changes, hence the discussion that lead to this ticket.





[CLJ-1750] There should be a way to observe platform features at runtime Created: 08/Jun/15  Updated: 30/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Luke VanderHart Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: reader

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Reader conditionals let the reader emit code conditionally based upon a set of platform features.

This is a closed set - however, currently it is baked in as an implementation detail of the reader. Runtime code cannot access the current platform feature set.

This is problematic when writing a macro that needs to emit code conditionally based upon the platform of the code being compiled. Reader conditionals themselves won't work since macros are always themselves read in Clojure.

We should enable some mechanism for retrieving the current platform at runtime, or at least at macro expansion time.

For example, this is the kind of thing it should be possible to do:

(defmacro mymacro []
    (if (*platforms* :clj)
      `(some-clojure-thing)
      `(some-cljs-thing)))


 Comments   
Comment by Micah Martin [ 19/Jun/15 1:46 PM ]

+1 - Would very much like to see this in 1.7. Currently I have to use an ugly hack.

(def ^:private ^:no-doc cljs? (boolean (find-ns 'cljs.analyzer)))





[CLJ-1242] get/= on sorted collections when types don't match result in a ClassCastException Created: 31/Jul/13  Updated: 30/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5, Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: None

Attachments: Text File 0001-fix-for-CLJ-1242-tests.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

user=> (= (sorted-set 1) #{:a})
ClassCastException java.lang.Long cannot be cast to clojure.lang.Keyword clojure.lang.Keyword.compareTo (Keyword.java:109)

but

user=> (= (sorted-set 1) :a)
false

also

user=> (get (sorted-set 1) :a 2)
ClassCastException java.lang.Long cannot be cast to clojure.lang.Keyword clojure.lang.Keyword.compareTo (Keyword.java:109)



 Comments   
Comment by OHTA Shogo [ 31/Jul/13 8:02 PM ]

PersistentVector also has the same problem.

user=> (compare [1] [:a])
java.lang.ClassCastException: clojure.lang.Keyword cannot be cast to java.lang.Number

The cause of this problem is that Util.compare() casts the second argument
to Number without checking its type when the first argument is a Number.

Comment by OHTA Shogo [ 31/Jul/13 8:26 PM ]

Umm, my brain was not working right.
Util.compare() should raise an Exception when the arguments' type are different.

Comment by François Rey [ 02/May/15 4:44 PM ]

Upvoting.
Here's a instance of this bug in codox:
https://github.com/weavejester/codox/issues/91

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 30/Jul/15 11:09 AM ]

The behavior of get is consistent with Java collections, so I think changing that expectation should be considered a feature request and not a bug.

The fix for equals should be informed by the approach taken in the JDK, where the implementation of equals (not get) has exception catchers.





[CLJ-1780] Test OOME from locals clearing change Created: 17/Jul/15  Updated: 30/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: regression
Environment:

1.8.0-alpha2


Attachments: Text File strengthen-clearing-test.patch    
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

IBM JDK 1.6 in test matrix is throwing errors from the new test for CLJ-1250 in 1.8.0-alpha2.

[java] ERROR in (test-closed-over-clearing) (Range.java:133)
     [java] expected: (number? (reduce + 0 (r/map identity (range 1.0E8))))
     [java]   actual: java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: null
     [java]  at clojure.lang.Range.forceChunk (Range.java:133)
     [java]     clojure.lang.Range.chunkedFirst (Range.java:150)
     [java]     clojure.core$chunk_first.invoke (core.clj:667)
     [java]     clojure.core.protocols/fn (protocols.clj:136)
     [java]     clojure.core.protocols$fn__6478$G__6473__6487.invoke (protocols.clj:19)
     [java]     clojure.core.protocols$seq_reduce.invoke (protocols.clj:31)
     [java]     clojure.core.protocols/fn (protocols.clj:95)
     [java]     clojure.core.protocols$fn__6452$G__6447__6465.invoke (protocols.clj:13)
     [java]     clojure.core.reducers$folder$reify__21452.coll_reduce (reducers.clj:126)
     [java]     clojure.core$reduce.invoke (core.clj:6519)
     [java]     clojure.test_clojure.reducers/fn (reducers.clj:95)
     [java]     clojure.test$test_var$fn__7669.invoke (test.clj:703)
     [java]     clojure.test$test_var.invoke (test.clj:703)
     [java]     clojure.test$test_vars$fn__7691$fn__7696.invoke (test.clj:721)
     [java]     clojure.test$default_fixture.invoke (test.clj:673)
     [java]     clojure.test$test_vars$fn__7691.invoke (test.clj:721)
     [java]     clojure.test$default_fixture.invoke (test.clj:673)
     [java]     clojure.test$test_vars.invoke (test.clj:717)
     [java]     clojure.test$test_all_vars.invoke (test.clj:727)
     [java]     clojure.test$test_ns.invoke (test.clj:746)
     [java]     clojure.core$map$fn__4553.invoke (core.clj:2624)
     [java]     clojure.lang.LazySeq.sval (LazySeq.java:40)
     [java]     clojure.lang.LazySeq.seq (LazySeq.java:49)
     [java]     clojure.lang.Cons.next (Cons.java:39)
     [java]     clojure.lang.RT.next (RT.java:681)
     [java]     clojure.core/next (core.clj:64)
     [java]     clojure.core$reduce1.invoke (core.clj:909)
     [java]     clojure.core$reduce1.invoke (core.clj:900)
     [java]     clojure.core$merge_with.doInvoke (core.clj:2936)
     [java]     clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo (RestFn.java:139)
     [java]     clojure.core$apply.invoke (core.clj:632)
     [java]     clojure.test$run_tests.doInvoke (test.clj:761)
     [java]     clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo (RestFn.java:137)
     [java]     clojure.core$apply.invoke (core.clj:630)
     [java]     user$eval28810.invoke (run_test.clj:8)
     [java]     clojure.lang.Compiler.eval (Compiler.java:6850)


 Comments   
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 18/Jul/15 12:02 AM ]

I don't understand how forcing a 32 element chunk could consume the memory. If locals clearing worked properly there should be no other part of that sequence in memory but I might be missing some detail.

Might there be something going on with the recent change in impl for Range?

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 18/Jul/15 12:19 AM ]

An interesting note is that (reduce + 0 (r/map identity (range 1e8))) is going through the seq path, despite reducers && reducible range. This is because coll-reduce doesn't prefer IReduceInit.

The CLJ-1250 test should be modified to intentionally hold the head of a seq in order to exercise the locals clearing. A good hypothesis from Alex is that GC is a bit slower on the archaic IBM JDK.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 18/Jul/15 1:21 AM ]

I can't reproduce this on Linux x86-64 with IBM JDK and an artificially tiny heap.

[ghadi@amdhex ibm-java-x86_64-60]$ ./bin/java -Xmx128m -cp $HOME/jsr166y-1.7.0.jar:$HOME/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar clojure.main
Clojure 1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT
user=> (require '[clojure.core.reducers :as r])
nil
user=> (number? (reduce + 0 (r/map identity (range 1e8))))
true

Can you post details on the IBM JDK environment in CI? Need point release, heap size, kernel, distro, and jvm opts.

I've strengthened the CLJ-1250 test case by relying on neither reducer impl nor range impl, and I reverified that the bug is in fact present on <1.7 and gone on -master using Oracle JDK and 128m heap.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jul/15 8:52 AM ]

OS is CentOS 5.5 afaict

JDK details:

java version "1.6.0"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build pxa6460sr9fp2-20110625_01(SR9 FP2))
IBM J9 VM (build 2.4, JRE 1.6.0 IBM J9 2.4 Linux amd64-64 jvmxa6460sr9-20110624_85526 (JIT enabled, AOT enabled)
J9VM - 20110624_085526
JIT - r9_20101028_17488ifx17
GC - 20101027_AA)
JCL - 20110530_01

As far as I can tell, nothing is being done to alter the default heap size or other jvm opts during the build.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 18/Jul/15 2:27 PM ]

The IBM JDK6 version I used was:

java version "1.6.0"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build pxa6460sr16fp7-20150708_01(SR16 FP7))
IBM J9 VM (build 2.4, JRE 1.6.0 IBM J9 2.4 Linux amd64-64 jvmxa6460sr16fp7-20150701_255724 (JIT enabled, AOT enabled)
J9VM - 20150701_255724
JIT - r9_20150630_95420
GC - GA24_Java6_SR16_20150701_1008_B255724)
JCL - 20150628_01

Seems like SR16 FP7 == 6.0.16.7, and the one on the CI build is SR9 FP2 == 6.0.9.2, a four or five year difference between point releases.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 18/Jul/15 2:51 PM ]

OK I found a download for the (old) IBM JDK 6.0.9.2 and installed it on Linux x86-64. I cannot reproduce the bug.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jul/15 3:53 PM ]

I'd be happy to update the ibm jdk 1.6 version and n the build box too to see what happens.





[CLJ-1472] The locking macro fails bytecode verification on ART runtime Created: 23/Jul/14  Updated: 30/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Adam Clements Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: None
Environment:

Android ART runtime


Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1472-Locking-macro-without-explicit-monitor-ente.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Android ART runs compile time verification on bytecode and was failing on any usage of the locking macro. Examination of the bytecode as compared to a java synchronized block shows up a number of differences:
https://gist.github.com/AdamClements/2ae6c4919964b71eb470

Having the monitor-enter inside the try block seems wrong to me, as surely if the lock fails to be acquired, it shouldn't be released with monitor-exit. Moving the monitor enter outside the try block seems to have resolved the issue and android no longer complains about usages of locking and all clojure tests still pass.

Java's generated code goes further and catches any exceptions generated by the monitor-exit itself and retries indefinitely (I believe the logic is that then at least your deadlock is in the right place, and not next time something else attempts to acquire a lock on the same object). I don't think that this can be replicated in clojure without getting down to the bytecode emitting level though and it doesn't seem to be an issue for the ART verifier.



 Comments   
Comment by Adam Clements [ 24/Jul/14 11:17 AM ]

After using this a little more, I've found that moving this outside the try block breaks nREPL.

Looking at the bytecode, the monitorenter for the locking in clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.session/session-out and in a few other places ends up in an entirely different method definition and we now get a JVM IllegalMonitorStateException as well as an ART verification error for this function.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 01/Aug/14 9:08 PM ]

Adam, I cannot comment on whether your patch is of interest or not, but it is true that no patch will be committed to Clojure if the author has not signed a Contributor Agreement, which can now be done on-line at http://clojure.org/contributing

Comment by Adam Clements [ 04/Aug/14 4:24 PM ]

Uploaded a new patch (and signed the contributor agreement). This passes both the JVM and ART bytecode verification, The extra try/catch around the monitor exit is optional (verification passes with or without it) but where the java version retries monitor-exit indefinitely and shows the deadlock at the right time, without catching errors in the monitor-exit an undetermined monitor-enter in the future might fail, not showing up the actual bug.

It's not very pretty, but without finer grained control of the generated bytecode, this is the best I could do.

Comment by Adam Clements [ 25/Nov/14 8:31 AM ]

Have just tested with Lollipop, and this patch might no longer be sufficient.

Getting in touch with the ART guys to see if they can shed a little more light and verify whether it will work on the current master branch of AOSP

Comment by Adam Clements [ 25/Nov/14 9:49 AM ]

Bug filed with AOSP project, hopefully they can shed some light on whether it is our problem and if so how we can fix it.

https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=80823

Comment by Adam Clements [ 28/Nov/14 11:03 AM ]

I have uploaded an alternative implementation of the locking macro (0001-CLJ-1472-Locking-macro-without-explicit-monitor-ente.patch) which cheats a little - the synchronized block is actually implemented in Java and so guarantees compatibility. This is at the cost of a little extra indirection and the naming/location could probably be better.

But it does fix the bug and work on all versions of android, android + art and the jvm. Would this approach be acceptable?

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 08/Dec/14 1:12 PM ]

I have yet to see any evidence that the bytecode clojure is generating in some way violates the jvm spec, so I suspect the issue is clojure requires a jvm to run, and android doesn't provide a jvm, just something that looks like one if you don't tread outside the beaten path.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 08/Dec/14 1:27 PM ]

given the structured locking verbiage in https://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jvms/se7/html/jvms-2.html#jvms-2.11.10, `(locking nil)` may generate bytecode whose runtime behavior violates structured locking. the first patch on this issue can cause the compiler to emit monitorenter/exit instructions in different methods, which definitely violates structured locking

Comment by Adam Clements [ 09/Dec/14 10:45 AM ]

Yes, the first patch was definitely wrong, I left it for some context to the conversation, but it's probably best to just remove it for clarity.

For anyone following this conversation who doesn't want to decompile and observe the bytecode, here's a gist with the difference between a java synchronized block and clojure locking https://gist.github.com/AdamClements/2ae6c4919964b71eb470

I'm finding it hard to work out where the deviation from the spec occurs too, though I can see the difference with the Java version, if anything, the Clojure version looks closer to what's described in the spec than the Java one!

If someone with more knowledge than me on the subject could engage on the AOSP bug https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=80823 then perhaps we could settle this as an android bug which is too focussed on the java implementation rather than the JVM spec, or perhaps they'll find something that's wrong with the Clojure implementation. I have uploaded the original clojure behaviour and asked them for some more explanation on why it is failing.

Comment by Adam Clements [ 09/Dec/14 11:09 AM ]

The response from the ART guys about what they think we're violating is:

The section on "Structured locking" contains the following:

"[...] implementations [...] are permitted but not required to enforce
both of the following two rules guaranteeing structured locking. [...]"

ART currently enforces both rules at verification time, including

"At no point during a method invocation may the number of monitor exits
performed by T on M since the method invocation exceed the number of
monitor entries performed by T on M since the method invocation."

Comment by Adam Clements [ 09/Dec/14 11:32 AM ]

If for example instruction https://gist.github.com/AdamClements/2ae6c4919964b71eb470#file-test_locks-class-L24 or the monitor-enter itself on the next line were to fail, couldn't it could end up in the finally clause and attempt to release the lock even though it has never been captured?

I think this violates the structured locking rules in the jvm spec you linked to.

Comment by Kevin Downey [ 09/Dec/14 1:15 PM ]

an interesting question about structured locking, is does the specification refer to the static bytecode or the runtime behavior of the bytecode. given the bytecode linked(https://gist.github.com/AdamClements/2ae6c4919964b71eb470#file-test_locks-class-L24), the static bytecode has the same number of entries and exits, but the dynamic behavior may be different. I wonder which one the art guys claim to be enforcing at verification time (it seems like it would have to be the static bytecode, not the dynamic properties, but then they shouldn't be failing to verify this). looking at the google code issue, the comment https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=80823#c6 was made by the same dev as https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=80823#c3, so I sort of suspect there is some miscommunication going on. It is not clear in what context the dev is replying in, since in the previous comment you mention splitting monitor-enter and exit across methods. I think things would be much clearer if all patches, specialized clojure android builds, etc, were gotten rid of, then with a vanilla clojure jar you get a javap dump of what fails to verify, then just take that over to the android issue tracker and ask "hey, this fails to verify, why?"

Comment by Adam Clements [ 11/Dec/14 9:15 AM ]

Yeah, I shouldn't have confused it with the patched versions. The gist and the currently uploaded version use the vanilla clojure version of the locking macro now though.

I think the issue comes from the exception table and the instructions that covers. If line 24 can throw for example, you would end up at runtime with a monitor-exit, having never encountered a monitor-enter.





[CLJ-1360] clojure.string/split strips trailing delimiters Created: 18/Feb/14  Updated: 30/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Tim McCormack Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 2
Labels: None

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

clojure.string/split and clojure.string/split-lines inherit the bizarre default behavior of java.lang.String#split(String,int) in stripping trailing consecutive delimiters:

(clojure.string/split "banana" #"an")
⇒ ["b" "" "a"]
(clojure.string/split "banana" #"na")
⇒ ["ba"]
(clojure.string/split "nanabanana" #"na")
⇒ ["" "" "ba"]

In the case of split-lines, processing a file line by line and rejoining results in truncation of trailing newlines in the file. In both cases, the behavior is surprising and cannot be inferred from the docstrings.

This behavior should either be fixed or documented.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 18/Feb/14 10:51 AM ]

Probably documenting would be safer than changing the behavior at this point, given that some people may actually rely on the current behavior after testing, deploying, etc.

I don't currently have a suggestion for a modified doc string, but note that there are examples of this behavior and how one can use an extra "-1" limit argument at the end to get all split strings: http://clojuredocs.org/clojure_core/clojure.string/split

Comment by Crispin Wellington [ 21/May/15 10:46 PM ]

This bug just bit me. +1 to be fixed. If we just document and leave the behavior as is, then we have a surprising and inconsistent behaving split (why are inner empty values kept, but outer ones stripped?) that is different to every other split you've ever used. The optional -1 limit argument looks hacky but a fix could keep this -1 argument working.

EDIT: this looks to be java's string class behavior: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2170557/split-method-of-string-class-does-not-include-trailing-empty-strings
Would be nice if limit defaulted to -1 on that type of clojure.string/split call.

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 19/Jul/15 8:03 AM ]

This is really gross, and the original developer has been punched in the neck. (Ow.)

I hate the Java leakage, but given that this is already out there, and that people are likely already relying on both the default and the negative-arg behavior, I think the least bad bet is to document precisely the semantics we have.





[CLJ-1676] map destructuring: prevent evaluation of values in :or when they are not used/needed Created: 14/Mar/15  Updated: 30/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Trivial
Reporter: Max Penet Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: destructuring

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

The name :or implies this should behave as "or" and be "lazy" but it's not the case currently.
The following gist shows the issue. :x is present in the map but we eval the default value:

(defn foo
  [{:keys [x]
    :or {x (println :set-default)}}] 
  x)
 
 
 
user> (foo {:x 1})
:set-default
1


 Comments   
Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 15/Mar/15 2:40 PM ]

1.2 - current all behave this way, doesn't seem like a recent change.

Comment by Max Penet [ 15/Mar/15 2:55 PM ]

Right, I thought it might have been a regression, but wasn't sure at all.
It seems it would be safe to change the current behavior, I doubt it would break any ones code.





[CLJ-1763] clojure.core/sort is not thread-safe on Java collections with backing arrays Created: 19/Jun/15  Updated: 30/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: collections

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1763-make-sort-thread-safe.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

If a (mutable) Java collection that exposes it's backing array is passed to c.c/sort in multiple threads, the collection will be concurrently modified in multiple threads.

user=> (def q (java.util.concurrent.ArrayBlockingQueue. 1))
#'user/q
user=> (future (loop [] (.add q 1) (.remove q 1) (recur)))
#object[clojure.core$future_call$reify__4393 0x4769b07b {:status :pending, :val nil}]
user=> (take 3 (distinct (repeatedly #(sort q))))
((1) () nil)

Approach: Convert coll to a seq before converting it to an array, thus preserving the original collection.

Patch: 0001-CLJ-1763-make-sort-thread-safe.patch

Alternate approaches:

1. Document in sort that, like Java arrays, Java collections backed by arrays are modified in-place.
2. Change RT.toArray() to defensively copy the array returned from a (non-IPersistentCollection) Java collection. This has a number of potential ramifications as this method is called from several paths.
3. For non-Clojure collections, could also use Collections.sort() instead of dumping to array and using Arrays.sort().



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jun/15 10:55 AM ]

The docstring says "If coll is a Java array, it will be modified. To avoid this, sort a copy of the array." which also seems like solid advice in this case.

Creating a sequence view of the input collection would significantly alter the performance characteristics.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jun/15 10:59 AM ]

I guess what I'm saying is, we should not make the performance worse for persistent collections in order to make it safer for arbitrary Java collections. But it may still be useful to make it safer without affecting persistent collection performance and/or updating the docstring.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 19/Jun/15 11:02 AM ]

Alex, no additional sequence is being created, the seq call was already there

Comment by Alex Miller [ 19/Jun/15 11:53 AM ]

Well, that's kind of true. The former use did not force realization of the whole seq, just the first element. That said, from a quick test the extra cost seems small on a set (vector seqs are actually faster due to their structure).

Comment by Stuart Halloway [ 30/Jul/15 9:11 AM ]

I think this should be a docstring change, if anything at all.





[CLJ-1790] Problem with 1.8.0-alpha3 handling of protocols with Java arrays Created: 29/Jul/15  Updated: 30/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Mike Anderson Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

1.8.0-alpha3 is breaking core.matrix at the moment.

Root cause appears to be related to how protocols are being handled when used with Java arrays:

e.g. for the protocol implementation:

(extend-protocol mp/PImplementation
  (Class/forName "[Ljava.lang.Object;")
    (implementation-key [m] :object-array)
    (meta-info [m]
      {:doc "Clojure.core.matrix implementation for Java Object arrays"})
    (new-vector [m length] (construct-object-vector (long length)))
    (new-matrix [m rows columns]
      (let [columns (long columns)
            m (object-array rows)]
        (dotimes [i rows]
          (aset m i (construct-object-vector columns)))
        m))
    (new-matrix-nd [m shape]
      (construct-nd shape))
    (construct-matrix [m data]
      (construct-object-array data))
    (supports-dimensionality? [m dims]
      (>= dims 1)))

When called as:

(clojure.core.matrix.protocols/construct-matrix (object-array 1) [1])

Gives exception:

VerifyError (class: clojure/core/matrix$eval10586, method: invokeStatic signature: ()Ljava/lang/Object;) Incompatible object argument for function call  java.lang.Class.getDeclaredConstructors0 (:-2)





[CLJ-1789] Use transients with select-keys if possible Created: 28/Jul/15  Updated: 28/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: performance


 Description   

Currently select-keys uses conj to add entries. If the map is editable, conj! could be used instead to improve select-keys performance.

Additionally keyseq is traversed as a seq but could be traversed via reduce instead, which might be faster.






[CLJ-1784] Reflector.getMethods should be cached Created: 21/Jul/15  Updated: 28/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Vladimir Sitnikov Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None


 Description   

Currently Reflector.getMethods performs expensive logic that includes java.lang.reflect.Method copying.
See: https://github.com/clojure/clojure/blob/b8607d5870202034679cda50ec390426827ff692/src/jvm/clojure/lang/Reflector.java#L373

In our application I see the following back-traces:

at Reflector.copyMethods
at Reflector.invokeInstanceMethod
at ...

These kind of backtraces are second top consumers of all the heap allocation.

JDK cannot cache Methods / Fields since they are mutable (e.g. user can call setAccessible here and there).
However, for the purposes of Clojure, I believe it should be fine to cache Methods and Fields.

What do you think?
E.g. WeakHashMap<Class, WeakReference<List<Method>>> or more sophisticated structure to account String name.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 23/Jul/15 8:19 AM ]

If you are seeing Reflector as a hot spot in your application, you should probably turn on warn-on-reflection and use type hints to avoid reflection.

Comment by Vladimir Sitnikov [ 28/Jul/15 6:10 AM ]

Do you mean there is absolutely no reason to use reflection in Clojure ever?
I do understand that if developer gives enough type hints the reflection would go away.

However:
1) I just do not know if it is easily doable (in other words, if it is possible at all, maintainable, etc)
2) I'm not sure if "always use type hints" is considered a best practice. For instance, warn-on-reflection documentation page says nothing like "always use type hints"
3) Caching copyMethods seems to be a low-hanging fruit here, so it would shave cpu cycles for those who omitted type hints

PS. I'm a java performance engineer, not a Clojure engineer (as in "my Clojure knowledge is somewhere near (+ x y)"), so I kindly beg on your forgiveness for me not doing RTFM.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 28/Jul/15 7:44 AM ]

No, I'm saying that if reflection is a hotspot in your application, usually it's worth investing a few minutes to add type hints in those hotspot areas and this is common advice for Clojure apps. Once that minimal work is done, few Clojure apps are bound by reflection.

Caching seems like an easy solution until you consider all of the management aspects. How does the cache get cleaned? Are the instances mutable and able to be reused? Are there cases where class loaders or code reloading create unexpected side effects? What are the concurrency effects of putting a shared resource in the invocation path? What is the memory impact of a cache and is it configurable?

Those are all things that would need to be investigated, meaning that this is not low-hanging fruit.





[CLJ-1743] Avoid compile-time static initialization of classes when using inheritance Created: 02/Jun/15  Updated: 27/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Abe Fettig Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 4
Labels: aot, compiler, interop

Attachments: Text File 0001-Avoid-compile-time-class-initialization-when-using-g.patch     Text File clj-1743-2.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

I'm working on a project using Clojure and RoboVM. We use AOT compilation to compile Clojure to JVM classes, and then use RoboVM to compile the JVM classes to native code. In our Clojure code, we call Java APIs provided by RoboVM, which wrap the native iOS APIs.

But we've found an issue with inheritance and class-level static initialization code. Many iOS APIs require inheriting from a base object and then overriding certain methods. Currently, Clojure runs a superclass's static initialization code at compile time, whether using ":gen-class" or "proxy" to create the subclass. However, RoboVM's base "ObjCObject" class [1], which most iOS-specific classes inherit from, requires the iOS runtime to initialize, and throws an error at compile time since the code isn't running on a device.

CLJ-1315 addressed a similar issue by modifying "import" to load classes without running static initialization code. I've written my own patch which extends this behavior to work in ":gen-class" and "proxy" as well. The unit tests pass, and we're using this code successfully in our iOS app.

Patch: clj-1743-2.patch

Here's some sample code that can be used to demonstrate the current behavior (Full demo project at https://github.com/figly/clojure-static-initialization):

Demo.java
package clojure_static_initialization;

public class Demo {
  static {
    System.out.println("Running static initializers!");
  }
  public Demo () {
  }
}
gen_class_demo.clj
(ns clojure-static-initialization.gen-class-demo
  (:gen-class :extends clojure_static_initialization.Demo))
proxy_demo.clj
(ns clojure-static-initialization.proxy-demo)

(defn make-proxy []
  (proxy [clojure_static_initialization.Demo] []))

[1] https://github.com/robovm/robovm/blob/master/objc/src/main/java/org/robovm/objc/ObjCObject.java



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jun/15 3:01 PM ]

No changes from previous, just updated to apply to master as of 1.7.0-RC2.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jun/15 3:03 PM ]

If you had a sketch to test this with proxy and gen-class, that would be helpful.

Comment by Abe Fettig [ 22/Jun/15 8:31 AM ]

Sure, what form would you like for the sketch code? A small standalone project? Unit tests?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Jun/15 8:40 AM ]

Just a few lines of Java (a class with static initializer that printed) and Clojure code (for gen-class and proxy extending it) here in the test description that could be used to demonstrate the problem. Should not have any dependency on iOS or other external dependencies.

Comment by Abe Fettig [ 01/Jul/15 8:49 PM ]

Sample code added, let me know if I can add anything else!

Comment by Abe Fettig [ 27/Jul/15 2:21 PM ]

Just out of curiosity, what are the odds this could make it into 1.8?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 27/Jul/15 6:06 PM ]

unknown.





[CLJ-1680] quot and rem handle doubles badly Created: 24/Mar/15  Updated: 27/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Francis Avila Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: math

Attachments: Text File clj-1680_no_div0_jre17.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

quot and rem in the doubles case (where any one of the arguments is a floating point) gives strange results for non-finite arguments:

(quot Double/POSITIVE_INFINITY 2) ; Java: Infinity
NumberFormatException Infinite or NaN  java.math.BigDecimal.<init> (BigDecimal.java:808)
(quot 0 Double/NaN) ; Java: NaN
NumberFormatException Infinite or NaN  java.math.BigDecimal.<init> (BigDecimal.java:808)
(quot Double/POSITIVE_INFINITY Double/POSITIVE_INFINITY) ; Java: NaN
NumberFormatException Infinite or NaN  java.math.BigDecimal.<init> (BigDecimal.java:808)
(rem Double/POSITIVE_INFINITY 2) ; Java: NaN
NumberFormatException Infinite or NaN  java.math.BigDecimal.<init> (BigDecimal.java:808)
(rem 0 Double/NaN) ; Java: NaN
NumberFormatException Infinite or NaN  java.math.BigDecimal.<init> (BigDecimal.java:808)
(rem 1 Double/POSITIVE_INFINITY) ; The strangest one. Java: 1.0
=> NaN

quot and rem also do divide-by-zero checks for doubles, which is inconsistent with how doubles act for division:

(/ 1.0 0)
=> NaN
(quot 1.0 0) ; Java: NaN
ArithmeticException Divide by zero  clojure.lang.Numbers.quotient (Numbers.java:176)
(rem 1.0 0); Java: NaN
ArithmeticException Divide by zero  clojure.lang.Numbers.remainder (Numbers.java:191)

Attached patch does not address this because I'm not sure if this is intended behavior. There were no tests asserting any of the behavior mentioned above.

Fundamentally the reason for this behavior is that the implementation for quot and rem sometimes (when result if division larger than a long) take a double, coerce it to BigDecimal, then BigInteger, then back to a double. The coersion means it can't handle nonfinite intermediate values. All of this is completely unnecessary, and I think is just leftover detritus from when these methods used to return a boxed integer type (long or BigInteger). That changed at this commit to return primitive doubles but the method body was not refactored extensively enough.

The method bodies should instead be simply:

static public double quotient(double n, double d){
    if(d == 0)
        throw new ArithmeticException("Divide by zero");
    double q = n / d;
    return (q >= 0) ? Math.floor(q) : Math.ceil(q);
}

static public double remainder(double n, double d){
    if(d == 0)
        throw new ArithmeticException("Divide by zero");
    return n % d;
}

Which is what the attached patch does. (And I'm not even sure the d==0 check is appropriate.)

Even if exploding on non-finite results is a desirable property of quot and rem, there is no need for the BigDecimal+BigInteger coersion. I can prepare a patch that preserves existing behavior but is more efficient.

More discussion at Clojure dev.



 Comments   
Comment by Francis Avila [ 24/Mar/15 12:55 PM ]

More testing revealed that n % d does not preserve the relation (= n (+ (* d (quot n d)) (rem n d))) as well as (n - d * (quot n d)), which doesn't make sense to me since that is the very relation the spec says % preserves. % is apparently not simply Math.IEEEremainder() with a different quotient rounding.

Test case: (rem 40.0 0.1) == 0.0; 40.0 % 0.1 == 0.0999... (Smaller numerators will still not land at 0 precisely, but land closer than % does.)

Updated patch which rolls back some parts of the simplification to remainder and adds this test case.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 04/Jul/15 12:12 AM ]

Francis, your patch clj-1680_no_div0.patch dated 2015-Mar-24 uses the method isFinite(), which appears to have been added in Java 1.8, and does not exist in earlier versions. I would guess that while the next release of Clojure may drop support for Java 1.6, it is less likely it would also drop support for Java 1.7 at the same time. It might be nice if your patch could use something like !(isInfinite() || isNaN()) instead, which I believe is equivalent, and both of those methods exist in earlier Java versions.

Comment by Francis Avila [ 26/Jul/15 11:22 PM ]

Updated patch with a java 1.7-compatible version, also rebased against master.

No tests fail except this one, which I don't think is related to this patch:

[java] FAIL in (gen-interface-source-file) (genclass.clj:151)
     [java] expected: (= "examples.clj" (str sourceFile))
     [java]   actual: (not (= "examples.clj" ""))
Comment by Michael Blume [ 27/Jul/15 1:34 PM ]

Francis, I tried downloading your patch and I didn't see any test failures at all. Do you see the same failure if you check out the master branch from the Clojure repo? Do you still see it if you mvn clean first? If so, it might be worth opening a ticket for it and seeing if anyone else can reproduce it.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 27/Jul/15 1:41 PM ]

Yes, and if you do see a failure with unmodified Clojure for 'mvn clean test', or './antsetup.sh ; ant clean; ant', please let us know the OS and JVM you are using. I haven't seen that on the OS/JVM combos I have tried.

Comment by Francis Avila [ 27/Jul/15 2:51 PM ]

Nevermind, failing test went away after a clean. All tests pass.





[CLJ-1788] Integrate lein with the clojure distribution. Created: 27/Jul/15  Updated: 27/Jul/15  Resolved: 27/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Morten Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Declined Votes: 0
Labels: enhancement, newbie
Environment:

All



 Description   

As a new clojure user I think clojure would be more approachable by beginners and less confusing to get started with if "lein" could get included in the standard clojure distribtion.

It seems almost all tools, books and clojure users use "lein" anyway so why make it a seperate download? It may seem as a trivial issue for existing power clojure developers but offering a integrated clojure distribution with a official package manager etc. would make it easier for new users to get started. After all clojure is not the simplest thing to get started with and "low hanging fruits" like this could help a lot. For tool vendors there would also be a benefit if "lein" was included.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 27/Jul/15 1:05 PM ]

This is not something we're going to do.

Comment by Morten [ 27/Jul/15 1:23 PM ]

I am new so I don't know how things are decided here but can I politely ask why? As a new user I can firmly say it would have helped me (who did not know about lein when I first got started) and is helping get new users easily started not a worthwhile goal (especially if it is easily done) ?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 27/Jul/15 1:38 PM ]

Morten, I can't comment officially on what changes will or will not be made to Clojure.

I did want to point out that if you get Leiningen, you don't need to do a separate manual download of Clojure in addition to that. Running Leiningen the first time auto-downloads it and a few other things for you.

Leiningen is not the only way to run Clojure, so the Clojure getting started page here: http://clojure.org/getting_started mentions Leiningen as one possible approach, but it does not happen to mention that if you choose that approach, downloading the JAR as described at the top of that page is unnecessary. Might be nice if that page mentioned that fact about Leiningen.

Comment by Morten [ 27/Jul/15 1:55 PM ]

I downloaded clojure first and only when I found out that my IDE insisted on a project file that belongs to "leiningen" did I find and install lein.

As for leining just being one approach I did read on InfoQ that according to a recent survey "Leiningen, at a whopping 98% adoption rate," (among Clojure users I assume).

So the 98% users seems to make lein a defacto standard and the fact that the IDE's I have tried require leining to work with clojure make another compelling argument.

But anyway - it is up to the clojure dev community to decide. I am just a new users and just wondered at the very quick and prompt No without any readon why?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 27/Jul/15 2:03 PM ]

Leiningen is an external tool built with a different contribution model and set of goals than Clojure itself. It's also not the only build tool in use in the Clojure community. As such, there are no plans to bundle Leiningen into Clojure.





[CLJ-1787] Add executables to distribution (suggested changes included) Created: 27/Jul/15  Updated: 27/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Morten Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None
Environment:

Linix, OS X and Windows


Patch: Code

 Description   

Being new to clojure I was surprised that there was not a executable included in the download. It makes Clojure appear less proff then it is and is unnecessary complex to remember the exact java cmd line to use so I suggest that shell executable files are added to the distibution for the next version of Clojure. They could look as suggest below for Windows and OS X:

1) Linux and OS X:
#!/bin/bash
java -jar `dirname "$0"`/clojure-1.8.0.jar $@

2) Windows:
java -jar %~dp0\clojure-1.8.0.jar %1 %2 %3 %4 %5 %6 %7 %8






[CLJ-1647] infinite loop in 'partition' and 'partition-all' when 'step' or 'n' is not positive Created: 20/Jan/15  Updated: 27/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Kevin Woram Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: checkargs, newbie

Attachments: Text File clj-1647.patch     Text File kworam-clj-1647.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

If you pass a non-positive value of 'n' or 'step' to partition, you get an infinite loop. Here are a few examples:

(partition 0 [1 2 3])
(partition 1 -1 [1 2 3])

To fix this, I recommend adding 'assert-args' to the appropriate places in partition and partition-all:

(assert-args
(pos? n) "n must be positive"
(pos? step) "step must be positive" )



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 03/Feb/15 5:34 PM ]

Also see CLJ-764

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Apr/15 12:02 PM ]

Needs a perf check when done.

Comment by Kevin Woram [ 16/May/15 1:58 PM ]

patch file to fix clj-1647

Comment by Kevin Woram [ 16/May/15 2:19 PM ]

Since 'n' and 'step' remain unchanged from the initial function call through all of the recursive self-calls, I only need to verify that they are positive once, on the initial call.

I therefore created functions 'internal-partition' and 'internal-partition-all' whose implementations are identical to the current versions of 'partition' and 'partition-all'.

I then added preconditions that 'step' and 'n' must be positive to the 'partition' and 'partition-all' functions, and made them call 'internal-partition' and 'internal-partition-all' respectively to do the work.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/May/15 8:14 AM ]

There are a lot of unrelated whitespace changes in this patch - can you supply a smaller patch with only the change at issue? Also needs tests.

Comment by Kevin Woram [ 17/May/15 2:05 PM ]

I will supply a patch file without the whitespace changes.

I know there are some existing functionality tests for 'partition' and 'partition-all' in test_clojure\sequences.clj and test_clojure\transducers.clj. I don't think I need to add more functionality tests, but I think I should add:

1. Tests that verify that non-positive 'step' and 'n' parameters are rejected.
2. Tests that show that 'partition' and 'partition-all' performance has not degraded significantly.

Could you give me some guidance on how to develop and add these tests?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 17/May/15 3:31 PM ]

You should add #1 to the patch. For #2, you can just do the timings before/after (criterium is a good tool for this) and put the results in the description.

Comment by Kevin Woram [ 22/May/15 4:04 PM ]

I have coded up the tests for #1 and taken some 'before' timings for #2 using criterium.

I have been stumped by a problem for hours now and I need to get some help. I made my changes to 'partition' and 'partition-all' in core.clj and then did 'mvn package' to build the jar. I executed 'target>java -cp clojure-1.7.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar clojure.main' to test out my patched version of clojure interactively. The (source ...) function shows that my source changes for both 'partition' and 'partition-all' are in place. My change to 'partition-all' seems to be working but my change to 'partition' is not. As far as I can tell, they should both throw an AssertionError with the input parameters I am providing.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

user=> (source partition)
(defn partition
"Returns a lazy sequence of lists of n items each, at offsets step
apart. If step is not supplied, defaults to n, i.e. the partitions
do not overlap. If a pad collection is supplied, use its elements as
necessary to complete last partition upto n items. In case there are
not enough padding elements, return a partition with less than n items."
{:added "1.0"
:static true}
([n coll]
{:pre [(pos? n)]}
(partition n n coll))
([n step coll]
{:pre [(pos? n) (pos? step)]}
(internal-partition n step coll))
([n step pad coll]
{:pre [(pos? n) (pos? step)]}
(internal-partition n step pad coll)))
nil
user=> (partition -1 [1 2 3])
()
user=> (source partition-all)
(defn partition-all
"Returns a lazy sequence of lists like partition, but may include
partitions with fewer than n items at the end. Returns a stateful
transducer when no collection is provided."
{:added "1.2"
:static true}
([^long n]
(internal-partition-all n))
([n coll]
(partition-all n n coll))
([n step coll]
{:pre [(pos? n) (pos? step)]}
(internal-partition-all n step coll)))
nil
user=> (partition-all -1 [1 2 3])
AssertionError Assert failed: (pos? n) clojure.core/partition-all (core.clj:6993)

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/May/15 4:47 PM ]

Did you mvn clean? Or rm target?

Comment by Kevin Woram [ 24/May/15 11:46 PM ]

Yes, I did mvn clean and verified that clojure-1.7.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar had the expected date-time stamp before doing the interactive test. I even went so far as to retrace my steps on my Macbook on the theory that maybe there was a Windows-specific build problem.

My change to partition-all works as expected but my change to partition does not. However, if I copy the result of the call to (source partition) and execute it (replacing clojure.core/partition with user/partition), user/partition works as expected. I don't understand why my change to clojure.core/partition isn't taking effect.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 25/May/15 1:27 AM ]

Kevin, I do not know the history of your Clojure source tree, but if you ever ran 'ant' in it, that creates jar files in the root directory, whereas 'mvn package' creates them in the target directory. It wasn't clear from your longer comment above whether the 'java -cp ...' command you ran pointed at the one in the target directory. That may not be the cause of the issue you are seeing, but I don't yet have any guesses what else it could be.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Jul/15 1:17 PM ]

What's the status of this?

Comment by Kevin Woram [ 16/Jul/15 10:20 PM ]

Alex, I moved to Seattle and took a permanent position with Microsoft recently. This has kept me very busy and I haven't been able to spend time on Clojure at all. I probably won't be able to devote time to Clojure for another month or two.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 16/Jul/15 10:46 PM ]

Thanks for the heads up.

Comment by Matthew Gilliard [ 23/Jul/15 2:51 PM ]

Kevin, Alex, I could pick this up if you like?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 23/Jul/15 8:40 PM ]

Go for it

Comment by Alex Miller [ 23/Jul/15 8:40 PM ]

Go for it

Comment by Alex Miller [ 23/Jul/15 8:40 PM ]

Go for it

Comment by Alex Miller [ 23/Jul/15 8:40 PM ]

Go for it

Comment by Alex Miller [ 23/Jul/15 8:41 PM ]

Sorry, browser fail

Comment by Kevin Woram [ 25/Jul/15 7:03 PM ]

Thanks for picking it up Matthew, I appreciate it!

Comment by Kevin Woram [ 25/Jul/15 7:03 PM ]

Thanks for picking it up Matthew, I appreciate it!

Comment by Matthew Gilliard [ 27/Jul/15 11:30 AM ]

New patch: clj-1647.patch

Includes tests, fewer whitespace changes, manually thrown IAEs. I'll do some basic benchmarking soon, although I expect the overhead to be quite low as we're only checking the arguments once.

Kevin, the reason your patch was working for partition-all but not partition is that partition is defined early-ish in the bootstrapping process and the {:pre .. :post ..} maps aren't read by defn until it's enhanced later on.

Comment by Kevin Woram [ 27/Jul/15 12:10 PM ]

Thanks for solving that mystery Matthew!





[CLJ-1786] Unused defaults are evaluted in `:or` destructoring Created: 26/Jul/15  Updated: 26/Jul/15  Resolved: 26/Jul/15

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Major
Reporter: Leon Grapenthin Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Duplicate Votes: 0
Labels: compiler


 Description   
(defn example [{:keys [foo] :or {foo (println "Evaluated!")}}])

(example {:foo 42})
;; prints "Evaluated!"


 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Jul/15 8:38 AM ]

Dupe of CLJ-1676





[CLJ-1771] Support for multiple key(s)-value pairs in assoc-in Created: 29/Jun/15  Updated: 23/Jul/15

Status: Reopened
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Major
Reporter: Griffin Smith Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: None
Environment:

All


Attachments: Text File clj-1771.patch    
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

It would be nice if assoc-in supported multiple key(s)-to-value pairs (and threw an error when there were an even number of arguments, just like assoc):

user=> (assoc-in {} [:a :b] 1 [:c :d] 2)
{:a {:b 1}, :c {:d 2}}
user=> (assoc-in {} [:a :b] 1 [:c :d])
IllegalArgumentException assoc-in expects even number of arguments after map/vector, found odd number


 Comments   
Comment by Matthew Gilliard [ 23/Jul/15 2:15 PM ]

Simple patch attached. I did not find any existing tests for assoc-in but I could add them if wanted.





[CLJ-1764] partition-by runs infinite loop when one element of infinite partition is accessed Created: 19/Jun/15  Updated: 23/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Leon Grapenthin Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: newbie

Attachments: Text File clj-1764.patch    
Approval: Triaged

 Description   
(def x (partition-by zero? (range)))
(first x)
;-> (0)
(first (second x))
;-> infinite loop

The reason is that partition-by counts and thus realizes each current partition to call itself recursively.

It seems like unexpected behavior, since the user may not intend to realize the entire partition.

It can be fixed by changing seq to lazy-seq in its last line.



 Comments   
Comment by Matthew Gilliard [ 23/Jul/15 2:36 PM ]

Patch as suggested by Leon, + test.





[CLJ-925] rand-nth throws on empty list Created: 05/Feb/12  Updated: 22/Jul/15  Resolved: 14/Aug/12

Status: Closed
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Defect Priority: Minor
Reporter: Jozef Wagner Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Completed Votes: 0
Labels: None

Attachments: File patch.diff    
Patch: Code

 Description   

rand-nth throws when given an empty list.

Solution is to either call seq on parameter, or to supply nil as a not-found parameter in call to nth. Patch fir latter fix included.



 Comments   
Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Mar/12 2:38 AM ]

Changing Patch attribute to value "Code", since I've been told that is what it ought to be for a ticket with a patch ready for screening.

Comment by Michael Nygard [ 22/Jul/15 5:59 PM ]

This is marked as "Completed," but the reported behavior still exists in 1.7.0. Was the fix rejected?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 22/Jul/15 6:18 PM ]

From looking at revision history, it seems that rand-nth has never been changed since it was added. Perhaps no fix was ever committed for it, maybe by accident.





[CLJ-1550] Classes generated by deftype and defrecord don't play nice with .getPackage Created: 07/Oct/14  Updated: 22/Jul/15

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7, Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Minor
Reporter: