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What is your plan for dealing with disappearing students?

Status
colourRed
titleTODO
 Type answer here

The most critical aspect is of course preventing such a scenario entirely.  This needs to happen at the selection of the proposal, the selection of the mentor, and the selection of student.  A proposal of proper scope, a dedicated mentor, and a student with a visible history of seeing projects to their end is critical to success.  Also critical is observing their involvement in the community prior to the student selection process.  We prefer students who have already started developing a working relationship with their mentor and interacting with the community.  Finally, a proper interview is probably required in order to find out whether the mentor/student pairing is ideal and whether the student will be free of time conflicts during the GSoC time period to see their project to completion.

What is your plan for dealing with disappearing mentors?

Status
colourRed
titleTODO
 Type answer here

Ideally, all projects will have at least one backup mentor.  Even so, mentors are selected from the community precisely for their history of involvement in the community and the issues surrounding proposal.

What steps will you take to encourage students to interact with your project's community before and during the program?

Status
colourRed
titleTODO
 Type answer here

We will be clear that community involvement prior to selection will be a strong factor for being considered for a proposal.  Our experience last year taught us that those students with the strongest community/mentor involvement before the program performed the best.  We believe that open source contribution is not solely a summer time affair.  Students should be talking with mentors from the start in order to develop the adequate understanding and material required to tackle the proposal.  This may include, but is not limited to, showing familiarity with an API, submitting patches, and reading papers and discussing them with mentors.  We believe that a well considered proposal/mentor/student combination reinforces student engagement during the GSoC period.

We will strongly encourage students to provide updates to the community at large about the work they are doing on a weekly or semimonthly basis.  To increase the effectiveness of this, we will make it easy for the community to be able to follow our students' progress.  Last year, a number of students were interviewed in community electronic publications, and we would like to encourage that once more.

What will you do to encourage that your accepted students stick with the project after Google Summer of Code concludes?

Status
colourRed
titleTODO
 Type answer here

Most of the proposal are significant enough that students should feel a sense of ownership about their accomplishment.  At the same time, the proposals are significant enough to the Clojure community that community members can provide support once the intensive GSoC period is done and the student must focus more time on academic responsibilities.  We will encourage students to submit talks about their work to community conferences, and we will take the opportunity to use GSoC's travel stipend to get our students to conferences.

Are you a new organization who has a Googler or other organization to vouch for you? If so, please list their name(s) here.

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Status
colourYellow
titleOptional
 Type answer here