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[CLJ-2182] s/& does not check preds if regex matches empty collection Created: 08/Jun/17  Updated: 29/Jun/17

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.9
Fix Version/s: Release 1.9

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Shogo Ohta Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: spec

Attachments: Text File clj-2182-2.patch     Text File clj-2182.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Screened

 Description   

In the following example, the ::x key is required in the map but it will conform without error for an empty collection:

(s/def ::x integer?)
(s/conform (s/keys* :req-un [::x]) [])
;; nil, expected error
(s/explain (s/keys* :req-un [::x]) [])
;; Success!, expected explanation

Cause: At the moment, (s/keys* :req-un [::x]) is expanded to a form equivalent to the following one:

(s/& (s/* (s/cat ::s/k keyword? ::s/v))
     ::s/kvs->map
     (s/keys :req-un [::x]))

The issue seems to be in the implementation of s/&, specifically the ::amp branch of accept-nil? which expects that either the conformed regex returns empty or that the preds are not invalid. This seems like a false assumption that an empty conformed regex ret does not require the s/& preds to be valid. In this case we are using a conformer to transform the input and do another check, so it's certainly not valid here.

Proposed: Modify s/& to always validate the preds when accepting nil.

user=> (s/conform (s/keys* :req-un [::x]) [])
:clojure.spec.alpha/invalid

user=> (-> (s/explain-data (s/keys* :req-un [::x]) []) ::s/problems first :pred)
(clojure.core/fn [%] (clojure.core/contains? % :x))

Patch: clj-2182-2.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Jun/17 4:20 PM ]

-2 patch includes a test





[CLJ-2098] autodoc fails to load clojure/spec.clj Created: 12/Jan/17  Updated: 07/Apr/17

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.9
Fix Version/s: Release 1.9

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: spec

Attachments: Text File clj-2098.patch    
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Reported by Tom F for the autodoc process. The following (essentially) is what autodoc is doing that currently blows up:

tom@renoir:~/src/clj/autodoc-work-area/clojure/src$ java -cp clojure.jar clojure.main
Clojure 1.9.0-master-SNAPSHOT
user=> (load-file "src/clj/clojure/spec.clj")
CompilerException java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: No implementation of method: :conform* \
of protocol: #'clojure.spec/Spec found for class: clojure.spec$regex_spec_impl$reify__14279, \
compiling:(/home/tom/src/clj/autodoc-work-area/clojure/src/src/clj/clojure/spec.clj:684:1)

Cause: There is code in Compiler.macroexpand() with the intention to suspend spec checking inside clojure.spec. However, it is currently doing an exact path match on SOURCE_PATH. In the load-file call above, this ends up being an absolute path.

Approach: Check for a path suffix rather than an exact match in Compiler.

Patch: clj-2098.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 07/Apr/17 3:38 PM ]

Removing "code" tag for patch as this is not good to screen yet. While the patch kind of works, it would be good if there were a more reliable way to omit spec checking in the scope of the spec namespace. Rather than checking the source path, it would be much better to instead check the current ns. This works EXCEPT during the macro expansion of ns (which has a spec) in spec itself. At that point you have not yet evaluated the (in-ns 'clojure.spec) (since that's what the ns macro is expanding to). Really, all of this is a problem at exactly one point - compiling clojure.spec itself. Another option might be some way to suspend macro spec checking altogether (which might be a generally useful feature).





[CLJ-1891] New socket server startup proactively loads too much code, slowing boot time Created: 09/Feb/16  Updated: 09/Feb/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.8
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Alex Miller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: server

Attachments: Text File clj-1891.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Prescreened

 Description   

In the new socket server code, clojure.core.server is proactively loaded (regardless of whether servers are in the config), which will also load clojure.edn and clojure.string.

Approach: Delay loading of this code until the first server config is found. This improves startup time when not using the socket server about 0.05 s.

Patch: clj-1891.patch






[CLJ-1872] empty? is broken for transient collections Created: 26/Dec/15  Updated: 19/Aug/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Release 1.9

Type: Defect Priority: Critical
Reporter: Leonid Bogdanov Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 0
Labels: collections

Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Couldn't find whether it was brought up earlier, but it seems that empty? predicate is broken for transient collections

user=> (empty? (transient []))
IllegalArgumentException Don't know how to create ISeq from: clojure.lang.PersistentVector$TransientVector  clojure.lang.RT.seqFrom (RT.java:528)

user=> (empty? (transient ()))
ClassCastException clojure.lang.PersistentList$EmptyList cannot be cast to clojure.lang.IEditableCollection  clojure.core/transient (core.clj:3209)

user=> (empty? (transient {}))
IllegalArgumentException Don't know how to create ISeq from: clojure.lang.PersistentArrayMap$TransientArrayMap  clojure.lang.RT.seqFrom (RT.java:528)

user=> (empty? (transient #{}))
IllegalArgumentException Don't know how to create ISeq from: clojure.lang.PersistentHashSet$TransientHashSet  clojure.lang.RT.seqFrom (RT.java:528)

The workaround is to use (zero? (count (transient ...))) check instead.



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Dec/15 9:58 PM ]

Probably similar to CLJ-700.





[CLJ-1814] Make `satisfies?` as fast as a protocol method call Created: 11/Sep/15  Updated: 18/Sep/17

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Nicola Mometto Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 10
Labels: performance, protocols

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-1814-cache-protocol-impl-satisfies-as-fast-as-me.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1814-cache-protocol-impl-satisfies-as-fast-as-me-v2.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1814-cache-protocol-impl-satisfies-as-fast-as-me-v3.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1814-cache-protocol-impl-satisfies-as-fast-as-me-v4.patch     Text File 0001-CLJ-1814-cache-protocol-impl-satisfies-as-fast-as-me-v5.patch     Text File CLJ-1814-v6.patch    
Patch: Code and Test
Approval: Vetted

 Description   

Currently `satisfies?` doesn't use the same impl cache used by protocol methods, making it too slow for real world usage.

With:

(defprotocol p (f [_]))
(deftype x [])
(deftype y [])
(extend-type x p (f [_]))

Before patch:

(let [s "abc"] (bench (instance? CharSequence s))) ;; Execution time mean : 1.358360 ns
(let [x (x.)] (bench (satisfies? p x))) ;; Execution time mean : 112.649568 ns
(let [y (y.)] (bench (satisfies? p y))) ;; Execution time mean : 2.605426 µs

Cause: `satisfies?` calls `find-protocol-impl` to see whether an object implements a protocol, which checks for whether x is an instance of the protocol interface or whether x's class is one of the protocol implementations (or if its in an inheritance chain that would make this true). This check is fairly expensive and not cached.

Proposed: Extend the protocol's method impl cache to also handle (and cache) instance checks (including negative results).

After patch:

(let [x (x.)] (bench (satisfies? p x))) ;; Execution time mean : 79.321426 ns
(let [y (y.)] (bench (satisfies? p y))) ;; Execution time mean : 77.410858 ns

Patch: CLJ-1814-v6.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Michael Blume [ 11/Sep/15 4:17 PM ]

Nice. Honeysql used to spend 80-90% of its time in satisfies? calls before we refactored them out.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 24/Sep/15 3:55 PM ]

I realize this is a deeply annoying bug to reproduce, but if I clone core.match, point its Clojure dependency to 1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT, start a REPL, connect to the REPL from vim, and reload clojure.core.match, I get

|| java.lang.Exception: namespace 'clojure.tools.analyzer.jvm.utils' not found, compiling:(clojure/tools/analyzer/jvm.clj:9:1)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5647| clojure.core$throw_if.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5733| clojure.core$load_lib.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5765| clojure.core$load_libs.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5787| clojure.core$require.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:703)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.analyzer.jvm/0.6.5/tools.analyzer.jvm-0.6.5.jar::clojure/tools/analyzer/jvm.clj|9| clojure.tools.analyzer.jvm$eval4968$loading__5561__auto____4969.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.analyzer.jvm/0.6.5/tools.analyzer.jvm-0.6.5.jar::clojure/tools/analyzer/jvm.clj|9| clojure.tools.analyzer.jvm$eval4968.invokeStatic
|| clojure.tools.analyzer.jvm$eval4968.invoke(jvm.clj)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6934)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6923)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:7381)
|| clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:372)
|| clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:363)
|| clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:453)
|| clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:419)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5883| clojure.core$load$fn__5669.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5882| clojure.core$load.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5683| clojure.core$load_one.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5728| clojure.core$load_lib$fn__5618.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5727| clojure.core$load_lib.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5765| clojure.core$load_libs.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5787| clojure.core$require.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:457)
src/main/clojure/clojure/core/match.clj|1| clojure.core.match$eval4960$loading__5561__auto____4961.invoke
src/main/clojure/clojure/core/match.clj|1| clojure.core.match$eval4960.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core.match$eval4960.invoke(match.clj)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6934)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6923)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:7381)
|| clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:372)
|| clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:363)
|| clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:453)
|| clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:419)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5883| clojure.core$load$fn__5669.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5882| clojure.core$load.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5683| clojure.core$load_one.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5728| clojure.core$load_lib$fn__5618.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5727| clojure.core$load_lib.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5765| clojure.core$load_libs.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5787| clojure.core$require.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:421)
|| clojure.core.match$eval4949.invokeStatic(form-init2494799382238714928.clj:1)
|| clojure.core.match$eval4949.invoke(form-init2494799382238714928.clj)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6934)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6897)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|3096| clojure.core$eval.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$eval.invoke(core.clj)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|240| clojure.main$repl$read_eval_print__7404$fn__7407.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|240| clojure.main$repl$read_eval_print__7404.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|258| clojure.main$repl$fn__7413.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|258| clojure.main$repl.invokeStatic
|| clojure.main$repl.doInvoke(main.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:1523)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|58| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$evaluate$fn__637.invoke
|| clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:152)
|| clojure.lang.AFn.applyTo(AFn.java:144)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|645| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|1874| clojure.core$with_bindings_STAR_.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$with_bindings_STAR_.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:425)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|56| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$evaluate.invokeStatic
|| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$evaluate.invoke(interruptible_eval.clj)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|191| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$interruptible_eval$fn__679$fn__682.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|159| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$run_next$fn__674.invoke
|| clojure.lang.AFn.run(AFn.java:22)
|| java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor.runWorker(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:1142)
|| java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor$Worker.run(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:617)
|| java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:745)

Same thing with reloading a namespace in my own project which depends on clojure.core.match

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 24/Sep/15 3:59 PM ]

is it possible that AOT is involved?

Comment by Michael Blume [ 24/Sep/15 5:31 PM ]

Narrowed it down a little, if I check out tools.analyzer.jvm, open a REPL, and do (require 'clojure.tools.analyzer.jvm.utils) I get

|| java.lang.ClassCastException: java.lang.Class cannot be cast to clojure.asm.Type, compiling:(utils.clj:260:13)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler$InvokeExpr.eval(Compiler.java:3642)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler$InvokeExpr.eval(Compiler.java:3636)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler$DefExpr.eval(Compiler.java:450)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6939)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.load(Compiler.java:7381)
|| clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:372)
|| clojure.lang.RT.loadResourceScript(RT.java:363)
|| clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:453)
|| clojure.lang.RT.load(RT.java:419)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5883| clojure.core$load$fn__5669.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5882| clojure.core$load.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5683| clojure.core$load_one.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_one.invoke(core.clj)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5728| clojure.core$load_lib$fn__5618.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5727| clojure.core$load_lib.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5765| clojure.core$load_libs.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$load_libs.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:137)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|647| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|5787| clojure.core$require.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$require.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:421)
|| clojure.tools.analyzer.jvm.utils$eval4392.invokeStatic(form-init8663423518975891793.clj:1)
|| clojure.tools.analyzer.jvm.utils$eval4392.invoke(form-init8663423518975891793.clj)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6934)
|| clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6897)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|3096| clojure.core$eval.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$eval.invoke(core.clj)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|240| clojure.main$repl$read_eval_print__7404$fn__7407.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|240| clojure.main$repl$read_eval_print__7404.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|258| clojure.main$repl$fn__7413.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/main.clj|258| clojure.main$repl.invokeStatic
|| clojure.main$repl.doInvoke(main.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:1523)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|58| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$evaluate$fn__637.invoke
|| clojure.lang.AFn.applyToHelper(AFn.java:152)
|| clojure.lang.AFn.applyTo(AFn.java:144)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|645| clojure.core$apply.invokeStatic
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/clojure/1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT/clojure-1.8.0-master-SNAPSHOT.jar::clojure/core.clj|1874| clojure.core$with_bindings_STAR_.invokeStatic
|| clojure.core$with_bindings_STAR_.doInvoke(core.clj)
|| clojure.lang.RestFn.invoke(RestFn.java:425)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|56| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$evaluate.invokeStatic
|| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$evaluate.invoke(interruptible_eval.clj)
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|191| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$interruptible_eval$fn__679$fn__682.invoke
zipfile:/Users/michael.blume/.m2/repository/org/clojure/tools.nrepl/0.2.10/tools.nrepl-0.2.10.jar::clojure/tools/nrepl/middleware/interruptible_eval.clj|159| clojure.tools.nrepl.middleware.interruptible_eval$run_next$fn__674.invoke
|| clojure.lang.AFn.run(AFn.java:22)
|| java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor.runWorker(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:1142)
|| java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor$Worker.run(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:617)
|| java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:745)

I don't see where AOT would be involved?

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 27/Sep/15 2:28 PM ]

Michael Blume The updated patch should fix the issue you reported

Comment by Michael Blume [ 28/Sep/15 12:39 PM ]

Cool, thanks =)

New patch no longer deletes MethodImplCache, which is not used – is that deliberate?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Nov/15 3:08 PM ]

It would be cool if there was a bulleted list of the things changed in the patch in the description. For example: "Renamed MethodImplCache to ImplCache", etc. That helps makes it easier to review.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 02/Nov/15 3:35 PM ]

Attached is an updated patch that doesn't replace MethodImplCache with ImplCache but simply reuses MethodImplCache, reducing the impact of this patch and making it easier (and safer) to review.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 07/Jun/16 11:42 AM ]

Bumping priority as this is used in new inst? predicate - see https://github.com/clojure/clojure/commit/58227c5de080110cb2ce5bc9f987d995a911b13e

Comment by Alex Miller [ 29/Jun/17 2:31 PM ]

I ran the before and after tests with the v3 patch. Before times matched pretty closely but I could not replicate the after results. I got this which is actually much worse in the not found case:

(let [x (x.)] (bench (satisfies? p x))) ;; Execution time mean : 76.833504 ns
(let [y (y.)] (bench (satisfies? p y))) ;; Execution time mean : 20.570007 µs
Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 29/Jun/17 4:09 PM ]

v4 patch fixes the regression on the not-found case, not sure how that happened, apologies.
Here are the timings I'm getting now:

clojure master:

user=> (let [x (x.)] (bench (satisfies? p x)))
Evaluation count : 604961580 in 60 samples of 10082693 calls.
             Execution time mean : 112.649568 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 12.216782 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 99.299203 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 144.265205 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.898271 ns

Found 3 outliers in 60 samples (5.0000 %)
	low-severe	 2 (3.3333 %)
	low-mild	 1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 73.7545 % Variance is severely inflated by outliers
nil
user=> (let [y (y.)] (bench (satisfies? p y)))
Evaluation count : 22676100 in 60 samples of 377935 calls.
             Execution time mean : 2.605426 µs
    Execution time std-deviation : 141.100070 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 2.487234 µs ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 2.873045 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.898271 ns

Found 1 outliers in 60 samples (1.6667 %)
	low-severe	 1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 40.1251 % Variance is moderately inflated by outliers
nil

master + v4:

user=> (let [x (x.)] (bench (satisfies? p x)))
Evaluation count : 731759100 in 60 samples of 12195985 calls.
             Execution time mean : 79.321426 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 3.959245 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 75.365187 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 87.986479 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.905711 ns

Found 1 outliers in 60 samples (1.6667 %)
	low-severe	 1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 35.2614 % Variance is moderately inflated by outliers
nil
user=> (let [y (y.)] (bench (satisfies? p y)))
Evaluation count : 771220140 in 60 samples of 12853669 calls.
             Execution time mean : 77.410858 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 1.407926 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 75.852530 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 80.759226 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 1.897646 ns

Found 4 outliers in 60 samples (6.6667 %)
	low-severe	 3 (5.0000 %)
	low-mild	 1 (1.6667 %)
 Variance from outliers : 7.7866 % Variance is slightly inflated by outliers

So to summarize:
master found = 112ns
master not-found = 2.6us

master+v4 found = 79ns
master+v4 not-found = 77ns

Comment by Michael Blume [ 14/Jul/17 5:12 PM ]

For records that have been declared with an implementation of a particular protocol, and which therefore implement the corresponding interface, would it make sense to use an (instance?) check against that interface as a fast path?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 04/Aug/17 11:28 AM ]

Michael - that check is already in there

Nicola - I have a few comments/questions:

1. I don't get what the purpose of the NIL stuff is - could you explain that?
2. In the case where x is an instance of the interface, the old code returned x and the new code in find-protocol-impl* returns interface. Why the change?
3. This: (alter-var-root (:var protocol) assoc :impl-cache (expand-method-impl-cache cache c impl)) is not thread-safe afaict - I think simultaneous misses in two different threads for different impls would cause the cache to only have one of them. This is probably unlikely, and probably not a big deal since the cache will just be updated on the next call (not give a wrong answer), but wanted to mention it. I don't see any easy way to avoid it without a lot of changes.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 04/Aug/17 6:14 PM ]

Alex, thanks for looking at this,
1- The NIL object is a placeholder in the method impl cache for nil, as `find-and-cache-protocol-impl` tests for `nil?` to know if the dispatch has been cached or not

2- The change is purely a consistency one, making find-and-cache-protocol-impl always return a class/interface rather than either a class/interface or a concrete instance. Behaviourally, it doesn't change anything since the two consumers of `find-protocol-impl`, namely `find-protocol-method` and `satisfies?` don't care what that value is in that case

3- Yes you are correct that it is not thread safe, however I think it's a decent tradeoff as it doesn't cause any incorrect behaviour and at worse would cause an extra cache miss, making it thread safe would mean an extra performance penalty in every cache hit/miss

Comment by Michael Blume [ 16/Aug/17 1:44 PM ]

Nicola Mometto I'm seeing a change in behavior from this patch

(defprotocol BoolProtocol
  (proto-fn [this]))

(extend-protocol BoolProtocol
  Object
  (proto-fn [x] "Object impl")

  nil
  (proto-fn [x] "Nil impl"))

(proto-fn false)

returns "Object impl" with Clojure master and "Nil impl" with this patch

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 17/Aug/17 3:08 AM ]

That's not good, I'll take a look later today, thanks

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 18/Aug/17 3:29 AM ]

This was an issue with how `nil` was cached, I decided to special-case `nil` to skip the method cache, removing the need for all the `NIL` funny business and fixing this bad interaction between `false` and `nil`.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 18/Aug/17 1:17 PM ]

Not sure if it's in scope for this ticket, but given that this wasn't caught, there should probably be more protocol dispatch tests

Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Aug/17 5:00 PM ]

yes, should definitely add

Comment by Michael Blume [ 21/Aug/17 12:52 PM ]

Patch with test

Comment by Michael Blume [ 21/Aug/17 12:56 PM ]

Verified that test fails with v4 patch:

[java] Testing clojure.test-clojure.protocols
     [java]
     [java] FAIL in (test-default-dispatch) (protocols.clj:695)
     [java] expected: (= "Object impl" (test-dispatch false))
     [java]   actual: (not (= "Object impl" "Nil impl"))
     [java]
     [java] FAIL in (test-default-dispatch) (protocols.clj:695)
     [java] expected: (= "Object impl" (test-dispatch true))
     [java]   actual: (not (= "Object impl" "Nil impl"))
Comment by Michael Blume [ 18/Sep/17 2:19 PM ]

Has this patch missed the 1.9 train? There was a fix we were hoping to make in HoneySQL that I'd hesitate to make with satisfies? as slow as it is.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Sep/17 2:48 PM ]

Not necessarily. We don't add features after 1.9 but perf stuff like this is still possible. It's been vetted by Rich. It's in my list of stuff to screen.





[CLJ-1743] Avoid compile-time static initialization of classes when using inheritance Created: 02/Jun/15  Updated: 25/Sep/17

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6, Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Abe Fettig Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 5
Labels: aot, compiler, interop

Attachments: Text File 0001-Avoid-compile-time-class-initialization-when-using-g.patch     Text File clj-1743-2.patch     Text File clj-1743-3.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

I'm working on a project using Clojure and RoboVM. We use AOT compilation to compile Clojure to JVM classes, and then use RoboVM to compile the JVM classes to native code. In our Clojure code, we call Java APIs provided by RoboVM, which wrap the native iOS APIs.

But we've found an issue with inheritance and class-level static initialization code. Many iOS APIs require inheriting from a base object and then overriding certain methods. Currently, Clojure runs a superclass's static initialization code at compile time, whether using ":gen-class" or "proxy" to create the subclass. However, RoboVM's base "ObjCObject" class [1], which most iOS-specific classes inherit from, requires the iOS runtime to initialize, and throws an error at compile time since the code isn't running on a device.

CLJ-1315 addressed a similar issue by modifying "import" to load classes without running static initialization code. I've written my own patch which extends this behavior to work in ":gen-class" and "proxy" as well. The unit tests pass, and we're using this code successfully in our iOS app.

Patch: clj-1743-2.patch

Here's some sample code that can be used to demonstrate the current behavior (Full demo project at https://github.com/figly/clojure-static-initialization):

Demo.java
package clojure_static_initialization;

public class Demo {
  static {
    System.out.println("Running static initializers!");
  }
  public Demo () {
  }
}
gen_class_demo.clj
(ns clojure-static-initialization.gen-class-demo
  (:gen-class :extends clojure_static_initialization.Demo))
proxy_demo.clj
(ns clojure-static-initialization.proxy-demo)

(defn make-proxy []
  (proxy [clojure_static_initialization.Demo] []))

[1] https://github.com/robovm/robovm/blob/master/objc/src/main/java/org/robovm/objc/ObjCObject.java



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jun/15 3:01 PM ]

No changes from previous, just updated to apply to master as of 1.7.0-RC2.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 18/Jun/15 3:03 PM ]

If you had a sketch to test this with proxy and gen-class, that would be helpful.

Comment by Abe Fettig [ 22/Jun/15 8:31 AM ]

Sure, what form would you like for the sketch code? A small standalone project? Unit tests?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 22/Jun/15 8:40 AM ]

Just a few lines of Java (a class with static initializer that printed) and Clojure code (for gen-class and proxy extending it) here in the test description that could be used to demonstrate the problem. Should not have any dependency on iOS or other external dependencies.

Comment by Abe Fettig [ 01/Jul/15 8:49 PM ]

Sample code added, let me know if I can add anything else!

Comment by Abe Fettig [ 27/Jul/15 2:21 PM ]

Just out of curiosity, what are the odds this could make it into 1.8?

Comment by Alex Miller [ 27/Jul/15 6:06 PM ]

unknown.

Comment by Didier A. [ 20/Nov/15 7:11 PM ]

I'm affected by this bug too. A function in a namespace calls a static Java variable which is initialized in place. Another namespace which is genclassed calls that function. Now at compile time, the static java is initialized and it makes building fail, because that static java initialization needs resources which don't exist on the build machine.

Comment by Michael Blume [ 13/Mar/17 10:00 PM ]

Refreshing patch so it applies to master, no changes, keeping attribution.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 27/Jun/17 5:22 PM ]

I am confused by the patch making changes in RT.loadClassForName() but the changes in Compiler are calls to RT.classForNameNonLoading()? Is this patch drift or what's up?

Comment by Michael Schwager [ 25/Sep/17 5:46 PM ]

Thank for you posting this patch. The issue with static initializers has been making it difficult to do JavaFX development with both AOT and interactive development. I cloned the Clojure 1.9.0-master source today and applied the patch, but the example Clojure project still shows "Running static initializers!" I verified this is the case with an actual use case of mine. The error goes away if I start a JFXPanel first. Is there a workaround as of Sept. 2017, eg another way of defining a proxy or deferring until runtime? Thank you.

$ lein clean;lein repl
Compiling 1 source files to C:\dev\clojure\clojure-static-initialization\target\classes
Compiling clojure-static-initialization.gen-class-demo
Compiling clojure-static-initialization.proxy-demo
Running static initializers!
Clojure 1.9.0-master-SNAPSHOT

user=> (def lcp (proxy [javafx.scene.control.ListCell] []))

CompilerException java.lang.ExceptionInInitializerError, compiling:(C:\dev\clojure\clojure-static-initialization\target\f31ee90298a1be447b450330204c3c0806c08b96-init.clj:1:10)

$ lein clean;lein repl
Compiling 1 source files to C:\dev\clojure\clojure-static-initialization\target\classes
Compiling clojure-static-initialization.gen-class-demo
Compiling clojure-static-initialization.proxy-demo
Running static initializers!
Clojure 1.9.0-master-SNAPSHOT

user=> (def jfxpanel (javafx.embed.swing.JFXPanel.))
#'user/jfxpanel
user=> (def lcp (proxy [javafx.scene.control.ListCell] []))
#'user/lcp





[CLJ-1611] clojure.java.io/pushback-reader Created: 08/Dec/14  Updated: 15/May/17

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Feature Priority: Critical
Reporter: Phill Wolf Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 11
Labels: io, reader

Attachments: Text File drupp-clj-1611-2.patch     Text File drupp-clj-1611.patch    
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Whereas

  • clojure.core/read and clojure.edn/read require a PushbackReader;
  • clojure.java.io/reader produces a BufferedReader, which isn't compatible;
  • the hazard has tripped folks up for years[1];
  • clojure.java.io is pure sugar anyway (and would not be damaged by the addition of a little bit more);
  • clojure.java.io's very existence suggests suitability and fitness for use (wherein by the absence of a read-compatible pushback-reader it falls short);

i.e., in the total absence of clojure.java.io it would not seem "hard" to use clojure.edn, but in the presence of clojure.java.io and its "reader" function, amidst so much else in the API that does fit together, one keeps thinking one is doing it wrong;

and

  • revising the "read" functions to make their own Pushback was considered but rejected [2];

Therefore let it be suggested to add clojure.java.io/pushback-reader, returning something consumable by clojure.core/read and clojure.edn/read.

[1] The matter was discussed on Google Groups:

(2014, "clojure.edn won't accept clojure.java.io/reader?") https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/3HSoA12v5nc

with a reference to an earlier thread

(2009, "Reading... from a reader") https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/_tuypjr2M_A

[2] CLJ-82 and the 2009 message thread



 Comments   
Comment by David Rupp [ 10/Jan/15 4:05 PM ]

Attached patch drupp-clj-1611.patch implements clojure.java.io/pushback-reader as requested.

Comment by David Rupp [ 10/Jan/15 4:07 PM ]

Note that you can always import java.io.PushbackReader and do something like (PushbackReader. (reader my-thing)) yourself; that's really all the patch does.

Comment by Phill Wolf [ 11/Jan/15 7:54 AM ]

clojure.java.io/reader is idempotent, while the patch of 10-Jan-2015 re-wraps an existing PushbackReader twice: first with a new BufferedReader, then with a new PushbackReader.

Leaving a given PushbackReader alone would be more in keeping with the pattern of clojure.java.io.

It also needs a docstring. If pushback-reader were idempotent, the docstring's opening phrase could echo clojure.java.io/reader's, e.g.: Attempts to coerce its argument to java.io.PushbackReader; failing that, (bla bla bla).

Comment by David Rupp [ 11/Jan/15 11:14 AM ]

Adding drupp-clj-1611-2.patch to address previous comments.





[CLJ-1522] Enhance multimethods metadata Created: 08/Sep/14  Updated: 26/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.6
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Bozhidar Batsov Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 18
Labels: metadata

Approval: Triaged

 Description   

I think that multimethod metadata can be extended a bit with some property indicating the var in question is referring to a multimethod (we have something similar for macros) and some default arglists property.

I'm raising this issue because as a tool writer (CIDER) I'm having hard time determining if something is a multimethod (I have to resort to code like (instance? clojure.lang.MultiFn obj) which is acceptable, but not ideal I think (compared to macros and special forms)). There's also the problem that I cannot provide the users with eldoc (function signature) as it's not available in the metadata (this issue was raised on the mailing list as well https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure/crje_RLTWdk).

I feel that we really have a problem with the missing arglist and we should solve it somehow. I'm not sure I'm suggesting the best solution and I'll certainly take any solution.



 Comments   
Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 09/Sep/14 4:24 AM ]

Btw, I failed to mention this as I thought it was obvious, but I think we should use the dispatch function's arglist in the multimethod metadata.





[CLJ-1517] Unrolled small vectors Created: 01/Sep/14  Updated: 18/May/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.7
Fix Version/s: Backlog

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Zach Tellman Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 22
Labels: collections, performance

Attachments: File unrolled-collections-2.diff     File unrolled-collections.diff     Text File unrolled-vector-2.patch     Text File unrolled-vector.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Incomplete

 Description   

As discussed on the mailing list [1], this patch has two unrolled variants of vectors and maps, with special inner classes for each cardinality. Currently both grow to six elements before spilling over into the general versions of the data structures, which is based on rough testing but can be easily changed. At Rich's request, I haven't included any integration into the rest of the code, and there are top-level static create() methods for each.

The sole reason for this patch is performance, both in terms of creating data structures and performing operations on them. This can be seen as a more verbose version of the trick currently played with PersistentArrayMap spilling over into PersistentHashMap. Based on the benchmarks, which can be run by cloning cambrian-collections [2] and running 'lein test :benchmark', this should supplant PersistentArrayMap. Performance is at least on par with PAM, and often much faster. Especially noteworthy is the creation time, which is 5x faster for maps of all sizes (lein test :only cambrian-collections.map-test/benchmark-construction), and on par for 3-vectors, but 20x faster for 5-vectors. There are similar benefits for hash and equality calculations, as well as calls to reduce().

This is a big patch (over 5k lines), and will be kind of a pain to review. My assumption of correctness is based on the use of collection-check, and the fact that the underlying approach is very simple. I'm happy to provide a high-level description of the approach taken, though, if that will help the review process.

I'm hoping to get this into 1.7, so please let me know if there's anything I can do to help accomplish that.

[1] https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/clojure-dev/pDhYoELjrcs
[2] https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections

Patch: unrolled-vector-2.patch

Screener Notes: The approach is clear and understandable. Given the volume of generated code, I believe that best way to improve confidence in this code is to get people using it asap, and add collection-test [3] to the Clojure test suite. I would also like to get the generator [4] included in the Clojure repo. We don't need to necessarily automate running it, but would be nice to have it nearby if we want to tweak something later.

[3] https://github.com/ztellman/collection-check/blob/master/src/collection_check.clj
[4] https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections/blob/master/generate/cambrian_collections/vector.clj



 Comments   
Comment by Zach Tellman [ 01/Sep/14 10:13 PM ]

Oh, I forgot to mention that I didn't make a PersistentUnrolledSet, since the existing wrappers can use the unrolled map implementation. However, it would be moderately faster and more memory efficient to have one, so let me know if it seems worthwhile.

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 02/Sep/14 5:23 AM ]

Zach, the patch you added isn't in the correct format, they need to be created using `git format-patch`

Comment by Nicola Mometto [ 02/Sep/14 5:31 AM ]

Also, I'm not sure if this is on-scope with the ticket but those patches break with *print-dup*, as it expects a static create(x) method for each inner class.

I'd suggest adding a create(Map x) static method for the inner PersistentUnrolledMap classes and a create(ISeq x) one for the inner PersistentUnrolledVector classes

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Sep/14 8:14 AM ]

Re making patches, see: http://dev.clojure.org/display/community/Developing+Patches

Comment by Jozef Wagner [ 02/Sep/14 9:16 AM ]

I wonder what is the overhead of having meta and 2 hash fields in the class. Have you considered a version where the hash is computed on the fly and where you have two sets of collections, one with meta field and one without, using former when the actual metadata is attached to the collection?

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 02/Sep/14 12:13 PM ]

I've attached a patch using the proper method. Somehow I missed the detailed explanation for how to do this, sorry. I know the guidelines say not to delete previous patches, but since the first one isn't useful I've deleted it to minimize confusion.

I did the print-dup friendly create methods, and then realized that once these are properly integrated, 'pr' will just emit these as vectors. I'm fairly sure the create methods aren't necessary, so I've commented them out, but I'm happy to add them back in if they're useful for some reason I can't see.

I haven't given a lot of thought to memory efficiency, but I think caching the hashes are worthwhile. I can see an argument for creating a "with-meta" version of each collection, but since that would double the size of an already enormous patch, I think that should probably wait.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 03/Sep/14 4:31 PM ]

I found a bug! Like PersistentArrayMap, I have a special code path for comparing keywords, but my generators for collection-check were previously using only integer keys. There was an off-by-one error in the transient map implementation [1], which was not present for non-keyword lookups.

I've taken a close look for other gaps in my test coverage, and can't find any. I don't think this substantively changes the risk of this patch (an updated version of which has been uploaded as 'unrolled-collections-2.diff'), but obviously where there's one bug, there may be others.

[1] https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections/commit/eb7dfe6d12e6774512dbab22a148202052442c6d#diff-4bf78dbf5b453f84ed59795a3bffe5fcR559

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 03/Oct/14 2:34 PM ]

As an additional data point, I swapped out the data structures in the Cheshire JSON library. On the "no keyword-fn decode" benchmark, the current implementation takes 6us, with the unrolled data structures takes 4us, and with no data structures (just lexing the JSON via Jackson) takes 2us. Other benchmarks had similar results. So at least in this scenario, it halves the overhead.

Benchmarks can be run by cloning https://github.com/dakrone/cheshire, unrolled collections can be tested by using the 'unrolled-collections' branch. The pure lexing benchmark can be reproduced by messing around with the cheshire.parse namespace a bit.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 06/Oct/14 1:31 PM ]

Is there no way to get this into 1.7? It's an awfully big win to push off for another year.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 07/Oct/14 2:08 PM ]

Hey Zach, it's definitely considered important but we have decided to drop almost everything not fully done for 1.7. Timeframe for following release is unknown, but certainly expected to be significantly less than a year.

Comment by John Szakmeister [ 30/Oct/14 2:53 PM ]

You are all free to determine the time table, but I thought I'd point out that Zach is not entirely off-base. Clojure 1.4.0 was released April 5th, 2012. Clojure 1.5.0 was released March 1st, 2013 with 1.6.0 showing up March 25th, 2014. So it appears that the current cadence is around a year.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 30/Oct/14 3:40 PM ]

John, there is no point to comments like this. Let's please keep issue comments focused on the issue.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 13/Nov/14 12:23 PM ]

I did a small write-up on this patch which should help in the eventual code review: http://blog.factual.com/using-clojure-to-generate-java-to-reimplement-clojure

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 07/Dec/14 10:34 PM ]

Per my conversation with Alex at the Conj, here's a patch that only contains the unrolled vectors, and uses the more efficient constructor for PersistentVector when spilling over.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 08/Dec/14 1:10 PM ]

Zach, I created a new placeholder for the map work at http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1610.

Comment by Jean Niklas L'orange [ 09/Dec/14 1:52 PM ]

It should probably be noted that core.rrb-vector will break for small vectors by this patch, as it peeks into the underlying structure. This will also break other libraries which peeks into the vector implementation internals, although I'm not aware of any other – certainly not any other contrib library.

Also, two comments on unrolled-vector.patch:

private transient boolean edit = true;
in the Transient class should probably be
private volatile boolean edit = true;
as transient means something entirely different in Java.

conj in the Transient implementation could invalidate itself without any problems (edit = false;) if it is converted into a TransientVector (i.e. spills over) – unless it has a notable overhead. The invalidation can prevent some subtle bugs related to erroneous transient usage.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 09/Dec/14 1:58 PM ]

Jean - understanding the scope of the impact will certainly be part of the integration process for this patch. I appreciate the heads-up. While we try to minimize breakage for things like this, it may be unavoidable for libraries that rely on implementation internals.

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 09/Dec/14 2:03 PM ]

I'll add support for unrolled vectors to core.rrb-vector the moment they land on master. (Probably with some conditional compilation so as not to break compatibility with earlier versions of Clojure – we'll see when the time comes.)

Comment by Michał Marczyk [ 09/Dec/14 2:06 PM ]

I should say that it'd be possible to add generic support for any "vector lookalikes" by pouring them into regular vectors in linear time. At first glance it seems to me that that'd be out of line with the basic promise of the library, but I'll give it some more thought before the changes actually land.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 09/Dec/14 5:43 PM ]

Somewhat predictably, the day after I cut the previous patch, someone found an issue [1]. In short, my use of the ArrayChunk wrapper applied the offset twice.

This was not caught by collection-check, which has been updated to catch this particular failure. It was, however, uncovered by Michael Blume's attempts to merge the change into Clojure, which tripped a bunch of alarms in Clojure's test suite. My own attempt to do the same to "prove" that it worked was before I added in the chunked seq functionality, hence this issue persisting until now.

As always, there may be more issues lurking. I hope we can get as many eyeballs on the code between now and 1.8 as possible.

[1] https://github.com/ztellman/cambrian-collections/commit/2e70bbd14640b312db77590d8224e6ed0f535b43
[2] https://github.com/MichaelBlume/clojure/tree/test-vector

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 10/Jul/15 1:54 PM ]

As a companion to the performance analysis in the unrolled map issue, I've run the benchmarks and posted the results at https://gist.github.com/ztellman/10e8959501fb666dc35e. Some notable results:

Comment by Alex Miller [ 13/Jul/15 9:02 AM ]

Stu: I do not think this patch should be marked "screened" until the actual integration and build work (if the generator is integrated) has been completed.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Jul/15 4:33 PM ]

FYI, we have "reset" all big features for 1.8 for the moment (except the socket repl work). We may still include it - that determination will be made later.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 14/Jul/15 4:43 PM ]

Okay, any idea when the determination will be made? I was excited that we seemed to be finally moving forward on this.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Jul/15 4:51 PM ]

No, but it is now on my work list.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 15/Jul/15 8:17 AM ]

I wonder if all of the overriding of APersistentVector yields important benefits - e.g. iterator, hashcode etc.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 15/Jul/15 11:51 AM ]

In the case of hashcode, definitely: https://gist.github.com/ztellman/10e8959501fb666dc35e#file-gistfile1-txt-L1013-L1076. This was actually one of the original things I wanted to speed up.

In the case of the iterator, probably not. I'd be fine removing that.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 16/Jul/15 5:17 PM ]

So am I to infer from https://github.com/clojure/clojure/commit/36d665793b43f62cfd22354aced4c6892088abd6 that this issue is defunct? If so, I think there's a lot of improvements being left on the table for no particular reason.

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 16/Jul/15 6:34 PM ]

Yes, that commit covers this functionality. It takes a different approach from the patch in building up from a small core, and maximizing improvements to the bases rather than having a lot of redundant definitions per class. That also allowed for immediate integration without as much concern for correctness, as there is little new code. It also emphasizes the use case for tuples, e.g. small vectors used as values that won't be changed, thus de-emphasizing the 'mutable' functions. I disagree that many necessary improvements are being left out. The patch 'optimized' many things that don't matter. Further, there are not big improvements to the pervasive inlining. In addition, the commit includes the integration work at a fraction of the size of the patch. In all, it would have taken much more back and forth to get the patch to conform with this approach than to just get it all done, but I appreciate the inspiration and instigation - thanks!

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 16/Jul/15 6:46 PM ]

That said, this commit need not be the last word - it can serve as a baseline for further optimization. But I'd rather that be driven by need. Clojure could become 10x as large optimizing things that don't matter.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 19/Jul/15 1:36 PM ]

What is our reference for "relevant" performance? I (or anyone else) can provide microbenchmarks for calculating hashes or whatever else, but that doesn't prove that it's an important improvement. I previously provided benchmarks for JSON decoding in Cheshire, but that's just one of many possible real-world benchmarks. It might be useful to have an agreed-upon list of benchmarks that we can use when debating what is and isn't useful.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 19/Jul/15 11:14 PM ]

I was interested in this implementation so created a branch that integrates Zach's unrolled vectors on top of clojure 1.8.0-alpha2. I also simplified some of the code (I don't think the metadata handling or unrolled seqs are worthwhile, for example)

Github branch: https://github.com/mikera/clojure/tree/clj-1517

Then I ran a set of micro-benchmarks created by Peter Taoussanis

Results: https://gist.github.com/mikera/72a739c84dd52fa3b6d6

My findings from this testing:

  • Performance is comparable (within +/- 20%) on the majority of tests
  • Zach's approach is noticeably faster (by 70-150%) for 4 operations (reduce, mapv, into, equality)

My view is that these additional optimisations are worthwhile. In particular, I think that reduce and into are very important operations. I also care about mapv quite a lot for core.matrix (It's fundamental to many numerical operations on arrays implemented using Clojure vectors).

Happy to create a patch along these lines if it would be acceptable.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 19/Jul/15 11:45 PM ]

The `reduce` improvements are likely due to the unrolled reduce and kvreduce impls, but the others are probably because of the unrolled transient implementation. The extra code required to add these would be pretty modest.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 20/Jul/15 9:20 PM ]

I actually condensed the code down to a single implementation for `Transient` and `TupleSeq`. I don't think these really need to be fully unrolled for each Tuple type. That helps by making the code even smaller (and probably also helps performance, given JVM inline caching etc.)

Comment by Peter Taoussanis [ 21/Jul/15 11:46 AM ]

Hey folks,

Silly question: is there actually a particular set of reference benchmarks that everyone's currently using to test the work on tuples? It took me a while to notice how bad the variance was with my own set of micro benchmarks.

Bumping all the run counts up till the noise starts ~dying down, I'm actually seeing numbers now that don't seem to agree with others here .

Google Docs link: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1QHY3lehVF-aKrlOwDQfyDO5SLkGeb_uaj85NZ7tnuL0/edit?usp=sharing
gist with the benchmarks: https://gist.github.com/ptaoussanis/0a294809bc9075b6b02d

Thanks, cheers!

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 21/Jul/15 6:52 PM ]

Hey Peter, I can't reproduce your results, and some of them are so far off what I'd expect that I have to think there was some data gathering error. For instance, the assoc operation being slower is kind of inexplicable, considering the unrolled version doesn't do any copying, etc. Also, all of your numbers are significantly slower than the ones on my 4 year old laptop, which is also a bit strange.

Just to make sure that we're comparing apples to apples, I've adapted your benchmarks into something that pretty-prints the mean runtime and variance for 1.7, 1.8-alpha2, and Mike's 1517 fork. It can be found at https://github.com/ztellman/tuple-benchmark, and the results of a run at https://gist.github.com/ztellman/3701d965228fb9eda084.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 22/Jul/15 2:24 AM ]

Hey Zach just looked at your benchmarks and they are definitely more consistent with what I am seeing. The overall nanosecond timings look about right from my experience with similar code (e.g. working with small vectors in vectorz-clj).

Comment by Peter Taoussanis [ 22/Jul/15 2:41 AM ]

Hi Zach, thanks for that!

Have updated the results -
Gist: https://gist.github.com/ptaoussanis/0a294809bc9075b6b02d
Google docs: https://goo.gl/khgT83

Note that I've added an extra sheet/tab to the Google doc for your own numbers at https://gist.github.com/ztellman/3701d965228fb9eda084.

Am still struggling to produce results that show any consistent+significant post-JIT benefit to either of the tuple implementations against the micro benchmarks and one larger small-vec-heavy system I had handy.

It's looking to me like it's maybe possible that the JIT's actually optimising away most of the non-tuple inefficiencies in practice?

Of course it's very possible that my results are off, or my expectations wrong. The numbers have been difficult to pin down.

It definitely helped to have a standardised reference micro benchmark to work against (https://github.com/ztellman/tuple-benchmark). Could I perhaps suggest a similar reference macro benchmark (maybe something from core.matrix, Mike?)

Might also be a good idea to define a worthwhile target performance delta for ops like these that run in the nanosecond range (or for the larger reference macro benchmark)?

Just some thoughts from someone passing through in case they're at all useful; know many of you have been deeply involved in this for some time so please feel free to ignore any input that's not helpful

Appreciate all the efforts, cheers!

Comment by Rich Hickey [ 22/Jul/15 9:24 AM ]

I think everyone should back off on their enthusiasm for this approach. After much analysis, I am seeing definite negative impacts to tuples, especially the multiple class approach proposed by Zach. What happens in real code is that the many tuple classes cause call sites that see different sized vectors to become megamorphic, and nothing gets adequately optimized. In particular, call sites that will see tuple-sized and large vectors (i.e. a lot of library code) will optimize differently depending upon which they see often first. So, if you run your first tight loop on vector code that sees tuples, that code could later do much worse (50-100%) on large vectors than before the tuples patch was in place. Being much slower on large collections is a poor tradeoff for being slightly faster on small ones.

Certainly different tuple classes for arity 0-6 is a dead idea. You get as good or better optimization (at some cost in size) from a single class e.g. one with four fields, covering sizes 0-4. I have a working version of this in a local branch. It is better in that sites that include pvectors are only bi-morphic, but I am still somewhat skittish given what I've seen.

The other takeaway is that the micro benchmarks are nearly worthless for detecting these issues.

Comment by Zach Tellman [ 22/Jul/15 11:07 AM ]

I'm pretty sure that all of my real-world applications of the tuples (via clj-tuple) have been fixed cardinality, and wouldn't have surfaced any such issue. Thanks for putting the idea through its paces.

Comment by Mike Anderson [ 22/Jul/15 10:37 PM ]

Rich these are good insights - do you have a benchmark that you are using as representative of real world code?

I agree that it is great if we can avoid call sites becoming megamorphic, though I also believe the ship has sailed on that one already when you consider the multiple types of IPersistentVector that already exist (MapEntry, PersistentVector, SubVector plus any library-defined IPersistentVector instances such as clojure.core.rrb-vector). As a consequence, the JVM is usually not going to be able to prove that a specific IPersistentVector interface invocation is monomorphic, which is when the really big optimisations happen.

In most of the real world code that I've been working with, the same size/type of vector gets used repeatedly (Examples: iterating over map entries, working with a sequence of size-N vectors), so in such cases we should be able to rely on the polymorphic inline cache doing the right thing.

The idea of a single Tuple class for sizes 0-4 is interesting, though I can't help thinking that a lot of the performance gain from this may stem from the fact that a lot of code does stuff like (reduce conj [] .....) or the transient equivalent which is a particularly bad use case for Tuples, at least from the call site caching perspective. There may be a better way to optimise such cases rather than simply trying to make Tuples faster.... e.g. calling asTransient() on a Tuple0 could perhaps switch straight into the PersistentVector implementation.

Comment by Colin Fleming [ 18/May/16 8:32 PM ]

Here's a relevant issue from Google's Guava project, where they also found serious performance degradation with fixed-size collections: https://github.com/google/guava/issues/1268. It has a lot of interesting detail about how the performance breaks down.





[CLJ-1289] aset-* and aget perform poorly on multi-dimensional arrays even with type hints. Created: 01/Nov/13  Updated: 26/Jan/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: Release 1.5
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Michael O. Church Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 1
Labels: arrays, performance
Environment:

Clojure 1.5.1.

Dependencies: criterium


Attachments: Text File CLJ-1289-p1.patch    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Here's a transcript of the behavior. I don't know for sure that reflection is being done, but the performance penalty (about 1300x) suggests it.

user=> (use 'criterium.core)
nil
user=> (def b (make-array Double/TYPE 1000 1000))
#'user/b
user=> (quick-bench (aget ^"[[D" b 304 175))
WARNING: Final GC required 3.5198021166354323 % of runtime
WARNING: Final GC required 29.172288684474303 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 63558 in 6 samples of 10593 calls.
             Execution time mean : 9.457308 µs
    Execution time std-deviation : 126.220954 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 9.344450 µs ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 9.629202 µs (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 2.477107 ns

One workaround is to use multiple agets.

user=> (quick-bench (aget ^"[D" (aget ^"[[D" b 304) 175))
WARNING: Final GC required 40.59820310542545 % of runtime
Evaluation count : 62135436 in 6 samples of 10355906 calls.
             Execution time mean : 6.999273 ns
    Execution time std-deviation : 0.112703 ns
   Execution time lower quantile : 6.817782 ns ( 2.5%)
   Execution time upper quantile : 7.113845 ns (97.5%)
                   Overhead used : 2.477107 ns

Cause: The inlined version only applies to arity 2, and otherwise it reflects.



 Comments   
Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 08/Dec/13 9:28 PM ]

A glance at the source makes it obvious that the hypothesis is correct – the inlined version only applies to arity 2, and otherwise it reflects.

I thought this would be as simple as converting the inline function to be variadic (using reduce), but after trying it I realized this is tricky as you have to generate the correct type hints for each step. E.g., given ^"[[D" the inline function needs to type-hint the intermediate result with ^"[D". This isn't difficult if we're just dealing with strings that begin with square brackets, but I don't know for sure that those are the only possibilities.

Comment by Yaron Peleg [ 13/Feb/14 4:44 AM ]

Bump. I just got bitten bad by this.

There are two seperate issues here:
1) (aget 2d-array-doubles 0 0 ) doesn't emit a reflection warning.
2) It seems like the compiler has enough information to avoid the reflective call here.

Note this gets exp. worse as number of dimensions grows, i.e (get doubles3d 0 0 0)
will be 1M slower, etc' Not true, unless you iterate over all elements. it's
simply n_dims*1000x per lookup.

Nasty surprise, especially considering you often go to primitive arrays for speed,
and a common use case is an inner loop(s) that iterate over arrays.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 13/Feb/14 7:08 AM ]

I can probably take a stab at this.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 13/Feb/14 8:34 PM ]

I think the reflection warning problem is pretty much impossible to solve without changing code elsewhere in the compiler, because the reflection done in aget is a different kind than normal clojure reflection – it's explicitly in the function body rather than emitted by the compiler. Since the compiler isn't emitting it, it doesn't reasonably know it's even there. So even if aget is fixed for other arities, you still won't get the warning when it's not inlined.

I can imagine some sort of metadata that you could put on a function telling the compiler that it will reflect if not inlined. Or maybe a more generic not-inlined warning?

The global scope of adding another compiler flag seems about balanced by the seriousness of array functions not being able to warn on reflection.

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 13/Feb/14 8:52 PM ]

Attached CLJ-1289-p1.patch which simply inlines variadic calls to aget. It assumes that if it sees a :tag on the array arg that is a string beginning with [, it can assume that the return value from one call to aget can be tagged with the same string with the leading [ stripped off.

I'm not a jvm expert, but having read through the spec a little bit I think this is a reasonable assumption.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/Feb/14 3:34 PM ]

I think this probably is actually true, but a more official way to ask that question would be to get the array class and ask for Class.getComponentType() (and less janky than string munging).

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 14/Feb/14 3:40 PM ]

How would you get the array class based on the :tag type hint?

Comment by Gary Fredericks [ 14/Feb/14 7:05 PM ]

I see (-> s (Class/forName) (.getComponentType) (.getName)) does the same thing – is that route preferred, or is there another one?





[CLJ-1209] clojure.test does not print ex-info in error reports Created: 11/May/13  Updated: 22/Dec/16

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Enhancement Priority: Critical
Reporter: Thomas Heller Assignee: Unassigned
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 6
Labels: clojure.test

Attachments: Text File 0001-use-new-printing-method.patch     Text File 0002-CLJ-1209-show-ex-data-in-clojure-test.patch     File clj-test-print-ex-data.diff     Text File output-with-0002-patch.txt    
Patch: Code
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

clojure.test does not print the data attached to ExceptionInfo in error reports.

(use 'clojure.test)
(deftest ex-test (throw (ex-info "err" {:some :data})))
(ex-test)

ERROR in (ex-test) (core.clj:4591)
Uncaught exception, not in assertion.
expected: nil
  actual: clojure.lang.ExceptionInfo: err
 at clojure.core$ex_info.invoke (core.clj:4591)
    user/fn (NO_SOURCE_FILE:2)
    clojure.test$test_var$fn__7666.invoke (test.clj:704)
    clojure.test$test_var.invoke (test.clj:704)
    ...

Approach: In clojure.stacktrace, which clojure.test uses for printing exceptions, add a check for ex-data and pr it.

After:

ERROR in (ex-test) (core.clj:4591)
Uncaught exception, not in assertion.
expected: nil
  actual: clojure.lang.ExceptionInfo: err
{:some :data}
 at clojure.core$ex_info.invoke (core.clj:4591)
    user/fn (NO_SOURCE_FILE:3)
    clojure.test$test_var$fn__7667.invoke (test.clj:704)
    clojure.test$test_var.invoke (test.clj:704)

Patch: 0002-CLJ-1209-show-ex-data-in-clojure-test.patch



 Comments   
Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Dec/13 9:53 AM ]

Great idea, thx for the patch!

Comment by Alex Miller [ 20/Dec/13 9:54 AM ]

Would be great to see a before and after example of the output.

Comment by Ivan Kozik [ 12/Jul/14 10:35 PM ]

Attaching sample output

Comment by Stuart Sierra [ 05/Sep/14 3:24 PM ]

As pointed out on IRC, there's a possible risk of trying to print an infinite lazy sequence that happened to be included in ex-data.

To mitigate, consider binding *print-length* and *print-level* to small numbers around the call to pr.

Comment by Stephen C. Gilardi [ 13/May/15 2:39 PM ]

http://dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJ-1716 may cover this well enough that this issue can be closed.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 14/May/15 8:35 AM ]

I don't think 1716 covers it at all as clojure.test/clojure.stacktrace don't use the new throwable printing. But they could! And that might be a better solution than the patch here.

For example, the existing patch does not consider what to do about nested exceptions, some of which might have ex-data. The new printer handles all that in a consistent way.

Comment by Ed Bowler [ 22/Dec/16 11:35 AM ]

I think http://dev.clojure.org/jira/secure/attachment/16361/0001-use-new-printing-method.patch fixes the printing of the Exceptions.





[CLJ-706] make use of deprecated namespaces/vars easier to spot Created: 05/Jan/11  Updated: 15/May/17

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Feature Priority: Critical
Reporter: Stuart Halloway Assignee: Cezary Kosko
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 21
Labels: errormsgs

Attachments: File 706-deprecated-ns-var-warnings-tested-2.diff     File 706-deprecated-ns-var-warnings-tested-3.diff     File 706-deprecated-ns-var-warnings-tested.diff     File 706-deprecated-var-warning.diff     Text File 706-deprecated-var-warning-patch-v2.txt     File 706-fix-deprecation-warnings-agents.diff     File 706-fix-deprecation-warnings-on-replicate.diff     File 706-fix-deprecation-warning-test-junit.diff     File 706-warning-on-deprecated-ns.diff    
Approval: Prescreened

 Description   

From the mailing list http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/msg/c41d909bd58e4534. It is easy to use deprecated namespaces or vars without knowing you are doing so. The documentation warnings are small, and there is no compiler warning.

Proposed:

  • Add new *warn-on-deprecated* dynamic var, defaulted to false
  • Warn to stderr when {:deprecated true} namespace is loaded.
  • Warn to stderr when {:deprecated true} var is analyzed.
  • Warn to stderr when {:deprecated true} macro is expanded.
  • New system property clojure.compiler.warn-on-deprecated
  • Compile Clojure itself with clojure.compiler.warn-on-deprecated
  • Fix deprecation warnings inside Clojure (replicate, clear-agent-errors)
  • Mark clojure.parallel as deprecated with :deprecation tag

Examples:

(set! *warn-on-deprecated* true)

;; use of a deprecated var (on compile)
(defn ^:deprecated f [x] x)
(f 5)
;;=> Deprecation warning, NO_SOURCE_PATH:7:1 : var #'user/f is deprecated

;; use of a deprecated macro (on macro expansion)
(defmacro ^:deprecated m [x] x)
(m 5)
;;=> Deprecation warning, NO_SOURCE_PATH:7:1 : macro #'user/m is deprecated

;; use of a deprecated namespace (on load)
(ns foo {:deprecated "1.1"})
(ns bar (:require foo))
;;=> Deprecation warning: loading deprecated namespace `foo` from namespace `bar`

Patch: 706-deprecated-ns-var-warnings-tested-3.diff

Questions: Should default for deprecation warnings be true instead? People upgrading are likely to see new warnings which might be surprising.

  • Should default be to warn or not warn on deprecated?


 Comments   
Comment by Rich Hickey [ 07/Jan/11 9:38 AM ]

I don't mind warning to stderr

Comment by Luke VanderHart [ 26/Oct/12 1:37 PM ]

706-deprecated-var-warning.diff adds warnings when using deprecated vars. The other three patches clean up deprecation warnings.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 26/Oct/12 2:23 PM ]

Great stuff. I looked through the first patch, and didn't see anything in there that lets someone disable deprecation warnings from the command line, the way that warn-on-reflection can today be set to true with a command line option.

Is that something important to have for deprecation warnings?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 28/Oct/12 4:57 PM ]

I was hoping it would be quick and easy to add source file, line, and column info to the deprecation warning messages. It isn't as easy as adding them to the format() call, because the method analyzeSymbol doesn't receive these values as args. Is this deprecation check being done in a place where it is not easy to relate it to the source file, line, and column? Could it be done in a place where that info is easily available?

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 29/Oct/12 1:02 AM ]

Another patch - this time to warn on loading deprecated namespaces, instead of vars. This patch requires the first one.

Re: line/column, I'll figure out how to thread the compile context through if it's desired.

Re: Compile flag. I have a patch for this also, but I'm still verifying how to invoke. How is warn-on-reflection set by command line?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Oct/12 1:43 AM ]

Re: Compile flag. Don't hold off on implementing a flag if you want to, but it might be worth hearing from others whether such a command line option is even desired. I was asking in hopes of eliciting such a response.

For the way that it is handled in the Clojure compiler, search for REFLECTION_WARNING_PROP and related code in Compile.java. If you invoke the Clojure compiler directly via a Java command line, use -Dclojure.compile.warn-on-reflection=true (default is false). See the recent email thread sent to Clojure Dev Google group if you want to know how to do it via ant or Maven. Link: https://mail.google.com/mail/?shva=1#label/clojure-dev/13aa0e34530196c3

There is also a separate command-line flag called compiler-options (see Compile.java) that is implemented as a map inside the compiler. It was added more recently than warn-on-reflection, and might be the preferred method to add more such options, to avoid having to continue to add more arguments to the pushThreadBindings calls done in several places.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 29/Oct/12 10:36 AM ]

Thanks, Andy.

Alternately for the last ns patch, it is equivalent to call (print-method msg err), rather than binding out to err, may be more readable. I'll be glad to send that in if it's preferable.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 13/Feb/13 12:38 AM ]

706-deprecated-var-warning-patch-v2.txt dated Feb 12 2013 is identical to 706-deprecated-var-warning.diff dated Oct 26 2012, except it applies cleanly to latest master.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 23/Feb/15 8:21 PM ]

For the information of anyone examining this ticket wishing for this feature, the Eastwood lint tool reports calls to deprecated Clojure functions, and also to deprecated Java methods. https://github.com/jonase/eastwood

Comment by Alex Miller [ 25/Jan/16 12:32 PM ]

I'm interested in considering this for Clojure 1.9 but I need some help getting it ready. Some comments I have on the current state: - Ticket needs to have more details about the current approach

  • I prefer *warn-on-deprecated* over *warn-on-deprecation* because it echoes the keyword you use to mark deprecated vars
  • The warning message does not tell you a location, which is grr - should be similar to the reflection messages
  • Needs tests - see test/clojure/test_clojure/compilation.clj and test/clojure/test_helper.clj (should-not-reflect) for examples
  • clojure itself has some instances of deprecated usage - it would be nice to clean those up in the patch too. That may need to be in a separate patch, depends if they are easy to fix or not. If there are cases in test/ that are actually good to leave, can set *warn-on-deprecated* to false in that namespace.
  • Current default is true - should probably be false instead to match the reflection warning default.
Comment by Vijay Kiran [ 26/Jan/16 3:10 AM ]

Alex Miller I can give this a shot.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Jan/16 8:51 AM ]

Hey Vijay, Andrew Rosa assigned it to himself so please coordinate with him as he was starting to work on it.

Comment by Bozhidar Batsov [ 26/Jan/16 10:52 AM ]

Just one small remark - isn't it more common to have deprecation warnings enabled by default? One could argue they are way more important than reflection warnings, as your code might get broken in the future because you didn't notice you were using deprecated stuff.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Jan/16 2:01 PM ]

Bozhidar Batsov I'm on the fence. My main hesitation in making it the default is that people will suddenly have a bunch of new warnings (which could be either good or bad I suppose). Depends how strongly we want people to care about deprecations I guess.

Comment by Phill Wolf [ 26/Jan/16 9:33 PM ]

A deprecation warning that is off by default does not address the first and primary problem given in this ticket: "It is easy to use deprecated namespaces without knowing you are doing so."

It's unlike the reflection warning. You may focus on speed at any time, at your leisure. But the eventual removal of at-risk features will be a sudden, unpleasant surprise; a warning would be helpful.

But - Suppose I wrote 300 lines of Clojure and use a million lines that come from jars. Will any deprecation problems in my own code be buried in a tsunami of warnings about those jars? Worse, the tsunami will likely linger for weeks or months, until the libraries' respective authors catch up. Inasmuch as the jars are covered (much more expediently) by 'lein ancient' and similar, I would prefer to be able to limit deprecation warnings to just my stuff, perhaps by namespace prefix if from-a-jar-or-not is inconvenient from the compiler's point of view.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 26/Jan/16 10:35 PM ]

There is a middle ground here to turn it off by default in the compiler, but to turn it on by default in the tools (like lein). But there's a reasonable chance that whatever I prefer, Rich will have a preference that overrules it when it gets to him.

I think creating more complexity around namespace prefixes is unlikely to help this ticket move forward.

Comment by Cezary Kosko [ 07/Mar/16 9:18 PM ]

Uploaded a patch that coalesces var/ns-related patches by Luke & adds tests.
The patch does not, however, warn the user about deprecated macros, I assume I should adjust it, then?

Also, I'm not able adjust the description, so how do I take care of Alex's list's first bullet?

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 08/Mar/16 1:05 AM ]

Cezary, I have bumped up your permissions on JIRA so you should be able to edit tickets now. Please reload the page and try again.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 10/Mar/16 10:54 AM ]
  • The if in the first change in core.clj should be a when instead.
  • Can namespace deprecation warning include more about where this is occurring?
  • I'm having a hard time reproducing the deprecated ns warning in a manual test (see below). There seems to be something weird about the binding+printf as the conditions appear to be satisfied. I'm thinking it has something to do with flushing *err*? Seems like (println "Warning: loading deprecated ns" lib) would be better there.
(set! *warn-on-deprecated* true)
(ns foo {:deprecated true})
(ns bar (:require foo))
  • src/jvm/clojure/lang/Compile.java needs added support for clojure.compile.warn-on-deprecated RT flag
  • I think we should turn on warn-on-deprecated in the Clojure build itself (in build.xml)
  • If you do that, the following deprecation warnings exist in the Clojure build itself and we should fix those:

[java] Deprecation warning, clojure/core_proxy.clj:112:75 : var #'clojure.core/replicate is tagged as deprecated
[java] Deprecation warning, clojure/genclass.clj:149:41 : var #'clojure.core/replicate is tagged as deprecated
[java] Deprecation warning, clojure/genclass.clj:235:65 : var #'clojure.core/replicate is tagged as deprecated
[java] Deprecation warning, clojure/test/junit.clj:118:22 : var #'clojure.test/file-position is tagged as deprecated

  • Mark clojure.parallel as deprecated in the ns meta
Comment by Cezary Kosko [ 11/Mar/16 5:40 AM ]

Uploaded a new diff addressing the comments & added warning on macroexpansion.

As far as the namespace deprecation warning goes, though, the code's only printing the current namespace, did not know whether there was a decent way to get a file/line combo.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Mar/16 8:53 AM ]

One more (hopefully final) round and then I think we're good:

  • The docstring for warn-on-deprecated should be updated now that we've expanded scope to cover ns too.
  • In the deprecated ns warning message, can we make it: "Deprecation warning: loading deprecated namespace `foo` from namespace `bar`."
  • In the macro and var warnings can we change "is tagged as deprecated" to just "is deprecated"?
  • Clean up the hanging parens in test/clojure/test_clojure/compilation/deprecated.clj

Thanks for the work on this!!

Comment by Alex Miller [ 11/Mar/16 1:49 PM ]

Marking pre-screened for Rich to look at.





[CLJ-440] java method calls cannot omit varargs Created: 27/Sep/10  Updated: 15/May/17

Status: Open
Project: Clojure
Component/s: None
Affects Version/s: None
Fix Version/s: None

Type: Feature Priority: Critical
Reporter: Alexander Taggart Assignee: Ragnar Dahlen
Resolution: Unresolved Votes: 14
Labels: interop

Attachments: Text File 0001-CLJ-440-Allow-calling-vararg-Java-methods-without-va.patch    
Approval: Triaged

 Description   

Problem

Clojure calls to Java vararg methods require creating an object array for the final arg. This is a frequent source of confusion when doing interop.

E.g., trying to call java.util.Collections.addAll(Collection c, T... elements):

user=> (Collections/addAll [] (object-array 0))
false
user=> (Collections/addAll [])
IllegalArgumentException No matching method: addAll  clojure.lang.Compiler$StaticMethodExpr.<init> (Compiler.java:1401)

The Method class provides an isVarArg() method, which could be used to inform the compiler to process things differently.

From http://groups.google.com/group/clojure/browse_thread/thread/7d0d6cb32656a621

Latest patch: Removed because incomplete and goal not clear

Varargs in Java

As currently stated, the scope of this ticket is only to omit varargs, but this is only one case where Clojures handling of varargs differs from Java. For completeness, here is a brief survey of how Java handles vararg methods, which could hopefully inform a discussion for how Clojure could do things differently, and what the goal of this ticket should be.

Given the following setup:

VarArgs.java
public class VarArgs {

    public static class SingleVarargMethod {
        public static void m(String arg1, String... args) {}
    }

    public static class MultipleVarargMethods {
        public static void m(String... args) {}
        public static void m(String arg1) {}
        public static void m(String arg1, String... args) {}
    }
}
Java Possible clojure equivalent? Comments
VarArgs.SingleVarargMethod.m("a"); (SingleVarargMethod/m "a")  
VarArgs.SingleVarargMethod.m("a", "b"); (SingleVarargMethod/m "a" "b")  
VarArgs.SingleVarargMethod.m("a", "b", "c"); (SingleVarargMethod/m "a" "b" "c")  
VarArgs.SingleVarargMethod.m("a", new String[]{"b", "c"}); (SingleVarargMethod/m "a" (object-array ["b" "c"]))  
VarArgs.MultipleVarargMethods.m(); (MultipleVarargMethods/m)  
VarArgs.MultipleVarargMethods.m((String) null); (MultipleVarargMethods/m nil) Use type hints to disambiguate?
VarArgs.MultipleVarargMethods.m((String[]) null); (MultipleVarargMethods/m nil) Use type hints to disambiguate?
VarArgs.MultipleVarargMethods.m("a", null); (MultipleVarargMethods/m "a" nil)  
VarArgs.MultipleVarargMethods.m("a", new String[]{}); (MultipleVarargMethods/m "a" (object-array 0))  
VarArgs.MultipleVarargMethods.m(new String[]{"a"}); (MultipleVarargMethods/m (object-array ["a"]))  
VarArgs.MultipleVarargMethods.m("a", new String[]{"b", "c"}); (MultipleVarargMethods/m "a" (object-array ["b" "c"]))  


 Comments   
Comment by Assembla Importer [ 27/Sep/10 8:19 PM ]

Converted from http://www.assembla.com/spaces/clojure/tickets/440

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 01/Apr/11 11:16 PM ]

Patch adds support for varargs. Builds on top of patch in CLJ-445.

Comment by Alexander Taggart [ 05/Apr/11 5:45 PM ]

Patch updated to current CLJ-445 patch.

Comment by Nick Klauer [ 29/Oct/12 8:12 AM ]

Is this ticket on hold? I find myself typing (.someCall arg1 arg2 (into-array SomeType nil)) alot just to get the right method to be called. This ticket sounds like it would address that extraneous into-array arg that I use alot.

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Oct/12 10:45 AM ]

fixbug445.diff uploaded on Oct 29 2012 was written Oct 23 2010 by Alexander Taggart. I am simply copying it from the old Assembla ticket tracking system to here to make it more easily accessible. Not surprisingy, it doesn't apply cleanly to latest master. I don't know how much effort it would be to update it, but only a few hunks do not apply cleanly according to 'patch'. See the "Updating stale patches" section on the JIRA workflow page here: http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/JIRA+workflow

Comment by Andy Fingerhut [ 29/Oct/12 10:56 AM ]

Ugh. Deleted the attachment because it was for CLJ-445, or at least it was named that way. CLJ-445 definitely has a long comment history, so if one or more of its patches address this issue, then you can read the discussion there to see the history.

I don't know of any "on hold" status for tickets, except for one or two where Rich Hickey has explicitly said in a comment that he wants to wait a while before making the change. There are just tickets that contributors choose to work on and ones that screeners choose to screen.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 02/Feb/16 11:47 AM ]

I would love to see an updated patch on this ticket that specifically addressed the varargs issue without building on the other mentioned ticket and patch (which is of lower priority).

Comment by Ragnar Dahlen [ 03/Feb/16 8:01 AM ]

I had a stab at this, have attached an initial patch, parts of which I'm not too sure/happy about so feedback would be appreciated.

The patch takes the following approach:

  1. Teach Reflector/getMethods how to find matching vararg methods. In addition to the current constraints, a method can also match if it is a varargs method, and the arity of the method is one more than the requested arity. That means it's a varargs method we could call, but the user hasn't provided the varargs argument.
  2. In MethodExpr/emitTypedArgs we handle the case were there is one more argument in the method being called than there were arguments provided. The only case were that should happen is when it is a varargs method and the last argument was not provided. In that case we push a new empty object array to the stack.

I'm not to sure about my implementation of the second part. It could open up for some hard to understand bugs in the future. One option would be to be more defensive, and make sure it's really the last argument for instance, or even pass along the Method object (or a varargs flag) so we know what we can expect and need to do.

Comment by Ragnar Dahlen [ 03/Feb/16 8:49 AM ]

I realised my patch is missing two important cases; the interface handling in Reflector and handling multiple matching methods. I'll look into that too, but would still appreciate feedback on the approach in MethodExpr/emitTypedArgs.

Comment by Alex Miller [ 03/Feb/16 9:00 AM ]

I am in favor of using isVarArg() to explicitly handle this case rather than guessing if we're in this situation. We should check the behavior (and add tests where it seems needed) for calling a var args method with too few args, too many args, etc. And also double-check that non vararg cases have not changed behavior.

Also, keep in mind that as a general rule, existing AOT compiled code may rely on calling into public Reflector methods, so if you change the signatures of public Reflector methods, you should leave a version with the old arity that has some default behavior for backwards compatibility.

Comment by Ghadi Shayban [ 21/Apr/17 11:31 AM ]

Any extra logic that the compiler implements will need to distinguish between:

public static class MultipleVarargMethods {
        public static void m(String... args) {}
        public static void m(String arg1, String... args) {}
    }

which I don't think is possible generically, without breaking code.

Rather than omitting varargs, how about handling them without tedious array construction. An alternative is to introduce new explicit sugar that you have to opt-in to:

(Whatever/varargs a b c ... x y z)

where ... or similar would be understood by StaticMethodExpr or InstanceMethodExpr in the compiler, and could be type-hinted to resolve ambiguity. This would not be a breaking change.

Comment by Phill Wolf [ 27/Apr/17 6:58 PM ]

If javac can tell the methods apart without the caller providing a "..." partition, so should Clojure. (But in the specific "MultipleVarargMethods" class, javac can't distinguish:

public class MultipleVarargMethods {
    public static void m(String... args) {}
    public static void m(String arg1, String... args) {}
    public static void main(String [] args) {
        m("bankruptcy");
        m("bankruptcy","in","progress");
    }
}


MultipleVarargMethods.java:5: error: reference to m is ambiguous
        m("bankruptcy");
        ^
  both method m(String...) in MultipleVarargMethods and method m(String,String...) in MultipleVarargMethods match
MultipleVarargMethods.java:6: error: reference to m is ambiguous
        m("bankruptcy","in","progress");
        ^
  both method m(String...) in MultipleVarargMethods and method m(String,String...) in MultipleVarargMethods match
2 errors

)





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